Roku 2 wireless

Roku 2 wireless DEFAULT

For some time now Roku has stopped supporting Roku players built in 2011 and before. This week Roku announced that they are ending support for more Roku players including the 2013 Roku 2 line of players.

Roku has finally decided to end support for older Roku players like the first gen Roku 2 and Roku 1—both released in 2013. To help with the transition, Roku is offering an exclusive deal for a $15 Roku Express to affected Roku owners.

As with all devices, someday support ends. The first gen Roku 2 and Roku 1 are now over six years old. The apps created today are far more complicated and require a more powerful Roku streaming player.

If you own an affected Roku player, your device will continue to work but you will no longer get new apps or features. So, you can continue to use your older Roku player, but you run the risk of the streaming service ending support for it. Recently, we saw Netflix end support for 1st generation Roku streaming players.

So, if you are worried about losing access to your streaming services you may want to take Roku up on their offer of a $15 Roku Express.

Here is the email Roku sent affected Roku owners:

Dear Roku customer,

Thanks for being a longtime Roku streamer. We see that you own a classic Roku player that’s many generations behind our newest devices. We’re reaching out to let you know that, as of November 15th, this Roku player will no longer receive new software updates, and to extend a special offer to keep you streaming well into the future.

What does this mean?

You can continue to enjoy this classic Roku player and stream your currently available channels. However, this Roku player will no longer get new features or streaming channels, updates to existing channels, or other software-related updates. You may also potentially lose existing channels if our partners decide to update their channel in the future.

Your exclusive offer for a new Roku player

We want you to enjoy streaming to the fullest with the latest features and channels, so today we’re providing this special replacement upgrade offer: a Roku Express+ for just $15, a discount of 50% off the regular retail price. Click here.

High definition streaming made easy

Roku Express+ delivers a faster HD streaming experience and includes optional composite cables if you’re connecting to an older TV. Best of all, your Roku Express+ will receive support for the newest software updates and channel releases, like the newly launched Apple TV channel and the Apple TV+* premium streaming service.

We hope you take advantage of this exclusive offer to enjoy all the benefits of the Roku streaming experience.

Did you get this email? Leave us a comment and let us know what streaming player Roku discontinued.

Did you know we have a YouTube Channel? Every week we have a live Cord Cutting Q&A, and weekly Cord Cutting recap shows exclusively on our YouTube Channel!

Please follow us on Facebook and Twitter for more news, tips, and reviews. Need cord cutting tech support? Join our Cord Cutting Tech Support Facebook Group for help.

Sours: https://www.cordcuttersnews.com/roku-is-ending-support-for-some-older-roku-players/

Roku updated its posh Ultra model with stronger Wi-Fi, a faster system overall, and the ability to stream in Dolby Vision, a feature we noted was lacking in its predecessor. The Ultra has all the features we've talked about so far, like dual-band Wi-Fi and voice search. It also has an Ethernet port for more stable wired connections, a headphone jack on the remote so you can watch TV shows in private while other folks sleep (the new version comes with Roku-branded headphones rather than JBL ones, but they are surprisingly decent), and a host of other small features like a USB slot and a remote finder.

There's also Night listening mode, which levels out audio so explosions in movies won't wake the whole household, and the remote has two programmable favorites buttons, which make it super easy to quickly launch YouTube or another app. It's worth noting that it lacks support for HDR10+, unlike the top streaming devices from Google and Amazon. It's unlikely you'll notice this, or own a TV and speaker set that takes advantage of these high-end features. 

Sours: https://www.wired.com/gallery/how-to-pick-the-right-roku/
  1. Football helmets graphics
  2. Walmart pet carrier
  3. Pictures of biceps
  4. Lavender tattoo small

Roku

Brand of streaming media players

Not to be confused with Ruku.

For the company which makes the devices, see Roku, Inc. For other uses, see Roku (disambiguation).

‹ The templateInfobox information appliance is being considered for merging. ›

Roku (ROH-koo) is a brand of hardware digital media players manufactured by American company Roku, Inc. They offer access to streaming media content from various online services.

The first Roku model, developed in collaboration with Netflix, was introduced in May 2008. Roku devices have been considered influential on the digital media player market, helping to popularize the concept of low-cost, small-form-factor set-top boxes for over-the-top media consumption.[1] Roku has also licensed its platform as middleware for smart TVs.

As of August 2021, Roku has more than 55 million active accounts, according to its quarterly earnings report.[2]

History[edit]

Roku was founded by Anthony Wood in 2002, who had previously founded ReplayTV, a DVR company that competed with Tivo.[3] After ReplayTV's failure, Wood worked for a while at Netflix. In 2007, Wood's company began working with Netflix on Project:Griffin, a set-top box to allow Netflix users to stream Netflix content to their TVs.[3] Only a few weeks before the project's launch, Netflix's founder Reed Hastings decided it would hamper license arrangements with third parties, potentially keeping Netflix off other similar platforms, and killed the project.[4]Fast Company magazine cited the decision to kill the project as "one of Netflix's riskiest moves".[4]

Netflix decided instead to spin off the company, and Roku released their first set-top box in 2008.[5] In 2010 they began offering models with various capabilities, which eventually became their standard business model.[5] In 2014, Roku partnered with smart TV manufacturers to produce TVs with built-in Roku functionality.[3] In 2015, Roku won the inaugural Emmy for Television Enhancement Devices.

In 2019, Roku acquired dataxu, an advertising technology company for $150 million.[6]

Roku streaming players[edit]

First generation[edit]

Original form factor XD/S

The first Roku model, the Roku DVP N1000, was unveiled on May 20, 2008. It was developed in partnership with Netflix to serve as a standalone set-top box for its recently introduced "Watch Instantly" service. The goal was to produce a device with a small footprint that could be sold at low cost compared to larger digital video recorders and video game consoles. It features an NXP PNX8935 video decoder supporting both standard and high definition formats up to 720p; HDMI output; and automatic software updates, including the addition of new channels for other video services.[7][1][8]

Roku launched two new models in October 2009: the Roku SD (a simplified version of the DVP, with only analog AV outputs); and the Roku HD-XR, an updated version with 802.11n Wi-Fi and a USB port for future functionality. The Roku DVP was retroactively renamed the Roku HD. By then, Roku had added support for other services. The next month, they introduced the Channel Store, where users could download third-party apps for other content services (including the possibility of private services for specific uses).[9][10]

Netflix support was initially dependent on a PC, requiring users to add content to their "Instant Queue" from the service's web interface before it could be accessed via the Roku. In May 2010, the channel was updated to allow users to search the Netflix library directly from the device.[11]

In August 2010, Roku announced plans to add 1080p video support to the HD-XR.[12] The next month, they released an updated lineup with thinner form factors: a new HD; the XD, with 1080p support; and the XDS, with optical audio, dual-band Wi-Fi, and a USB port. The XD and XDS also included an updated remote.[13]

Support for the first-generation Roku models ended in September 2015.[14]

Second generation[edit]

In July 2011, Roku unveiled its second generation of players, branded as Roku 2 HD, XD, and XS. All three models include 802.11n, and also add microSD slots and Bluetooth. The XD and XS support 1080p, and only the XS model includes an Ethernet connector and USB port. They also support the "Roku Game Remote"—a Bluetooth remote with motion controller support for games, which was bundled with the XS and sold separately for other models.[15] The Roku LT was unveiled in October, as an entry-level model with no Bluetooth or microSD support.[16]

In January 2012, Roku unveiled the Streaming Stick - a new model condensed into a dongle form factor using Mobile High-Definition Link (MHL).[17][18] Later in October, Roku introduced a new search feature to the second-generation models, aggregating content from services usable on the device.[19]

Third generation[edit]

Roku unveiled its third-generation models in March 2013, the Roku 3 and Roku 2. The Roku 3 contains an upgraded CPU over the 2 XS, and a Wi-Fi Direct remote with an integrated headphone jack. The Roku 2 features only the faster CPU.[20][21]

Fourth generation[edit]

In October 2015, Roku introduced the Roku 4; the device contains upgraded hardware with support for 4K resolution video, as well as 802.11ac wireless.[22]

Fifth generation[edit]

Roku revamped their entire streaming player line-up with five new models in September 2016 (low end Roku Express, Roku Express+, high end Roku Premiere, Roku Premiere+, and top-of-the-line Roku Ultra), while the Streaming Stick (3600) was held over from the previous generation (having been released the previous April) as a sixth option.[23] The Roku Premiere+ and Roku Ultra support HDR video using HDR10.[24]

Sixth generation[edit]

In October 2017, Roku introduced its sixth generation of products. The Premiere and Premiere+ models were discontinued, the Streaming Stick+ (with an enhanced Wi-Fi antenna device) was introduced, as well as new processors for the Roku Streaming Stick, Roku Express, and Roku Express+.[25]

Seventh generation[edit]

In September 2018, Roku introduced the seventh generation of products. Carrying over from the 2017 sixth-generation without any changes were the Express (3900), Express+ (3910), Streaming Stick (3800), and Streaming Stick+ (3810). The Ultra is the same hardware device from 2017, but it comes with JBL premium headphones and is repackaged with the new model number 4661. Roku has resurrected the Premiere and Premiere+ names, but these two new models bear little resemblance to the 2016 fifth-generation Premiere (4620) and Premiere+ (4630) models. The new Premiere (3920) and Premiere+ (3921) are essentially based on the Express (3900) model with 4K support added, it also includes Roku Streaming Stick+ Headphone Edition (3811) for improving Wifi signal strength and private listening.

Eighth generation[edit]

In September 2019, Roku introduced the eighth generation of products.[26]

The same year, Netflix decided not to support older generations of Roku, including the Roku HD, HD-XR, SD, XD, and XDS, as well as the NetGear-branded XD and XDS. Roku had warned in 2015 that it would stop updating players made in May 2011 or earlier, and these vintage boxes were among them.[27]

Ninth generation[edit]

On September 28, 2020, Roku introduced the ninth generation of products.[28] An updated Roku Ultra was released along with the addition of the Roku Streambar, a 2-in-1 Roku and Soundbar device. The microSD slot was removed from the new Ultra 4800, making it the first top-tier Roku device since the first generation to lack this feature. On April 14, 2021, Roku announced the Roku Express 4K+, replacing the 8th generation Roku Express devices, the Voice Remote Pro as an optional upgrade for existing Roku players, and Roku OS 10 for all modern Roku devices.[29]

Tenth generation[edit]

On September 20, 2021, Roku introduced the tenth generation of products.[30] The Roku Streaming Stick 4K[31] was announced along with the Roku Streaming Stick 4K+ which includes an upgraded rechargeable Roku Voice Remote Pro with lost remote finder.[32] Roku announced an updated Roku Ultra LT with a faster processor, stronger Wi-Fi and Dolby Vision as well as Bluetooth audio streaming and built-in ethernet support.[33] Roku also announced Roku OS 10.5 with several new and improved features.[34]

Feature comparison[edit]

Model Introduced Video outputs Video resolutions Audio output Network USB Remote Processor Memory Channel storage [note 1]micro
SD
slot
Netflix with Profiles
Composite,
S-Video
Component,
HDMI
480i,
480p
720p,
1080p (HD)
2160p
(4K)
Analog Optical,
HDMI
Ethernet 802.11
wireless
First generation
Roku DVP (N1000) May 2008 Both Both Both 720p No Yes Both Yes b/g No IR PNX8935 400 MHz [35][36][37]256 MB 64 MB[38]No No
Roku SD (N1050) Oct 2009 Composite Neither 480i Neither No Yes Neither Yes b/g No IR PNX8935 400 MHz[38][39]256 MB 64 MB[38]No No
Roku HD (N1100) Nov 2009 Both Both Both 720p No Yes Both Yes b/g No IR PNX8935 400 MHz[38][39]256 MB 64 MB[38]No No
Roku HD-XR (N1101) Oct 2009 Both Both Both Both[note 2]No Yes Both Yes a/b/g/n dual-band Yes IR PNX8935 400 MHz[38][39]256 MB 256 MB[38]No No
Roku HD (2000) Sep 2010 Composite HDMI Both 720p No Yes HDMI Yes b/g No IR PNX8935 400 MHz[38]256 MB 64 MB[38]No No
Roku XD (2050) Sep 2010 Composite HDMI Both Both[note 2]No Yes HDMI Yes b/g/n No IR PNX8935 400 MHz[38][40]256 MB 64 MB[38]No No
Roku XDS (2100) Sep 2010 Composite Both[note 3]Both Both[note 2]No Yes Both Yes a/b/g/n dual-band Yes IR PNX8935 400 MHz[37][42]256 MB 256 MB[38]No No
Second generation
Model Introduced Video outputs Video resolutions Audio output Network USB Remote Processor Memory Channel storage [note 1]micro
SD
slot
Netflix with Profiles
Composite,
S-Video
Component,
HDMI
480i,
480p
720p,
1080p (HD)
2160p
(4K)
Analog Optical,
HDMI
Ethernet 802.11
wireless
Roku LT (2400) Nov 2011 Composite HDMI Both 720p No Yes HDMI No b/g/n No IR BCM2835 600 MHz[38][43]256 MB 256 MB[38]No No
Roku LT (2450) Apr 2012 Composite HDMI Both 720p No Yes HDMI No b/g/n No IR BCM7208 405 MHz[38]256 MB 256 MB[38]No No
Roku HD (2500) Apr 2012 Composite HDMI Both 720p No Yes HDMI No b/g/n No IR BCM7208 405 MHz[44]256 MB[44]256 MB[44]No No
Roku 2 HD (3000) Jul 2011 Composite HDMI Both 720p No Yes HDMI No b/g/n No IR[note 4]BCM2835 600 MHz[38][45]256 MB 256 MB[38]Yes No
Roku 2 XD (3050) Jul 2011 Composite HDMI Both Both[note 5]No Yes HDMI No b/g/n No IR[note 4]BCM2835 600 MHz[38][45]256 MB 256 MB[38]Yes No
Roku 2 XS (3100) Jul 2011 Composite HDMI Both Both[note 5]No Yes HDMI Yes b/g/n Yes IR, Bluetooth BCM2835 600 MHz [45][46]256 MB 256 MB[38]Yes No
Roku Streaming Stick, MHL (3400, 3420) Oct 2012 Neither MHL only 480p Both[note 6]No No HDMI No b/g/n dual-band[47]No Wi-Fi Direct BCM2835 600 MHz[38]256 MB[48]512 MB No No
Roku Streaming Stick, HDMI (3500) Mar 2014[49]Neither HDMI Neither Both No No HDMI No a/b/g/n dual-band No Wi-Fi Direct BCM2835 600 MHz 512 MB 256 MB No Yes
Third generation
Model Introduced Video outputs Video resolutions Audio output Network USB Remote Processor Memory Channel storage [note 1]micro
SD
slot
Netflix
with
Profiles[50]
Composite,
S-Video
Component,
HDMI
480i,
480p
720p,
1080p (HD)
2160p
(4K)
Analog Optical,
HDMI
Ethernet 802.11
wireless
Roku LT (2700) Sep 2013 Composite HDMI Both 720p No Yes HDMI No b/g/n No IR BCM7218 600 MHz 512 MB 256 MB No No
Roku 1, SE (2710) Sep 2013 Composite HDMI Both Both No Yes HDMI No b/g/n No IR BCM7218 600 MHz 512 MB 256 MB No No
Roku 2 (2720) Sep 2013 Composite HDMI Both Both No Yes & Remote HDMI No a/b/g/n dual-band No IR, Wi-Fi Direct BCM7218 600 MHz 512 MB 256 MB No No
Roku 3 (4200) Mar 2013 Neither HDMI Neither Both No Remote[note 7]HDMI Yes a/b/g/n dual-band Yes IR, Wi-Fi Direct BCM11130 900 MHz 512 MB 256 MB Yes Yes
Roku 2 (4210) Apr 2015 Neither HDMI Neither Both No No HDMI Yes a/b/g/n dual-band Yes IR[note 8]BCM11130 900 MHz 512 MB 256 MB Yes Yes
Roku 3 (4230) Apr 2015 Neither HDMI Neither Both No Remote[note 7]HDMI Yes a/b/g/n dual-band Yes IR, Wi-Fi Direct, Voice Search BCM11130 900 MHz 512 MB 256 MB Yes Yes
Fourth generation
Model Introduced Video outputs Video resolutions Audio output Network USB Remote Processor Memory Channel storage [note 1]micro
SD
slot
Netflix
with
Profiles[50]
Composite,
S-Video
Component,
HDMI
480i,
480p
720p,
1080p (HD)
2160p
(4K)
Analog Optical,
HDMI
Ethernet 802.11
wireless
Roku Streaming Stick (3600) [51]Apr 2016 Neither HDMI Neither Both No Stream to smartphone HDMI No a/b/g/n dual-band No Wi-Fi Direct BCM2836 900 MHz[52][53]512 MB 256 MB No Yes
Roku 4 (4400) [54]Oct 2015 Neither HDMI Neither Both Yes Remote[note 7]Optical & HDMI Yes, 10/100 Mbps a/b/g/n/ac dual-band Yes IR, Wi-Fi Direct, Voice Search STV7723A01 [55]1.5 GB 512 MB Yes Yes
Fifth generation
Model Introduced Video outputs Video resolutions Audio output Network USB Remote Processor Memory Channel storage [note 1]micro
SD
slot
Netflix
with
Profiles[50]
Composite,
S-Video
Component,
HDMI
480i,
480p
720p60,
1080p60 (HD)
2160p60
(4K)
Analog Optical,
HDMI
Ethernet 802.11
wireless
Roku Express (3700) Oct 2016 Neither HDMI Neither Both No Stream to smartphone HDMI No b/g/n No IR MStar MSA3Z177Z1[56] 900 MHz 512 MB 256 MB No Yes
Roku Express+ (3710) Oct 2016 Composite HDMI 480i Both No Yes & Stream to smartphone HDMI No b/g/n No IR MSA3Z177Z1 900 MHz 512 MB 256 MB No Yes
Roku Premiere (4620) Oct 2016 Neither HDMI Neither Both Yes Stream to smartphone HDMI No a/b/g/n/ac dual-band No IR MStar MSO9380 1.2 GHz 1 GB 512 MB No Yes
Roku Premiere+ (4630) Oct 2016 Neither HDMI Neither Both Yes Remote[note 7] & Stream to smartphone HDMI Yes, 10/100 Mbps a/b/g/n/ac dual-band No IR, Wi-Fi Direct MStar MSO9380 1.2 GHz 1 GB 512 MB Yes Yes
Roku Ultra (4640) Oct 2016 Neither HDMI Neither Both Yes Remote[note 7] & Stream to smartphone Optical & HDMI Yes, 10/100 Mbps a/b/g/n/ac dual-band Yes IR, Wi-Fi Direct, Voice Search MStar MSO9380 1.2 GHz 1 GB 1 GB Yes Yes
Sixth generation
Model Introduced Video outputs Video resolutions HDR format Audio output Network USB Remote Processor [57]Memory Channel storage [note 1]micro
SD
slot
Netflix
with
Profiles[50]
Composite,
S-Video
Component,
HDMI
480i,
480p
720p60,
1080p60 (HD)
2160p60
(4K)
HDR10/Dolby Vision Analog Optical,
HDMI
Ethernet 802.11
wireless
Roku Express (3900)[58]Oct 2017 Neither HDMI Neither Both No No Stream to smartphone HDMI No b/g/n No IR ARM Cortex A53 512MB 256MB No Yes
Roku Express+ (3910)[59]Oct 2017 Composite HDMI 480i Both No No Yes & Stream to smartphone HDMI No b/g/n No IR ARM Cortex A53 512MB 256MB No Yes
Roku Streaming Stick (3800)[60]Oct 2017 Neither HDMI Neither Both No No Stream to smartphone HDMI No a/b/g/n/ac dual-band No Wi-Fi Direct, Voice Search ARM Cortex A53 512MB 256MB No Yes
Roku Streaming Stick+ (3810)[61]Oct 2017 Neither HDMI Neither Both Yes HDR10 Stream to smartphone HDMI No a/b/g/n/ac dual-band No Wi-Fi Direct, Voice Search ARM Cortex A53 1GB 512MB No Yes
Roku Ultra (4660)[62]Oct 2017 Neither HDMI Neither Both Yes HDR10 Remote[note 7] & Stream to smartphone HDMI Yes, 10/100 Mbps a/b/g/n/ac dual-band Yes IR,Wi-Fi Direct, Voice Search ARM Cortex A53 1GB 512MB Yes Yes
Seventh generation
Model Introduced Video outputs Video resolutions HDR format Audio output Network USB Remote Processor Memory Channel storage [note 1]micro
SD
slot
Netflix
with
Profiles[50]
Composite,
S-Video
Component,
HDMI
480i,
480p
720p60,
1080p60 (HD)
2160p60
(4K)
HDR10/Dolby Vision Analog Optical,
HDMI
DTS Dolby Atmos Ethernet 802.11
wireless
Roku Premiere (3920) Sep 2018 Neither HDMI Neither Both Yes HDR10 Stream to smartphone HDMI Yes Yes No b/g/n No IR ARM Cortex A53 1 GB[47]512MB No Yes
Roku Premiere+ (3921) Sep 2018 Neither HDMI Neither Both Yes HDR10 Stream to smartphone HDMI Yes Yes No b/g/n No IR,Wi-Fi Direct, Voice Search ARM Cortex A53 1GB[63]512MB[63]No Yes
Roku Ultra (4661) Sep 2018 Neither HDMI Neither Both Yes HDR10 Remote[note 7] & Stream to smartphone HDMI Yes Yes Yes, 10/100 Mbps a/b/g/n/ac dual-band Yes IR,Wi-Fi Direct, Voice Search ARM Cortex A53 1GB 512MB Yes Yes
Eighth generation
Model Introduced Video outputs Video resolutions HDR format Audio output Network USB Remote Processor Memory Channel storage [note 1]micro
SD
slot
Netflix
with
Profiles[50]
Composite,
S-Video
Component,
HDMI
480i,
480p
720p60,
1080p60 (HD)
2160p60
(4K)
HDR10/Dolby Vision Analog Optical,
HDMI
DTS Dolby Atmos Ethernet 802.11
wireless
Roku Streaming Stick+ (3810) Sep 2019 Neither HDMI Neither Both Yes HDR10 Stream to smartphone HDMI 2.0a Yes Yes No a/b/g/n/ac dual-band Yes*, for long-range wireless receiver IR,Wi-Fi Direct, Voice Search ARM Cortex A53 1GB 512MB No Yes
Roku Express (3930) Sep 2019 Neither HDMI Neither Both No No Stream to smartphone HDMI 1.4b Yes Yes No b/g/n Yes*, for power IR ARM Cortex A53 512MB 256MB No Yes
Roku Express+ (3931) Sep 2019 Neither HDMI Neither Both No No Stream to smartphone HDMI 1.4b Yes Yes No b/g/n Yes*, for power IR,Wi-Fi Direct, Voice Search ARM Cortex A53 512MB 256MB No Yes
Roku Premiere (3920) Sep 2019 Neither HDMI Neither Both Yes HDR10 Stream to smartphone HDMI 2.0a Yes Yes No b/g/n Yes*, for power IR ARM Cortex A53 1GB 512MB[63]No Yes
Roku Ultra LT (4662) Sep 2019 Neither HDMI Neither Both Yes HDR10 Remote & Stream to smartphone HDMI 2.0a Yes Yes Yes a/b/g/n/ac dual-band No IR,Wi-Fi Direct, Voice Search ARM Cortex A53 1GB 512MB Yes Yes
Roku Ultra (4670) Sep 2019 Neither HDMI Neither Both Yes HDR10 Remote & Stream to smartphone HDMI 2.0a Yes Yes Yes a/b/g/n/ac dual-band Yes IR,Wi-Fi Direct, Voice Search ARM Cortex A53 2GB 512MB Yes Yes
Ninth generation
Model Introduced Video outputs Video resolutions HDR format Audio output Network USB Remote Processor Memory Channel storage [note 1]micro
SD
slot
Netflix
with
Profiles[50]
Composite,
S-Video
Component,
HDMI
480i,
480p
720p60,
1080p60 (HD)
2160p60
(4K)
HDR10/HDR10+/Dolby Vision/HLG Analog Optical,
HDMI
DTS Dolby Atmos Ethernet 802.11
wireless
Roku Express 4K (3940X) May 2021 Neither HDMI Neither Both Yes HDR10, HDR10+, HLG Stream to smartphone HDMI 2.0b Yes No Yes, with compatible USB Ethernet adaptera/b/g/n/ac dual-band MIMO Yes IR Realtek 1315 1GB 4GB No Yes
Roku Express 4K+ (3941X) May 2021 Neither HDMI Neither Both Yes HDR10, HDR10+, HLG Remote & Stream to smartphone HDMI 2.0b Yes No Yes, with compatible USB Ethernet adaptera/b/g/n/ac dual-band MIMO Yes IR,Wi-Fi Direct, Voice Search Realtek 1315 1GB 4GB No Yes
Roku Ultra (4800) Oct 2020 Neither HDMI Neither Both Yes All Remote & Stream to smartphone HDMI 2.0b Yes Yes Yes a/b/g/n/ac dual-band MIMO Yes IR,Wi-Fi Direct, Voice Search Realtek

1319

2GB 4GB No Yes
Roku Streambar (9102R) Oct 2020 Neither HDMI Neither Both Yes HDR10, HLG Remote & Stream to smartphone Optical, HDMI 2.0a Yes Yes Yes, with compatible USB Ethernet adaptera/b/g/n/ac dual-band Yes IR,Wi-Fi Direct, Voice Search MStar C2 1GB 512MB No Yes
Tenth generation
Model Introduced Video outputs Video resolutions HDR format Audio output Network USB Remote Processor Memory Channel storage [note 1]micro
SD
slot
Netflix
with
Profiles[50]
Composite,
S-Video
Component,
HDMI
480i,
480p
720p60,
1080p60 (HD)
2160p60
(4K)
HDR10/HDR10+/Dolby Vision/HLG Analog Optical,
HDMI
DTS Dolby Atmos Ethernet 802.11
wireless
Roku Streaming Stick 4K (3820R) Sep 2021 Neither HDMI Neither Both Yes All Stream to smartphone HDMI 2.0b Yes Yes No a/b/g/n/ac dual-band MIMO Yes IR,Wi-Fi Direct, Voice Search Realtek

131x

1GB 4GB No Yes
Roku Streaming Stick 4K+ (3821R) Sep 2021 Neither HDMI Neither Both Yes All Stream to smartphone HDMI 2.0b Yes Yes No a/b/g/n/ac dual-band MIMO Yes IR,Wi-Fi Direct, Voice Search Realtek

131x

1GB 4GB No Yes
Roku Ultra LT (4801RW) Sep 2021 Neither HDMI Neither Both Yes All Remote & Stream to smartphone HDMI 2.0b Yes Yes Yes a/b/g/n/ac dual-band MIMO Yes IR,Wi-Fi Direct, Voice Search Realtek

1319

2GB 4GB No Yes

Roku TV[edit]

Roku announced its first branded Smart TV and it was released in late 2014. These TVs are manufactured by companies like TCL, Westinghouse and Hisense, and use the Roku user interface as the "brain" of the TV. Roku TVs are updated just like the streaming devices.[64] More recent[vague] models also integrate a set of features for use with over-the-air TV signals, including a program guide that provides information for shows and movies available on local antenna broadcast TV, as well as where that content is available to stream, and the ability to pause live TV (although the feature requires a USB hard drive with at least 16GB storage).

In January 2020, Roku created a badge to certify devices as working with a Roku TV model.[citation needed] The first certified brands were TCL North America, Sound United, Polk Audio, Marantz, Definitive Technology, and Classé.[citation needed]

In January 2021, a Roku executive said one out of three smart TVs sold in the United States and Canada came with Roku's operating system built-in.[65]

Software[edit]

The Roku box runs a custom Linux distribution called Roku OS. Updates to the software include bug fixes, security updates, feature additions, and many new interface revisions. Roku pushes OS updates to supported devices in a staggered release. OS updates are rolled out to a percentage group of candidate devices to ensure the build is stable before being made available en masse.

Content and programming[edit]

Roku provides video services from a number of Internet-based video on demand providers.

Roku channels[edit]

Content on Roku devices is provided by Roku partners and are identified using the term channel. Users can add or remove different channels using the Roku Channel Store. Roku's website does not specify which channels are free to its users.

Service creation for Roku Player[edit]

The Roku is an open-platform device with a freely available software development kit that enables anyone to create new channels.[66] The channels are written in a Roku-specific language called BrightScript, a scripting language the company describes as 'unique', but "similar to Visual Basic" and "similar to JavaScript".[67]

Developers who wish to test their channels before a general release, or who wish to limit viewership, can create "private" channels that require a code be entered by the user in the account page of the Roku website. These private channels, which are not part of the official Roku Channel Store, are neither reviewed or certified by Roku.[68][69]

There is an NDK (Native Developer Kit) available, though it has added restrictions.[67]

The Roku Channel[edit]

Roku launched its own streaming channel on its devices in October 2017. It is ad-supported, but free. Its licensed content includes movies and TV shows from studios such as Lionsgate, MGM, Paramount, Sony Pictures Entertainment, Warner Bros., Disney, and Universal as well as Roku channel content publishers American Classics, FilmRise, Nosey, OVGuide, Popcornflix, Vidmark, and YuYu. It is implementing an ad revenue sharing model with content providers. On August 8, 2018, The Roku Channel became available on the web as well.[70] Roku also added the "Featured Free" section as the top section of its main menu from which users can get access to direct streaming of shows and movies from its partners.[71]

In January 2019, premium subscription options from select content providers were added to The Roku Channel.[citation needed]

Originally only available in the U.S.,[72] it launched in the UK on April 7, 2020, with a different selection of movies and TV shows, and without premium subscription add-ons.[73]

On January 8, 2021, Roku announced that it had acquired the original content library of the defunct mobile video service Quibi for an undisclosed amount, reported to be around $100 million.[74][75] The content is being rebranded as Roku Originals.[76]

Controversies[edit]

Non-certified channels[edit]

The Daily Beast alleged that non-certified channels on Roku eased access to materials promoting conspiracy theories and terrorism content.[77]

In June 2017, a Mexico City court banned the sale of Roku products in Mexico, following claims by Televisa (via its Izzi cable subsidiary), that the devices were being used for subscription-based streaming services that illegally stream television content without permission from copyright holders. The devices used Roku's private channels feature to install the services, which were all against the terms of service Roku applies for official channels available in its store. Roku defended itself against the allegations as such, stating that these channels were not officially certified and that the company takes active measures to stop illegal streaming services.[78] The 11th Collegiate Court in Mexico City overturned the decision in October 2018, with Roku returning to the Mexican market soon after; Televisa's streaming service Blim TV would also launch on the platform.[79]

In August 2017 Roku began to display a prominent disclaimer when non-certified channels are added, warning that channels enabling piracy may be removed "without prior notice".[80][69][81] In mid-May 2018, a software glitch caused some users to see copyright takedown notices on legitimate services such as Netflix and YouTube. Roku acknowledged and patched the glitch.[82][83]

Carriage disputes[edit]

Pay television-styled carriage disputes emerged on the Roku platform in 2020, as the company requires providers to agree to revenue sharing for subscription services that are billed through the platform, and to hold 30% of advertising inventory.[84] On September 18 of that same year, Roku announced that NBCUniversalTV Everywhere services would be removed from its devices "as early as this weekend", due to its refusal to carry the company's streaming service Peacock under terms it deemed "unreasonable".[84] It reached an agreement with NBCUniversal later that day.[85]HBO Max was unavailable on Roku since its launch until December 2020 due to similar disputes over revenue sharing, particularly in regards to an upcoming ad-supported tier.[86][87] On December 17 of that same year, HBO Max began streaming on Roku.[88]

Another dispute, starting mid-December 2020, caused Spectrum customers to be unable to download the Spectrum TV streaming app to their Roku devices; existing customers could retain the app, but would lose it upon deletion, even to fix software bugs. This dispute was resolved on August 17, 2021.[89][90]

On April 30, 2021, Roku removed the over-the-top television service YouTube TV from its Channels Store, preventing it from being downloaded. The company accused operator Google LLC of making demands regarding its YouTube app that it considered "predatory, anti-competitive and discriminatory", including enhanced access to customer data, giving YouTube greater prominence in Roku's search interface, and requiring that Roku implement specific hardware standards that could increase the cost of its devices. Roku accused Google of "leveraging its YouTube monopoly to force an independent company into an agreement that is both bad for consumers and bad for fair competition."[91][92]

Google claimed that Roku had "terminated our deal in bad faith amidst our negotiation", stating that it wanted to renew the "existing reasonable terms" under which Roku offered YouTube TV. Google denied Roku's claims regarding customer data and prominence of the YouTube app, and stated that its carriage of a YouTube app was under a separate agreement, and unnecessarily brought into negotiations.[93] As a partial workaround, YouTube began to deploy an update to its main app on Roku and other platforms, which integrates the YouTube TV service.[92][94]

See also[edit]

Notes[edit]

  1. ^ abcdefghijIn the first generation players, the size of flash memory limited the number of channels that could be installed. Later models (>2100) removed that limit.
  2. ^ abc1080p at p24 or p30 only.
  3. ^The component video connector on the Roku XDS (2100X) is a nonstandard 3.5mm connector and a proprietary adapter cable, which is sold separately, is effectively required to use this.[41]
  4. ^ abBluetooth remote optional.
  5. ^ ab1080p at p60 only.
  6. ^1080p at p24.
  7. ^ abcdefgAnalog audio output is available only through the headphone jack on the remote.
  8. ^WiFi Direct Remote optional.

References[edit]

  1. ^ ab"The Consumer Electronics Hall of Fame: Roku DVP N1000". IEEE Spectrum. December 6, 2018. Retrieved March 15, 2020.
  2. ^"Roku tops 55M active accounts as user growth and engagement slow in Q2". FierceVideo. Retrieved August 8, 2021.
  3. ^ abcButler, Dave. "History of Roku: Timeline and Facts". TheStreet. Retrieved May 31, 2020.
  4. ^ abCarr, Austin (January 23, 2013). "Inside Netflix's Project Griffin: The Forgotten History Of Roku Under Reed Hastings". Fastcompany. Archived from the original on January 23, 2013. Retrieved June 21, 2020.
  5. ^ abBouma, Luke (December 16, 2015). "A Short History of The Roku Player". Cord Cutter News. Retrieved May 31, 2020.
  6. ^"Roku buys adtech platform dataxu for $150 million". TechCrunch. Retrieved July 17, 2021.
  7. ^Hansell, Saul (May 20, 2008). "Netflix to Sell a Device for Instantly Watching Movies on TV Sets". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Archived from the original on January 5, 2018. Retrieved March 15, 2020.
  8. ^Dumas, Daniel (May 20, 2008). "Review: Roku Netflix Set Top Box Is Just Shy of Totally Amazing". Wired. ISSN 1059-1028. Retrieved March 15, 2020.
  9. ^Falcone, John. "Roku Player review: Roku Player". CNET. Retrieved March 15, 2020.
  10. ^Frakes, Dan (November 22, 2009). "Hands on: Roku's updated Player software and new Channel Store". Macworld. Retrieved March 15, 2020.
  11. ^Krasnoff, Barbara (May 27, 2010). "Roku makes its Netflix channel better -- a lot better". Computerworld. Retrieved March 16, 2020.
  12. ^Caldwell, Serenity (August 30, 2010). "Roku cuts player prices, plans 1080p support for HD-XR model". Macworld. Retrieved March 15, 2020.
  13. ^"Roku launches revamped HD, XD, and XDS players, starting at $59". Engadget. Retrieved March 16, 2020.
  14. ^Spangler, Todd (September 2, 2015). "Roku Drops Support for 'Classic' Streaming Boxes". Variety. Retrieved March 15, 2020.
  15. ^Falcone, John. "Roku officially unveils new game-enabled video players". CNET. Retrieved March 15, 2020.
  16. ^"Roku announces $50 LT model, will add HBO Go streaming to all of its boxes this month". Engadget. Retrieved March 15, 2020.
  17. ^"Roku unveils Streaming Stick, squeezes box into MHL dongle". Engadget. Retrieved March 15, 2020.
  18. ^Isaac, Mike (January 4, 2012). "New Roku Streaming Stick: Smart TV Sans Set-Top Box". Wired. ISSN 1059-1028. Retrieved March 15, 2020.
  19. ^Bishop, Bryan (October 29, 2012). "Roku adds universal search channel for movies and TV". The Verge. Retrieved March 15, 2020.
  20. ^"Roku PSA: Here's how to tell the new Roku 2 and Roku 3 from the old versions". TechHive. April 27, 2015. Retrieved March 15, 2020.
  21. ^"Roku 3, a faster and more powerful media player, to go on sale". Los Angeles Times. March 5, 2013.
  22. ^"Roku Unveils Its 4K Streamer, The Roku 4, Plus New Software, Discovery Features, And Upgraded Mobile App". TechCrunch. Retrieved March 15, 2020.
  23. ^"Roku Announces All-New Streaming Player Line Up Starting at $29.99 | Roku Online Newsroom". Roku.com. Retrieved September 26, 2016.
  24. ^Katzmaier, David (September 26, 2016). "Roku unveils five new streaming boxes with prices as low as $30". CNET. Retrieved September 26, 2016.
  25. ^"Roku rolls out Roku OS 8, refreshes TV hardware with 4K and faster processors". The Verge. Retrieved July 16, 2018.
  26. ^"Introducing the new Roku player lineup". Roku Blog. Retrieved April 23, 2020.
  27. ^"Netflix ends support for some older Roku players on December 1st". Engadget. Retrieved October 13, 2019.
  28. ^"Introducing the new Roku player lineup". Roku Blog. Retrieved October 24, 2020.
  29. ^Dunn, Jeff (April 13, 2021). "Roku's latest streaming device gives 4K, HDR, and a voice remote for $40". Ars Technica. Retrieved April 26, 2021.
  30. ^"Introducing the all-new Roku Streaming Stick 4K and Roku Streaming Stick 4K+". Roku Blog. Retrieved September 20, 2021.
  31. ^"Roku Streaming Stick 4K — Powerful & portable". Roku Website. Retrieved September 20, 2021.
  32. ^"Roku Streaming Stick 4K+ — Powerful & portable". Roku Website. Retrieved September 20, 2021.
  33. ^"Roku Ultra LT — Powerful 4K streaming". Roku Website. Retrieved September 20, 2021.
  34. ^"Roku OS 10.5 offers easy access to content, new mobile features, and expanded surround sound capabilities". Roku Blog. Retrieved September 20, 2021.
  35. ^"NXP and Roku Enable Instant Enjoyment of New Release Movies" (Press release). March 4, 2009. Retrieved November 11, 2011.
  36. ^"Netflix Player source code released". Hack a Day. July 2, 2008. Retrieved November 11, 2011.
  37. ^ abHiggins, Tim (September 29, 2010). "Roku XDS Reviewed – Inside". SmallNetBuilder. Retrieved November 11, 2011.
  38. ^ abcdefghijklmnopqrstuv"Developer Guide". roku.com. Retrieved February 11, 2015.
  39. ^ abc"MIPS-Based Products". Archived from the original on November 12, 2011. Retrieved November 11, 2011.
  40. ^Lueke, Alan (November 12, 2010). "Netgear Roku XD: Streaming for the Masses". AnandTech. Retrieved November 11, 2011.
  41. ^"What is the component cable?". Roku. July 22, 2010.
  42. ^Detwiler, Bill (January 14, 2011). "Roku XDS Teardown". TechRepublic. Retrieved November 11, 2011.
  43. ^O'Brien, Terrence (September 27, 2011). "Budget-friendly Roku LT pops up at the FCC as the 2400X (Updated with pics)". Engadget. Retrieved November 11, 2011.
  44. ^ abc"New Roku HD player hits the FCC with composite out, new remote, does away with microSD storage". Wireless Goodness. March 15, 2012. Retrieved July 26, 2013.
  45. ^ abcO'Brien, Terrence (June 29, 2011). "Roku 2 line passes through the FCC with modest hardware updates and a reset button". Engadget. Retrieved November 11, 2011.
  46. ^"Roku 2 XS 3100R Streaming Media Adapter". Hearst Electronic Products and iSuppli. October 26, 2011. Archived from the original on November 12, 2011. Retrieved November 11, 2011.
  47. ^ ab"Roku". Roku.
  48. ^"TempConfidential_(3400, 3420)Internal photos_20120921 - Internal Photos FCC ID: TC2-R1005 Document ID 1799488". fccid.net.
  49. ^"Roku unveils new video-streaming stick in response to popularity of Google's Chromecast". Fox News.
  50. ^ abcdefghRoku. "Roku". Roku.
  51. ^Roku. "Roku Streaming Stick". Roku. Archived from the original on September 23, 2016.CS1 maint: bot: original URL status unknown (link)
  52. ^"Roku Streaming Stick (3600R)". wikidevi.com. Retrieved September 26, 2016.
Sours: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Roku

Roku 2 () review: Faster Roku 2 masters the streaming universe

Both the Stick and the Roku 2 offer all of the goodness of the Roku interface and app selection (including Netflix, Hulu Plus, Amazon Prime, Vudu, Watch ESPN, HBO Go and Sling TV among its more than 2, channels), and the same lightning-quick response times as the Roku 3 (both new and old ), with none of the extra remote-based features you may not use.

The Roku 2 is more-expensive than the Stick, but the only major advantage it has is the presence of an Ethernet port. If you have spotty Wi-Fi, and an Ethernet cable near your TV, you might want the Roku 2 instead of the Stick.

If you want a headphone jack on the remote for private listening, or voice search from the remote, spend the extra $30 for the Roku 3. Meanwhile, if you're looking to add a streaming box to an old, pre-HD television and need those analog video outputs, the company continues to sell the analog-equipped Roku 1 unchanged.

Roku's interface, search and app selection still lead the pack, so unless you're a devotee of the Apple pantheon, or find yourself inescapably enmeshed in Amazon's jungle of media services, Roku is the best platform for streaming. And the Roku 2 is the best value among Rokus if you want that Ethernet port.

Update April 21, This review has been updated, its Editors' Choice award removed, and its rating reduced, based on the release of the Roku Streaming Stick.

Downgrade the remote

The new Roku 2 remote is a step down from that used in the Stick, the old Roku 2 and the Roku 3. Those all operate via Wi-Fi Direct, rather than infrared or Bluetooth, so you didn't need line-of-sight to operate the box. It also allows the new Roku 3 remote to include voice search and that headphone jack.

The Roku 2 remote drops those hardware extras entirely. It's a standard infrared clicker you need to aim at the box, and you'll have to keep the box's IR sensor exposed to work, a requirement that eliminates some out-of-sight installations.

Otherwise the clicker is dead-simple to use and I have no complaints. It's quite a bit slimmer than before, and its finish is matte instead of glossy, which I prefer for rejecting grime and fingerprints. I also prefer the "OK" button in the midst of the four-way cursor rather than below. And the presence of actual play/pause, rewind and fast-forward keys is highly preferable to their absence; the Apple TV and Nexus Player remotes lack those buttons entirely.

Compared to the Roku 3 remote, the Roku 2 remote is also missing the voice search button and the tiny mic hole, the A/B keys for gaming, and the volume controls for that absent headphone jack. Three of the four direct-app keys are the same, but the fourth is for Sling TV on the Roku 2 (and the latest Roku 1) and Hulu Plus on the Roku 3. Meanwhile the latest version of the Stick remote gets direct access to Google Play. Roku's little Chromecast jab, perhaps?

The Roku 2 box itself supports Wi-Fi direct, so you can actually pair it more capable Roku remote, to add headphone support for example (see below for details). And of course, if you're going to use a universal remote with your Roku anyway, there's no reason to get a Roku 3 instead of a Roku 2.

Note, however, that if you use Roku's free iOS or Android app, you can use voice search via your smartphone. The app's private listening feature is, for now at least, exclusive to the Stick.

but pump the responsiveness

Operational speed is something I consider extremely important in a living room box you'll use every day. In my speed tests the Roku 3 (both the old and new versions), the Stick and the Roku 2 simply flew around the bases, responding equally fast to button presses, launching and navigating apps, populating thumbnails, grabbing search results and whizzing around the system menus. When it comes to getting your shows on-screen pronto, the new Rokus will outrun most cable boxes, disc players and Smart TV systems, not to mention your phone (that's myChromecast jab).

Compared to the Apple TV, Google Nexus Player and Amazon Fire TV (both stick and box ), Roku hold its own perfectly well. Yes, Amazon did demonstrate an advantage launching Amazon's own content, but Roku got to it speedily enough. They're all fast enough in regular operation to satisfy most users.

Why Roku rules the roost

Three main reasons make Roku's platform better than the competition: an interface that treats all apps equally, the best universal search around, and the widest selection of apps, which Roku calls "channels."

Equal-opportunity streaming: Roku doesn't sell content (yet), so unlike Apple TV, Amazon Fire TV and Android TV, its interface doesn't prioritize any source of content over another. You can freely move icons around to surface the ones you want, delete the icons you don't want, and even hide the branded items on the main menu -- Movie Store, TV Store (both by M-Go) and News (by AOL On). Apple TV comes closest to Roku's level of customization, while Amazon and Google lag far behind; their interfaces often seem little more than gateways to their respective content gardens.

Universal search finds savings: Roku's search currently queries 30 apps, including major services Netflix, Amazon Instant Video, Hulu Plus, Crackle, Fox Now, FXNow, HBO Go, M-Go, Time Warner Cable and Vudu. Meanwhile Fire TV's and Android TV's cross-platform search catalogs are much more limited; both still omit Netflix and HBO Go results, among many others. The new Apple TV's search is much better, but it still lacks pay-per-title services beyond iTunes.

The inclusion of subscription services may actually save you money. If you're a Netflix, Amazon Prime, Hulu Plus or HBO Go subscriber, for example, you'll see results for movies available there listed as "free" in addition to those available from pay-per-view services, with costs attached.

When I looked for "The Lego Movie" for example, Roku's search results told me I could watch it for free on HBO Go, $ on Vudu, Amazon or M-Go, and $ on CinemaNow. The same search of Amazon Fire TV only showed me a $ HD version I could purchase from Amazon, even though the box has an HBO Go app of its own. Worse, there was no option I saw for the $ SD version that I could buy using Roku's Amazon Instant Video app.

Still more apps than anyone: Although pretty much every streaming device can access every major app, Roku still offers more apps than any other platform--more than 2, by its reckoning. I didn't count them up myself.

Yes, hundreds of those apps are for local churches, local TV news and small content providers with niche appeal. But that's fine, because Roku has nearly all of the mass market entertainment bases covered. You'll find pretty much everything big beyond the Starz, PlayStation Vue, and local file playback favorite Kodi.

Check out the full, updated list of major apps available by platform here.

Unlike the old Roku 2, the Roku 2 has the updated version of the Netflix app, the one that supports profiles for different users on the same account, as well as the latest YouTube app. It does lack the latest interface for a few apps, however, including Amazon Instant Video and HBO Go.

Meanwhile Roku's selection of minor and niche apps is second to none. You can get lost for hours browsing the channel store for esoterica, and can often discover some real gems, like the National Geographic Kids app my daughter convinced me to subscribe to.

Roku makes finding new apps relatively easy, although there is a sort of firehose effect. A new addition to the software is a search window just for channels in the channel store; as always, you can also find apps from Roku's main search window.

More ways to browse: Roku is also the best at presenting TV shows and movies across the different services. In addition to the "Follow" feature, which allows you to tag shows, films and even actors and receive notifications for when they're available to stream, there's a new feature available to all Roku devices with the latest software update. It shows the most popular TV shows and movies across all of the services Roku searches, updated four times a day. It's a great way to find new things to watch, although I do wish there were a "Show only stuff I can watch for free" option.

For more details and comparisons between the various platforms, check out my Roku 3 review.

Feature breakdown

Streaming devices (and sticks) are mature enough that even the most basic ones will give you pretty much everything you need. But the boxes have some advantages over the sticks, especially in terms of connectivity.

If you'd rather connect via wired Ethernet than Wi-Fi -- something I do at home because it's simply more stable even though I have a great Wi-Fi router -- get a box and not a stick. If you have an older AV receiver that lacks HDMI inputs, you may want to go with a non-Roku device (not the Nexus) to get an optical digital audio output.

All of the platforms offer dedicated apps for Android and iOS (with the exception of Google, which doesn't have an iOS version). All offer voice search and the ability to type in searches via text, and all are handy for when your physical remote goes missing. That's right: you can get voice search on your Roku 2 (and Roku 1 and Stick) using the app. I do like Roku's app best among the three, mainly because it offers the Play On Roku screen mirroring function to send photos and music to the box.

Full-fledged screen mirroring has been added to the new Roku 2, but it's more limited than on Apple TV (with AirPlay) or the Nexus Player (with the Cast feature). You still need to have an Android or higher device or a PC running Windows or higher to get full mirroring. The feature works very well in my experience. Roku 3 and the Roku Streaming Stick also support mirroring. Check out our full how-to for more.

In the past Roku fell short of other players in its handling of local media from the network, but that's all changed. The basic Roku Media Player app works well for getting music, photo and video files on-screen, and if you want more robust support, Plex is available on Roku too. If you're a serious media hoarder, however, the Nvidia Shield is a better bet than Roku.

Replacement remote options

One unique thing about the Roku 2 is that you can buy an older Roku remote separately if you want to get the headphone jack and volume control. They cost about $

I was able to successfully pair the Roku 2 with all of the legacy "Roku enhanced remotes" that I tried, including the original remotes for both old and new Roku 3s, the old Roku 2 and the Roku Streaming Stick. All of the remotes' original functionality was preserved: the headphone jacks with volume control worked properly, muting the sound when I plugged in my headphones, and I no longer had to aim the clicker at the box.

Voice searches from the Roku 3 remote using the Roku 2 box also worked exactly like they did on the actual Roku 3. Unlike Amazon Fire TV however, Roku doesn't yet sell the voice-enabled Roku 3 remote separately.

The verdict: Roku 2 is a great value, but the new Stick is an even better one

The other streaming platforms have a few advantages over Roku, especially if you care about gaming, need captive portal access or must have an exclusive app. And if you're all in with Apple's or Amazon's ecosystem, you'll probably be happier sticking with one of those devices.

Roku vs. Apple TV vs. Chromecast vs. Amazon Fire TV vs. Android TV: Which streamer should you buy?

For almost everyone else, Roku's platform is the best. The main question is which Roku to buy. You can definitely save some money with an older Roku like the Roku 1, but I think its worth paying a bit more for a faster Roku. Since the new Stick is just as fast as the Roku 2 and Roku 3, and costs less, it's my favorite Roku. But if you want Ethernet, and don't care about the Roku 3's fancy remote, the Roku 2 is the best buy of the bunch.

Sours: https://www.cnet.com/reviews/rokureview/

Wireless roku 2

Roku 2 Streaming Media Player (4210R) with Faster Processor (2015 Model)

More channels

3,000 plus channels. Over 300,000 movies and TV episodes.

Find What You Want—Fast

Search across top channels by title, actor, or director using remote, voice, or the Roku mobile app. We make it easy to see what’s on, where you can watch it, where it’s free for you, or if there are purchase or rental options.

Follow Your Favorites - Movies, Shows, and More

With the Roku Feed, you can follow movies, TV shows, actors, and directors and get automatic updates when new content is ready to stream.

You’re Connected

Roku 2 features Ethernet, a USB connection for personal media and a microSD card slot to expand internal storage.

Sours: https://www.amazon.com/Roku-Streaming-Player-4210R-Processor/dp/B00UJ3IREE
How To Set Up The Roku 2- How to Set Up the Roku

Roku 2 (2015) review: Faster Roku 2 masters the streaming universe

Both the Stick and the Roku 2 offer all of the goodness of the Roku interface and app selection (including Netflix, Hulu Plus, Amazon Prime, Vudu, Watch ESPN, HBO Go and Sling TV among its more than 2,000 channels), and the same lightning-quick response times as the Roku 3 (both new and old ), with none of the extra remote-based features you may not use.

The Roku 2 is more-expensive than the Stick, but the only major advantage it has is the presence of an Ethernet port. If you have spotty Wi-Fi, and an Ethernet cable near your TV, you might want the Roku 2 instead of the Stick.

If you want a headphone jack on the remote for private listening, or voice search from the remote, spend the extra $30 for the Roku 3. Meanwhile, if you're looking to add a streaming box to an old, pre-HD television and need those analog video outputs, the company continues to sell the analog-equipped Roku 1 unchanged.

Roku's interface, search and app selection still lead the pack, so unless you're a devotee of the Apple pantheon, or find yourself inescapably enmeshed in Amazon's jungle of media services, Roku is the best platform for streaming. And the Roku 2 is the best value among Rokus if you want that Ethernet port.

Update April 21, 2016: This review has been updated, its Editors' Choice award removed, and its rating reduced, based on the release of the 2016 Roku Streaming Stick.

Downgrade the remote...

The new Roku 2 remote is a step down from that used in the Stick, the old Roku 2 and the Roku 3. Those all operate via Wi-Fi Direct, rather than infrared or Bluetooth, so you didn't need line-of-sight to operate the box. It also allows the new Roku 3 remote to include voice search and that headphone jack.

The 2015 Roku 2 remote drops those hardware extras entirely. It's a standard infrared clicker you need to aim at the box, and you'll have to keep the box's IR sensor exposed to work, a requirement that eliminates some out-of-sight installations.

Otherwise the clicker is dead-simple to use and I have no complaints. It's quite a bit slimmer than before, and its finish is matte instead of glossy, which I prefer for rejecting grime and fingerprints. I also prefer the "OK" button in the midst of the four-way cursor rather than below. And the presence of actual play/pause, rewind and fast-forward keys is highly preferable to their absence; the Apple TV and Nexus Player remotes lack those buttons entirely.

Compared to the Roku 3 remote, the Roku 2 remote is also missing the voice search button and the tiny mic hole, the A/B keys for gaming, and the volume controls for that absent headphone jack. Three of the four direct-app keys are the same, but the fourth is for Sling TV on the Roku 2 (and the latest Roku 1) and Hulu Plus on the Roku 3. Meanwhile the latest version of the Stick remote gets direct access to Google Play. Roku's little Chromecast jab, perhaps?

The Roku 2 box itself supports Wi-Fi direct, so you can actually pair it more capable Roku remote, to add headphone support for example (see below for details). And of course, if you're going to use a universal remote with your Roku anyway, there's no reason to get a Roku 3 instead of a Roku 2.

Note, however, that if you use Roku's free iOS or Android app, you can use voice search via your smartphone. The app's private listening feature is, for now at least, exclusive to the 2016 Stick.

...but pump the responsiveness

Operational speed is something I consider extremely important in a living room box you'll use every day. In my speed tests the Roku 3 (both the old 2013 and new 2015 versions), the 2016 Stick and the Roku 2 simply flew around the bases, responding equally fast to button presses, launching and navigating apps, populating thumbnails, grabbing search results and whizzing around the system menus. When it comes to getting your shows on-screen pronto, the new Rokus will outrun most cable boxes, disc players and Smart TV systems, not to mention your phone (that's myChromecast jab).

Compared to the Apple TV, Google Nexus Player and Amazon Fire TV (both stick and box ), Roku hold its own perfectly well. Yes, Amazon did demonstrate an advantage launching Amazon's own content, but Roku got to it speedily enough. They're all fast enough in regular operation to satisfy most users.

Why Roku rules the roost

Three main reasons make Roku's platform better than the competition: an interface that treats all apps equally, the best universal search around, and the widest selection of apps, which Roku calls "channels."

Equal-opportunity streaming: Roku doesn't sell content (yet), so unlike Apple TV, Amazon Fire TV and Android TV, its interface doesn't prioritize any source of content over another. You can freely move icons around to surface the ones you want, delete the icons you don't want, and even hide the branded items on the main menu -- Movie Store, TV Store (both by M-Go) and News (by AOL On). Apple TV comes closest to Roku's level of customization, while Amazon and Google lag far behind; their interfaces often seem little more than gateways to their respective content gardens.

Universal search finds savings: Roku's search currently queries 30 apps, including major services Netflix, Amazon Instant Video, Hulu Plus, Crackle, Fox Now, FXNow, HBO Go, M-Go, Time Warner Cable and Vudu. Meanwhile Fire TV's and Android TV's cross-platform search catalogs are much more limited; both still omit Netflix and HBO Go results, among many others. The new Apple TV's search is much better, but it still lacks pay-per-title services beyond iTunes.

The inclusion of subscription services may actually save you money. If you're a Netflix, Amazon Prime, Hulu Plus or HBO Go subscriber, for example, you'll see results for movies available there listed as "free" in addition to those available from pay-per-view services, with costs attached.

When I looked for "The Lego Movie" for example, Roku's search results told me I could watch it for free on HBO Go, $9.99 on Vudu, Amazon or M-Go, and $14.99 on CinemaNow. The same search of Amazon Fire TV only showed me a $17.99 HD version I could purchase from Amazon, even though the box has an HBO Go app of its own. Worse, there was no option I saw for the $9.99 SD version that I could buy using Roku's Amazon Instant Video app.

Still more apps than anyone: Although pretty much every streaming device can access every major app, Roku still offers more apps than any other platform--more than 2,000 by its reckoning. I didn't count them up myself.

Yes, hundreds of those apps are for local churches, local TV news and small content providers with niche appeal. But that's fine, because Roku has nearly all of the mass market entertainment bases covered. You'll find pretty much everything big beyond the Starz, PlayStation Vue, and local file playback favorite Kodi.

Check out the full, updated list of major apps available by platform here.

Unlike the old Roku 2, the 2015 Roku 2 has the updated version of the Netflix app, the one that supports profiles for different users on the same account, as well as the latest YouTube app. It does lack the latest interface for a few apps, however, including Amazon Instant Video and HBO Go.

Meanwhile Roku's selection of minor and niche apps is second to none. You can get lost for hours browsing the channel store for esoterica, and can often discover some real gems, like the National Geographic Kids app my daughter convinced me to subscribe to.

Roku makes finding new apps relatively easy, although there is a sort of firehose effect. A new addition to the software is a search window just for channels in the channel store; as always, you can also find apps from Roku's main search window.

More ways to browse: Roku is also the best at presenting TV shows and movies across the different services. In addition to the "Follow" feature, which allows you to tag shows, films and even actors and receive notifications for when they're available to stream, there's a new feature available to all Roku devices with the latest software update. It shows the most popular TV shows and movies across all of the services Roku searches, updated four times a day. It's a great way to find new things to watch, although I do wish there were a "Show only stuff I can watch for free" option.

For more details and comparisons between the various platforms, check out my Roku 3 review.

Feature breakdown

Streaming devices (and sticks) are mature enough that even the most basic ones will give you pretty much everything you need. But the boxes have some advantages over the sticks, especially in terms of connectivity.

If you'd rather connect via wired Ethernet than Wi-Fi -- something I do at home because it's simply more stable even though I have a great Wi-Fi router -- get a box and not a stick. If you have an older AV receiver that lacks HDMI inputs, you may want to go with a non-Roku device (not the Nexus) to get an optical digital audio output.

All of the platforms offer dedicated apps for Android and iOS (with the exception of Google, which doesn't have an iOS version). All offer voice search and the ability to type in searches via text, and all are handy for when your physical remote goes missing. That's right: you can get voice search on your Roku 2 (and Roku 1 and Stick) using the app. I do like Roku's app best among the three, mainly because it offers the Play On Roku screen mirroring function to send photos and music to the box.

Full-fledged screen mirroring has been added to the new Roku 2, but it's more limited than on Apple TV (with AirPlay) or the Nexus Player (with the Cast feature). You still need to have an Android 4.2.2 or higher device or a PC running Windows 8.1 or higher to get full mirroring. The feature works very well in my experience. Roku 3 and the Roku Streaming Stick also support mirroring. Check out our full how-to for more.

In the past Roku fell short of other players in its handling of local media from the network, but that's all changed. The basic Roku Media Player app works well for getting music, photo and video files on-screen, and if you want more robust support, Plex is available on Roku too. If you're a serious media hoarder, however, the Nvidia Shield is a better bet than Roku.

Replacement remote options

One unique thing about the Roku 2 is that you can buy an older Roku remote separately if you want to get the headphone jack and volume control. They cost about $30.

I was able to successfully pair the Roku 2 with all of the legacy "Roku enhanced remotes" that I tried, including the original remotes for both old and new Roku 3s, the old Roku 2 and the Roku Streaming Stick. All of the remotes' original functionality was preserved: the headphone jacks with volume control worked properly, muting the sound when I plugged in my headphones, and I no longer had to aim the clicker at the box.

Voice searches from the Roku 3 remote using the Roku 2 box also worked exactly like they did on the actual Roku 3. Unlike Amazon Fire TV however, Roku doesn't yet sell the voice-enabled Roku 3 remote separately.

The verdict: Roku 2 is a great value, but the new Stick is an even better one

The other streaming platforms have a few advantages over Roku, especially if you care about gaming, need captive portal access or must have an exclusive app. And if you're all in with Apple's or Amazon's ecosystem, you'll probably be happier sticking with one of those devices.

Roku vs. Apple TV vs. Chromecast vs. Amazon Fire TV vs. Android TV: Which streamer should you buy?

For almost everyone else, Roku's platform is the best. The main question is which Roku to buy. You can definitely save some money with an older Roku like the Roku 1, but I think its worth paying a bit more for a faster Roku. Since the new Stick is just as fast as the Roku 2 and Roku 3, and costs less, it's my favorite Roku. But if you want Ethernet, and don't care about the Roku 3's fancy remote, the Roku 2 is the best buy of the bunch.

Sours: https://www.cnet.com/reviews/roku-2-review/

You will also be interested:

Update: The official Roku app (which can be used to control the device) has received a pretty substantial overhaul. The biggest addition is a new 'What's on' section, which provides an easy way to view a curated selection of recent television and movie releases. The app has also received a more general design overhaul to make it easier to navigate. 

Original review below...

The Roku 2 has always been - and always will be - the middle child of the Roku family.

At $69 (£59, about AU$90), it's pricier than the Roku or Roku Streaming Stick, but comes in well under the cost of a $99 (£79, about AU$129) Roku 3. Likewise, it has more features and a landslide of better specs than its predecessor, the original Roku, but it's not quite as feature rich as its video game-ready older brother, the Roku 3.

But herein lies the magic of the middle child. By cutting out some of the features you may not want or need (e.g. a headphone jack or gaming functionality), you save money while keeping the things that matter, like a faster processor and plenty of ports.

It's hard to say anything bad about the refreshed 2015 Roku 2. While I was left struggling with a few nagging issues, the puck-shaped streamer kept impressing me long after the first set of credits rolled.

Design

Externally, little has changed about the Roku 2. It's still a small, hockey puck-shaped box and has one tiny, but incredibly iconic, purple tag. Like the Roku 3, it has one side USB 2.0 port and four essential slots on the back for Ethernet, HDMI, microSD and power.

The unit itself is slightly larger than the palm of your hand but is far from unsightly. At 3.5 x 3.5 x 1 inches or 88.9 x 88.9 x 25.4mm (W x D x H), it sits so low to the entertainment center it completely blends in with its surroundings.

The Roku 2 also has integrated dual-band Wi-Fi (a/b/g/n compatible). However, the wired Ethernet option is hands-down the best choice when it comes to streaming.

The microSD card slot, a carryover from earlier models, allows you to store excess channels, and comes in handy after you fill up the internal storage.

It's also worth noting that the Roku 2 doesn't have an actual "off" button. The player stays online (consuming less than 3.5w) and updates itself automatically.

So then what exactly makes the re-designed Roku 2, well, redesigned?

Roku made two changes to this year's model: one good, one bad. The good is a markedly improved processor - the same kind that's inside the Roku 3. I'll touch on this more in a minute and while the change isn't an external one, it vastly improves the overall product.

The bad news is that the remote we loved from the original Roku 2 - the one with a headphone jack - is gone. It's been replaced with a plasticky feeling replica that's practical, but far from premium. It's also worth noting that two of the buttons from the Roku 2's remote, Blockbuster and MGo, have been replaced with Sling TV and Rdio.

Setup

Getting the Roku 2 ready is unbelievably easy. Plug the unit into the wall, run an HDMI cable to your TV and voila! You're well on your way to watching the latest season of House of Cards.

First-time users will need to create an account on Roku's website, while veteran Rokuites will simply need to add the unit to their accounts via a short identification number.

While the whole setup takes a matter of minutes, you'll need to provide Roku with a credit card - in case of any additional fees - and you won't be able to use your new streamer until it receives a short firmware update. A bummer, I know.

Content

Easily its biggest strength, the Roku 2 is an equal opportunity player. Netflix, Amazon, MGo, Google Play Store are on equal ground here; Roku makes it clear that it's content first, platforms second.

Roku has over 2,000 channels available to download with varying degrees of paid content, interesting shows and specificity. If you're looking for a film noir alien channel or an ultra-specific '90s country metal hybrid station, Roku's storefront is the place to find it.

Of course, while there are plenty of niche channels to pick from, the streaming staples are front and center. In the US, that includes Amazon Instant Video, Netflix, HBO Go, Google Play Store, Vimeo, DailyMotion and CBS Access. Folks in the UK will see Sky's Now TV platform (Sky being a shareholder in Roku), the ubiquitous Netflix, BBC iPlayer, ITV, 4oD and Demand 5 as some of the most highly downloaded channels. Audio apps of note in both territories include Spotify, Rdio, Tunein and Vevo.

Cord cutters who live in the US will also have access to Sling TV, the new live TV cable alternative that's bringing new life to the cord cutting movement. The stream was crisp and clear on Roku 2, just as it was when I tested it on Roku 3. (Obviously, your mileage may vary, as my home setup isn't identical - or even necessarily in the same ballpark either way - as everyone else.)

The amount of content available on Roku's boxes is vast, and while the majority of the options are either too oddly niche to be concerned with or poor ports of YouTube channels, the additional options don't detract from the experience. Plus, the ability to customize the contents and order of your home screen means you only ever have to see the channels you want to see.

Prices - Roku 2:▼

Nick Pino is the senior home entertainment editor at TechRadar and covers TVs, headphones, speakers, video games, VR and streaming devices. He also has a degree in computer science he's not using if anyone wants it.

Sours: https://www.techradar.com/reviews/audio-visual/av-accessories/roku-2-1291043/review


13261 13262 13263 13264 13265