Fallen london turncoat

Fallen london turncoat DEFAULT

marketing agency in Halifax.

The Piece Hall was an epicentre of the 18th-century cloth and textiles industry. It was a place where textile craftsmen from all over came to trade 30-yard lengths of hand-woven cloth – the eponymous ‘pieces’ the Hall is named after. The cloth industry was one of the most vital in the world, and The Piece Hall is one of the few architectural echoes of that heritage still standing.

Today, instead of trading in cloth, The Piece Hall is home to a whole new world of industry. From hosting packed shows for Father John Misty to being the home of Turncoat Marketing’s newest office, The Piece Hall is full of life again. A stunning monument to the city’s past yet filled with very modern businesses, The Piece Hall is a thriving symbol of Halifax’s recent resurgence. Since 2017, the town has boomed, to the point where even Prince Charles took notice. In a 2018 visit to The Piece Hall, Charles remarked of his astonishment at how much the city has changes since his last visit in the 1990s.

Just like its Northern counterparts, Halifax is booming, and it doesn’t show any sign of stopping soon.

Here at Turncoat Marketing, we specialise in that kind of growth – for everyone. That means we don’t charge exorbitant fees to fund extravagant offices and fancy company cars. Instead, we approach content marketing with a client-first attitude, working out what’s going to work best for you and your customers, rather than what’s going to work best for our bank balance.

To that end, we have our very own super-group of strategists, copywriters and top-tier creatives. We work together to bring your products, services and story to life and put them where your customers are – on social media, email, websites, out-of-home and so on. Basically, wherever it is they are is where we make sure you are.

The best part? Most of these talented people know Halifax like you do. Halifax has a wealth of highly skilled industry talent, so along with the musicians, artists, and artisans, we’re proud to employ local graphic designers, videographers, social media marketers and even VR tech-heads.

Sours: https://www.turncoatmarketing.com/marketing-agency-halifax/

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Wooden marionette dressed as a Jewish banker

Wooden marionette dressed as a Jewish banker

Object

19th century German marionette dressed as an Orthodox Jewish banker in a somewhat shabby black suit. The carved, painted face has a large, curved nose and peyots (sidecurls), but these Jewish features are not overly exaggerated. Marionette shows were a popular form of entertainment in the 19th century for adults as well as children. Germany was now the banking center of Europe, after the chaos of the French revolution and Napoleonic wars, and the house of Rothschild had emerged in Frankfurt. Jews were still linked to the stereotypical evils of money lending, and while the banker was a more respectable figure, Jews were now also viewed with jealousy and suspicion as the creators of capitalism and its evils. This marionette is one of more than 900 items in the Katz Ehrenthal Collection of antisemitic visual materials.

Bronze figurine of a seated Jewish peddler

Bronze figurine of a seated Jewish peddler

Object

Metal figurine of a sitting Jewish peddler with a box of goods on his lap, from the 19th century. The man has several stereotypical physical features commonly attributed to Jewish men: a large nose, hooded eyes, full and thick lips, sidelocks, and a beard. Peddlers were itinerant vendors who traveled the countryside and sold goods to the public. They usually traveled alone and carried their goods with them as they went. Peddling was a common occupation for young Jewish men during the 18th and 19th centuries. Most peddlers hoped their hard work would serve as a springboard to more lucrative and comfortable occupations. However, old prejudices formed an antisemitic stereotype of the Jewish peddler. The stereotype originated from the economic and professional restrictions placed on early European Jews. They were barred from owning land, farming, joining trade guilds, and military service. These restrictions limited Jews to the occupations of retail peddling, hawking, and money lending. Additionally, medieval religious belief held that charging interest (known as usury) was sinful, and the Jews who occupied these professions were looked down upon predominantly by European Christians. They were perceived as morally deficient and willing to engage in unethical business practices. The inability of Jews to legally hold other occupations, combined with Christians’ disdain for the professions Jews were allowed to practice, helped form the canard of the greedy Jew who exploited Gentiles. This canard was often visually depicted as a Jewish peddler, an untrustworthy figure that sold cut-rate items at inflated prices. Often, they were shown carrying a sack on their back or a tray around their midsection. This figurine is one of the more than 900 items in the Katz Ehrenthal Collection of antisemitic artifacts and visual materials.

Bronze figurine of a Jewish man holding a rooster

Bronze figurine of a Jewish man holding a rooster

Object

Detailed bronze figure of an Orthodox Jewish man holding a rooster upside down by its feet, possibly created by Carl Kauba (1865-1922). The man has a long pointed nose, side curls, and a curly beard, all stereotypical physical features commonly attributed to Jewish men. The man may be performing the ceremony of Kaparot, a custom practiced by some Orthodox Jews the day before Yom Kippur. Kaparot consists of circling a chicken over one’s head nine times while reciting the appropriate text from the Bible. The purpose of the ceremony is to transfer the sins of a person to a fowl, so that it will take on any misfortune that might otherwise occur to the person. The bird is then slaughtered according to the laws of kashrut, and donated to the less fortunate or sold, on the condition that the proceeds are donated. Traditionally, roosters are used for men, and hens for women. Alternatively, money can be substituted for the bird. The figurine’s likely creator, Carl Kauba, was known for producing Viennese bronzes with polychrome finish, intricate detail, and the realistic forms, around the turn of the 20th century. His most well-known bronzes depict figures from the American West, many of which were sold in the United States. This figurine is one of the more than 900 items in the Katz Ehrenthal Collection of antisemitic artifacts and visual materials.

Ceramic change holder in the shape of an Orthodox Jewish man

Ceramic change holder in the shape of an Orthodox Jewish man

Object

Ceramic change holder from the 19th century, designed in the shape of an Orthodox Jewish man standing on top of a shallow dish labelled, “The Old Pal.” The man has very long, bushy sidelocks, a stereotypical physical feature commonly attributed to Jewish men. The man’s black clothing and the kippah conform to the Jewish concept of tzniyus (modest dress and behavior), which Orthodox Jews adhere to for religious reasons. Orthodox Judaism is the most traditional and stringent of the three main branches of modern Judaism. Orthodox Jews believe the Torah is of divine origin and strive to adhere to the 613 commandments of Jewish Law. The long, black suit-style jacket is either a “rekel” or a “bekishe.” Men traditionally wear the fancier bekishe on special occasions, such as Jewish holidays, weddings, or on the Sabbath. The simpler rekel is worn on an everyday basis. The resemblance of the man’s eyes and nose to gold coins, as well as his presence on the coin dish, are likely references to the antisemitic stereotype of the greedy Jew who exploits Gentiles for their own economic advantage. This stereotype originated from the economic and professional restrictions placed on early European Jews. They were barred from owning land, farming, joining trade guilds, and military service. These restrictions forced many Jews into occupations such as money changing or money lending. Additionally, medieval religious belief held that charging interest (known as usury) was sinful, and the Jews who occupied these professions were looked down upon predominantly by European Christians. They were perceived as morally deficient, greedy, and willing to engage in unethical business practices. This change holder is one of more than 900 items in the Katz Ehrenthal Collection of antisemitic artifacts and visual materials.

Wooden folk art figurine of a Jewish freeloader

Wooden folk art figurine of a Jewish freeloader

Object

Small, roughly carved, 19th-century wooden figurine of a Jewish schnorrer, a Judeo-German term for a Jewish beggar. A phrase on the figurine’s base may represent the sort of a line a schnorrer could use on a hesitant potential benefactor. Methuselah is a biblical figure renowned for his old age, and Strauss is likely a reference to a rich Jewish family of department store owners and bankers. By referencing those two names, the schnorrer may be implying that their mark is old and wealthy, and would not need or miss any money that the mark contributed to him. During the Chmielnicki pogroms in Poland (1648-57), hundreds of Jewish communities were destroyed and thousands of Jews fled west after the destruction of their homes and way of life. Afterward, the influx of destitute Jewish refugees in central Europe helped create the archetype of the Jewish beggar, or schnorrer. Unlike a beggar or panhandler who could be distinguished by their ragged outward appearance, a stereotypical schnorrer dressed respectably. Schnorrers were characterized as impudent, with an air of entitlement to disguise their true needs from charitable individuals. They were evasive about why they needed assistance, and were not satisfied with small favors. Typical reasons given for a schnorrer’s collection included recovering from the destruction of their home, or funding the dowry for their daughter or another relative. Schnorrers were said to invert the act of charity by asking for handouts. They give the affluent members of society a chance to do a good deed, which complies with the Jewish communal practice of providing aid to those less well off in the community. This act of kindness meant the charitable patron should be thankful to the schnorrer for providing the opportunity. This folk art figurine is one of the 900 items in the Katz Ehrenthal Collection of antisemitic artifacts and visual materials.

Caricature of Jewish man in a top hat with exaggerated facial features

Caricature of Jewish man in a top hat with exaggerated facial features

Object

Small, color print with a crudely exaggerated caricature of a Jewish schnorrer. The print may be a trade card, an illustrated advertising card distributed by businesses to promote their goods or services. The cards often featured colorful and vivid images designed to attract consumer’s attention. However, some images played on popular prejudices and stereotypes of Native Americans, Near and Far Eastern cultures, and Jewish minorities. A widely held antisemitic stereotype of the time was the schnorrer, a Judeo-German term for a Jewish beggar. During the Chmielnicki pogroms in Poland (1648-57), hundreds of Jewish communities were destroyed and thousands of Jews fled west after the destruction of their homes and way of life. Afterward, the influx of destitute Jewish refugees in central Europe helped create the archetype of the Jewish beggar, or schnorrer. Unlike a beggar or panhandler who could be distinguished by their ragged outward appearance, a stereotypical schnorrer dressed respectably. Schnorrers were characterized as impudent, with an air of entitlement to disguise their true needs from charitable individuals. They were evasive about why they needed assistance, and were not satisfied with small favors. Typical reasons given for a schnorrer’s collection included recovering from the destruction of their home, or funding the dowry for their daughter or another relative. Schnorrers were said to invert the act of charity by asking for handouts. They give the affluent members of society a chance to do a good deed, which complies with the Jewish communal practice of providing aid to those less well off in the community. This act of kindness meant the charitable patron should be thankful to the schnorrer for providing the opportunity. This print is one of the 900 items in the Katz Ehrenthal Collection of antisemitic artifacts and visual materials.

Pewter pepper shaker as a bearded Jewish peddler in tricorn hat

Pewter pepper shaker as a bearded Jewish peddler in tricorn hat

Object

Pewter pepper pot in the shape of a Jewish man in the tricorn hat, knee length jacket, and breeches fashionable circa 1775, known as colonial style. He has stereotypical Jewish features, such as a very large nose, but the fine, detailed metalwork make it a naturalistic portrait. The character and subject resemble depictions found in popular prints produced at the same time, known as Cries of London. These were picturesque scenes of city life that featured street characters, such as Jewish peddlers, as workers who provided useful services and vibrancy to urban areas. This pepper pot is one of the 900 items in the Katz Ehrenthal Collection of antisemitic artifacts and visual materials.

Drinking glass with caricature a Jew on his hobby-horse, Old Clothes

Drinking glass with caricature a Jew on his hobby-horse, Old Clothes

Object

Small drinking glass with a painted caricature of a Jewish man riding a draisienne (also known as a hobby-horse, and derogatively called a dandy horse), comprised of a sack on wheels. The original image is attributed to the satirical English printmaker, William Heath, and dates to 1819. This image has been reproduced in print form, and has been used to decorate other objects, such as glasses and plates. The draisienne was a precursor to, and has a similar design as the bicycle, but without pedals or gears for propulsion. A rider pushed themselves along with their feet, and coasted once at speed. After its invention, the draisienne was featured in many caricatures of the time that mocked aspects of society. In the image, the frame of the draisienne is replaced by a sack labeled, “Old Clothes,” and the caption reads “The Jews [sic] Hobby.” This references Jewish clothes peddlers, itinerant vendors who bought and sold used clothes, often carrying them in heavy sacks. The image and caption imply that clothes peddling was a choice or hobby of Jews, when the opposite is true. European Jews were barred from owning land, farming, joining trade guilds, and military service. These restrictions limited Jews to the occupations of retail peddling, hawking, and moneylending. Due to limited options, peddling was a common occupation for young Jewish men during the 18th and 19th centuries. Most peddlers hoped their hard work would serve as a springboard to more lucrative and comfortable occupations. This drinking glass is one of 900 items in the Katz Ehrenthal Collection of antisemitic artifacts and visual materials.

Faience tile with an image of a Jewish peddler with a large box on his back

Faience tile with an image of a Jewish peddler with a large box on his back

Object

French faience tile with a colorful image of a stereotypical Jewish peddler created in the 18th century. Faience is earthenware that is coated with a tin-glaze, which gives it a milky, opaque white color. This technique was popular in France from the late 16th century through the 18th century. French manufacturers produced tea sets, tiles, plates, and tureens decorated with elaborate designs and artistic images. The peddler in the image has a large nose and a long beard, two stereotypical Jewish features. Peddling was a common occupation for young Jewish men during the 18th and 19th centuries. However, old prejudices originating from the economic and professional restrictions placed on early European Jews formed an antisemitic stereotype of the Jewish peddler. They were barred from owning land, farming, joining trade guilds, and military service. These restrictions limited Jews to the occupations of retail peddling, hawking, and money lending. Additionally, medieval religious belief held that charging interest (known as usury) was sinful, and the Jews who occupied these professions were looked down upon predominantly by European Christians. They were perceived as morally deficient and willing to engage in unethical business practices. The inability of Jews to legally hold other occupations, combined with Christians’ disdain for the professions Jews were allowed to practice, helped form the canard of the greedy Jew who exploited Gentiles. This canard was often visually depicted as a Jewish peddler, an untrustworthy figure that sold cut-rate items at inflated prices. Often, they were shown carrying a sack on their back or a tray around their midsection. This tile is one of the 900 items in the Katz Ehrenthal Collection of antisemitic artifacts and visual materials.

White porcelain match holder depicting a stereotypical Jewish peddler

White porcelain match holder depicting a stereotypical Jewish peddler

Object

Decorative porcelain match holder shaped as a Jewish peddler carrying a large, empty sack on his back. The man has several stereotypical physical features commonly attributed to Jewish men: a large nose, fleshy lips, and red hair. Peddlers were itinerant vendors who sold goods to the public. Peddling was a common occupation for young Jewish men during the 18th and 19th centuries. However, old prejudices stemming from the economic and professional restrictions placed on early European Jews formed an antisemitic stereotype of the Jewish peddler. These restrictions limited Jews to the occupations of retail peddling, hawking, and moneylending. Additionally, medieval religious belief held that charging interest (known as usury) was sinful, and the Jews who occupied these professions were looked down upon, predominantly by European Christians. They were perceived as morally deficient and willing to engage in unethical business practices. The inability of Jews to legally hold other occupations, combined with Christians’ disdain for the professions Jews were allowed to practice, helped form the canard of the greedy Jew who exploited Gentiles. This canard was often visually depicted as a Jewish peddler, an untrustworthy figure that sold cut-rate items at inflated prices. The depiction of wicked Jewish characters as redheads also has a long history. Some interpretations of the Bible describe Esau and David (King of Israel), as having red hair, and for many, red hair became a Jewish identifier, even though Jews are no more likely to have red hair than other groups. In medieval Europe, redheads were regarded as untrustworthy, and the Jewish literary villains Fagin and Shylock had red hair. This figurine is one of the 900 items in the Katz Ehrenthal Collection of antisemitic artifacts and visual materials.

White porcelain figurine of a Jewish money changer in a gold dotted vest

White porcelain figurine of a Jewish money changer in a gold dotted vest

Object

Rockingham porcelain figurine of a Jewish money changer made in approximately 1820. He has a large nose and a long beard, both of which are stereotypical physical features commonly attributed to Jewish men. The Rockingham Works pottery factory was located in Swinton, England, on the estate of the Marquess of Rockingham. The factory produced a range of earthenware, stoneware, and porcelain pieces including tableware, figurines, and other decorative pieces. Money changers exchanged foreign coins or currency for those used locally. Many antisemitic depictions of Jews show them hoarding, counting, or handling money. These stereotypes originated from the economic and professional restrictions placed on early European Jews. They were barred from owning land, farming, joining trade guilds, and military service. These restrictions forced many Jews into occupations such as money changing or money lending. Additionally, medieval religious belief held that charging interest (known as usury) was sinful, and the Jews who occupied these professions were looked down upon, predominantly by European Christians. They were perceived as morally deficient, greedy, and willing to engage in unethical business practices. Jews’ inability to legally hold other occupations, combined with Christians’ disdain for the professions Jews were allowed to practice, helped form the canard of the greedy Jew who exploited Gentiles. This canard was often visually depicted as a Jewish man expressing an exaggerated desire for, or counting money. This figurine is one of the 900 items in the Katz Ehrenthal Collection of antisemitic artifacts and visual materials.

Staffordshire loving cup printed with Lord Gordon's circumcision

Staffordshire loving cup printed with Lord Gordon's circumcision

Object

Staffordshire creamware double handed cup with 2 transfer painted scenes: one of sailors and a drinking song, Can of Grog, by Charles Didbin. The other image, Lord George Riot made a Jew, depicts the circumcision of Lord George Gordon (1751-1793), a British politician who converted to Judaism and was circumcised in 1787, taking the name Israel Ben Abraham. The title refers to the Gordon Riots of 1780, which began with an anti-Catholic demonstration organized by Gordon to protest the Catholic Relief Act. A crowd of 60,000 gathered and anti-Catholic riots broke out in London for several days. In 1788, Gordon was jailed for libel. He continued observing Jewish rituals, and died in Newgate Prison in 1793. This loving cup is one of the more than 900 items in the Katz Ehrenthal Collection of antisemitic artifacts and visual materials.

Porcelain figure of Shylock, richly dressed and carrying a dagger

Porcelain figure of Shylock, richly dressed and carrying a dagger

Object

Colorful, 19th century, English porcelain figurine of Shylock, the antagonist from Shakespeare's play, The Merchant of Venice. He has a large nose, side curls, and a long beard; all stereotypical physical features attributed to Jewish men. Jews were expelled from England in 1290, making it unlikely that Shakespeare ever met a Jewish person, and he likely based Shylock on long-standing antisemitic stereotypes. In the play, Shylock is a Jewish moneylender who demands a pound of flesh as recompense from a merchant who failed to repay a loan. Although some scenes make him a sympathetic character, and show how society and his Christian enemies cruelly mistreat him, in the end, he is punished and forced to convert to Christianity. The play was extremely popular in Nazi Germany, with fifty productions between 1933 and 1939. The Ministry of Propaganda created edited versions of the play that removed scenes and lines that evoked sympathy for Shylock or Jews. The Nazis used Shylock to promote Jewish inferiority by making him emblematic of the Jewish race’s perceived wickedness. These versions ignored the ambiguity Shylock was originally infused with, and portrayed him as an avaricious and vengeful character that was grotesque and inhuman. Despite the stereotypical and anti-Jewish elements, the play remains popular and continues to spark debates over whether it should be considered antisemitic. This figurine is one of more than 900 items in the Katz Ehrenthal Collection of antisemitic artifacts and visual materials.

Brass door knocker with the head of an evil looking Shylock

Brass door knocker with the head of an evil looking Shylock

Object

Brass door knocker with the head of Shylock from Shakespeare's Merchant of Venice. Shylock is a Jewish moneylender who demands that his contract for a pound of flesh, owed by a youth for not repaying a loan, be paid in full. First published in 1600 in England, Shylock's characteristics are based upon long standing stereotypes, still popular in a country where Jews had been expelled for 300 years. At times, the portrayal is sympathetic, and we are shown how society and his Christian enemies cruelly mistreat him, but at the end, Shylock is punished for his greed and forced to convert. The play was extremely popular in Nazi Germany, with fifty productions from 1933-1945. Despite the stereotypical anti-Jewish elements, the play continues to spark debate over whether it is antisemitic. This door knocker is one of more than 900 items in the Katz Ehrenthal Collection of antisemitic artifacts and visual materials.

Hand painted vase with a scene of Portia and Shylock in the courtroom

Hand painted vase with a scene of Portia and Shylock in the courtroom

Object

Porcelain vase from the late 19th or early 20th century with an image of the courtroom scene from Shakespeare's play, The Merchant of Venice. The vase was manufactured by the Porzellanfabrik Victoria Schmidt & Co (now part of Thun Karlovarský Porcelán) in Carlsbad, Austria-Hungary (now, Karlovy Vary, Czech Republic), and features a reproduction of an illustration by the English artist, Walter Paget. The image was commonly used on tableware and decorative ceramics. In the scene, Shylock has a long beard and is wearing a skullcap, both stereotypical features attributed to Jewish men. Jews were expelled from England in 1290, making it unlikely that Shakespeare ever met a Jewish person, and he likely based Shylock on longstanding antisemitic stereotypes. In the play, Shylock is a Jewish moneylender who demands a pound of flesh as recompense from a merchant who failed to repay a loan. Although some scenes make him a sympathetic character, and show how society and his Christian enemies cruelly mistreat him, in the end, he is punished and forced to convert to Christianity. The play was extremely popular in Nazi Germany, with fifty productions between 1933 and 1939. The Ministry of Propaganda created edited versions of the play that removed scenes and lines that evoked sympathy for Shylock or Jews. The Nazis used Shylock to promote Jewish inferiority by making him emblematic of the Jewish race’s perceived wickedness. These versions ignored the ambiguity Shylock was originally infused with, and portrayed him as an avaricious and vengeful character that was grotesque and inhuman. Despite the stereotypical and anti-Jewish elements, the play remains popular and continues to spark debates over whether it should be considered antisemitic. This vase is one of more than 900 items in the Katz Ehrenthal Collection of antisemitic artifacts and visual materials.

Adams scalloped soup bowl with Portia in court with Shylock

Adams scalloped soup bowl with Portia in court with Shylock

Object

William Adams and Sons soup bowl with a scalloped rim with a colorful illustration of Portia and Shylock in the courtroom scene from Shakespeare's The Merchant of Venice. Shylock is a Jewish moneylender who demands that his contract for a pound of flesh, owed him by a youth who failed to repay a loan, be paid in full. First published in 1600 in England, Shylock's characteristics are based upon long standing, stereotypes, still popular in a country where Jews had been expelled 300 years, since 1290. Although some scenes make him sympathetic, and show how society and his Christian enemies cruelly mistreat him, he is punished and forced to convert. The play was extremely popular in Nazi Germany, with fifty productions from 1933-1945. Despite the stereotypical and anti-Jewish elements, the play continues to spark debates over whether it must be considered antisemitic. This bowl is one of more than 900 items in the Katz Ehrenthal Collection of antisemitic artifacts and visual materials.

Toby Jug of Shylock holding his contract

Toby Jug of Shylock holding his contract

Object

Toby jug depicting Shylock from Shakespeare's play, The Merchant of Venice. It was manufactured by the English pottery company, SylvaC, which was in operation from 1894 until 1982. Toby jugs were first made in the mid-18th century and are ceramic pitchers modeled on full-bodied representations of popular characters. Shylock has a large nose, fleshy lips, thick eyebrows, hooded eyes, and a beard; all stereotypical physical features attributed to Jewish men. Jews were expelled from England in 1290, making it unlikely that Shakespeare ever met a Jewish person, and he likely based Shylock on long standing antisemitic stereotypes. In the play, Shylock is a Jewish moneylender who demands a pound of flesh as recompense from a merchant who failed to repay a loan. Although some scenes make him a sympathetic character, and show how society and his Christian enemies cruelly mistreat him, in the end, he is punished and forced to convert to Christianity. The play was extremely popular in Nazi Germany, with fifty productions between 1933 and 1939. The Ministry of Propaganda created edited versions of the play that removed scenes and lines that evoked sympathy for Shylock or Jews. The Nazis used Shylock to promote Jewish inferiority by making him emblematic of the Jewish race’s perceived wickedness. These versions ignored the ambiguity Shylock was originally infused with, and portrayed him as an avaricious and vengeful character that was grotesque and inhuman. Despite the stereotypical and anti-Jewish elements, the play remains popular and continues to spark debates over whether it should be considered antisemitic. This pitcher is one of more than 900 items in the Katz Ehrenthal Collection of antisemitic artifacts and visual materials.

Staffordshire Toby Jug of a seated Shylock

Staffordshire Toby Jug of a seated Shylock

Object

Toby jug depicting Shylock from Shakespeare's play, The Merchant of Venice. It was manufactured by the Staffordshire company, H. Wain & Sons Ltd. Toby jugs were first made in the mid-18th century and are ceramic pitchers modeled on popular characters. Shylock has a large nose, thick eyebrows, hooded eyes and a long beard; all stereotypical physical features attributed to Jewish men. Jews were expelled from England in 1290, making it unlikely that Shakespeare ever met a Jewish person, and he likely based Shylock on longstanding antisemitic stereotypes. In the play, Shylock is a Jewish moneylender who demands a pound of flesh as recompense from a merchant who failed to repay a loan. Although some scenes make him a sympathetic character and show how society and his Christian enemies cruelly mistreat him, in the end, he is punished and forced to convert to Christianity. The play was extremely popular in Nazi Germany, with fifty productions between 1933 and 1939. The Ministry of Propaganda created edited versions of the play that removed scenes and lines that evoked sympathy for Shylock or Jews. The Nazis used Shylock to promote Jewish inferiority by making him emblematic of the Jewish race’s perceived wickedness. These versions ignored the ambiguity Shylock was originally infused with, and portrayed him as an avaricious and vengeful character that was grotesque and inhuman. Despite the stereotypical and anti-Jewish elements, the play remains popular and continues to spark debates over whether it should be considered antisemitic. This pitcher is one of more than 900 items in the Katz Ehrenthal Collection of antisemitic artifacts and visual materials.

Royal Doulton Shakespeare seriesware with Shylock presenting his contract

Royal Doulton Shakespeare seriesware with Shylock presenting his contract

Object

Royal Doulton dinner plate depicting Shylock from the Shakespeare play The Merchant of Venice. Shylock is a Jewish moneylender who demands that his contract for a pound of flesh, owed by a youth who failed to repay a loan, be paid in full. First published in 1600 in England, Shylock's characteristics were based upon long standing stereotypes still popular in a country where Jews had been expelled since 1290, 300 years. Although some scenes make him sympathetic, and show how society and his Christian enemies cruelly mistreat him, he is punished and forced to convert. The play was extremely popular in Nazi Germany, with fifty productions from 1933-1945. Despite the stereotypical and anti-Jewish elements, the play continues to spark debates over whether it must be considered antisemitic. The Royal Doulton Shakespeare seriesware was introduced in England in 1912, and produced into the early 1930s. The character is portrayed with recognizably Jewish features, a skull cap, sidecurls, and large nose, similar to 19th century stage performers. This plate is one of more than 900 items in the Katz Ehrenthal Collection of antisemitic artifacts and visual materials.

Porcelain figurine of a ribbon peddler in a red coat

Porcelain figurine of a ribbon peddler in a red coat

Object

Brightly colored porcelain figurine of a Jewish peddler in red overcoat and green jacket selling ribbons and cloth from a tray hanging from his shoulder. Likely the work of 19th century Staffordshire potters, it resembles a work by Minton produced in several variations. Jewish peddlers were a familiar sight in 19th century London, especially following the large influx of East European Jews. Those who arrived with no money, could acquire goods on credit and immediately begin selling items on the street. Others were continuing the trade they had pursued previously. This figurine is one of more than 900 items in the Katz Ehrenthal Collection of antisemitic artifacts and visual materials.

Terracotta figurine of a Jewish ribbon peddler with a basket of colorful cloth

Terracotta figurine of a Jewish ribbon peddler with a basket of colorful cloth

Object

Colorful terracotta figurine modelled by Anton Sohn in in early 19th century Germany. It is a satirical depiction of an unpleasant looking and unkempt Jewish peddler selling ribbons. Sohn (1769-1841), trained as a church painter, established a workshop in Zizenhausen, Germany, that was celebrated for its exceptionally detailed and elaborate terracotta figurines. His subject matter ranged widely and included genre and satirical groups on popular, topical themes, and religious figurines which were favorites for Christmas displays in homes, as well as businesses. This figurine is one of more than 900 items in the Katz Ehrenthal Collection of antisemitic artifacts and visual materials.

Adams dinner plate with an image of Shylock and Tubal in conversation

Adams dinner plate with an image of Shylock and Tubal in conversation

Object

William Adams and Sons dinner plate decorated with a colorful illustration of Shylock and Tubal from the Shakespeare play, The Merchant of Venice. Shylock is a Jewish moneylender who demands that his contract for a pound of flesh, owed by a youth who failed to repay a loan, be paid in full. Tubal is his friend and also a Jewish moneylender. First published in 1600 in England, Shylock's characteristics were based upon long standing stereotypes still popular in a country where Jews had been expelled since 1290, 300 years. Although some scenes make him sympathetic, and show how society and his Christian enemies cruelly mistreat him, he is punished and forced to convert. The play was extremely popular in Nazi Germany, with fifty productions from 1933-1945. Despite the stereotypical and anti-Jewish elements, the play continues to spark debates over whether it must be considered antisemitic. This plate is one of more than 900 items in the Katz Ehrenthal Collection of antisemitic artifacts and visual materials.

Ceramic pitcher with two images of Jewish peddlers trying to sell their wares

Ceramic pitcher with two images of Jewish peddlers trying to sell their wares

Object

English, 19th-century ceramic pitcher with two images of peddlers trying to sell their wares to customers. One peddler has a large nose and a beard; two stereotypical physical features commonly attributed to Jewish men. The other peddler is selling strings of garlic, a traditional food associated with Jews. Peddlers were itinerant vendors who traveled the countryside and sold goods to the public. They usually traveled alone and carried their goods with them as they went. Peddling was a common occupation for young Jewish men during the 18th and 19th centuries. Most peddlers hoped their hard work would serve as a springboard to more lucrative and comfortable occupations. However, old prejudices formed an antisemitic stereotype of the Jewish peddler. The stereotype originated from the economic and professional restrictions placed on early European Jews. They were barred from owning land, farming, joining trade guilds, and military service. These restrictions limited Jews to the occupations of retail peddling, hawking, and moneylending. Additionally, medieval religious belief held that charging interest (known as usury) was sinful, and the Jews who occupied these professions were looked down upon, predominantly by European Christians. They were perceived as morally deficient and willing to engage in unethical business practices. The inability of Jews to legally hold other occupations, combined with Christians’ disdain for the professions Jews were allowed to practice, helped form the canard of the greedy Jew who exploited Gentiles. This canard was often visually depicted as a Jewish peddler, an untrustworthy figure that sold cut-rate items at inflated prices. This pitcher is one of the 900 items in the Katz Ehrenthal Collection of antisemitic artifacts and visual materials.

Painted metal figure of a Jew on skis with an umbrella

Painted metal figure of a Jew on skis with an umbrella

Object

Cut out, painted metal silhouette of a man with stereotypical Jewish features, most noticeably, a huge, hooked nose and red hair, on skies, holding an open black umbrella over his head. A Jew carrying an umbrella was a long standing stereotype, often used to refer to the on the move peddler, or, with more genteel figures, as a sign of the Jews pretentious claim to middle class respectability. European artisans commonly adorned everyday items such as ceramics, toys, and even walking sticks, with Jewish caricatures. This folk art piece is an example of racial antisemitism becoming part of everyday life. This figurine is one of the 900 items in the Katz Ehrenthal Collection of antisemitic artifacts and visual materials.

Comical figurine of a Jewish soldier, Austro-Hungarian Army

Comical figurine of a Jewish soldier, Austro-Hungarian Army

Object

Comical bronze figurine of a young, not especially promising, Jewish soldier. He appears to wear an Austro-Hungarian Army uniform, post-1908 Hechtgrau [pike gray] issue. The figurine was likely made a few years after this or in the early months of World War I (1914-1918). The figurine is one of more than 900 items in the Katz Ehrenthal Collection of antisemitic artifacts and visual materials.

Ink caricature of three unlikely Polish Army recruits

Ink caricature of three unlikely Polish Army recruits

Object

Cartoon, Eight Week Exercise, drawn by an unknown artist, of three very young, and comical looking, youth in ill fitting military uniforms, standing at parade rest. The uniform is likely that of the voluntary Polish Legion, although apart from the cap, in style and fit it resembles the uniform of the Polish Army Podhale Rifles regiment, circa 1930s. This drawing is one of more than 900 items in the Katz Ehrenthal Collection of antisemitic artifacts and visual materials.

Musical chamber pot with an image of Hitler

Musical chamber pot with an image of Hitler

Object

Ceramic, musical chamber pot with an image of Adolf Hitler inside the bowl, made by S. Fielding & Co., after the German invasion of Poland in September 1939. Chamber pots are portable containers that were used as toilets before the widespread use indoor plumbing. In Great Britain, they were also known by the slang term, “Jerry.” Coincidentally, “Jerry” was also a slang term for Germans used by the British, and Hitler’s image on the pot is a reference to this double meaning. The rim text, “Another violation of Poland,” is a reference to the German invasion of Poland. The pot has a music box attached to the underside that plays a song when lifted. Depending on the version of the chamber pot either “Rule Britannia” or “God Save the King” is played. Similar chamber pots, as well as ashtrays, were made that featured images of Mussolini, Hermann Göring, and Stalin as well. By utilizing cultural slang terms that were easily recognized British citizens, this object ridiculed Hitler and helped instill a sense of national unity against the German threat, represented by his image. The chamber pot was made by S. Fielding & Co., an English pottery company that produced high-quality tableware, pottery, and decorative pieces. The chamber pots were produced only for a short time, as the subject matter was considered to be in bad taste. Although not antisemitic, this musical chamber pot is one of the more than 900 items in the Katz Ehrenthal Collection of antisemitic artifacts and visual materials.

Ceramic change plate depicting a greedy Jew admiring his gold coins

Ceramic change plate depicting a greedy Jew admiring his gold coins

Object

Antisemitic change plate modeled as Jewish man lovingly staring at the gathered coins in his outstretched arms. The man has large ears, a large curved nose, and fleshy lips; all stereotypical physical features commonly attributed to Jewish men. The man’s black clothing conforms to the Jewish concept of tzniyus (modest dress and behavior), which Orthodox Jews adhere to for religious reasons. Many antisemitic depictions of Jews show them hoarding, counting, or handling money. These stereotypes originated from the economic and professional restrictions placed on early European Jews. They were barred from owning land, farming, joining trade guilds, and military service. These restrictions forced many Jews into occupations such as money changing (exchanging foreign coins or currency for those used locally). Additionally, medieval religious belief held that charging interest (known as usury) was sinful, and the Jews who occupied these professions were looked down upon, predominantly by European Christians. They were perceived as morally deficient and willing to engage in unethical business practices. The inability of Jews to legally hold other occupations, combined with Christians’ disdain for the professions Jews were allowed to practice, helped form the canard of the greedy Jew who exploited Gentiles. This canard was often visually depicted as a Jewish man expressing an exaggerated desire for, or counting money. This change plate is one of the more than 900 items in the Katz Ehrenthal Collection of antisemitic artifacts and visual materials.

Porcelain drinking cup shaped as the head of a sneering Jewish man

Porcelain drinking cup shaped as the head of a sneering Jewish man

Object

Small, colorful ceramic drinking cup in the shape of a Jewish man with an unpleasant facial expression. The piece is similar in style and production period to character mugs, which were ceramic mugs modeled on representations of popular characters. The man has thick eyebrows, hooded eyes, and fleshy red lips with curly hair; all stereotypical physical features commonly attributed to Jewish men. Stereotypes of the Jewish body are a common antisemitic trope. Malformities such as flat feet and bowed legs were used as justification to exclude Jews from the military, which was then used to indicate a lack of patriotism and masculinity in those men. Other physical features such as short, arched foreheads, large, hooked noses, and fleshy lips were believed to be predominant features of Jewish men. In antisemitic images, these features were applied to humans as well as animals commonly considered vermin or pests to indicate Jewishness. The idea of the large Jewish nose originated from craniological studies by Johann Friedrich Blumenbach (1752–1840) that claimed to identify a prominent nasal bone in Jewish people. Later scientific studies have proven that none of these features are more prominent in Jews than in any other population. However, these stereotypes were used by the Nazis to foment antisemitism, and many still permeate today. This drinking cup is one of the more than 900 items in the Katz Ehrenthal Collection of antisemitic artifacts and visual materials.

Small ceramic figure of a Jewish man in a long red coat

Small ceramic figure of a Jewish man in a long red coat

Object

Small ceramic figurine of a man, possibly a Jewish peddler, holding a small bundle. The man has a prominent, molded nose, with painted sidelocks and a beard; all stereotypical physical features commonly attributed to Jewish men. Peddlers were itinerant vendors who traveled the countryside and sold goods to the public. They usually traveled alone and carried their goods with them as they went. Peddling was a common occupation for young Jewish men during the 18th and 19th centuries. Most peddlers hoped their hard work would serve as a springboard to more lucrative and comfortable occupations. However, old prejudices formed an antisemitic stereotype of the Jewish peddler. The stereotype originated from the economic and professional restrictions placed on early European Jews. They were barred from owning land, farming, joining trade guilds, and military service. These restrictions limited Jews to the occupations of retail peddling, hawking, and moneylending. Additionally, medieval religious belief held that charging interest (known as usury) was sinful, and the Jews who occupied these professions were looked down upon, predominantly by European Christians. They were perceived as morally deficient and willing to engage in unethical business practices. The inability of Jews to legally hold other occupations, combined with Christians’ disdain for the professions Jews were allowed to practice, helped form the canard of the greedy Jew who exploited Gentiles. This canard was often visually depicted as a Jewish peddler, an untrustworthy figure that sold cut-rate items at inflated prices. This figurine is one of the more than 900 items in the Katz Ehrenthal Collection of antisemitic artifacts and visual materials.

Bisque coin bank in the shape of a Jew with a garlic bulb under each arm

Bisque coin bank in the shape of a Jew with a garlic bulb under each arm

Object

Small, bisque, porcelain coin bank in the shape of a Jewish man sitting between two oversized bulbs of garlic. The man has several stereotypical physical features commonly attributed to Jewish men: a large nose and ears, sidelocks, a beard, and hooded eyes. The man’s coy facial expression and the placement of his open hands on the lower portions of the bulbs imply a carnal subtext with the bulbs. Garlic is a vegetable that has long been associated with Jews. To the ancient Israelites, garlic was a central concept of a good life as well as a key ingredient to many dishes. Babylonian rabbis also considered garlic a necessity for a good diet. However, Jews’ affinity for garlic had negative connotations as well. The ancient Romans derogatively called Jews “garlic eaters,” and the smell of garlic was widely associated with Jews. Some associated Jews’ consumption of garlic with foetor judaicus, the antisemitic belief that Jews exuded a foul-smelling odor. During the 19th century, it was believed that Jews had an odor that resembled the smell of onion and garlic, caused by bad hygiene or a poor diet. This coin bank is one of the 900 items in the Katz Ehrenthal Collection of antisemitic artifacts and visual materials.

Porcelain figure of a Jewish matchmaker with his umbrella

Porcelain figure of a Jewish matchmaker with his umbrella

Object

Small, porcelain figurine of a Jewish Shadchan, in his traditional black suit and top hat, with a blue umbrella. In the 19th century, a Jewish man with an umbrella became a common stereotype and featured prominently in antisemitic depictions of Eastern European Jews. Umbrellas were a common accessory carried by Jewish peddlers who spent most of their time outdoors, and this stereotype may have originated with them. Shadchan (sometimes spelled, shadkhan) is the Hebrew term for a matchmaker, also known as a marriage broker. Male matchmakers are called “shadchans,” and female ones are called “shadchanit.” In return for financial compensation, a matchmaker would suggest prospective marriage mates based on the compatibility of the individuals and the suitability of their families. The matchmaker would then coach them through the courting process. Over time, the societal role of the matchmaker began to decline. However, the archetypal character of a Jewish matchmaker who glosses over physical and character defects of their clients has remained. This figurine is one of the more than 900 items in the Katz Ehrenthal Collection of antisemitic artifacts and visual materials.

Cork bottle stopper with a porcelain finial depicting a Jewish stereotype

Cork bottle stopper with a porcelain finial depicting a Jewish stereotype

Object

Porcelain bottle stopper in the shape of a small bust, depicting a Jewish man’s head. It was created by Gardner Porcelain Works in Dmitrov, Russia, near the end of the 19th century. The man is wearing a skullcap and has a large hooked nose, sidelocks, a beard, and fleshy lips; all stereotypical physical features commonly attributed to Jewish men. Jews have historically been persecuted and demonized. They have been associated with and called “children of the devil,” accused of deicide, treacherous conspiracies, and treasonous acts by influential figures and archaic Christian beliefs. These defamations are often visually depicted through antisemitic or malevolent features and characteristics, such as horns and cloven feet. They have also been depicted with distorted facial features, including bulging eyes and large or hooked noses. Gardner Porcelain Works was established in 1766, and has produced fine porcelain ware for the public and the Russian monarchy. The company is still operating, and is a member of the Kremlin Suppliers Guild. This bottle stopper is one of the more than 900 items in the Katz Ehrenthal Collection of antisemitic artifacts and visual materials.

Cork bottle stopper with a porcelain finial depicting a Jewish stereotype

Cork bottle stopper with a porcelain finial depicting a Jewish stereotype

Object

Porcelain bottle stopper in the shape of a small bust depicting a Jewish man’s head, made in the Alsace region of central Europe during the 19th century. The man is wearing a skullcap and has a large nose, fat rosy cheeks, fleshy red lips, and hooded eyes; all stereotypical physical features commonly attributed to Jewish men. Jews have historically been persecuted and demonized. They have been associated with and called “children of the devil,” accused of deicide, treacherous conspiracies, and treasonous acts by influential figures and archaic Christian beliefs. These defamations are often visually depicted through antisemitic or malevolent features and characteristics, such as horns and cloven feet. They may also be depicted with distorted facial features, including bulging eyes and large or hooked noses. The Alsace region has a long history of crafting fine pottery that dates back to the Bronze Age. Many of the small villages in the region still have workshops that specialize in traditional techniques of decorating and creating pottery. This bottle stopper is one of the more than 900 items in the Katz Ehrenthal Collection of antisemitic artifacts and visual materials.

Cork bottle stopper with a porcelain finial depicting a Jewish stereotype

Cork bottle stopper with a porcelain finial depicting a Jewish stereotype

Object

Porcelain bottle stopper in the shape of a small bust depicting a Jewish man’s head, made in the Alsace region of central Europe during the 19th century. The man is wearing a skullcap and has a large nose, fleshy red lips, hooded eyes, and a black pointed beard; all stereotypical physical features commonly attributed to Jewish men. Jews have historically been persecuted and demonized. They have been associated with and called “children of the devil,” accused of deicide, treacherous conspiracies, and treasonous acts by influential figures and archaic Christian beliefs. These defamations are often visually depicted through antisemitic or malevolent features and characteristics, such as horns and cloven feet. They may also be depicted with distorted facial features, including bulging eyes and large or hooked noses. The Alsace region has a long history of crafting fine pottery that dates back to the Bronze Age. Many of the small villages in the region still have workshops that specialize in traditional techniques of decorating and creating pottery. This bottle stopper is one of the more than 900 items in the Katz Ehrenthal Collection of antisemitic artifacts and visual materials.

Bottle stopper with a wooden finial depicting a Jewish stereotype

Bottle stopper with a wooden finial depicting a Jewish stereotype

Object

Carved and painted wooden bottle stopper in the shape of a small bust, depicting a Jewish man. It was made in Germany, approximately 1870. The man has a large hooked nose, fleshy red lips, and a beard all stereotypical physical features commonly attributed to Jewish men. Jews have historically been persecuted and demonized. They have been associated with and called “children of the devil,” accused of deicide, treacherous conspiracies, and treasonous acts by influential figures and archaic Christian beliefs. These defamations are often visually depicted through antisemitic or malevolent features and characteristics, such as horns and cloven feet. They have also been depicted with distorted facial features, including bulging eyes and large or hooked noses. This bottle stopper is one of the more than 900 items in the Katz Ehrenthal Collection of antisemitic artifacts and visual materials.

Cork bottle stopper with a bronze finial depicting a Jewish stereotype

Cork bottle stopper with a bronze finial depicting a Jewish stereotype

Object

Bronze bottle stopper in the shape of a small bust, depicting a Jewish man’s head made in Austria during the 19th century. The man is wearing a skullcap and has a large nose, fleshy lips, hooded eyes, a beard, and sidelocks; all stereotypical physical features commonly attributed to Jewish men. Jews have historically been persecuted and demonized. They have been associated with and called “children of the devil,” accused of deicide, treacherous conspiracies, and treasonous acts by influential figures and archaic Christian beliefs. These defamations are often visually depicted through antisemitic or malevolent features and characteristics, such as horns and cloven feet. They have also been depicted with distorted facial features, including bulging eyes and large or hooked noses. This bottle stopper is one of the more than 900 items in the Katz Ehrenthal Collection of antisemitic artifacts and visual materials.

Bust of an unpleasant looking Jewish man picking his nose

Bust of an unpleasant looking Jewish man picking his nose

Object

Painted ceramic figurine in the shape of a caricatured Jewish man picking his nose, made in approximately 1820. The man is wearing a skullcap and has a large hooked nose, fleshy lips, hooded eyes, sidelocks, and curly hair; all stereotypical physical features commonly attributed to Jewish men. The action of the man picking his nose may be an attempt to draw attention to the stereotype of the large Jewish nose. Jews have historically been persecuted and demonized through the use of antisemitic or malevolent physical features and characteristics, such as horns and cloven feet. They may also be depicted with distorted facial features, including bulging eyes and large or hooked noses. The action of nose picking is also generally condemned and thought of as inappropriate or unclean in most cultures. This reinforces the stereotype of Jews as dirty and vectors of disease. Pejoratives such as “dirty Jew” and antisemitic myths such as a Jewish odor caused by bad hygiene or a poor diet were common during the 19th century. This bust is one of the more than 900 items in the Katz Ehrenthal Collection of antisemitic artifacts and visual materials.

White porcelain figurine of a Jewish matchmaker with his umbrella

White porcelain figurine of a Jewish matchmaker with his umbrella

Object

White Parian porcelain figurine, possibly a shadchan, manufactured by Gardner Porcelain Works in Verbilki, Russia, near the end of the 19th century. The man is wearing a skullcap and has a large nose, sidelocks, a beard, and fleshy lips; all stereotypical physical features commonly attributed to Jewish men. In the 19th century, a Jewish man with an umbrella became a common stereotype and featured prominently in antisemitic depictions of Eastern European Jews. Umbrellas were a common accessory carried by Jewish peddlers who spent most of their time outdoors, and this stereotype may have originated with them. Shadchan (sometimes spelled, shadkhan) is the Hebrew term for a matchmaker, also known as a marriage broker. Male matchmakers are called “shadchans,” and female ones are called “shadchanit.” In return for financial compensation, a matchmaker would suggest prospective marriage mates based on the compatibility of the individuals and the suitability of their families. The matchmaker would then coach them through the courting process. Over time, the societal role of the matchmaker began to decline. However, the archetypal character of a Jewish matchmaker who glosses over physical and character defects of their clients has remained. Gardner Porcelain Works was established in 1766, and has produced fine porcelain ware for the public and the Russian monarchy. The company is still operating, and is a member of the Kremlin Suppliers Guild. This figurine is one of the more than 900 items in the Katz Ehrenthal Collection of antisemitic artifacts and visual materials.

Ceramic jug shaped as a comical Jewish man with a collection box

Ceramic jug shaped as a comical Jewish man with a collection box

Object

Toby jug depicting a man holding a collection box, made in England during the 19th century. Toby jugs were first made in the mid-18th century and are ceramic pitchers usually modeled on full-bodied representations of popular characters. The man has a large nose, fat rosy cheeks, and thick, dark eyebrows; all stereotypical physical features commonly attributed to Jewish men. The phrase “I PAY OUT” may be a reference to the stereotype of the greedy Jew. This stereotype dates back to the Middle Ages, when economic and professional restrictions were placed on early European Jews. These restrictions limited many Jews to the occupations of retail peddling, hawking, and moneylending. Additionally, medieval religious belief held that charging interest (known as usury) was sinful, and the Jews who occupied these professions were looked down upon, predominantly by European Christians. They were perceived as morally deficient and willing to engage in unethical business practices. The inability of Jews to legally hold other occupations, combined with Christians’ disdain for the professions Jews were allowed to practice, helped form the canard of the greedy Jew who exploited Gentiles. The word “Ikey” (sometimes spelled Iky, or phrased as “Ikey Mo”) is a derogatory British term for a Jewish person. The word is an abbreviated version of the Jewish name Isaac (and Mo is an abbreviation of Moses). The term may have originated with the Ally Sloper cartoon series that began running in the British satirical magazine, “Judy,” in August 1867. This toby jug is one of the more than 900 items in the Katz Ehrenthal Collection of antisemitic artifacts and visual materials.

Murano glass figure of a Jew holding a full money bag

Murano glass figure of a Jew holding a full money bag

Object

Murano glass figurine of a Jewish man holding a large sack of money, with a vacant expression on his face. The man is wearing a skullcap and has a large nose, sidelocks, and a beard; all stereotypical physical features commonly attributed to Jewish men. The moneybag in his hands is a reference to the stereotype of the greedy Jew. This stereotype dates back to the Middle Ages, when economic and professional restrictions were placed on early European Jews. These restrictions limited many Jews to the occupations of retail peddling, hawking, and moneylending. Additionally, medieval religious belief held that charging interest (known as usury) was sinful, and the Jews who occupied these professions were looked down upon, predominantly by European Christians. They were perceived as morally deficient and willing to engage in unethical business practices. The inability of Jews to legally hold other occupations, combined with Christians’ disdain for the professions Jews were allowed to practice, helped form the canard of the greedy Jew who exploited Gentiles. Murano glass comes from the small island of Murano in Venice, Italy. Glassmaking on the island dates back to 1291, when the Venetian government ordered the glassmakers to relocate to Murano as a precautionary measure against fire. During creation, the glass is mixed with minerals to give it vibrant colors. The mixture is then mouth-blown and handcrafted into a range of forms and shapes by glassmakers. This statue is one of the more than 900 items in the Katz Ehrenthal Collection of antisemitic artifacts and visual materials.

Wood snuff box with a carving of three Jewish hareskin dealers

Wood snuff box with a carving of three Jewish hareskin dealers

Object

Wood snuff box with an image of three Jewish hareskin dealers carved on the lid. Snuffboxes were used to store smokeless tobacco, called snuff, which was inhaled through the nose. The use of snuff became popular in Europe during the 18th century. Snuffboxes were made in a variety of shapes and sizes. Smaller snuffboxes were carried by individuals, and large boxes were set on tables or other furniture and remained stationary. The boxes were made from several different materials, including wood, metal, ivory, and animal horns. They were often ornately decorated with jewels, precious metals, paintings or carvings. The image on the snuffbox depicts the Jewish hareskin dealers with stereotypically hooked noses, hooded eyes, beards, and pointed teeth. The scene, possibly based on a Dutch folktale about three Jewish hareskin dealers who swindle a miserly farmer, can be traced back to the lithographic printing firm of Johan Martin Billroth, which opened in 1829 in Groningen, Netherlands. This image was popular in northern Europe in the early 19th century and was reproduced in various mediums. The snuffbox is one of more than 900 items in the Katz Ehrenthal Collection of antisemitic artifacts and visual materials.

Carved snuff box with an image of three Jewish hareskin dealers

Carved snuff box with an image of three Jewish hareskin dealers

Object

Coquilla nut snuffbox with an image of three Jewish hareskin dealers carved on the lid. Snuffboxes were used to store smokeless tobacco, called snuff, which was inhaled through the nose. The use of snuff became popular in Europe during the 18th century. Snuffboxes were made in a variety of shapes and sizes. Smaller snuffboxes were carried by individuals, and large boxes were set on tables or other furniture and remained stationary. The boxes were made from several different materials, including wood, metal, ivory, and animal horns. They were often ornately decorated with jewels, precious metals, paintings or carvings. The image on the snuffbox depicts the Jewish hareskin dealers with stereotypically hooked noses, hooded eyes, beards, and pointed teeth. The scene, possibly based on a Dutch folktale about three Jewish hareskin dealers who swindle a miserly farmer, can be traced back to the lithographic printing firm of Johan Martin Billroth, which opened in 1829 in Groningen, Netherlands. This image was popular in northern Europe in the early 19th century and was reproduced in various mediums. The snuffbox is one of more than 900 items in the Katz Ehrenthal Collection of antisemitic artifacts and visual materials.

Bronze figurine in the shape of a seated Jewish fortune teller

Bronze figurine in the shape of a seated Jewish fortune teller

Object

Bronze figure of a seated Jewish fortune teller depicted with oversized tarot cards made in Austria during the 19th century. It is possible that this figure was used to hold calling cards, or even as an ashtray. Although the Bible forbid Jews from using divination and magic, Jews were still associated with the magic and mysticism in the eyes of many non-Jews (Gentiles). The accusations stemmed from a combination of antisemitic beliefs, including pre-modern ignorance about the causes of natural phenomena like weather, fear of “others” (individuals or groups from outside the population majority or with nonlocal origins), and ignorance of Jewish language and religious practices. Throughout the Middle Ages in Western Europe, Jews were falsely accused of many malicious acts, including ritual murder, performing satanic black masses, and using amulets and talismans for occult sciences. It was believed that Jewish religious texts, written in Hebrew, with its different characters and right-to-left orientation, contained spells or secret knowledge that could only be used by initiated members. In Eastern Europe, many Gentiles believed Jews possessed the ability to control the weather. Folk tales accused Jews of using the holiday, Sukkot, which celebrates the gathering of the harvest and commemorates the protection God provided for the children of Israel when they left Egypt, as a Jewish ritual event to control the weather. It was believed that the Jewish ritual dances and prayers called, Tefillat Hageshem, were used to invoke rain. This statue is one of the more than 900 items in the Katz Ehrenthal Collection of antisemitic artifacts and visual materials.

Bisque change plate with figure of a Jew in a white plasterers coat in gray boots

Bisque change plate with figure of a Jew in a white plasterers coat in gray boots

Object

Porcelain bisque figurine of a Jewish man, possibly an ashtray, made in Germany. The man has a large nose, sidelocks, large ears, a beard, hooded eyes, and fleshy lips; all stereotypical physical features commonly attributed to Jewish men. The text on the figurine indicates the man is bemoaning the spa tax in Carlsbad, Austria-Hungary (now Karlovy Vary, Czech Republic). Carlsbad is a European town located on a thermal spring, and has accommodations that use those springs for their medicinal and rejuvenating properties. Many European spa towns can trace their histories back to ancient Roman settlements. During the 18th and 19th centuries, European spa towns became increasingly popular as centers for health and social destinations for the affluent, the nobility, and European royalty. During this time, seemingly large numbers of Jewish guests also frequented the spa towns. However, antisemitic sentiment was also present. Derogatory postcards, called Judenspottkarten [Jew-mocking cards], and other souvenirs were produced and sold. The figurine lamenting the cost of the services at the spa town is a reference to the stereotype of the greedy Jew. This stereotype dates back to the Middle Ages, when economic and professional restrictions limited many Jews to the occupations of retail peddling, hawking, and moneylending. Additionally, medieval religious belief held that charging interest (known as usury) was sinful, and the Jews who occupied these professions were perceived as morally deficient and willing to engage in unethical business practices. These factors formed the canard of the greedy Jew who exploited Gentiles. This figurine is one of the more than 900 items in the Katz Ehrenthal Collection of antisemitic artifacts and visual materials.

Cast brass figure of a Jew holding an ashtray

Cast brass figure of a Jew holding an ashtray

Object

Antisemitic ashtray modeled as Jewish man holding a large tray in is arms. The man has a large nose, a long beard, sidelocks, and thick eyebrows; all stereotypical physical features commonly attributed to Jewish men. The figure may be a representation of a Jewish peddler. Peddlers, often depicted carrying trays, were itinerant vendors who traveled the countryside and sold goods to the public. They usually traveled alone and carried their goods with them as they went. Peddling was a common occupation for young Jewish men during the 18th and 19th centuries. Most peddlers hoped their hard work would serve as a springboard to more lucrative and comfortable occupations. However, old prejudices formed an antisemitic stereotype of the Jewish peddler. The stereotype originated from the economic and professional restrictions placed on early European Jews. They were barred from owning land, farming, joining trade guilds, and military service. These restrictions limited Jews to the occupations of retail peddling, hawking, and moneylending. Additionally, medieval religious belief held that charging interest (known as usury) was sinful, and the Jews who occupied these professions were looked down upon, predominantly by European Christians. They were perceived as morally deficient and willing to engage in unethical business practices. The inability of Jews to legally hold other occupations, combined with Christians’ disdain for the professions Jews were allowed to practice, helped form the canard of the greedy Jew who exploited Gentiles. This canard was often visually depicted as a Jewish peddler, an untrustworthy figure that sold cut-rate items at inflated prices. This ashtray is one of the more than 900 items in the Katz Ehrenthal Collection of antisemitic artifacts and visual materials.

Metal ashtray in the form of a Jewish man holding a tray

Metal ashtray in the form of a Jewish man holding a tray

Object

Metal ashtray from the 19th century, in the form of a Jewish peddler holding an empty tray. The man has several stereotypical physical features commonly attributed to Jewish men: a large nose, hooded eyes, sidelocks, and a beard. Peddlers were itinerant vendors who traveled the countryside and sold goods to the public. They usually travelled alone and carried their goods with them as they went. Peddling was a common occupation for young Jewish men during the 18th and 19th centuries. Most peddlers hoped their hard work would serve as a springboard to more lucrative and comfortable occupations. However, old prejudices formed an antisemitic stereotype of the Jewish peddler. The stereotype originated from the economic and professional restrictions placed on early European Jews. They were barred from owning land, farming, joining trade guilds, and military service. These restrictions limited Jews to the occupations of retail peddling, hawking, and moneylending. Additionally, medieval religious belief held that charging interest (known as usury) was sinful, and the Jews who occupied these professions were looked down upon, predominantly by European Christians. They were perceived as morally deficient and willing to engage in unethical business practices. The inability of Jews to legally hold other occupations, combined with Christians’ disdain for the professions Jews were allowed to practice, helped form the canard of the greedy Jew who exploited Gentiles. This canard was often visually depicted as a Jewish peddler, an untrustworthy figure that sold cut-rate items at inflated prices. Often, they were shown carrying a sack on their back or a tray around their midsection. This ashtray is one of the more than 900 items in the Katz Ehrenthal Collection of antisemitic artifacts and visual materials.

The Customs guard: Oh, wonder how I stepped in this

The Customs guard: Oh, wonder how I stepped in this

Object

Colorful terracotta figure group based upon a watercolor, Customs House, created by Hieronymous Hess in 1838. The sculpture was modelled by Anton Sohn in early 19th century Germany. It shows a uniformed French customs agent tormenting a comically dressed Jewish peddler and his small crying son by grinding his foot in the merchant's open sack of belongings. The work has many painted and molded details. Sohn (1769-1841), trained as a church painter, established a workshop in Zizenhausen, Germany, that was celebrated for its exceptionally detailed and elaborate terracotta figurines. His subject matter ranged widely and included genre and satirical groups on popular, topical themes, and religious figurines which were favorites for Christmas displays in homes, as well as businesses. This figure group is one of the more than 900 items in the Katz Ehrenthal Collection of antisemitic artifacts and visual materials.

Colorful terracotta figure group of a Jewish family dressed for Sabbath

Colorful terracotta figure group of a Jewish family dressed for Sabbath

Object

Colorful terracotta figure group based upon a watercolor, A Feast Day, created by Hieronymous Hess in 1838. The sculpture was modelled by Anton Sohn in early 19th century Germany. It is a tableaux of a Jewish family, one man, three women, and a young boy, conversing and dressed in what are probably their best clothes, although they are shabby and patched. Sohn (1769-1841), trained as a church painter, established a workshop in Zizenhausen, Germany, that was celebrated for its exceptionally detailed and elaborate terracotta figurines. His subject matter ranged widely and included genre and satirical groups on popular, topical themes, and religious figurines which were favorites for Christmas displays in homes, as well as businesses. This figure group is one of the more than 900 items in the Katz Ehrenthal Collection of antisemitic artifacts and visual materials.

Terracotta figurine of a Jewish marriage negotiation

Terracotta figurine of a Jewish marriage negotiation

Object

Colorful terracotta figure group, Lydia is Married, modelled by Anton Sohn in early 19th century Germany. It depicts four figures, a Jewish man, presenting his daughter to a prospective groom, while bargaining with the matchmaker. Sohn (1769-1841), trained as a church painter, had a workshop in Zizenhausen, Germany, that was celebrated for its exceptionally detailed and elaborate terracotta figurines. His subject matter ranged widely and included genre and satirical groups on popular, topical themes, and religious figurines which were favorites for Christmas displays in homes, as well as businesses. This figure group is one of the more than 900 items in the Katz Ehrenthal Collection of antisemitic artifacts and visual materials.

The Schacherjude

The Schacherjude

Object

Colorful terracotta figurine, The Schacherjude [The Haggling Jew], modelled by Anton Sohn in early 19th century Germany. It is a satirical depiction of a negative Jewish stereotype, the bargainer, an upright figure in a black tricorn hat, coat, and an umbrella, gesturing and yelling to someone. Sohn (1769-1841), trained as a church painter, established a workshop in Zizenhausen, Germany, that was celebrated for its exceptionally detailed and elaborate terracotta figurines. His subject matter ranged widely and included genre and satirical groups on popular, topical themes, and religious figurines which were favorites for Christmas displays in homes, as well as businesses. This figurine is one of the more than 900 items in the Katz Ehrenthal Collection of antisemitic artifacts and visual materials.

Colorful terracotta figure group of 4 Jewish men, a boy, and a goat

Colorful terracotta figure group of 4 Jewish men, a boy, and a goat

Object

Colorful terracotta figure group, Kinder Israel, modelled by Anton Sohn in early 19th century Germany. It is a caricatured depiction of Jewish stereotypes, including the livestock dealer, the scholar/student, and the peddler. Sohn (1769-1841), trained as a church painter, established a workshop in Zizenhausen, Germany, that was celebrated for its exceptionally detailed and elaborate terracotta figurines. His subject matter ranged widely and included genre and satirical groups on popular, topical themes, and religious figurines which were favorites for Christmas displays in homes, as well as businesses. This figure group is one of the more than 900 items in the Katz Ehrenthal Collection of antisemitic artifacts and visual materials.

Terracotta figurine of a Jewish peddler with an underfed cow

Terracotta figurine of a Jewish peddler with an underfed cow

Object

Colorful terracotta figurine of a Jewish dealer and a bony, worn out cow, modelled by Anton Sohn in early 19th century Germany. It is a satirical depiction of the stereotypical Jewish peddler who always tries to cheat. While the figure is clearly Jewish, the features are not exagerrated to get the point across, reflecting how deeply the concept of the deceitful Jewish salesman was embedded in the culture. Many of Sohn's works were based upon drawings by Hieronymus Hess. This work is on his style, but the original is not known. Sohn (1769-1841), trained as a church painter, established a workshop in Zizenhausen, Germany, that was celebrated for its exceptionally detailed and elaborate terracotta figurines. His subject matter ranged widely and included genre and satirical groups on popular, topical themes, and religious figurines which were favorites for Christmas displays in homes, as well as businesses. This figurine is one of the more than 900 items in the Katz Ehrenthal Collection of antisemitic artifacts and visual materials.

Terracotta figure group of 2 Jewish traders selling an old sagging cow

Terracotta figure group of 2 Jewish traders selling an old sagging cow

Object

Colorful terracotta figure group, Horse Trading, modelled by Anton Sohn in early 19th century Germany. It is a satirical and vulgar depiction of two Jewish cattle dealers using deceptive word play to sell an old, worn out cow to a German gentleman. Sohn (1769-1841), trained as a church painter, established a workshop in Zizenhausen, Germany, that was celebrated for its exceptionally detailed and elaborate terracotta figurines. His subject matter ranged widely and included genre and satirical groups on popular, topical themes, and religious figurines which were favorites for Christmas displays in homes, as well as businesses. This figure group is one of the more than 900 items in the Katz Ehrenthal Collection of antisemitic artifacts and visual materials.

Wooden cane with a grip shaped as a Jewish man’s elongated nose

Wooden cane with a grip shaped as a Jewish man’s elongated nose

Object

Oak walking stick with a changeable carved handle shaped as the head of a Jewish man with kippah and pointy beard. European artisans commonly adorned everyday items such as ceramics, toys, and even walking sticks, with caricatures of Jewish faces. These walking sticks are examples of racial antisemitism becoming part of everyday life. This cane is one of the more than 900 items in the Katz Ehrenthal Collection of antisemitic artifacts and visual materials.

Wooden cane with a carved Orthodox Jewish man's beard as the grip

Wooden cane with a carved Orthodox Jewish man's beard as the grip

Object

Black painted walking stick carved from a single piece of wood with the handle made in the shape of a grotesque looking Orthodox Jewish man with a kippah. European artisans commonly adorned everyday items such as ceramics, toys, and even walking sticks, with caricatures of Jewish faces. These walking sticks are examples of racial antisemitism becoming part of everyday life. This cane is one of the more than 900 items in the Katz Ehrenthal Collection of antisemitic artifacts and visual materials.

Silver plated cane knob shaped as a Jewish man in cap with sidelocks

Silver plated cane knob shaped as a Jewish man in cap with sidelocks

Object

Cast silver plated walking stick handle in the shape of the head of a Jewish peddler with side locks and sharply pointed nose. It has a hollow, open tubular neck made to be inserted over a cylindrical shaft. The soft cap and unkempt appearance were commonly used in representations of both Jewish peddlers and beggars, stock figures often portrayed in popular culture. European artisans commonly adorned everyday items such as ceramics, toys, and even walking sticks, with caricatures of Jewish faces. These walking stick knobs are examples of racial antisemitism becoming part of everyday life. This walking stick knob is one of the more than 900 items in the Katz Ehrenthal Collection of antisemitic artifacts and visual materials.

Wooden cane with a carved grip of a beardless Jew with distorted features

Wooden cane with a carved grip of a beardless Jew with distorted features

Object

Carved natural wood walking stick with a knob handle shaped as a Jewish man with an oversize nose and lips. European artisans commonly adorned everyday items such as ceramics, toys, and even walking sticks, with caricatures of Jewish faces. These walking sticks are examples of racial antisemitism becoming part of everyday life. This cane is one of the more than 900 items in the Katz Ehrenthal Collection of antisemitic artifacts and visual materials.

Wooden walking stick knob carved as Fagin’s head

Wooden walking stick knob carved as Fagin’s head

Object

Wooden knob handle for a figural walking stick carved in the shape of a Jewish man's head with stereotypically Jewish features and a sinister appearance. The name Fagin is carved on the back, although it does not resemble the descriptions of the devil-like Jewish character Fagin from the novel, Oliver Twist, written by Charles Dickens in 1837-8. European artisans commonly adorned everyday items such as ceramics, toys, and even walking sticks, with caricatures of Jewish faces. The name Fagin may have been added to expand the market for the item. Items such as this walking stick knob are examples of racial antisemitism becoming part of everyday life. Fagin, referred to as The Jew, is a "villainous and repulsive" character with black nails and teeth like fangs, who kidnaps small children and trains them to be thieves. Dickens expressed a common 19th century prejudice, saying that if he had a character who was a fence, a dealer in stolen goods, he had to be a Jew because "that class of criminal almost invariably was a Jew." This walking stick knob is one of the more than 900 items in the Katz Ehrenthal Collection of antisemitic artifacts and visual materials.This walking stick knob is one of the more than 900 items in the Katz Ehrenthal Collection of antisemitic artifacts and visual materials.

Black wooden cane with a silver grip of a Jewish peddler's head

Black wooden cane with a silver grip of a Jewish peddler's head

Object

Black wooden cane with a changeable cast silver plated knob handle in the shape of the head of a Jewish peddler with side locks and sharply pointed nose. It has a hollow, open tubular neck that inserts over the cylindrical shaft. The soft cap and unkempt appearance were commonly used in representations of both Jewish peddlers and beggars, stock figures often portrayed in popular culture. European artisans commonly adorned everyday items such as ceramics, toys, and even walking sticks, with caricatures of Jewish faces. These walking sticks are examples of racial antisemitism becoming part of everyday life.This walking stick is one of the more than 900 items in the Katz Ehrenthal Collection of antisemitic artifacts and visual materials.

Walking stick with the crudely carved head of a Jewish man

Walking stick with the crudely carved head of a Jewish man

Object

Slender walking stick made from a single stick with a knob handle carved as a grotesque caricature of a Jewish man. European artisans commonly adorned everyday items such as ceramics, toys, and even walking sticks, with caricatures of Jewish faces. These walking sticks are examples of racial antisemitism becoming part of everyday life. This walking stick is one of the more than 900 items in the Katz Ehrenthal Collection of antisemitic artifacts and visual materials.

Wooden cane with a carved grip of a Jewish man with painted eyes

Wooden cane with a carved grip of a Jewish man with painted eyes

Object

Walking stick made from a single stick with a head carved in the shape of a young Jewish man in a cap. European artisans commonly adorned everyday items such as ceramics, toys, and even walking sticks, with caricatures of Jewish faces. These walking sticks are examples of racial antisemitism becoming part of everyday life.This walking stick is one of the more than 900 items in the Katz Ehrenthal Collection of antisemitic artifacts and visual materials.

Wooden cane with a grip carved as grotesque Jewish man

Wooden cane with a grip carved as grotesque Jewish man

Object

Wooden walking staff with a grip handle carved as a Jewish man with a huge nose and a grimace that reveals his missing teeth. European artisans commonly adorned everyday items such as ceramics, toys, and even walking sticks, with caricatures of Jewish faces. These walking sticks are examples of racial antisemitism becoming part of everyday life.This walking stick is one of the more than 900 items in the Katz Ehrenthal Collection of antisemitic artifacts and visual materials.

Black wooden cane with a grip carved as a Jewish man’s elongated nose

Black wooden cane with a grip carved as a Jewish man’s elongated nose

Object

Black wooden cane with an attached, probably changeable, grip carved as a Jewish man’s elongated nose. European artisans commonly adorned everyday items such as ceramics, toys, and even walking sticks, with caricatures of Jewish faces. These walking sticks are examples of racial antisemitism becoming part of everyday life. This walking stick is one of the more than 900 items in the Katz Ehrenthal Collection of antisemitic artifacts and visual materials.

Cane with a bone grip carved as a caricatured Jewish man's head with warts

Cane with a bone grip carved as a caricatured Jewish man's head with warts

Object

Walking stick with a black wooden shaft and a changeable bone handle carved as the exaggerated, caricatured head of an unattractive Jewish man with one gold tooth and an extremely elongated nose with big warts. European artisans commonly adorned everyday items such as ceramics, toys, and even walking sticks, with caricatures of Jewish faces. These walking sticks are examples of racial antisemitism becoming part of everyday life. This cane is one of the more than 900 items in the Katz Ehrenthal Collection of antisemitic artifacts and visual materials.

Bronze cane knob in the shape of a squinting Jewish man’s head

Bronze cane knob in the shape of a squinting Jewish man’s head

Object

Bronze cane knob cast in the shape of a Jewish man's head, wearing a patched kippah. European artisans commonly adorned everyday items such as ceramics, toys, and even walking sticks, with caricatures of Jewish faces. These walking sticks are examples of racial antisemitism becoming part of everyday life. This cane knob is one of the more than 900 items in the Katz Ehrenthal Collection of antisemitic artifacts and visual materials.

Crook handled staff with a carved Jewish head with bulging eyes

Crook handled staff with a carved Jewish head with bulging eyes

Object

Crook handled walking stick with an intricately carved head of a Jewish man with bulging eyes, and a patterned, segmented shaft giving it a snakelike appearance. European artisans commonly adorned everyday items such as ceramics, toys, and even walking sticks, with caricatures of Jewish faces. These walking sticks are examples of racial antisemitism becoming part of everyday life. This cane is one of the more than 900 items in the Katz Ehrenthal Collection of antisemitic artifacts and visual materials.

Toby Jug of a seated Fagin clutching his treasure box

Toby Jug of a seated Fagin clutching his treasure box

Object

Toby jug depicting Fagin holding a collection box, made by Wood & Sons for Franklin Porcelain in London, England. Toby jugs were first made in the mid-18th century and are ceramic pitchers usually modeled on full-bodied representations of popular characters. This Toby jug was designed by English cartoonist, Peter Jackson, and one of a set of 12, modeled on popular Charles Dickens' characters. Fagin is portrayed with red hair, a beard, a large nose, thick eyebrows, and hooded eyes; all stereotypical physical features attributed to Jewish men. In “Oliver Twist,” Fagin is the villainous leader of a gang of children whom he has instructed in the ways of criminality. He attempts to corrupt the protagonist, Oliver, in the same manner. In the novel, Fagin is described in his first scene as hunched over a fire holding a toasting fork, imagery that reinforces the antisemitic stereotype of Jewish associations with the devil, due to its resemblance of a pitchfork. He is repeatedly referred to as “the Jew” in the book and also emphasized as a greedy, miserly, and cowardly character; all traits aligning with common antisemitic stereotypes. However, in a later edition of the novel, Dickens reduced his use of “the Jew,” substituting it for pronouns or other phrases. Even in this later version, Fagin is still repeatedly and negatively referred to as “the Jew,” and remains emblematic of multiple antisemitic canards. Later writings by Dickens portrayed Jews in a more positive light, however, the reprehensible Fagin is his most remembered Jewish character. This pitcher is one of the more than 900 items in the Katz Ehrenthal Collection of antisemitic artifacts and visual materials.

Royal Doulton Dickens Ware dinner plate decorated with an image of Fagin

Royal Doulton Dickens Ware dinner plate decorated with an image of Fagin

Object

Dickens Ware series plate featuring an image of Fagin, made by Royal Doulton in England during the 20th century. Royal Doulton is an English ceramic manufacturer that specializes in artistically styled, decorated ceramics and tableware. In 1889, Charles Noke joined the company. He later introduced Doulton Series Ware, plates, and other items with decorations based on characters from popular culture. In 1908, Royal Doulton introduced the Dickens Ware series based on Charles Dickens’ characters, which was originally produced until 1937. A second run of the series was produced mid-century. On the plate, Fagin is portrayed with a beard and a large nose; both stereotypical physical features attributed to Jewish men. In “Oliver Twist,” Fagin is the villainous leader of a gang of children whom he has instructed in the ways of criminality. He attempts to corrupt the protagonist, Oliver, in the same manner. In the novel, Fagin is first seen hunched over a fire holding a toasting fork, imagery that reinforces the antisemitic stereotype of Jewish associations with the devil, due to its resemblance of a pitchfork. He is repeatedly referred to as “the Jew” in the book and is emphasized as a greedy, miserly, and cowardly character, all traits aligning with common antisemitic stereotypes. However, in a later edition of the novel, Dickens reduced his use of “the Jew,” substituting it for pronouns or other phrases. Even in this later version, Fagin is still repeatedly, and negatively, referred to as “the Jew” and remains emblematic of multiple antisemitic canards. Later writings by Dickens portrayed Jews in a more positive light, however, the reprehensible Fagin is his most remembered Jewish character. This plate is one of the more than 900 items in the Katz Ehrenthal Collection of antisemitic artifacts and visual materials.

Royal Doulton Dickens Ware bowl decorated with an image of Fagin

Royal Doulton Dickens Ware bowl decorated with an image of Fagin

Object

Dickens Ware series bowl featuring an image of Fagin, made by Royal Doulton in England during the 20th century. Royal Doulton is an English ceramic manufacturer that specializes in artistically styled, decorated ceramics and tableware. In 1889, Charles Noke joined the company. He later introduced Doulton Series Ware, plates, and other items with decorations based on characters from popular culture. In 1908, Royal Doulton introduced the Dickens Ware series based on Charles Dickens’ characters, which was originally produced until 1937. A second run of the series was produced mid-century. On the bowl, Fagin is portrayed with a beard and a large nose; both stereotypical physical features attributed to Jewish men. In “Oliver Twist,” Fagin is the villainous leader of a gang of children whom he has instructed in the ways of criminality. He attempts to corrupt the protagonist, Oliver, in the same manner. In the novel, Fagin is first seen hunched over a fire holding a toasting fork, imagery that reinforces the antisemitic stereotype of Jewish associations with the devil, due to its resemblance of a pitchfork. He is repeatedly referred to as “the Jew” in the book and is emphasized as a greedy, miserly, and cowardly character, all traits aligning with common antisemitic stereotypes. However, in a later edition of the novel, Dickens reduced his use of “the Jew,” substituting it for pronouns or other phrases. Even in this later version, Fagin is still repeatedly, and negatively, referred to as “the Jew” and remains emblematic of multiple antisemitic canards. Later writings by Dickens portrayed Jews in a more positive light, however, the reprehensible Fagin is his most remembered Jewish character. This bowl is one of the more than 900 items in the Katz Ehrenthal Collection of antisemitic artifacts and visual materials.

Royal Doulton Dickens Ware pitcher decorated with an image of Fagin

Royal Doulton Dickens Ware pitcher decorated with an image of Fagin

Object

Dickens Ware series pitcher featuring an image of Fagin, made by Royal Doulton in England during the 20th century. Royal Doulton is an English ceramic manufacturer that specializes in artistically styled, decorated ceramics and tableware. In 1889, Charles Noke joined the company. He later introduced Doulton Series Ware, plates, and other items with decorations based on characters from popular culture. In 1908, Royal Doulton introduced the Dickens Ware series based on Charles Dickens’ characters, which was originally produced until 1937. A second run of the series was produced mid-century. On the pitcher, Fagin is portrayed with a beard and a large nose; both stereotypical physical features attributed to Jewish men. In “Oliver Twist,” Fagin is the villainous leader of a gang of children whom he has instructed in the ways of criminality. He attempts to corrupt the protagonist, Oliver, in the same manner. In the novel, Fagin is first seen hunched over a fire holding a toasting fork, imagery that reinforces the antisemitic stereotype of Jewish associations with the devil, due to its resemblance of a pitchfork. He is repeatedly referred to as “the Jew” in the book and is emphasized as a greedy, miserly, and cowardly character, all traits aligning with common antisemitic stereotypes. However, in a later edition of the novel, Dickens reduced his use of “the Jew,” substituting it for pronouns or other phrases. Even in this later version, Fagin is still repeatedly, and negatively, referred to as “the Jew” and remains emblematic of multiple antisemitic canards. Later writings by Dickens portrayed Jews in a more positive light, however, the reprehensible Fagin is his most remembered Jewish character. This pitcher is one of the more than 900 items in the Katz Ehrenthal Collection of antisemitic artifacts and visual materials.

Colorful Fagin fireplace tool holder with poker and tongs

Colorful Fagin fireplace tool holder with poker and tongs

Object

Cast iron fireplace tool holder with poker and tongs in the shape of Fagin, a Jewish criminal from the novel, Oliver Twist, by Charles Dickens, 1837-39. The tongs resemble a trident, referencing the toasting fork Fagin uses in the novel. He is described as devil-like and is often portrayed with a trident shaped toasting fork to emphasize this connection. His characterization is antisemitic and exploits many negative stereotypes. Referred to as The Jew, Fagin is introduced as "villainous and repulsive." His nails are black, his few teeth are fangs, he is greedy, vicious, and kidnaps small children to make them thieves. Dickens rationalized it by saying that if he had a character who was a fence for stolen goods, he had to be a Jew because "that class of criminal almost invariably was a Jew." Many adaptations try to sidestep the complications of Fagin's ethnic identity, and make him more of a comic figure, but the unpleasant Jewish stereotypes are central to his depiction. This fireset is one of the more than 900 items in the Katz Ehrenthal Collection of antisemitic artifacts and visual materials.

Cast iron Fagin lamp holding a toasting fork / trident

Cast iron Fagin lamp holding a toasting fork / trident

Object

Cast iron lamp in the shape of Fagin, a Jewish criminal from the novel, Oliver Twist, by Charles Dickens, 1837-39. He holds a trident, referencing the toasting fork Fagin uses in the novel. He is called devil-like and often portrayed with a trident shaped toasting fork to emphasize this connection. His characterization is antisemitic and exploits many negative stereotypes. Referred to as The Jew, Fagin is introduced as "villainous and repulsive." His nails are black, his few teeth are fangs, he is greedy, vicious, and kidnaps small children to make them thieves. Dickens rationalized it by saying that if he had a character who was a fence for stolen goods, he had to be a Jew because "that class of criminal almost invariably was a Jew." Many adaptations try to sidestep the complications of Fagin's ethnic identity, and make him more of a comic figure, but the unpleasant Jewish stereotypes are central to his depiction. This lamp base is one of the more than 900 items in the Katz Ehrenthal Collection of antisemitic artifacts and visual materials.

Porcelain figure of Fagin counting his money by candlelight

Porcelain figure of Fagin counting his money by candlelight

Object

Small, porcelain figurine portraying a scene from “Oliver Twist,” where Fagin is going through his box of stolen goods. In the scene, Fagin, who is repeatedly referred to as “the Jew,” is delighted that his previous partners in crime were executed, allowing him to keep the valuables for himself. Fagin is wearing a skull cap, and is portrayed with red hair, a beard, and a large nose; all stereotypical physical features attributed to Jewish men. In “Oliver Twist,” Fagin is the villainous leader of a gang of children whom he has instructed in the ways of criminality. He attempts to corrupt the protagonist, Oliver, in the same manner. In the novel, Fagin is described in his first scene as hunched over a fire holding a toasting fork, imagery that reinforces the antisemitic stereotype of Jewish associations with the devil, due to its resemblance of a pitchfork. He is repeatedly referred to as “the Jew” in the book and also emphasized as a greedy, miserly, and cowardly character; all traits aligning with common antisemitic stereotypes. However, in a later edition of the novel, Dickens reduced his use of “the Jew,” substituting it for pronouns or other phrases. Even in this later version, Fagin is still repeatedly and negatively referred to as “the Jew,” and remains emblematic of multiple antisemitic canards. Later writings by Dickens portrayed Jews in a more positive light, however, the reprehensible Fagin is his most remembered Jewish character. This figurine is one of the more than 900 items in the Katz Ehrenthal Collection of antisemitic artifacts and visual materials.

Thimble in the shape of Fagin's head

Thimble in the shape of Fagin's head

Object

Porcelain thimble in the shape of a small bust, depicting the head of Fagin, a character from Charles Dickens’ novel, “Oliver Twist.” It was manufactured by Harmer Sculptures in Staffordshire, England, likely during the 1980s. Fagin is portrayed with a beard, sidelocks, a large nose, and thick eyebrows; all stereotypical physical features attributed to Jewish men. In “Oliver Twist,” Fagin is the villainous leader of a gang of children whom he has instructed in the ways of criminality. He attempts to corrupt the protagonist, Oliver, in the same manner. In the novel, Fagin is described in his first scene as hunched over a fire holding a toasting fork, imagery that reinforces the antisemitic stereotype of Jewish associations with the devil, due to its resemblance of a pitchfork. He is repeatedly referred to as “the Jew” in the book and also emphasized as a greedy, miserly, and cowardly character; all traits aligning with common antisemitic stereotypes. However, in a later edition of the novel, Dickens reduced his use of “the Jew,” substituting it for pronouns or other phrases. Even in this later version, Fagin is still repeatedly and negatively referred to as “the Jew,” and remains emblematic of multiple antisemitic canards. Later writings by Dickens portrayed Jews in a more positive light, however, the reprehensible Fagin is his most remembered Jewish character. This thimble is one of the more than 900 items in the Katz Ehrenthal Collection of antisemitic artifacts and visual materials.

Frosted drinking glass with a painted image of Fagin

Frosted drinking glass with a painted image of Fagin

Object

Frosted glass cup with a painted scene of Oliver’s first encounter with Fagin, from Charles Dickens’ novel, “Oliver Twist.” The cup is part of a set painted with scenes from the works of Charles Dickens. The set is commonly associated with 20th-century glass manufacturers, Federal Glass and Hazel Atlas. Fagin is portrayed with a beard, a large nose, and thick eyebrows; all stereotypical physical features attributed to Jewish men. In “Oliver Twist,” Fagin is the villainous leader of a gang of children whom he has instructed in the ways of criminality. He attempts to corrupt the protagonist, Oliver, in the same manner. In the novel, Fagin is described in his first scene as hunched over a fire holding a toasting fork, imagery that reinforces the antisemitic stereotype of Jewish associations with the devil, due to its resemblance of a pitchfork. He is repeatedly referred to as “the Jew” in the book and also emphasized as a greedy, miserly, and cowardly character; all traits aligning with common antisemitic stereotypes. However, in a later edition of the novel, Dickens reduced his use of “the Jew,” substituting it for pronouns or other phrases. Even in this later version, Fagin is still repeatedly and negatively referred to as “the Jew,” and remains emblematic of multiple antisemitic canards. Later writings by Dickens portrayed Jews in a more positive light, however, the reprehensible Fagin is his most remembered Jewish character. This glass is one of the more than 900 items in the Katz Ehrenthal Collection of antisemitic artifacts and visual materials.

Pair of William Adams & Sons stoneware candlesticks with a scene of Oliver Twist meeting Fagin

Pair of William Adams & Sons stoneware candlesticks with a scene of Oliver Twist meeting Fagin

Object

Pair of candlesticks (a and b) decorated with two colored illustrations from popular Charles Dickens’ books, manufactured by William Adams & Sons, likely between 1896 and 1920. The first image is from “Old Curiosity Shop,” and was originally drawn by Hablot Knight Browne (aka Phiz). The image was first published in 1840, with the serialized release of the story. However, the caption is from a later illustration of the same scene by Charles Green, and was first published in a later edition of the novel in 1876. The second image is from “Oliver Twist,” and was originally drawn by George Cruikshank. It was first originally published in 1837, with the serialized release of the story. Fagin is portrayed with a beard and a large nose; both stereotypical physical features attributed to Jewish men. In “Oliver Twist,” Fagin is the villainous leader of a gang of children whom he has instructed in the ways of criminality. He attempts to corrupt the protagonist, Oliver, in the same manner. In the novel, Fagin is described in his first appearance as hunched over a fire holding a toasting fork. This imagery reinforces the antisemitic stereotype of Jewish associations with the devil, due to the toasting fork’s resemblance of a pitchfork. He is repeatedly referred to as “the Jew” in the book and also emphasized as a greedy, miserly, and cowardly character; all traits aligning with common antisemitic stereotypes. However, in a later edition of the novel, Dickens reduced his use of “the Jew,” substituting it for pronouns or other phrases. Even in this later version, Fagin is still repeatedly and negatively referred to as “the Jew,” and remains emblematic of multiple antisemitic canards. Later writings by Dickens portrayed Jews in a more positive light, however, the reprehensible Fagin is his most remembered Jewish character. These candlesticks are two of the more than 900 items in the Katz Ehrenthal Collection of antisemitic artifacts and visual materials.

Character jug of Fagin wringing his hands

Character jug of Fagin wringing his hands

Object

Toby jug depicting Fagin wringing his hands, made by Manor (Manor ware) in England. Although the markings identify it as a character jug, its design is more similar to that of a Toby jug. Toby jugs were first made in the mid-18th century and are ceramic pitchers usually modeled on full-bodied representations of popular characters. Character jugs usually only feature the head and shoulders. Fagin is portrayed with red hair, a beard, a large nose, thick eyebrows, and hooded eyes; all stereotypical physical features attributed to Jewish men. In “Oliver Twist,” Fagin is the villainous leader of a gang of children whom he has instructed in the ways of criminality. He attempts to corrupt the protagonist, Oliver, in the same manner. In the novel, Fagin is described in his first scene as hunched over a fire holding a toasting fork, imagery that reinforces the antisemitic stereotype of Jewish associations with the devil, due to the toasting fork's resemblance of a pitchfork. He is repeatedly referred to as “the Jew” in the book and also emphasized as a greedy, miserly, and cowardly character; all traits aligning with common antisemitic stereotypes. However, in a later edition of the novel, Dickens reduced his use of “the Jew,” substituting it for pronouns or other phrases. Even in this later version, Fagin is still repeatedly and negatively referred to as “the Jew,” and remains emblematic of multiple antisemitic canards. Later writings by Dickens portrayed Jews in a more positive light, however, the reprehensible Fagin is his most remembered Jewish character. This pitcher is one of the more than 900 items in the Katz Ehrenthal Collection of antisemitic artifacts and visual materials.

Brass nutcracker with a Fagin shaped handle

Brass nutcracker with a Fagin shaped handle

Object

Brass lever nutcracker cast in the shape of Fagin holding a money bag. This style and similar nutcrackers were mass produced for a long period by the Pearson-Page brass company in England, under several names. Fagin is a devil-like Jewish criminal from the novel, Oliver Twist, by Charles Dickens, 1837-39. The characterization is antisemitic and exploits many negative stereotypes. Referred to as The Jew, Fagin is villainous, greedy and repulsive, with black nails and fangs for teeth, and kidnaps small children to make them thieves. Dickens shared a common prejudice of the day, saying that if he had a character who was a fence, he had to be a Jew because "that class of criminal almost invariably was a Jew." Many adaptations try to sidestep Fagin's ethnic identity, or make him more of a comic figure, but his Jewishness is central to his depiction. This nutcracker is one of the more than 900 items in the Katz Ehrenthal Collection of antisemitic artifacts and visual materials.

Porcelain figurine of a rosy cheeked Fagin

Porcelain figurine of a rosy cheeked Fagin

Object

Small, ceramic figurine of Fagin, a character from Charles Dickens’ novel, “Oliver Twist.” Fagin is portrayed with a long beard, a large nose, thick eyebrows, and hooded eyes; all stereotypical physical features attributed to Jewish men. In “Oliver Twist,” Fagin is the villainous leader of a gang of children whom he has instructed in the ways of criminality. He attempts to corrupt the protagonist, Oliver, in the same manner. In the novel, Fagin is described in his first scene as hunched over a fire holding a toasting fork, imagery that reinforces the antisemitic stereotype of Jewish associations with the devil, due to its resemblance of a pitchfork. He is repeatedly referred to as “the Jew” in the book and also emphasized as a greedy, miserly, and cowardly character; all traits aligning with common antisemitic stereotypes. However, in a later edition of the novel, Dickens reduced his use of “the Jew,” substituting it for pronouns or other phrases. Even in this later version, Fagin is still repeatedly and negatively referred to as “the Jew,” and remains emblematic of multiple antisemitic canards. Later writings by Dickens portrayed Jews in a more positive light, however, the reprehensible Fagin is his most remembered Jewish character. This figurine is one of the more than 900 items in the Katz Ehrenthal Collection of antisemitic artifacts and visual materials.

Royal Doulton ceramic figurine of Fagin dressed in black

Royal Doulton ceramic figurine of Fagin dressed in black

Object

Dickens Ware series figurine of Fagin, designed by Leslie Harradine, and made by Royal Doulton in England, likely in the 1920s or 1930s. Royal Doulton is an English ceramic manufacturer that specializes in artistically styled and decorated ceramics and tableware. In 1908, Royal Doulton introduced the Dickens Ware series, based on Charles Dickens’ characters, which was originally produced until 1937. A second run of the series was produced mid-century. Fagin is portrayed with a beard and a large nose; both stereotypical physical features attributed to Jewish men. In “Oliver Twist,” Fagin is the villainous leader of a gang of children whom he has instructed in the ways of criminality. He attempts to corrupt the protagonist, Oliver, in the same manner. In the novel, Fagin is described in his first scene as hunched over a fire holding a toasting fork, imagery that reinforces the antisemitic stereotype of Jewish associations with the devil, due to its resemblance of a pitchfork. He is repeatedly referred to as “the Jew” in the book and also emphasized as a greedy, miserly, and cowardly character; all traits aligning with common antisemitic stereotypes. However, in a later edition of the novel, Dickens reduced his use of “the Jew,” substituting it for pronouns or other phrases. Even in this later version, Fagin is still repeatedly and negatively referred to as “the Jew,” and remains emblematic of multiple antisemitic canards. Later writings by Dickens portrayed Jews in a more positive light, however, the reprehensible Fagin is his most remembered Jewish character. This figurine is one of the more than 900 items in the Katz Ehrenthal Collection of antisemitic artifacts and visual materials.

Character jug of Fagin sitting on a box

Character jug of Fagin sitting on a box

Object

Toby jug depicting Fagin sitting on a box, made by Artone in Burslem, England. Artone was a small company founded in 1946, which specialized in hand-painted bone china. Toby jugs were first made in the mid-18th century and are ceramic pitchers usually modeled on full-bodied representations of popular characters. Character jugs usually only feature the head and shoulders. Fagin is portrayed with a long beard, a large nose, and thick eyebrows; all stereotypical physical features attributed to Jewish men. In “Oliver Twist,” Fagin is the villainous leader of a gang of children whom he has instructed in the ways of criminality. He attempts to corrupt the protagonist, Oliver, in the same manner. In the novel, Fagin is described in his first scene as hunched over a fire holding a toasting fork, imagery that reinforces the antisemitic stereotype of Jewish associations with the devil, due to its resemblance of a pitchfork. He is repeatedly referred to as “the Jew” in the book and also emphasized as a greedy, miserly, and cowardly character; all traits aligning with common antisemitic stereotypes. However, in a later edition of the novel, Dickens reduced his use of “the Jew,” substituting it for pronouns or other phrases. Even in this later version, Fagin is still repeatedly and negatively referred to as “the Jew,” and remains emblematic of multiple antisemitic canards. Later writings by Dickens portrayed Jews in a more positive light, however, the reprehensible Fagin is his most remembered Jewish character. This pitcher is one of the more than 900 items in the Katz Ehrenthal Collection of antisemitic artifacts and visual materials.

Royal Doulton Dickens Ware teapot decorated with an image of Fagin

Royal Doulton Dickens Ware teapot decorated with an image of Fagin

Object

Dickens Ware series teapot featuring an image of Fagin, made by Royal Doulton in England during the 20th century. Royal Doulton is an English ceramic manufacturer that specializes in artistically styled and decorated ceramics and tableware. In 1889, Charles Noke joined the company. He later introduced Doulton Series Ware, plates and other items with decorations based on characters from popular culture. In 1908, Royal Doulton introduced the Dickens Ware series, based on Charles Dickens’ characters. The series was originally produced until 1937, and a second run of the series was produced mid-century. On the teapot, Fagin is portrayed with a beard and a large nose; both stereotypical physical features attributed to Jewish men. In “Oliver Twist,” Fagin is the villainous leader of a gang of children whom he has instructed in the ways of criminality. He attempts to corrupt the protagonist, Oliver, in the same manner. In the novel, Fagin is described in his first scene as hunched over a fire holding a toasting fork. This imagery reinforces the antisemitic stereotype of Jewish associations with the devil due to the toasting fork’s resemblance of a pitchfork. He is repeatedly referred to as “the Jew” in the book and also emphasized as a greedy, miserly, and cowardly character; all traits aligning with common antisemitic stereotypes. However, in a later editionof the novel, Dickens reduced his use of “the Jew,” substituting it for pronouns or other phrases. However, even in this later version, Fagin is still repeatedly and negatively referred to as “the Jew,” and remains emblematic of multiple antisemitic canards. Later writings by Dickens portrayed Jews in a more positive light, however, the reprehensible Fagin is his most remembered Jewish character. This teapot is one of the more than 900 items in the Katz Ehrenthal Collection of antisemitic artifacts and visual materials.

Roy Kirkham Toby jug of Fagin holding a coin bag
Sours: https://collections.ushmm.org/search/catalog/irn538324
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The Turncoat’s Widowby Mally Becker

Interview + Excerpt of The Turncoat’s Widow + Book & Author Info + Rafflecopter Giveaway


The Turncoat’s Widow

The Turncoat's WidowRecently widowed, Rebecca Parcell is too busy struggling to maintain her farm in Morristown to care who wins the War for Independence. But rumors are spreading in 1780 that she’s a Loyalist sympathizer who betrayed her husband to the British—quite a tidy way to end her disastrous marriage, the village gossips whisper.

Everyone knows that her husband was a Patriot, a hero who died aboard a British prison ship moored in New York Harbor. But “everyone” is wrong. Parcell was a British spy, and General Washington – who spent two winters in Morristown – can prove it. He swears he’ll safeguard Becca’s farm if she unravels her husband’s secrets. With a mob ready to exile her or worse in the winter of 1780, it’s an offer she can’t refuse.

Escaped British prisoner of war Daniel Alloway was the last person to see Becca’s husband alive, and Washington throws this unlikely couple together on an espionage mission to British-occupied New York City. Moving from glittering balls to an underworld of brothels and prisons, Becca and Daniel uncover a plot that threatens the new country’s future.

But will they move quickly enough to warn General Washington? And can Becca, who’s lost almost everyone she loves, fight her growing attraction to Daniel, a man who always moves on?

Genre: Historical Suspense / Mystery
Published by: Level Best Books
Publication Date: February 16, 2021
ISBN: 978-1-953789-27-3

To buy The Turncoat’s Widow, click on any of the following links: Amazon || Goodreads


The Turncoat’s Widow—The Interview

The Turncoat’s Widow is set during the Revolutionary War. Tell us about the research you did for your historical novel.

Sometimes research felt like a treasure hunt, especially when I found original documents from the time or tracked down details in person. I attended Revolutionary War reenactments and chatted with reenactors about 18th century cannons, sipped hot chocolate with cayenne pepper in Williamsburg, Virginia, and found a list of the officers who each paid $400 to attend a ball hosted by George Washington. (Yes, $400.)

The cannon, hot chocolate and party all made it into my story!

I searched for information wherever I could find it about women’s lives back then and about how divided our nation truly was at its founding. Books like The Uncertain Revolution and Liberty’s Daughters were tremendously helpful. Because whiskey plays a featured role in my plot, I also read about the history of alcohol in this country. The Forgotten Drinks of Colonial New England was a fun read on that front.

You found an indictment for the Revolutionary War crime of traveling from NJ to NYC during the Revolutionary War “without permission or passport.” What was that document and how did it spark your story?

I thought I’d be clearing trails when I volunteered at the Morristown National Historical Park. Instead, I was put to work sifting through one of the Park’s old collection of letters.

That’s where I found a 240-year-old indictment, or allegation, that a local farmer had committed the crime of traveling to New York City in the middle of the American Revolution “without permission or passport.”

A crime to travel into New York? I’ve lived in New York City or its suburbs all my life. That stopped me in my tracks.

I took the document to one of the Park historians for an explanation. He said that not all colonists supported independence, and there were so many spies and smugglers slipping between New Jersey and British-held New York City, that the local government made travel without its permission a crime.

South of New England, another historian told me, only about 50% of the population may have supported independence.

Spying, smuggling, and a divided nation? With that, my story started to take shape.

Are there parallels between the era the book is set in and today?

Oh, yes. Congress was ineffective. Smallpox and yellow fever outbreaks were the pandemics of the time. Food became almost unaffordable. Farmers resented and distrusted the urban “elites.”

The more I learned about the American Revolution, the more “present” it felt. Our nation was as argumentative, passionate and divided then as it is now. To misquote Lady Gaga, we were born this way. Paradoxically, that makes me an optimist. We survived and (mostly) thrived, despite it all.

How did your prior experiences as a publicist, freelance writer, attorney and advocate for foster children prepare you to launch your first novel?

My role as a volunteer advocate for foster children influenced my story the most.

Most foster kids I’ve met manage to look forward with hope and optimism, despite the trauma they’ve survived. What accounts for that kind of resilience? What makes some of us able to let go of the hurts in our past–big and small–while others can’t?

I didn’t realize how much this question haunts each of the characters you’ll meet in The Turncoat’s Widow until I finished writing my story.

As far as launching the book, nothing in my past prepared me! I’m a “behind the camera” type of person, my sister says. I’m comfortable advocating for clients but less comfortable talking about myself.

Is historical fiction your go-to genre as a reader? Are there specific books or authors that inspired you to write (in any genre)?

On my night table right now are Atomic Love by Jennie Fields, Before We Were Yours by Lisa Wingate, Rules of Civility by Amor Towles and Freedom Lessons by Eileen Sanchez. I guess that means historical fiction is my go-to!

And I love a good historical mystery. Caleb Carr, Lyndsay Faye, and David Liss write mysteries that inspire me and make me feel as if I’m spending time in another time period.

I also love historical mystery authors Ellis Peters, Eleanor Kuhns, Susanna Calkins, Deanna Raebourn, and C.J. Sansom.

How did you come to work with Level Best Books?

A friend and a great mystery author—Tina deBellegarde—had recently signed on with Level Best Books, a crime fiction publisher. She pitched my book to her editor there, then called to say that they were interested in seeing my entire manuscript!

I met the publishers a few years earlier at Malice Domestic, a wonderful mystery fan and writer conference in Maryland, and at Crime Bake, an annual mystery writers conference outside of Boston. I remembered them, and, as it turned out, they remembered me.

And the rest is history! Great to have you here on my blog! Best of luck with your launch.


Excerpt from The Turncoat’s Widow

Chapter One

Morristown – January 1780

There was a nervous rustling in the white-washed meeting house, a disturbance of air like the sound of sparrows taking wing.

Becca Parcell peered over the balcony’s rough, wood railing, blinking away the fog of half-sleep. She had been dreaming of the figures in her account book and wondering whether there would be enough money for seed this spring.

“I didn’t hear what ….” she whispered to Philip’s mother.

Lady Augusta Georgiana Stokes Parcell, known simply as Lady Augusta, covered Becca’s hand with her own. “Philip. They’re speaking of Philip.”

Becca couldn’t tell whether it was her hand or Augusta’s that trembled.

“The Bible says, if thine eye offend thee, pluck it out and cast it from thee, does it not?” The preacher’s voice was soft, yet it carried to every corner of the congregation. “They’re here. Amongst us. Neighbors who toast the King behind closed doors. Neighbors with no love of liberty.”

Philip was a Patriot. He had died a hero. Everyone knew. Minister Townsend couldn’t be talking about him.

The minister raised his eyes to hers. With his long thin arms and legs and round belly, he reminded her of a spider. She twisted her lips into the semblance of a smile as if to say “you don’t scare me.” But he did.

“Which of your neighbors celebrates each time a Patriot dies?” Townsend’s voice rose like smoke to the rafters, took on strength and caught fire. “Their presence here is an abomination.” He rapped the podium with a flat palm, the sound bruising in the quiet church. “Then cast them out. Now.”

Men pounded the floor with their feet.

Becca flinched. It wouldn’t take much to tip the congregation into violence. Everyone had lost someone or something to this endless war. It had been going on for almost five years.

Townsend’s thin arm rose, pointing to her.

Becca’s breath caught.

“And what of widows like Mrs. Parcell? Left alone, no longer guided by the wise direction of their husbands.”

Guided? Becca pulled her hand from Augusta’s. She rubbed her thumb along the palm of her hand, feeling the rough calluses stamped there. She had learned the rhythm of the scythe at the end of the summer, how to twist and swing low until her hands were so stiff that she’d struggle to free them from the handle. She’d fallen into a dreamless sleep each night during the harvest too exhausted even to dream of Philip. She, Augusta and their servant Annie were doing just fine.

“He hardly slept at home, as I hear it,” a woman behind her sniffed to a neighbor.

Becca’s spine straightened.

“No wonder there were no babes,” the second woman murmured.

Becca twisted and nodded a smile to Mrs. Huber and Mrs. Harrington. Their mouths pursed into surprised tight circles. She’d heard them murmur, their mouths hidden by fluttering fans: About her lack of social graces; her friendship with servants; her awkward silence in company. “What else could you expect from her?” they would say, snapping shut their fans.

Relief washed through Becca, nonetheless. This was merely the old gossip, not the new rumors.

“Some of you thought Mr. Parcell was just another smuggler.” The pastor’s voice boomed.

A few in the congregation chuckled. It was illegal to sell food to the British in New York – the “London Trade” some called it — but most turned a blind eye. Even Patriots need hard currency to live, Becca recalled Philip saying.

“He only married her for the dowry,” Mrs. Huber hissed.

Becca’s hand curved into a fist.

Augusta cleared her throat, and Becca forced herself to relax.

“Perhaps some of you thought Mr. Parcell was still a Tory,” the minister said.

The chuckling died.

“He came to his senses, though. He was, after all, one of us,” Minister Townsend continued.

One of us. Invitations from the finer families had trickled away after Philip’s death.

“We all know his story,” Townsend continued. “He smuggled whiskey into New York City. And what a perfect disguise his aristocratic roots provided.” The minister lifted his nose in the air as if mimicking a dandy.

“The British thought he was one of them, at least until the end.” The minister’s voice swooped as if telling a story around a campfire. “He brought home information about the British troops in the City.”

Becca shifted on the bench. She hadn’t known about her husband’s bravery until after his death. It had baffled her. Philip never spoke of politics.

Townsend lifted one finger to his chin as if he had a new thought. “But who told the British where Mr. Parcell would be on the day he was captured? Who told the Redcoats that Mr. Parcell was a spy for independence?”

Becca forgot to breathe. He wouldn’t dare.

“It must have been someone who knew him well.” The minister’s gaze moved slowly through the congregation and came to rest on Becca. His eyes were the color of creosote, dark and burning. “Very, very well.”

Mrs. Coddington, who sat to Becca’s left, pulled the hem of her black silk gown close to avoid contact. Men in the front pews swiveled and stared.

“I would never. I didn’t.” Becca’s corset gouged her ribcage.

“Speak up, Mrs. Parcell. We can’t hear you,” the minister said in a singsong voice.

Townsend might as well strip her naked before the entire town. Respectable women didn’t speak in public. He means to humiliate me.

“Stand up, Mrs. Parcell.” His voice boomed. “We all want to hear.”

She didn’t remember standing. But there she was, the fingers of her right hand curled as it held the hunting bow she’d used since she was a child. Becca turned back to the minister. “Hogwash.” If they didn’t think she was a lady, she need not act like one. “Your independence is a wickedly unfair thing if it lets you accuse me without proof.”

Gasps cascaded throughout the darkening church.

From the balcony, where slaves and servants sat, she heard two coughs, explosive as gun fire. She twisted. Carl scowled down at her in warning. His white halo of hair, fine as duckling feathers, seemed to stand on end. He had worked for her father and helped to raise her. He had taught her numbers and mathematics. She couldn’t remember life without him.

“Accuse? Accuse you of what, Mrs. Parcell?” The minister opened his arms to the congregation. “What have we accused you of?”

Becca didn’t feel the chill now. “Of killing my husband. If this is what your new nation stands for – neighbors accusing neighbors, dividing us with lies – I’ll have none of it. “Five years into this endless war, is anyone better off for Congress’ Declaration of Independence? Independence won’t pay for food. It won’t bring my husband home.”

It was as if she’d burst into flames. “What has the war brought any of us? Heartache, is all. Curse your independence. Curse you for ….”

Augusta yanked on Becca’s gown with such force that she teetered, then rocked back onto the bench.

The church erupted in shouts, a crashing wave of sound meant to crush her.

Becca’s breath came in short puffs. What had she done?

“Now that’s just grief speaking, gentlemen. Mrs. Parcell is still mourning her husband. No need to get worked up.” The voice rose from the front row. She recognized Thomas Lockwood’s slow, confident drawl.

She craned her neck to watch Thomas, with his wheat-colored hair and wide shoulders. His broad stance reminded her of a captain at the wheel. He was a gentleman, a friend of General Washington. They’ll listen to him, she thought.

“Our minister doesn’t mean to accuse Mrs. Parcell of anything, now do you, sir?”

The two men stared at each other. A minister depended on the good will of gentlemen like Thomas Lockwood.

The pastor blinked first. He shook his head.

Becca’s breathing slowed.

“There now. As I said.” Lockwood’s voice calmed the room.

Then Mr. Baldwin stood slowly. Wrinkles crisscrossed his cheeks. He’d sent his three boys to fight with the Continental Army in ’75. Only one body came home to be buried. The other two were never found. He pointed at Becca with fingers twisted by arthritis. “Mrs. Parcell didn’t help when the women raised money for the soldiers last month.”

A woman at the end of Becca’s pew sobbed quietly. It was Mrs. Baldwin.

“You didn’t invite me.” Becca searched the closed faces for proof that someone believed her.

“Is she on our side or theirs?” another woman called.

The congregation quieted again. But it was the charged silence between two claps of thunder, and the Assembly waited for a fresh explosion in the dim light of the tired winter afternoon.

With that, Augusta’s imperious voice sliced through the silence: “Someone help my daughter-in-law. She’s not well. I believe she’s about to faint.”

Becca might be rash, but she wasn’t stupid, and she knew a command when she heard one. She shut her eyes and fell gracelessly into the aisle. Her head and shoulder thumped against the rough pine floorboards.

Mrs. Coddington gasped. So did Becca, from the sharp pain in her cheek and shoulder.

Women in the surrounding rows scooted back in surprise, their boots shuffling with a shh-shh sound.

“Lady Augusta,” Mrs. Coddington huffed.

Independence be damned. All of Morristown seemed to enjoy using Augusta’s family title, her former title, as often as possible.

“Lady Augusta,” she repeated. “I’ve had my suspicions about that girl since the day she married your son. I don’t know why you haven’t sent her back to her people.”

“She has no ‘people,’ Mrs. Coddington. She has me,” Augusta’s voice was as frosty as the air in the church. “And if I had doubts about Rebecca, do you think I’d live with her?”

Becca imagined Augusta’s raised eyebrows, her delicate lifted chin. She couldn’t have borne it if her mother-in-law believed the minister’s lies.

Augusta’s featherlight touch stroked her forehead. “Well done,” she murmured. “Now rise slowly. And don’t lean on me. I might just topple over.”

“We are eager to hear the rest of the service on this Sabbath day, Minister Townsend. Do continue,” Thomas Lockwood called.

Becca stood, her petite mother-in-law’s arm around her waist. The parishioners at the edges of the aisles averted their eyes as the two women passed.

As they stepped into the stark, brittle daylight, one last question shred the silence they left behind: “Do you think she turned her husband over to the British?”

Someone else answered. “It must be true. Everyone says so.


Mally Becker—author of The Turncoat’s Widow

The Turncoat's WidowMally Becker is a writer whose historical suspense novel, The Turncoat’s Widow, will be published in February 2021 by Level Best Books. She was born in Brooklyn and began her professional career in New York City as a publicist and freelance magazine writer, then moved on, becoming an attorney and, later, an advocate for children in foster care.

As a volunteer, she used her legal background to create a digest of letters from US Supreme Court Justices owned by the Morristown National Park. That’s where she found a copy of an indictment for the Revolutionary War crime of traveling from New Jersey to New York City “without permission or passport.” It led her to the idea for her story.

​A winner of the Leon B. Burstein/MWA-NY Scholarship for Mystery Writing, Mally lives with her husband in the wilds of New Jersey where they hike, kayak, look forward to visits from their son, and poke around the region’s historical sites.

To learn more about Mally, click on her name, photo, or any of the following links: Goodreads, Instagram – @mallybeckerwrites, Twitter – @mally_becker & Facebook – Mally Baumel Becker


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Elena Taylor is the author of All We Buried, available now in print, e-book, and audio book format at all your favorite on-line retailers. And don’t forget many independent bookstores can order books for you and have them shipped to your home or for curbside pickup.

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historical fictionHistorical mysteryLevel Best BooksMally BeckermysterypublishingsuspenseThe Turncoat's Widowwriting

Sours: https://www.elenataylorauthor.com/2021/03/07/the-turncoats-widow-mally-becker/

The Turncoat King

A thirst for revenge . . . Ava is committed to vengeance against the man responsible for the death of her parents. The same man, the Queen's Herald, kept her prisoner for two years, until she escaped with Luc, a warlord bent on vengeance just as fierce as her own. He's forged a powerful army of people from all through the region, called the Rising Wave, to march on theA thirst for revenge . . . Ava is committed to vengeance against the man responsible for the death of her parents. The same man, the Queen's Herald, kept her prisoner for two years, until she escaped with Luc, a warlord bent on vengeance just as fierce as her own. He's forged a powerful army of people from all through the region, called the Rising Wave, to march on the Kassian royal family and smash its corrupt power under the weight of their anger. But for Luc, just as for Ava, his true motive is a lot more personal.

A hidden magic . . . Luc suspects Ava has magical abilities, suspects he's benefited greatly from them, but he's no stranger to the burdens of power, and he's prepared to let her tell him in her own time-after all, she's his heart's choice and he will give her all the time she needs. Except time is running out for both of them. As they near the Kassian stronghold, forces from within their own camp and without will use every trick they have to stop both Luc and Ava and tear them apart.

A secret laid bare . . . Luc knows Ava has a secret she's keeping from him-but what he doesn't realize is she has many. And when those secrets are exposed, everyone will have to grapple with the consequences. Ava is prepared to sacrifice her happiness and even her life to save the Rising Wave and Luc-but she would prefer to use her heart and her head to outwit her enemies instead....more

Kindle Edition, 349 pages

Published January 12th 2021 by Eclipse

Sours: https://www.goodreads.com/en/book/show/55960517

London turncoat fallen

Turncoat (Paperback)

Ryan O'Sullivan

Published by T Publications, United States(2016)

ISBN 10: 0992752388 ISBN 13: 9780992752385

New Paperback Quantity: 10

Book Description Paperback. Condition: New. Language: English. Brand new Book. Turncoat follows the story of Duke, the world's worst superhero assassin, and his constant battle with his ex-wife-and-rival assassin, Sharon. Duke is always one step behind Sharon, constantly missing out on the big hit that will set him for life. (It certainly doesn't help matters that he only ever seems to go up against D-list superheroes like Bug-Boy and Freedom Fighter.) .so when Duke receives a contract for the most famous superhero team in the world, he realizes his time has come. Not just to finally make the big hit, but to finally move on from his ex-wife. If only it were that simple. Turncoat is a collection of the entire six-issue run of the popular webcomic of the same name ). Created by Ryan O'Sullivan and Plaid Klaus in 2014, despite the two of them never having met. Ryan is from London, England, and Klaus is from New York. Seller Inventory # BZV9780992752385

More information about this seller | Contact this seller

Sours: https://www.abebooks.com/9780992752385/Turncoat-OSullivan-Ryan-0992752388/plp
Sunless Skies OST

Fallen London

FOREWORD & INTRO:

It will not be easy to write a review for this game, it has to be said first.

Fallen London is still being worked on by its creator, the indie team that is Failbetter. Ever since its conception in 2009 (or perhaps even earlier), it has undergone many changes, including a name-change. Many of the changes are far more than just cosmetic; many gameplay elements have been overhauled to address both player feedback and the whims of its creators.

Failbetter still has some major projects going on, such as the revamping of the system of Connections into Favours and Renown (there will be more on these later) – though at this time of writing, further work on these projects has been rather slow.

This review article might become obsolete in a year or two, assuming that Failbetter suddenly gains speed on finishing what it has started. (Also, hopefully, this article doesn’t end up being subjected to requests for changes by Failbetter; that indie developer can be rather proactive in trying to muzzle spoilers.)

With all that said, as a “free-to-play” game, Fallen London has an incredible amount of content and complexity in its gameplay that belies its web-based infrastructure.

Yet, there are some aspects about the browser game which have not changed since its inception. Unfortunately, these are some of its worst and most displeasing aspects; typically, as to be expected of a “free-to-play” game, these concern its business model and how it affected its gameplay.

The always-available help page is an indicator of how complicated and bewildering the game can be to a newcomer.

MORE FOREWORDS:

Quite a number of the screenshots which are seen in this article were taken before the current state of the game. Therefore, there are visual differences in the screenshots, such as the different artwork that is used for the thumbnails and side images of options.

Speaking of the changing artwork, there will be remarks on these later in the section for visual designs.

PREMISE:

Seasoned story-goers will be able to recognize the sources of inspiration for the premise of Fallen London. The Victorian era is particularly prominent, considering that the game is set in a fictitious version of Victorian-era London (though it is not exactly set in the same place as real-world London; more on this later).

There are also elements of Lovecraft and Edgar Ellen Poe, alongside the styles of more contemporary writers such as Jack Vance and Terry Pratchett. To describe the game’s premise as a smorgasbord – or a mess – of writing would not be an overstatement.

Anyway, the game is set on an alternate Earth. This Earth has been visited by literally otherworldly things, who also revealed the presence of a subterranean realm where many laws on the surface, including even the laws of physics, do not exactly apply. This realm is called the “Neath”, and it is a bizarre place of many wonders and horrors. It is also a place where there are worse fates than death.

It is in this realm where certain otherworldly entities have built a home for themselves (though it is debatable whether they consider this place their “home”). They have a reason for doing so, and it involves a grand plan which spans eons. To achieve this plan, they bring entire cities and their mortal denizens underground. The means to do so will not be described in this article, for it is a spoiler that might attract unwanted attention to this review article.

The most recent city to have been brought underground is none other than the titular London. Like the previous cities, London has been forever changed by this shift, though it retains much of its cultural identity, such as its Victorian qualities. Despite its fall, London has become the nexus of many intrigues both mortal and supernatural, and somewhere in between.

It is into this London that the player character comes into. The motivations and pasts of the player character are up to the player to decide, but all player characters will have one thing in common: London and Neath are now their proverbial oysters – albeit oysters with snapping teeth and pearls which can drive people crazy by merely looking at them.

There is no turning back for the player character.

POSSIBLE ULTIMATE END:

Up to now, there are many things to suggest that the game world of Fallen London will not last forever. After all, there is a companion browser game, The Silver Tree, which has already formally concluded its overarching story, and it was about the previous city. The Silver Tree has also since been made into a completely free browser game.

That companion browser game did not exactly end in a way that pleased everyone. The official end of its development was also accompanied by the end of an experimental business model that was supposed to co-opt independent contributors and share revenue with them. Although the end of the model was not terribly acrimonious, it does raise some concerns about what Failbetter intends to do with Fallen London.

To put it simply, there is no guarantee that Fallen London will screw over its player-base, especially its paying ones. Anyone who is interested in this game might want to be warned that heartache might occur into the future if he/she chooses to invest in this game.

FREE-TO-WAIT:

Unfortunately, Fallen London starts itself off by introducing its deliberate limitations: the player only has a limited number of opportunities to make decisions, which are otherwise known as “actions” according to official parlance. For the sake of this review article, they will be referred to as “action points”.

Action points are generally consumed whenever the player makes a significant decision. In the version of the game at this time of writing, an action point will be restored every 10 minutes. However, the player can only store up to 20 points, at least by default.

Of course, whales (i.e. paying players) can choose to restore action points by paying real money to replenish them. If the player subscribes to the game’s own club system of “favored” players, the player can store up to 40 action points. (Incidentally, Failbetter has mentioned that most of its income came from such microtransactions in one of its blog posts about why it hasn’t made Fallen London completely free after the launch of Sunless Sea.)

Such designs would be quite familiar to players who are well-versed in the shenanigans of “free-to-play” titles. To summarize, Fallen London is a “free-to-wait” game, though it is not limited to just being this.

People who despise such a system are advised to steer clear away, because Fallen London isn’t likely to shed this dubious system anytime soon.

Unfortunately, this will not be the only problem to be had with the game’s business model. The others will be described later.

Whales who subscribe to the club system also gain exclusive stories, in addition to the ‘perks’ of subscription. Such sequestering might not please everyone.

At the very least, there are times when the game might provide the player with in-game items which replenish action points for (relatively) free, but these are far and few in between.

For players who can put up with the “free-to-wait” system, there are still a couple of minor problems in which this system can be a source of irritation. This will be described later where relevant.

QUALITIES:

The framework of the game makes use of what Failbetter terms as “qualities”. These are actually variables which are oriented around narrative-based conditions, though this description is too brief to be completely appropriate.

Anyway, qualities are used to track the player’s progress in many things, from one-time stories and quests to repeatable ventures and endeavours. They also represent the player character’s personal capabilities. Players who have played Sunless Sea before diving into Fallen London might find this system quite familiar, because this system was used for Sunless Sea.

Some of the following sections will be about specific groups of qualities which happen to be considerable factors in the gameplay.

QUALITY RANKS:

Most of the qualities make use of a system of levels, or ranks, depending on how the player would see this. Next to the names of these qualities, there are numbers which delineate their ranks. These ranks are generally used to track the progress of the player in the stories which are associated with these qualities. Sometimes, they are also used to denote which one of multiple mutually exclusive options that the player has selected in order to conclude a story.

For example, there is a story-line named “Entwined in the Intrigues of the Clathermont Family”. The number next to the name shows how far the player has progressed in dealing with the problems of the aforementioned family; a higher number shows further advancement.

For another example, there is the quality which is named “The Dilmun Club: Loyalties”. The number next to this quality denotes which patron of the secretive Dilmun Club whom the player character has pledged loyalty to.

The rank of a quality may also be used to describe how much the player has grinded in order to increase it. In this case, the rank is generally associated with another pervasive gameplay element in Fallen London, which will be described shortly.

When a story-related quality advances in rank, this occurrence is accompanied by a passage. Sometimes, the writing can be unsettling.

CHANGE-POINT (CP) SYSTEM FOR SOME QUALITIES:

Fallen London has its own take on the ages-old system of “experience points”. It calls these “change-points”, or “CPs” for short, but experienced players would know better.

Many qualities can only increase in rank if the player can grind the change-points that are needed to do so. Generally, the amount of change-points which are needed to achieve the next rank is the number of the current rank, plus one. This simple system lets the player make use of spreadsheets to keep track of the accumulation of CPs.

The implementation of this system of CPs would make sense for some qualities, such as the main attributes of the player character (which will be described shortly). After all, the player could imagine that the player character is becoming better at what he/she does.

However, for other qualities, especially ventures and endeavours, the system seems to have been used to stretch out these experiences within the game, sometimes with little believable reason. For example, for the ‘A Nocturnal Visitor to the Palace Cellars’ story, the player will encounter an option to bring a locksmith over to attempt to unlock a door. Considering the writing for this option, one would think that the locksmith might not want to come along again, but the player can take this option again to gain more CPs anyway.

There is also a major problem with this system that Failbetter has not addressed for years. This problem is the inability to see the number of CPs which have gone into a quality, outside of the outcome screens. To elaborate, the player can see the number of CPs gained and the number of CPs remaining to get the next level in a quality when looking at the outcomes of actions, but cannot see these anywhere else. Furthermore, in the outcome screens, the number of CPs gained and CPs remaining for the next level are obscured if the associated quality has gained a level in that outcome.

Using a spreadsheet makes it much easier to keep up with the system of change-points which is used to control the rank advancement of some qualities.

STORYLETS & LOCATIONS:

The earliest versions of the game made use of what Failbetter calls “storylets”; these are activities which the player can spend action points on. The range of storylets which the player can peruse mainly depends on the location which the player character is in, though there are other factors which will be described later where relevant.

For example, the player character starts in the tutorial area that is a version of New Newgate Prison, so the storylets which are available happen to be about escaping the prison, as well as learning about the basics of the gameplay.

There will be more elaborative statements about storylets later in this article, when the other gameplay elements which are associated with them are described.

OPPORTUNITY CARDS & CARD DECK:

The gameplay element of opportunity cards and the card deck was introduced sometime after the conception of the game.

Opportunity cards are like variants of storylets which have been (mostly) detached from locations and will only appear according to the whims of chance. For example, the “Presumptuous Little Opportunity” opportunity card is one that is rarely drawn, but can be drawn anywhere as long as the player is in the city proper.

Like action points, opportunity cards are generated over every ten minutes. In the current build of the game, the generation rate of cards is virtually tied to the rate for action points; previously, it lacked this consistency and had caused some frustration among players who are trying to make plans.

Anyway, cards which have been generated go into a stack of cards, face-down. The player will only know what cards these are when he/she draws them from the stack and into the card deck, which appears above the storylets in most locations.

The number of slots in the card deck is dependent on the type of lodging which the player character has, or the location which the player character is in. For the sake of preventing information overload, lodgings and deck-affecting locations will be described later.

There is a history of storylets being converted into opportunity cards. The most prominent example of this is “Polite Invitation”, a mini-game which was formerly accessed by a storylet and which is now only available as an opportunity card.

Generally, there can only be up to 6 cards in the stack; any card that is generated after these are wasted. This means that the player will have to check every hour if he/she does not want to waste any cards, which is likely not to be always possible.

DRAWING, DISCARDING & KEEPING CARDS:

There are a few conditions which determine the number of cards which are drawn from the stack. The first condition is that the cards in the stack outnumber or equal the empty slots in the card deck; in this case, the number of cards drawn is equal to the number of empty slots. The second condition is that the empty slots outnumber the cards in the stack; in this case, all of the cards in the stack are drawn.

Keeping these two conditions in mind is important if one is to exploit certain deliberate limitations of the card system.

The first of these limitations is that the player will not draw more than one card of the same name. The second is that the player will not draw more cards of the same name if one of these is already in the deck.

This means that the player can choose to keep some opportunity cards in the deck in order to prevent them from being drawn again. This technique is not very useful when the player character is in the city proper, but it will be when he/she is at other locations which dictate the range of opportunity cards which the player can draw. For example, at the bizarre island of Polythreme, there are less than ten types of opportunity cards which can be drawn, so keeping these limitations in mind will allow the player to influence which of the cards are drawn.

When the player’s card deck is still small in size, drawing a non-discardable card can be unpleasant.

The player can also choose to discard cards from the deck, if these cards can be removed. This also means that these cards can be possibly drawn from the stack again.

One of the more engrossing parts of the gameplay in Fallen London is deciding which cards to keep or discard in order to influence the drawing of cards, especially at locations with a limited range of opportunity cards.

FALLING OUT OF REQUIREMENTS FOR CARDS:

Generally, the player can only draw cards if the player character meets the requirements to draw them. After they have been drawn, the player character could lose the means to maintain these requirements.

When this happens, there are two outcomes. The first is that the cards may remain in the deck, but cannot be used (but can be discarded, or used later after the player character has met the requirements again). The second is that the cards disappear; this always occurs if the cards cannot be discarded without being used.

Keeping this limitation in mind will help the player prevent the card deck from being clogged up with cards which cannot be discarded.

FREQUENCY OF OPPORTUNITY CARDS:

Every opportunity card has a probability of being drawn. The probabilities for opportunity cards are grouped into several tiers which are called “frequencies” in-game. These tiers have been designed with functionality in mind.

To elaborate, most cards have the so-called “standard” frequency, meaning that they have the same probability of being drawn. Cards of “infrequent” or “rare” frequency have less probability of being drawn. They are mainly there to reward good luck, because they often have lucrative options. “Frequent” cards are usually what the player needs in order to grind towards something, whereas “very frequent” and “abundant” cards are used for the purpose of ending endeavours or to help the player participate in a seasonal event.

Unfortunately, the use of probabilities also means that luck is a major factor in this gameplay element. For example, in the case of the cards which are used to end endeavours, they might not appear even though the player has been drawing many cards.

The Tower of Eyes opportunity card will be particularly important when the player character has become a Person of Some Importance, so it is convenient that it has a frequency of, well, “Frequent”.

AUTO-FIRE CARDS:

There are some opportunity cards which appear as red-rimmed cards. They are called “auto-fire” cards, mainly because they are considered to be used as soon as the player clicks/taps on them.

Auto-fire cards will consume action points if they are used, if the player has any action points left. However, if the player does not have any left, they can be used anyway. Wily players can exploit this by draining away all action points before using them, though of course this might be a problem if the player needs to have a bunch of action points for an option which uses many points.

CHALLENGES:

For better or worse, luck is a factor in the gameplay. One of the ways that luck expresses itself is through the gameplay element of “challenges”. Challenges are options which make use of RNG rolls.

For many challenges, the threshold at which a roll is considered a failure or a success is dependent on certain qualities which the player character has. For example, there are many challenges which utilize the main attributes of the player character; there will be more elaboration on main attributes later. Generally, higher ranks for these qualities means that more RNG roll outcomes will fall inside the range in which the roll is considered a success.

In the wiki for the game, ardent followers have generated tables for the thresholds at which roll outcomes are considered a success. It is in the player’s interest to seek out these tables so as to know which ranks of qualities are needed for guaranteed success, i.e. 100% chance of the outcome being considered a success.

The scaling of the quality-dependent thresholds for these challenges is done in two ways, as described by ardent followers of the game: “narrow” and “broad”. The “narrow” scaling is usually used for qualities other than the main attributes, whereas the “broad” scaling is used for challenges which use the main attributes.

Unfortunately, not all challenges allow the player to achieve a 100% chance of success. There are pure luck-based challenges, such as the options to convert Tier 3 resources into other Tier 3 resources (there will be more elaboration on this later). There is no 100% chance of success for these rolls; the player will just have to cross his/her fingers and hope for superb luck or hope to avoid bad luck.

SOCIAL ACTIONS:

Social actions are options which are generally available at the player character’s lodgings. To perform these, the player character needs the consent of another player character, in addition to other requirements such as both characters being in the city proper and qualities which the characters must have.

Incidentally, many social actions happen to have better benefits than similar options which do not need the involvement of another player character. These will be described in later sections, where relevant.

MAIN ATTRIBUTES:

“Main attributes” is the term which the wiki for the game uses to describe the four qualities which describe the player character’s personal capabilities.

Although they might have been given eloquent names, experienced players would recognize them as the archetypal statistics of strength, dexterity, charisma and intelligence. However, these main attributes in Fallen London do not exactly work like the statistics in typical so-called RPGs. Instead of being used as the basis for the calculations of various other statistics, these qualities have more relevance to the many narratives of Fallen London.

For example, in the case of role-playing options which require brutality or courage, the Dangerous quality is used.

The levels of the main attributes are used to determine whether some opportunity cards or storylets will appear. Prior to a string of updates which tidied up storylets in the districts of London, this was especially the case. After the updates, far fewer storylets and opportunity cards would appear due to the levels of these main attributes, purportedly for the better according to Failbetter.

There is quite a number of people to seduce in Veilgarden. Only two of them will return in later content, however.

CHALLENGES WITH MAIN ATTRIBUTES & ADVANTAGE ITEMS:

The challenges which use main attributes grant CPs to the associated attributes, regardless of the outcome. The amount of CPs which are gained is inversely proportional to the possibility of success. Moreover, a successful outcome generally provides more CPs than a failure.

The player can make use of so-called “Advantage” items in order to force a re-roll on these challenges if bad luck failed the roll the first time around. This is just as well, because there will be many challenges which are well beyond the player character’s capability to achieve guaranteed success.

However, the outcome of re-rolls must be accepted by the player; they cannot be re-rolled again. On the other hand, the player can choose to simply abandon the challenge; doing so will be as if nothing happened. Nevertheless, the player will forfeit the action points which have been spent on the challenge, as well as the circumstances which led to challenges, in the case of challenges which are not easy to gain access to.

Anyway, Advantage items come in two types: the current and more common version of Second Chances, and the older, and now rarer, version of Second Chances.

As their names suggest, Second Chances allow the player to re-attempt failed challenges which utilize main attributes, but only these challenges; they cannot be used to re-roll any other kinds of challenges. Furthermore, each type of Second Chance is only associated with one main attribute. For example, Hard-Earned Lessons are associated with the Dangerous main attribute and can thus only be used for Dangerous-based challenges.

The older forms of Second Chances can only be used in such a manner. They have been rendered obsolete by the current versions of Second Chances, which are easier to obtain and are also used for at least two other purposes.

One of these purposes is that some options for some scenarios requires the consumption of Second Chances. For example, there is an opportunity card in the Cave of the Nadir which allows the player to exchange Second Chances for valuable items.

The other purpose will be described in its own section, because it has greater gameplay-affecting consequences.

POWER-LEVELLING MAIN ATTRIBUTES AND FARMING SECOND CHANCES WITH SOCIAL ACTIONS:

The other aforementioned purpose of the current Second Chances is that they can be spent in batches of five at the player character’s Lodgings in order to increase their associated Main Attributes.

Incidentally, these Second Chances can be accrued by performing certain social actions. These particular social actions can be performed between two player characters so that both of them obtain Second Chances. There does not appear to be any noticeable limitation for such social actions, other than a soft-cap on the number of Second Chances that can be obtained in this way.

This means that players can exploit these social actions in order to farm Second Chances, and then use these to power-level their main attributes.

The player might want to spend some Advantage items for one-time only challenges.

CARDS TIED TO RANGES OF MAIN ATTRIBUTES:

Despite updates which re-ordered opportunity cards and storylets, there are still a bunch of opportunity cards which will only appear when the player character has his/her main attributes in specific ranges of levels.

For example, “Tea with the Inspector” is an opportunity card that only appears when the player character has a Watchful rating in the range of 81 to 118 levels.

Incidentally, these cards often have challenges which are usually beyond the player character’s current capabilities. Returning to the example of the “Tea with the Inspector” card, there is an option which has a challenge level that can only provide a guaranteed success if the player character’s Watchful level is far above 118. This means that without any bonuses to the Watchful attribute, the player is not guaranteed to succeed on the challenge roll of this option.

In order to utilize these cards, the player must purchase the gear which increases the attributes of the player character. Unfortunately, gear pieces are incredibly costly.

UNDESIRABLE RETURNING CARDS:

Failbetter is currently attempting to revamp the abovementioned cards so that they appear according to the ranks of certain qualities which it has introduced. These qualities are labelled “Making a Name”, so as to represent the player character’s attempts to ease into life in the fallen city. These qualities will be used instead of the ranges of the player character’s main attributes.

Unfortunately, its first attempt at doing so will not be pleasing to everyone. At this time of writing, it brought back some of “The Ways of (Someplace)” cards, which are cards which are associated with locations in the city of London. These opportunity cards have options that become unprofitable very quickly. (The only exception is “Ways of the Flit”, but this card was not brought back.)

In fact, they appear to be mainly there so that the player has the option of paying Fate to unlock their associated locations, in case the player has not done so already.

SOFT-CAPPING OF CP THRESHOLDS FOR MAIN ATTRIBUTES:

As mentioned earlier, the main attributes are qualities which use the CP system, which requires the player to garner enough CPs to achieve the next level in the qualities. Main attributes can reach up to level 200 in the build of the game at this time of writing; at first glance, it might mean that the player will need to grind incredible amounts of CP to get through the triple digits.

Fortunately, this is not the case. The CP thresholds for level-gaining is capped at 70, after level 70. Therefore, the effort which is needed to plumb the depths of the triple digit ranges is a lot more reasonable than it would have been if there was not a cap. However, this is not exactly well-communicated to the player in-game.

The Darkdrop Coffee may be a much coveted item, but it also happens to be harmful to the player character.

“STORIES”:

There are many qualities which are associated with the many stories to be experienced in Fallen London. Understandably, at least at first, these qualities are lumped under the category of “Stories”.

Later, this might seem like a poor design decision, because that category is very much used as a placeholder for qualities which have yet to receive their own category. For example, prior to an update at the end of 2015, the “Airs of London” and “Airs of the Forgotten Quarter” qualities were lumped under “Stories” before being given a category of their own; these two qualities are not exactly story-related either, as will be described later.

In addition, the amount of qualities which are currently lumped under “Stories” can be daunting. If the player wants to check a specific quality, he/she will need to use the search function of his/her browser, which also means that he/she will need to remember the name of the quality. This is actually easier said than done, due to Failbetter’s tendency to write names for qualities such that they might be references to some other literary work or other works of art.

For example, there is the quality known as “Pygmalion”. Its name is a reference to a theatrical work. However, the quality itself is actually a progress tracker for a repeatable venture about training a culturally inept person.

Nonetheless, Failbetter appears to be aware of this issue and does occasionally re-order qualities around, such as in the case of the two aforementioned “Airs” qualities. Yet it could have been more proactive about this matter.

ACCOMPLISHMENTS:

There are qualities which are mainly there to denote how far the player character has gotten into life in the Neath. They are practically milestones, but they also unlock more gameplay options. Therefore, it is indeed appropriate for them to be called “accomplishments”.

For example, there is the accomplishment known as “The Darling of the Ambassador’s Ball”. This is obtained after the player character has managed to get into a high-profile social function and used that to gain considerable publicity. This happens to be one of the milestones in the progression of stories which are associated with the Persuasive main attribute. In addition, it also enables certain lucrative options on two opportunity cards; one of these lets the player reduce Wounds while gaining other benefits, and the other offers rewards of random but generally considerable amounts.

“CIRCUMSTANCES”:

“Circumstances” appear to be a category that is not easy to associate with stories, milestones or anything else. The category seems to be little more than a typical “miscellaneous” category, which the content creators use to dump anything too far removed from any other subject into.

In fact, some of the “circumstance” qualities appear to be part of stories that are no longer being worked on. For example, there is “The Cheery Man and the Last Constable” quality, which is associated with a story about these two characters, but which has not received any continuation update for a long time.

“INTRIGUES”:

“Intrigues” appear to be a category of story-related qualities, likely to have been made with the intention of somehow further categorizing “stories” according to technical descriptions. If this was indeed the case, it would have been an act of futility, because Fallen London’s writers have a habit of trying to make their stories as sublime as possible. Like “circumstances”, “intrigues” are likely to be another categorization that lacks conciseness.

“MAJOR LATERAL”:

“Major lateral” qualities seem to be like yet another category in the same vein as “intrigues” and “circumstances”. However, the qualities which have been lumped into this category have more in common with “accomplishments”, in that they act as milestones.

Yet, their relevance to gameplay is expressed through other qualities or even gear items. For example, the player character’s chosen profession is placed “major lateral”. However, most professions are associated with specific gear items, and it is the presence of these items in the player character’s inventory that is more relevant to gameplay than the presence of the “major lateral” quality.

The Darling of the Ambassador’s Ball is an accomplishment which the player should pursue as soon as possible.

MENACES - OVERVIEW:

The Neath is not a safe place for the body, mine and soul. Even with the familiarity offered by the presence of London, it will be difficult for a human to stay safe, or even stay sane.

The threat to one’s well-being which is posed by life in the Neath is expressed through the “Menace” qualities. There is one of these for each of the main attributes: Wounds (Dangerous), Nightmares (Watchful), Suspicion (Shadowy) and Scandal (Persuasive).

There are also other ancillary ones which are associated with specific stories. For example, the Turncoat quality is used whenever the player character becomes involved in particularly deep factional conflict. However, these Menaces are not as pervasive as the main four.

For the four which are associated with the main attributes, the player character generally gains CPs for them whenever he/she fails at challenges which make use of the main attributes. For example, most Dangerous-based challenges will Inflict Wounds on the player character whenever he/she fails at them.

It is generally in the player’s interest to avoid accruing too high levels of Menaces. Although there are no permanent game-overs, there are purgatory states which the player character will be shunted into if he/she gains too many Menaces; these purgatory states will cause the player to waste a lot of action points on trying to get out of them.

Each of these purgatory states have their own gameplay designs, which will be described shortly. Their descriptions will include mild spoilers however, which are unavoidable as they involve matters of gameplay.

NIGHTMARES & THE BETHLEHEM HOTEL:

“Nightmares” are the Menace quality which is used to track the player character’s loss of sanity. By far, this is the worst of the menaces, because once it gets to level 5 and beyond, the player character will start drawing more than one type of awful cards which cannot be discarded. Each of the other menaces usually has only one such card which becomes available at level 5, and even then, most of these offer some beneficial opportunities.

(For any reader that is thinking of disputing the above passage, there is a card which is associated with high Nightmares that does offer a beneficial opportunity, but it is one-time only.)

In other words, the player character gets into a spiraling positive feedback loop when he/she/it has lost too many marbles. When he/she/it has too much already, the player character is sent to the Bethlehem Hotel, which also happens to be an otherworldly mental asylum, albeit a posh one.

Getting out of the hotel can be time-consuming. The storylets and opportunity cards do not give much in the way of reductions in Nightmares. Many of them also require the player to make sacrifices, such as losing levels in the main attributes.

To say anymore about this particular purgatory state is to include spoilers. It should suffice to say that this purgatory state is the worst of the three, mainly because there are few ways to quickly get out of it.

NIGHTMARES & MIRROR-MARSHES:

In lieu of the Bethlehem Hotel, a player character who has been driven insane may be sent to the Mirror-Marshes instead, if certain conditions are met. The Mirror-Marshes is said to be less harsh, but that is mainly because the player character generally would spend less time here than in the Hotel.

WOUNDS & THE BOAT:

Perhaps echoing the legend of Charon and the boat on the River Styx, player characters who succumb to accumulation of wounds and other injuries will appear on an otherworldly boat which is travelling down an otherworldly river.

Interestingly, there is a repeatable storylet which allows the player to reduce Wounds without making too many sacrifices. However, the Watchful-based challenge for this storylet becomes more and more difficult as the player attempts it more often. Eventually, the player will have to resort to the opportunity cards, some of which are not kind.

There is also at least one opportunity card which the player can get that grants something other than Wound reduction. It grants a certain quality which the player can use for specific situations when the player character returns to the world of the living.

Yet, getting dead and getting onto the boat is not exactly a good expenditure of action points.

SUSPICION & PRISON:

Suspicion generally builds up when the player fails Shadowy-based challenges. However, in the current version of the game, there are actions which will cause the accumulation of Suspicion anyway, such as the accruing of Favours with criminals.

Anyway, once the player character has accumulated considerable Suspicion, he/she/it will draw a certain card which cannot be discarded. This card can be used to either reduce Suspicion or even gain more, and all of the options on this card change some of the player character’s quirks. Wily players would use this card in order to juggle quirks around. (Quirks will be described later.)

However, if the player character has gained too much Suspicion, the player character will be arrested and will end up in prison - again. Unlike the boat or the Hotel, imprisonment is a relatively easy state to get out of; the player has access to storylets which allow the player character to curry favor with the prison officials and inmates, resulting in (relatively) fast reduction of Suspicion.

Furthermore, unlike the boat and Hotel, there is a good reason to get imprisoned; this is the only non-Fate way to gain the acquaintance of a certain talented artist.

Despite what this picture suggests, this story is a very short one (though it is repeatable).

SCANDAL & THE TOMB-COLONIES:

Even after having made the transition to the near-otherworldly Neath, the society in the city of London still frowns upon conduct which would be seen as inappropriate in real Victorian-era London. It so happens that the Neath has as many delights as it has horrors, so there are many kinds of conducts which are seen as scandalous.

Generally, the player character gains Scandal upon failing Persuasive-based challenges. However, participating in the pleasures of the Neath, such as imbibing the substance known as Prisoner’s Honey, is also considered scandalous behavior, so this will lead to accumulation of Scandal as well.

Of all the four main types of Menaces, Scandal is one which the player might want to keep high. There are many options which become available when the player character’s Scandal is high enough, and unlike the other menaces, it will not cause an inconvenient opportunity card to appear. For example, there is the aforementioned City Vices card, “A Rather Decadent Evening”. One of the benefits of this card happens to increase in magnitude when the player character’s Scandal is high.

When the player character is deemed too awfully scandalous, he/she/it is abducted by an outraged mob, bundled with fabrics and shipped over to the Tomb-Colonies to live a (temporary) life of exile. The player character can eventually get back to London, but only after the people of London has forgotten – or made to forget – about the player character’s excesses.

In the meantime, there is still a few things to do in the Tomb-Colonies; the player’s time there would be a bit more fruitful than in the other purgatory states. For example, there is a creature which the player character can befriend and bring back to London, if he/she/it has advanced far enough into a storyline about animals in the Neath.

MENACE-REDUCING CARDS & STORYLETS:

When the player character’s Menaces become significant, opportunity cards which give options to reduce Menaces will become available for drawing. The default options are not very good though, especially when compared to social actions which reduce menace.

For example, there is the opportunity card “an afternoon of good deeds” which can appear after the player character has accrued a Scandal rank of 2. Its default option is not very effective at reducing scandal.

Yet, they do have options which tie into a special venture, and these other options happen to be a lot more effective at what they do. These other options and their associated venture will be described later.

The Lodgings location also has some storylets which let the player reduce Menaces. However, these are the most inefficient means to do, because they either cost a considerable number of action points or they come with other setbacks.

Running multiple characters on the player’s own is cheesy and defeats the purpose of having multiplayer options in the game, but Fallen London is a lot easier to play if the player does this.

MENACE-REDUCING SOCIAL ACTIONS:

The reason that the aforementioned dedicated menace-reducing options are not particularly effective is that there are social actions which are far better at doing so.

At the player character’s lodgings, there are storylets which will become available when the player character’s Menaces has risen to specific levels. For example, after the character’s Suspicion has risen to level 4, a storylet which is about throwing Constables off the character’s trail appears.

These storylets let the player character send invitations to another player character, either to ask for help or to offer help. If the other player character agrees to the invitation, the character who is being helped will have his/her/its corresponding Menace reduced considerably. The other character, however, will obtain at least one CP in his/her/its own Menace rating (with the exception of Wounds), though there may be other kinds of penalties or even benefits instead.

Ostensibly, this feature of the game is counter-balanced by the need to obtain the assent of another human player. However, in practice, any single human player can create multiple accounts and thus have multiple player characters which support each other in reducing Menaces.

Failbetter appears to be aware of this exploit, considering the posts by its officials like Alexis Kennedy on this matter. However, Failbetter does not exactly see this as a matter of concern (which is perhaps for the better).

QUIRKS:

Quirks are qualities which define the player character’s personality. Despite this description, the player should not expect that quirks will frequently come into play; quirks actually do little more than enable special options. Yet, it is still in the player’s interest to build up and maintain quirks anyway, if only to provide the player with more options to deal with certain situations.

Anyway, some options, when committed to, will result in a change in the player character’s quirks. For example, choosing to help someone in need instead of preying on them will increase the player character’s Magnanimous quirk. Usually, this is accompanied by a drop in an opposing quirk. Returning to the aforementioned example, helping a person when there is an alternative to exploit that person will result in the loss of CPs for either the Heartless or Ruthless quirk.

QUIRK-RELATED FATE-LOCKED CONTENT:

A portion of the premium content in the game requires the player to build up specific pairs of quirks to incredible levels. These pairs are usually opposing quirks, such as Austere and Hedonistic. The narrative reason for this is that a certain exclusive club in London happens to favor individuals who manage to develop wonderfully complicated or hypocritical personalities.

Achieving the required levels in the perks can be difficult, because Failbetter has implemented soft caps on the levels of quirks which can be achieved with repeatable storylets and common opportunity cards. Generally, if the player wants to achieve the teen levels of quirks, he/she needs to utilize options which consume considerable resources.

It is unfortunate that the higher-end content which is associated with quirks is sequestered as premium content. Without access to this content, quirks are not particularly useful qualities to have.

There is no soft cap to the CP gains of quirks for the outcomes of one-time only stories. For example, in this screenshot, there is no soft cap for the gain in the Hedonistic quirk for achieving this milestone in the player character’s life in the Neath.

ACQUAINTANCES:

“Acquaintances” are qualities which measure the closeness of the relationship between the player character and certain interesting individuals. An example of these interesting individuals is the Sardonic Music Hall-Singer, whose talent for singing borders on the supernatural.

Among these characters, four are particularly dominant. Incidentally, each character is associated with one of the player character’s main attributes. For example, the Regretful Soldier, who is a drunken but still very skilled army veteran, is associated with the Dangerous attribute.

Starting the relationships with these four characters is not easy, because the conditions or circumstances for doing so only comes through specific opportunity cards which only appear at certain locations, or through the rare variants of successful outcomes. Afterwards, the player will need to build these relationships. There are multiple ways to do so, but for a few characters, the rare opportunity card that is “A Visit” is the only way to do that.

After achieving specific quality levels in the player character’s relationship with these exceptional characters, some lucrative options will open up; most of these are generally lumped under the aforementioned “A Visit” card, thus making this card even more valuable.

Two examples of these emergent options are the “City Vices” cards which are associated with the Sardonic Music Hall Singer. These two cards have options which reward the player with Intriguing Gossip and Presbyterate Passphrases, which are (information-based) resources which are not easy to find anywhere else.

The other acquaintances have lesser appearances in the game, but they still have their roles and uses. For example, one of the Mercy sisters can be obtained as an acquaintance, and she will be a handy friend to have when the player character establishes a salon.

The two City Vices cards which are associated with the Sardonic Music-Hall Singer will be particularly useful for player characters who have become Persons of Some Importance.

CONTACTS:

The real Victorian-era London had plenty of intrigues, mainly due to the many factions within the city of London at the time. In Fallen London, this is not any different, despite the transition to the Neath. Rather, it may have become even more complicated because of the involvement of the supernatural and inhumanly esoteric.

It is in the player’s interest to build up contact with the factions in London, because they have many things to offer to the player character.

However, it might not be easy for new players to know where to start. Their only tip is Mrs. Plenty’s Carnival, though it would be difficult to understand how the player can obtain connections to various factions at a bizarre “fun-fair”.

Fortunately, after the player has made some headway into building connections with the various factions, opportunity cards which are associated with them will start to show up in the player’s deck. These opportunity cards allow the player to deepen his/her/its relationship with one faction, while worsening the relationship with another faction, albeit by a lesser degree. Wily players will notice the net gain in relationships, and use these cards to juggle the factions against each other until they have gained high levels in the qualities for these relationships.

CONNECTIONS:

At this time of writing, the game makes use of qualities known as “connections” in order to measure the depth of the player character’s relationship with any faction. A “connection” is a simple quality; its level determines how well the player character is known among the people of a faction, and how closely involved the player character is in the affairs of the faction.

As the player makes use of these connections, they may rise or fall, like any other quality. When it falls, it suggests that the factions are somehow forgetting about the player character. Failbetter itself has expressed its dissatisfaction with this and intends to revamp the system.

Opportunity cards which are associated with specific factions will start to appear in the player’s deck after the player has established a relationship with them. In the case of the Bohemians, their card provides options to raise Persuasiveness and even pursue a second-tier profession.

FAVOURS & RENOWN:

Failbetter intends to replace the system of connections with qualities known as “Favours” and “Renown”. The latter measures how well the player character is known among the faction, and ostensibly, it cannot be diminished. The former is what the player can expend in order to reap benefits from the relationship with the faction, but what benefits there can be are decided by the level of Renown.

This makes for a more comprehensive and believable system for relationships with the factions, though Failbetter deliberately limited the number of Favours to just seven, if only because it is the game’s “sacred number”.

At this time of writing, only the Criminals faction has benefited from this revamp. This is because the Criminal factions are the most detached from the other factions, so their associated stories and opportunity cards were easier to rework than the others.

Despite this rather limited change for now, the revamp did open up new opportunities and strategies to exploit the player character’s relationship with the Criminals faction. For one, the change to Favours has caused each action which is spent towards gaining benefits to become far more efficient and lucrative. For example, there is the card “Implausible Penance”, which previously required the player to grind considerable amounts of Criminals connection CPs if only to attempt a single option. With Favours, the card is now a lot more useful for gaining wealth.

CASHING IN CONNECTIONS/FAVOURS:

In addition to the opportunity cards, there are storylets which appear throughout locations in London that let the player spend connections and favours in return for resources. The exchanges are not always great, but they do allow the player to obtain some resources quickly, without having to resort to the Echo Bazaar (more on this later).

Among these options though, there is one which is different from the rest. It is not a storylet, but rather an opportunity card which occurs only in the Flit. For whatever reason, the exchanges are far more substantial in terms of the monetary worth of the resources. It is not clear why this is so.

There are other non-story-related ways to spend connections, such as item conversions, which will be described later.

VENTURES & ENDEAVOURS:

There are things to do in Fallen London, but they can take considerable time and investment. For the purpose of this review, they will be called “ventures” and “endeavours”, mainly to differentiate between activities which require dedicated investment of effort and those which have interchangeable progress trackers (more on these later).

Ventures require the player to specifically spend action points on furthering the qualities which are associated with them. Progress in these qualities usually cannot be spent anywhere else. For example, there are some contracts which are put out by London’s Department of Menace Eradication. Action points spent in this venture yields results which cannot be used on anything else.

Some storylines end with the player drawing opportunity cards instead of having access to a storylet. This is an example.

Endeavours are a bit more flexible in their design, because the effort which has been invested in them can actually be spent on other endeavours, if they have the same type of progress. Wily players would make use of the means which are provided by one endeavour in order to achieve another endeavour.

For example, there is a storyline involving investigations of an incident at the only University in Fallen London. Effort which has been spent on investigations there can be used for investigations elsewhere, such as an endeavour to uncover the secrets of an individual who resides in Veilgarden.

“PROGRESS”:

The effort which the player has invested towards completing an endeavour is tracked with qualities which are placed under the category of “progress”. There are several types of “progress” qualities, four of them being associated with the main attributes. Any progress which has been accrued can be spent on any endeavour which makes use of the same type of progress.

For example, there is the “Casing…” quality. It can be accrued through some activities in Spite, some others in the Flit and through some opportunity cards which are associated with Shadowy. Any accrued “Casing…” can then be spent on endeavours in Spite or those in the Flit.

This interchangeability is convenient from the perspective of gameplay. However, it can be difficult to reconcile from a narrative point of view. Returning to the example of “Casing…”, any “Casing…” which is accumulated in the Flit is obtained by spying on people who use the Flit for shady activities; the information which is obtained is about people who make deals in the dark places of the Flit. Yet, “Casing…” can then be spent on facilitating the burglary of various premises in Spite; in this case, the information which is relevant is the interior layout of the premises and the routines of the employees, and certainly not about people making deals on rooftops.

(Spending “Casing…” on endeavours in Spite is less profitable than spending it on those in Flit, of course. The abovementioned example has been made from the perspective of narrative, not gameplay.)

Nevertheless, shrewd players will attempt to juggle various progress-accruing activities against spending progress on achieving endeavours. For example, the progress reward from associated opportunity cards can be considerable, so the player might want to wait for such opportunity cards in order to spend action points on them instead of storylets which produce less progress.

COUNTING THE DAYS:

There is a special type of venture that is known as “Counting the Days”. This happens after the player character has passed a milestone or two in learning to live a life in the Neath. The story-related details will be left out, but the gameplay-related details will be mentioned.

After the player has gained the ability to start this venture, new options will open up on the opportunity cards which are associated with the menaces. These options are more effective at reducing the menaces than the default ones. These options also have additional requirements, such as a payment of glim shards for a physician who would treat the player character’s wounds for an option on the “A Restorative” card. Nevertheless, a clever player will be able to juggle these requirements and still be efficient at reducing menaces, at least in theory.

However, these options only become available after the player has achieved specific levels in the “Counting the Days” quality. This in itself would not be an issue, except that the opportunity cards do not have enough options to cover all levels of the quality. For example, the “A Restorative” card only has options for levels 6 to 13.

After the “Counting The Days” endeavour is available, handy Suspicion-reducing options appear under this opportunity card.

If there had been more options, these options and their opportunity cards would have been a lot more fun to utilize.

The “Counting The Days” venture eventually culminates in the “Spending Secrets” card being drawn. This is the other main reason to go on this venture: the player can obtain certain resources which cannot be obtained any other way, specifically Marks of Credit, which can be used for some unique options. After that, the venture can be repeated, i.e. “Counting The Days” can be accrued again.

Unfortunately, there is a problem with this system. The Marks of Credit can only be used upon completion of one cycle of “Counting The Days”. This venture would have been more useful if the Marks of Credit can be used anytime the player wants.

“SOMEONE IS COMING!”:

At about the same time that the player gains the capability to start the “Counting The Days” venture, the player also begins to obtain increments to the progress quality which is named “Someone is Coming!”. It might seem ominous, but it is actually a way to reward the player for having taken advantage of seemingly minor elements of life in the Neath. In other words, there are many things which contribute CPs to this quality, and it is in the player’s interest to keep track of it if he/she wants to make the expenditure of every action point worthwhile.

Firstly, after the player has accumulated enough CPs, he/she can spend them on a certain option in Spite to get some cash, with a very small chance to earn a particularly valuable item. Secondly, he/she can accrue a bit more CPs than that and wait for a particular opportunity card to be drawn, which allows the player to cash in the CPs for some resources which have few other alternative sources.

GRINDING:

Unfortunately, endeavours and ventures are where the grinding-oriented gameplay of Fallen London shows itself. The player will need to repeat storylets and opportunity cards many times over in order to complete any endeavour or venture, which eventually saps their appeal. The writing for the text which accompanies them will also become stale too.

This is made worse if the grinding involves the consumption of resources, in addition to action points. It is even worse if the outcome of the endeavour or venture is randomized.

An example which has these two problems is the venture of Expeditions into the Forgotten Quarter. The player will need to spend resources or connections in order to gather the supplies which are needed for expeditions into the Forgotten Quarter, a gloomy and misty region outside of London. Afterwards, the player will need to spend supplies and action points in order to find certain places in the Forgotten Quarter. When the player has found them, there is an RNG roll to decide what the player would get. More tedious expeditions would make higher tiers of rewards available, but the player will still need to land the RNG rolls to score these tiers.

Expeditions into the Forgotten Quarter are some of the most resource- and time-intensive ventures. Make use of good luck whenever possible.

CAROUSELS:

The worst expression of grinding-oriented endeavours and ventures comes in the form of “carousels”. This is the developer’s and fans’ term for cycles of storylets which the player needs to repeat over and over in order to advance in an overarching endeavour, venture or even storyline.

In other words, carousels are what the player does in order to get progress just to get progress in something else. They can be tedious, especially when a carousel cycle does not come with rewards.

For example, there is the carousel of “Boxful of Intrigues”. The player will need to repeat these carousels over and over in order to advance in a storyline about friction between two mysterious characters who play a major role in London.

VENTURES & ENDEAVOURS WHICH END WITH OPPORTUNITY CARDS:

Most ventures and endeavours eventually culminate with the player having access to a storylet which ends them and grants the player rewards. However, some others require the player to draw an opportunity card before he/she can end them.

As mentioned earlier, such an opportunity card generally has a frequency of “Abundant”, which is the highest tier of probability. Therefore, the player can usually expect to be able to draw forth this card shortly after attaining enough progress. However, bad luck can mean that the player would not draw this card for a long time.

MULTI-QUALITY CHALLENGES:

There are certain challenges which make use of multiple qualities for the RNG rolls. These challenges require a separate roll for each quality which is a factor. In these cases, the player must succeed at all rolls in order for the challenges to be considered successfully completed.

One example of such challenges is one of the “City Vices” opportunity cards, “A Rather Decadent Evening”. For the challenge option in this card, there are rolls made with the player character’s Persuasive main attribute and his/her/its connections to the Bohemians. Both rolls must be successful in order to reap the rewards.

Unfortunately, some of these challenges make use of rolls which are purely luck-based, alongside rolls which use qualities as factors. Considering that the player will have to invest effort into raising these qualities, that the player’s effort can be in vain due to the vagaries of the purely luck-based rolls can be a source of frustration.

One of the Sardonic Music-Hall Singer’s opportunity cards has options which make use of two qualities for its challenge rolls.

RARE OUTCOMES FOR CHALLENGES:

Certain challenges have special outcomes which only occur if the player is lucky (or unlucky, in the case of bad special outcomes). Generally, these special outcomes are rare variants of successful outcomes. To cite a famous example, the outcome of robbing a certain furious and incoherent drunken (anthropomorphic) rat has two variants: the regular one rewards the player with a handful of Surface Currency, whereas the rare one rewards the player with the very valuable Ratwork Watch.

(Incidentally, this is the aforementioned option in Spite which consumes “Someone is Coming!” CPs.)

RANDOMIZERS:

For better or worse, some storylets and options will only appear when certain luck-dependent conditions are in place. These luck-dependent conditions include the qualities which are known as “randomizers”. Two examples of these are the “Airs of London” and “Airs of the Forgotten Quarter”.

The “Airs of London” quality is intended to show that opportunities and options may come and go in life in London. In terms of gameplay, whenever the player utilizes any opportunity or option which is associated with this quality, the quality is reset to a random level. Consequently, other opportunities and options may become available, while some others are rendered unavailable, depending on the level range of the randomizer.

“Airs of the Forgotten quarter” is mainly used for the venture of Expeditions into the Forgotten Quarter and the storylets in this part of the Neath. These are a bit more predictable than the options and opportunities which are associated with “Airs of London”, if only because the diversity of the former is less than that for the latter.

DREAMS:

Another major aspect of the narrative in Fallen London is dreams. Every denizen of the Neath has vivid and surreal dreams, and in the case of mortals such as the player character, these dreams are both a curse and a blessing.

They are a curse, because dreams often come with the Nightmare menace. They are a blessing, because they divulge esoteric knowledge which cannot be obtained any other way; this knowledge unlocks certain equally esoteric options to deal with bizarre problems.

Dreams are the slowest qualities to build up. This is because dreams generally only come as opportunity cards with “infrequent” frequency, and any CP gains are only ever one point.

Dreams often come in the form of auto-fire cards.

However, it remains to be seen whether dreams will matter more in the narrative and gameplay of Fallen London in the future. For now, they are little more than bizarre experiences with allusions to story elements which have yet to be significantly fleshed out by Failbetter’s writers.

For example, the “What the Thunder Said” dreams allude to the influence of a character which is speculated to be Failbetter’s take on dragons. Yet, at this time of writing, there is nothing concrete to be had from the dreams (pun not intended).

LOCATIONS:

Up to now, the review article has mentioned locations in the city of London, but has yet to elaborate how they factor into the gameplay. This section is for that elaboration.

When the player character arrives in the city, there are only five locations which are available to the player character: the player character’s lodgings and the four main districts, which are Ladybones Road, Veilgarden, Watchmaker’s Hill and Spite.

The player character’s lodgings determine how big the card deck is. Lowly lodgings provide only two or three slots, whereas the higher-end ones give more than that. Low-end lodgings can be bought off the Land Agency in the Bazaar after the player has settled into the game and learned how to earn income. The high-end ones are incredibly expensive, but there are other ways to obtain them, though these require considerable investment of effort too.

As for the four main districts, each of them is associated with one of the four main attributes. For example, Spite is where the player character can practice and improve his/her/its Shadowy attribute. These districts will be where the player spends most of his/her action points during the early days of the player character’s residence in London.

Eventually, the player will either have exhausted most of the content in these districts or the options which they offer are no longer lucrative. When this happens, the player will want to see about unlocking other locations. This is generally done via a storylet at the Lodgings location.

The other locations are not available by default. In terms of narrative, this is due to the labyrinthine nature of Fallen London; knowledge of routes to the other districts is not common.

Gameplay-wise, this restriction is there to stall the player’s advancement through the content of the game. Some locations are more straightforward to unlock than others; for example, gaining access to the Flit only requires a Shadowy challenge. Some others are absurdly more complicated; for example, access to the Mahogany Hall requires silly hats, weasels, talking rats and scraps of silk, among other things.

When the player character enters London for the first time, there is a tutorial which describes the association between the four main districts and the main attributes of the player character.

For better or worse, the player can choose to spend Fate on options in certain opportunity cards in order to gain access to other locations without having to go through the fuss of meeting these requirements.

REVAMPING OF MAIN-ATTRIBUTE-DEPENDENT STORYLETS:

At this time of writing, Failbetter is also using the aforementioned “Making a Name” qualities to revamp the storylets which appear according to ranges of the player character’s main attributes, just like it is doing for the cards. In fact, the revamping of these storylets took place before that for the cards, and the work that has been done in this matter is a lot more satisfactory in comparison.

The implementation of the “Making A Name” qualities brought back some older options as storylets which the player can choose to use at any time. It also made their arrangement more orderly.

However, the implementation is not without problems. The biggest problem is that elements of luck has been injected into the re-arrangement.

For example, the storylet of “Opportunism in Spite” lists down many of the storylets which were originally in the previous version of Spite, but what is in the list depends on the “Airs of London” quality.

LOCATION-UNIQUE CARDS:

The main draw of any location is generally its set of storylets. However, for locations which allow the use of the card deck, there may be special opportunity cards which are associated with the locations and which can only be drawn when the player character is in that location. These special opportunity cards offer options which cannot be found anywhere else.

The most prominent example of these is “Call in favours in the Flit”, which is a card that can only be drawn when the player character is in the Flit, obviously. The options in the card involves the expenditure of connections with three specific factions in return for substantially worthwhile rewards.

There are also locations in London which disable the card deck. These are usually locations which are accessed from other locations. For example, the Gamekeeper’s Cottage is accessed from the Watchmaker’s Hill. The Cottage does not use the card deck; in order to see it again, the player will have to exit the cottage to go elsewhere.

It is worth noting here that at this time of writing, whenever a player character accesses a location with a unique card deck, the number of available opportunity cards is doubled (but limited by the max stack size, of course). A wily player can take advantage of this in order to ensure that the player character enters that location with a full stack of cards.

TRAVEL MAP:

When the player character is in the city proper, he/she/it can move from one district to another by using the Travel map. The map has icons which indicate the locations which the player has unlocked. Using the map does not consume any action points in the current build of the game, which is convenient.

The map is only available when the player character is in London, and not any land away from London or particularly isolated places within London itself.

If the player has accessed a location from another location without using the map, travelling away from that location using the map means that the player will have to return to that location by accessing it from the other location. The player may have to waste at least one action point to do so, which means that the player might want to do some planning before accessing such locations so as not to waste action points.

The Travel map used to be a lot uglier than its current incarnation.

PROGRESSION-DEPENDENT REWARD-SCALING:

In the current version of the game, the player character’s progress through the game is tracked by his/her/its main attributes and, in the most recent build of the game, the “Making A Name” qualities.

As the player character makes progress, some older options and opportunities disappear permanently, which is just as well because they would have lost their appeal and are no longer lucrative. Additional options and opportunities will be introduced; these generally provide better rewards than the older ones. Incidentally, the risks of these newer options and opportunities also happen to be more substantial than the earlier ones.

The most obvious change in the scaling of rewards due to changing opportunities and options occurs after the player character has become a Person of Some Importance. This social status will be described in its own section shortly.

PERSONS OF SOME IMPORTANCE:

The player will know that a player character under his/her control has come a long way after the character has achieved the “Person of Some Importance” status. The opportunity to obtain this status becomes available after the player character has gain a level of 100 in at least one main attribute, though all four main attributes actually need to achieve that level before this transition can even be completed (at least without spending any Fate).

Even after achieving the requirements for the main attributes, the player character will need to obtain other achievements in order to proceed. These other achievements are particularly risky to obtain and require a lot of investment. For example, one of the achievements is to win many duels against skilled combatants by building a “Running Battle” progress quality and using the quality to hedge an RNG roll; failing the roll sets the player character back and also inflict Menaces.

After the player character has taken these big steps, more lucrative – and riskier – options and opportunities will become available. These also happen to require considerable investment, but after the player has fulfilled these, the payoffs are considerable and steady.

For example, one of the opportunities which arise from becoming a Person of Some Importance is to obtain a transportation vehicle. This vehicle in turn makes lucrative opportunity cards available for drawing.

A consequence of becoming a Person of Some Importance is that Menace-reducing “medicines” are no longer as effective as they once were.

There are other changes too, both good and bad. An example of the good changes is that some options in some cards and storylets have been upgraded to provide better rewards (in return for raised difficulty of the challenge rolls). An example of the bad changes is that medicines and unguents which were previously useful for reducing menaces are now next to useless.

Nevertheless, it is in the player’s interest to obtain this status as soon as possible, because it will be needed to access other content in the game and learn more about the powers behind the city.

The other significant gameplay elements which are related to this social status in the city will be described in their own sections.

SAILING:

Perhaps one of the most important reasons to have a player character become a Person of Some Importance is to obtain a ship. Having a ship allows the player character to sail to other places, away from Fallen London. There are other ways to go to other places, but sailing is a method that is more in the player’s control, especially in the current iteration of the game.

One important thing to keep in mind before the player sets sail from London is that almost all progress-category qualities will be wiped, along with other qualities such as any Knife-&-Candle forms which the player has. (There will be more elaboration on the mini-game of Knife-&-Candle later.) Therefore, the player will want to tie up as many loose ends as possible before leaving London.

Unfortunately, sailing is not a very fun mini-game, especially its previous version. This is because sailing is treated as a venture; the player must build up a specific quality which is associated with sailing in order to reach the place which he/she wants to go to. The quality has to be accumulated by spending action points on storylet options which are luck-dependent, or on non-discardable opportunity cards.

In the previous version of the sailing system, the opportunity cards and the card deck follow the same rules as those for when the player character is in London. Considering that the cards cannot be discarded, this can lead to the player having to choose between a rock and a hard place (sometimes literally) if none of the cards drawn are the ones which the player wants. Moreover, if the player runs out of opportunity cards, the only options remaining to spend action points on before they are wasted are the luck-dependent storylets. Furthermore, the gains from either storylets or cards are small.

All these limitations can lead to the player spending close to a day’s worth of action points on trying to have the player character sail from one place to another, with little in the way of profit. This version of the sailing system made sailing a rather unpalatable prospect.

As ominous as it sounds and looks, the Sea of Voices is actually funnier than it is scary.

Sometime in the middle of 2015, the sailing system has been revamped. The aforementioned quality, “Approaching the Journey’s End”, is now much faster to accumulate, and the cards are now more lucrative. Furthermore, the stack of cards next to the deck is always full, meaning that the player can always draw cards, though the cards remain non-discardable. Yet, there is also an unwanted change; the card deck is now limited to just three slots, presumably to balance the positive changes.

Perhaps the most important part of the revamp is that players can spend Puzzling Maps and Sea Stories to immediately accrue a significant level of “Approaching the Journey’s End” even before setting sail. This is expensive, but it does allow the player to cut sailing time short and thus reduce opportunity costs.

Yet, even with these improvements, there is still little incentive to go out sailing; the opportunity costs of staying away from London are considerable.

If there are any reasons to go out to sea and reach places away from London, these are the rare few opportunities which are only available out at sea, such as the catching of a certain hideous sea creature. Sailing is also needed to pursue the advancement of certain stories, especially the Ambitions (more on these later).

MAKING WAVES & NOTABILITY:

One of the most engaging yet most tedious gameplay element which comes with being a Person of Some Importance is gaining fame and maintaining it. The effort to build fame is represented by the “Making Waves” quality, while any fame which has been secured (at least semi-permanently) is represented by the “Notability” quality.

The player gains Making Waves CPs mainly through opportunities and options which become available after the player character has become a Person of Some Importance. For example, the opportunity cards which are associated with the types of lodgings which the player has will have options which allow the player to spend resources in order to gain Making Waves CPs.

Grinding Making Waves can be very expensive, and also luck-dependent. The CPs which are gained from many options and opportunities to Make Waves are wildly inconsistent. In fact, the only reliable and predictable means of gaining CPs of Making Waves are certain options in the “Tower of Eyes” opportunity card that have the player character sending invitations to other player characters. (There will be passages on the “Tower of Eyes” card and its associated lodgings later.) There are other cheaper options to Make Waves, but they yield little CPs.

Compounding the problem further is a certain weekly gameplay mechanism that can set the player back a lot if he/she cannot garner enough Making Waves in time. (This mechanism will be described later.)

Anyway, after the player has obtained enough Making Waves, he/she will then have to cash these in with a certain individual who tracks the fame of Persons of Importance. This provides one point of Notability, which is considered in London as the true measure of a person’s fame. Notability is in turn needed for many high-end options, such as gaining Tier 8 resources. (There will be more elaboration on resources later.) It so happens that Notability is often consumed from doing so, so the player will need to start the process of grinding Making Waves again.

Meeting this creepy person is the first step to using one’s own fame as a powerful leverage.

BIZARRE, DREADED & RESPECTABLE:

The level of Making Waves which is needed to obtain a point of Notability is not fixed. Generally, it starts at 20, with an additional 4 levels for each point of Notability which the player character has. Obviously, gaining more Notability – and maintaining it – becomes progressively more difficult.

However, the player can reduce the level of Making Waves which is needed by accruing points in the qualities known as “Bizarre”, “Dreaded” and “Respectable”. Generally, these qualities can only be accumulated by equipping gear and other inventory items which grant these qualities. Furthermore, ever since February 2014, there is a yearly event which can grant permanent points of these qualities unto a player character, assuming that the player character has pursued a specific quest to its non-premium end-point.

The details of this gameplay element is not exactly well-communicated to the player in-game. There are few in-game hints which describe what the Bizarre, Dreaded or Respectable qualities do regarding the accumulation of Notability. It is more than likely that the player will need to rely on third-party documentation for the game in order to figure these out.

INVENTORY - OVERVIEW:

Fallen London happens to take the “role-playing” part of RPG gameplay more seriously than any other aspects of RPGs. That is not to say that the game does not dip its hand into things like gear and loot.

Each player character has a tab which is dedicated to cataloguing the qualities which he/she has accrued. This tab also happens to display the resources and assets which he/she has accumulated. This tab can have an incredible number of icons, which become more numerous the longer the player plays the game.

It can be overwhelming to a new player, but fortunately, Failbetter has improved the user interface for this tab over the years, such as introducing more categories to list resources under and providing tooltips for just about every icon.

ASSETS - OVERVIEW:

The player character has trappings which generally grant bonuses to his/her/its main attributes. Some of these assets also happen to offer opportunities of their own, or enable options which would not have been possible without them.

Generally, the player character can only “equip” one of each type of assets and thus gain only the bonuses from this one asset. For example, the player character can have many weapons, but can only equip one weapon at a time; only the bonuses from this weapon will be conferred. If the player wants the bonuses from another weapon, the player will need to switch out the currently equipped weapon.

The inventory screen of a veteran player character can look rather dense to a newcomer.

The types of assets which are notable for their gameplay designs will be described in their own sections.

GEAR:

The player character’s assets include gear, the concept of which would be familiar to veterans of RPGs. There are hats, clothing (for the torso region), gloves, boots and weapons. For the most part, these just provide bonuses, but some of these gear pieces do enable some options or make available some opportunities – or cause problems, in some cases.

For example, the Ratskin Suit is generally harmless on its own. However, if the player has a Working Rat companion, a particular occasion will arise due to the Working Rat’s discomfort with the player character’s choice of apparel. This occasion can actually lead to an entire storyline, though details of this will of course be left out.

It is unfortunate that there are not many pieces of gear which provide such opportunities. Even if they do, it is often one-time only. Thus, there are many pieces of gear which become redundant after the player character has obtained the gear pieces which provide the best bonuses of the same types.

COMPANIONS:

Companions are friends, admirers, pets or employees which are around to provide their skills and capabilities for the player character to use. Gameplay-wise, their skills and capabilities are represented as bonuses to the player character’s own qualities.

Like gear pieces, only the companion who is currently “equipped” will confer bonuses. There are also many companions, many of whom confer the same types of benefits. Therefore, there is also a problem of redundancy among companions.

However, some companions, especially those who are hired/indentured employees, do introduce their own opportunity cards to the deck, provided that certain other requirements are met. For example, the Winsome Dispossessed Orphan will generate an opportunity card if the player character has some Laudanum; this card can be used to gain even more Laudanum, or to readjust the player character’s Ruthless and Magnanimous quirks.

Amusingly, there are also opportunity cards which can be drawn if the player has a pair of companions who happen to oppose each other. Generally, these opportunity cards can be troublesome because they cannot be discarded and any option to resolve the conflict has bad consequences. For example, the Midnight Matriarch, which is a supernatural cat, will not co-exist well with the Scuttering Squad, which is a pack of (well-armed) criminal rats. Any resolution which the player picks will result in nasty consequences.

The Clandestine Rendezvous storylet grants one of a type of companions which are known among followers of the game as “Connected Pets”. These companions are perhaps the first companions to offer points for the Bizarre, Dreaded or Respectable qualities.

ASSETS OF A PERSON OF IMPORTANCE:

After the player character has become a Person of Some Importance, he/she/it gains the opportunity to obtain assets which are not available to lowlier people. These assets are membership in a club, affiliations with influential/high-profile organizations and a ship, among other things.

These assets generally require a lot of investment in order to be obtained, but they either open up special storylets or make available useful opportunity cards.

For example, the Gang of Hoodlums is an “affiliation”-type asset which requires a lot of material investment, such as the expenditure of a lot of rostygold, before it can be obtained. Once the player character has it, its associated opportunity card can be drawn, which in turn is an easy source of Criminal favours.

Some of these assets do eventually lose their usefulness. For example, the Formidable Black Gymnasium offers an opportunity card which can be used to grind Dangerous, but after the player has achieved the maximum level of 200 in Dangerous, the card loses its usefulness. Its card has another option, but it is neither lucrative nor unique.

It also has to be mentioned here that these types of asset are very limited in variety, at least to a player who has not spent real money to unlock more content.

THE SALON & THE ORPHANAGE:

Perhaps the most important asset which a Person of Importance can have is a Salon or Orphanage, both of which are affiliation-type assets. The Salon or the Orphanage can be used to gain a lot of Making Waves CPs in a few actions, after the player has invested significant effort into building up their associated qualities. Considering this convenience, it should not be a surprise that the requirements for the acquisition of either asset is incredibly steep.

However, there is not enough in-game documentation to inform the player about the way to obtain a Salon or Orphanage, namely the requirement that the player character owns a Handsome Townhouse lodging. It is likely that the player will only know about this after having read guides on grinding Making Waves.

Anyway, after the player has obtained a Salon or Orphanage, the player character will have to invest resources and even connections into it. For example, the player character can expend a lot of Society or Bohemian connections in order to make his/her/its Salon more attractive.

Of the two, the Orphanage has been said to be costlier to invest in, in terms of material. In truth, investment in the Salon comes with greater opportunity costs, because of the need to grind connections. In contrast, the Orphanage has some investment options which can be quickly taken simply by buying the necessary goods to be supplied to it.

The best options to expend the “Engaged in a Scheme” quality are the options which invite another player character to help.

After the player has accrued enough reputation for the Orphanage or Salon, which is represented by the “Engaged in a Scheme” quality, the player can expend this quality to gain many Making Waves CPs by making use of the options in the Handsome Townhouse’s opportunity card, the “Tower of Eyes”.

The options which are available depends on whether the player character has a Salon or Orphanage. The Salon has a lot more options, but they require the player to obtain Acquaintances, three of which are only acquired through seasonal events. The Orphanage has fewer options, but three of these are social invitations for other player characters. These options are generally more efficient and reliable than other options.

The main problem with all of the options is that their appearance depends on the “Airs of London” randomizer quality. The player may have to juggle this quality around before the options which he/she wants appears.

CLUB MEMBERSHIP, SHIP & “DESTINY”:

There are some assets which cannot be easily switched to others. These are membership in a club, the player character’s ship and “Destiny”. The first is due to societal rules of exclusive membership which prevents the player character from simultaneously being a member of another club, and the second is due to London legal regulations. If the player character wants to switch to another club or ship, the player character will have to ditch the old one and repeat the process to re-obtain either asset. In the case of switching ships, this can be incredibly costly, so the player will want to be as certain as possible about his/her choice in the first place.

“Destiny” is an “item” which can only be gained via the Hallowmas and Christmas seasonal events. Obtaining a “Destiny” gives a foreshadowing of events which would happen far in the future, presumably when Failbetter has decided to implement the end-game and end development of Fallen London.

The game is Failbetter’s flagship product, so this is not likely to happen soon, but considering that Failbetter has ended development for another game, namely The Silver Tree, this might happen eventually.

Anyway, the player character’s “Destiny” cannot be changed without spending Fate. On the other hand, there are no options or opportunities which utilize the player character’s “Destiny” as of now, so which type of “Destiny” that the player has does not currently matter.

EQUIPPABLE ASSET CONFIGURATIONS:

Sometime during the latter half of 2015, Failbetter implemented a convenience feature that allows the player to maintain up to four configurations of assets which can be equipped. The player can use this feature to switch between entire sets of gear and other assets which are equipped for their bonuses.

Although one could say “better late than never”, this feature of convenience should have come around a lot earlier; switching out assets one by one took considerable amounts of time. Moreover, there is not any in-game documentation on how to use this feature of convenience at this time of writing.

RESOURCES - OVERVIEW:

In the Neath, many things can be considered as commodities. Tangible resources are of course considered as such, and the supernatural nature of the Neath means that many of these resources are bizarre things. Prisoner’s Honey is an example; in the narrative of the game, it is a sweet liquid drug that can send the imbiber into the dream-world.

The “Curiosities” category is for resources which do not fit into any other category.

Information and secrets are also considered as resources. Considering that the game is set in the Victorian era where knowledge of intrigues is valuable, this is not a surprise. What is a surprise though is that memories are considered commodities too, and they can be plucked out of someone’s mind in many ways. The greatest of such knowledge-based resources is knowledge of the eldritch and esoteric; in the lore of the game, such knowledge is valuable, but it comes with the risk of insanity.

Debts and favours are also considered as resources. However, with the impending revamp of the connections system, these resources might be phased out or replaced with something else that has the same function but different narrative value.

Resources are generally there for the player to spend on options and opportunities, or just sold off for currency. However, many resources also provide their own opportunities, mainly through the resource conversion system which will be described shortly.

RESOURCE TIERS:

Before describing resource conversions, the tier system of resources will have to be described first. This system is not immediately visible to the player, but an astute player might notice that many resources share the same selling price at the Bazaar. The prices determine the tier of the resources.

At the lowest rung, there are the resources which fetch a selling price of one to four pennies for each unit at the Bazaar. In the narrative of the game, these commodities are often used as substitutes for London’s currency for many reasons, such as fear of being traced via the use of currency. Therefore, it should be of little surprise that the player character will be rewarded with payment in the form of these resources for many things, even after the player character has become a Person of Some Importance.

The second tier of resources often sell at 10 pennies for each unit at the Bazaar. There are surprisingly few sources for these resources, compared to the sources for the first tier or even the next. This is perhaps just as well, because the conversion of these resources to the next tier – which in itself is quite profitable – would have been easier to exploit.

The third tier of resources sell at 50 pennies for each unit. These are perhaps the most versatile resources, mainly due to special loop of conversions that is unique only to this tier. Third-tier resources are also provided as rewards for options and opportunities which are unlocked after the player character has become a Person of Some Importance.

The fourth tier of resources sell at 250 pennies for each unit. These are part of the rewards for rare successes at challenges, if the player is lucky to get these instead of the usual rewards. They can be used in some carousels to obtain guaranteed results.

The fifth tier of resources sell at 1250 pennies for each unit. The consumption of these resources becomes more prominent after the player has become a Person of Some Importance, especially the resources which are about influence over others. Some of them are also used for shortcut options, if the player treasures action points more than these resources.

Antique Mysteries are the only fifth tier resources to have an upwards conversion option in the inventory screen. The conversion is not exactly monetarily efficient though.

The sixth tier of resources sell at 6250 pennies for each unit. These are decidedly rarer than most of the lower tier resources. Getting them in a profitable manner is often a matter of patience and good luck. For example, Searing Enigmas are sixth tier resources which are included as rewards from certain endeavours, if the player is lucky. Incidentally, very few of them have any use at all; the only one that has a significant number of uses is the Searing Enigma, though a certain incident at the end of 2014 froze many of these usage options. (This will be mentioned later.)

The seventh and eighth tiers of resources are indicative of how much of the content in the game is under-utilized. There are only few uses for these resources, and even so, there might be alternatives to their consumption instead.

For example, three of the eighth-tier resources are used to obtain the much-coveted five-card lodgings. However, if the player is patient enough to wait for Christmas, the seasonal event of that time allows the player to gain these lodgings through much less expensive means.

Sours: https://www.gamespot.com/fallen-london/user-reviews/2200-12683599/

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Video Game / Fallen London

  • Badass Moustache: Some of the constables, it seems.

    "Now that's odd. When you find your way back to the Stuttering Fence's place, there's no one there. Except a number of inconspicuously placed Constables, invisible to the untrained eye. You, however, recognise them instantly by the strength of their moustaches."

  • Badass Preacher: The Bishop of Southwark. He's the finest orator in the Church. He's also a formidable wrestler and a former cavalry officer, and he hopes to lead an invasion of Hell.
  • Bad Santa: Mr Sacks. He comes at Christmas to take things. He might take your headache away. He might take your regards. He might take your reputation. He might take your auntie. If you're very unwise, he might take you.
  • Badly Battered Babysitter: Taken Up to Eleven; the premise of the Frequently Deceased Exceptional Story is that the governess to a family of extraordinarily troublesome children has gone missing after dying for the third time while looking after them and the Harassed Mother desperately wants to get her services back as no one else can last for more than ten days with her children.
  • Bandaged Face: Major characteristic of Tomb-Colonists, and one of the neutral-gender options has your face wrapped up, a la The Invisible Man.
  • Bat Out of Hell: London was stolen by them. Of course, only revolutionaries still use the word 'stole'.
  • Bavarian Fire Drill: A storylet in the University involves the player stealing from the Young Stags, and the player carries a few boxes to blend in with the tradespeople there.
  • Bazaar of the Bizarre: Sells clothing, candles, books, pet rats, bottled souls, typewriters, a cider that grants immortality... buys blackmail, love stories, songs, and all manner of thing.
  • Be Careful What You Wish For:
    • During the storyline where the player investigates a murder at the University, the Duchess may reveal that she bargained with the Bazaar after her lover was bitten by a serpent. He survived, but in the monstrous and agonising form of the Cantigaster. She theorises that a similar fate awaits the Empress and her Consort. "There is always a price that is known and a price that is not."
    • In the Heart's Desire ambition it's said that this was so with the First City, with its priest-king making a deal to save his lover... who became the King with a Hundred Hearts.
      • In the same ambition we find out that this was also the case with Gregory Beechwood, who used his wish to turn himself into the monkey, as he believed this is the ideal form to humanity. He came to regret this, and claims this trope as one of the reasons why the Marvellous must end.
  • Because You Were Nice to Me:
    • The Ambitious Barrister's motive for helping you become a Person of Some Importance.
    • Upon becoming a Person of Some Importance, you can draw an opportunity card wherein you come across a Soft-Hearted Widow, wandering along a theatre queue trying to collect charity donations. Say, don't you recognise her from somewhere? When you escaped from New Newgate at the very beginning of the game, she might have been the one who took you in and allowed you a spare bedroom. You can choose to make a substantial donation, at which she is overjoyed; with such a contribution, she'll be able to take in all manner of lodgers who are without a home. Aww...
  • Becoming the Mask:
    • The Church/Great Game conflict card concerns a spy that was ordered to infiltrate the Church and report on its secrets, but came to genuinely believe the Church's rites and is now refusing to talk. You can choose to either help him break free of the Great Game, guilt him into returning to his masters, or Take a Third Option and convince him to host a religious service for his fellow spies.
    • The Tattooed Courier's Secrets storyline can end with you realizing that you've grown too attached to the Courier to betray her secrets like you initially planned to and returning them to her instead.
  • Bedlam House:
    • Subverted by the prestigious Royal Bethlehem Hotelnote (yes, it very well may be the Trope Namer with the name slightly altered.). Its fees are almost unaffordable. The mysterious proprietor waives the fee for lunatics, who consequently make up the vast majority of the guests, and live in unparalleled luxury.
    • The third coil of the Labyrinth of Tigers zig-zags this with its "human exhibits": some of them are insane, some are political prisoners or cat-chasers who will eventually go insane, but most of them - with overlap - are body-stealing invaders from behind mirrors. That's why taking mirrors there is prohibited: exhibits can escape through them.
  • Beneath the Earth: The "Fallen" in Fallen London refers to its physical location. In addition, there is also Flute Street, which lies beneath Fallen London itself.
  • Big First Choice: As soon as you finish the tutorial, you can make the choice of one (and only one out of four) Ambition, a huge, sprawling story that lasts for the entirety of the game; although if you really want to, you can spend 50 Fate to buy Lethean Tea-Leaves so you can forget your current Ambition and choose another. (Light Fingers gives you some for free after it becomes clear that you're not going to get to steal a diamond at all; you can either use them yourself, or give them away to progress later.)
  • Blatant Lies:
    • You tell these in some early Persuasive storylets, and if you're successful, people believe you.

    "Devils are feasting on human flesh in the Veilgarden! The tomb-colonists are to return home en masse! Cats are toxic! Cheese is made from spiders!"
    "Russia is sinking! Fallen London will annex the tomb-colonies! Mr Wines is marrying the skeletal corpse of a nun! The Spider-Council is holding a débutantes' ball! It's almost impossible to stop once you've started. Just keep talking. Everything will be fine."

  • Blow You Away: The Stormy-Eyed quality seems to give one some degree of power over wind, or at least make one believe that's the case.
  • Body Horror:
    • The ending of the Finder of Heiresses storyline is pretty bad.
    • The description of what the Cantigaster actually is during one of the later Watchful quests defines this. You can find out that the Cantigaster was once a man...
    • A lot of the descriptions of the people suffering from too much irrigo absorption in the Cave of the Nadir. If you yourself linger in it for too long, you'll get a message about how your skin is starting to grow over your eyes before you escape.
  • Body Surf: How Jack-of-Smiles evades capture. It doesn't matter if you kill his current host, he'll be back in a new body soon. He's not limited to humans, either. A later story reveals that Jack-of-Smiles isn't an actual body surfer: 'he' is a consciousness residing in certain trademark knives, and anyone who touches one "becomes" him as if via possession.
  • Bomb Throwing Anarchist: The Revolutionaries, naturally. On their faction opportunity card:

    Some call them the dynamite faction, but they're very far from united.

  • Bonus Dungeon: The Upper River is among the last places that become accessible to a player: though you only need 175 Persuasive to unlock the Railway storyline, you can't actually get Railway Steel and lay tracks until you reach 200 Watchful and have finished 40 experiments in the Laboratory. None of the Ambitions requires you to reach the Upper River; in fact, content in the Upper River is tuned for players who have already completed their Ambition: challenges with a Broad difficulty level above 200 are commonplace, and 40 Renown and Ambition rewards can be put to use in more ways than just as stat providers. By extension, Khan's Heart, which can only be reached after gaining access to Balmoral and provides similarly-difficult challenges, also qualifies.
  • Bonus Stage: The Mind of a Long-Dead God might be considered one. It is nearly Menace-free, can provide a lot of Dangerous boosts and Aeolian Screams, and is the location to redeem the 40 Renown: Urchins item, but you can only get there by grinding Having Recurring Dreams: What the Thunder Said to 18, cash it in to gain 7 points of Stormy-Eyed, then grind What the Thunder Said back to 15 and Stormy-Eyed to 19. Except that there's no reliable way to grind What the Thunder Said: you have to draw a lot of dream cards to raise it that high, while also avoiding the State of some confusion (the default Nightmares failure state if you have no Memories of Light) at all costs lest it wipe a good chunk of your progress.
  • Booze-Based Buff: Drinking a bottle of Greyfields 1868 First Sporing wine reduces Nightmares and increases Persuasive.
  • Bored with Insanity: Well, frustrated with it. While in a state of some confusion, you might encounter a white cat that asks "Are you here to stay? Or are you just another goddamn weekender?" The game notes that you "don't feel welcome at all", and your Nightmares drop, as though you're willing yourself less insane so you can leave faster.
  • Boring, but Practical:
    • The Tier 1 professions aren't the most efficient in Echoes-over-time and their unique items are seldom best-in-slot compared to the higher-tier professions, but most of them are reliable sources of Favours which otherwise can only be obtained through Opportunity Cards, making them the best for grinding Renown. They also don't require Person of Some Importance status and their weekly payments can include PoSI items (such as Strong-Backed Labour from the Rat-Catcher's payment) well before you can get them the "normal" way, letting you build up a reserve while you're still working towards PoSI status.
    • You can, with time and some effort, acquire your very own Laboratory at the University. Here you can perform experiments, uncover secrets and mysteries of the Neath, take on students of your own and through all this acquire items and resources unattainable anywhere else... Or you can exploit the fact that you can give your Struggling Artist acquaintance a job here for the sole purpose of keeping his card from appearing in said Deck for as long as he is employed.
  • Bragging Rights Reward:
    • Reaching 10 Renown with a faction grants access to an item that grants a bonus of 4 to a single attribute. All of these items are outclassed by rewards of the Making Your Name stories (which cost no Echoes and are very easy to get), Bazaar items that are cheaper than the corresponding faction's Connected item (which is needed to grind Renown in the first place) or the Judgemental Hat (which costs no Echoes nor actions). Adding to the fact that a fair amount of Favours are needed to reach 10 Renown themselves, and each of these items requires you to draw the faction's opportunity card and spend 3 Favours, it's better just to spend the Favours elsewhere or store them and beeline for the higher Renown items, which are often more useful.
    • Reaching 40 Renown with a faction lets you obtain an item in a difficult-to-reach location that gives a +10 bonus to an attribute and some of these items are among the best possible for their slot. However, unless you had really high Connections before they got converted to the new Renown system, getting to 40 Renown for any faction is such a long and tedious grind with several other items existing that are only slightly worse and much easier to obtain than the 40 Renown ones that the items mainly just serve as proof of your dedication to that faction.
    • The July 2017 updates to a Person of Some Importance added unique "London's X" qualities that can be obtained only if you spent 15 Notability (which is extremely hard to build up in the first place) to increase one of your base stats and meet at least one other requirement for the quality associated with that stat. Getting all of these qualities enables you to become a fabled Paramount Presence, but given that this requires you to spend 15 Notability four times and 12 Notability or 15 Fate at least three times to change POSI specializations, any benefits that being a Paramount Presence might have will be massively outweighed by the costs of becoming one in the first place.
    • The items that are sold for 3 Memories of Tales, despite requiring real money, are some of the weakest ones in the game, and easily outmatched by those that are much more readily available elsewhere in the Bazaar. To a lesser degree, the items that cost 7 Memories of Tales are also matched or outclassed by free items, though some of them have other uses, and the free items tend to be difficult to get or locked to certain Ambitions or events.
    • Getting the Passion destiny is the epitome of this trope in Fallen London. Its Persuasive bonus is exactly the same as the far-easier-to-obtain Curator destiny, and to get it you have to 1) reach a specific ending of a Fate-locked story that requires you to act like a complete jerk to one of your acquaintances (and this story isn't resettable so if you got the non-asshole ending, you can't get the Passion destiny period) and 2) draw a rare card that can be found only in the Bazaar Sidestreets (and by "rare", we mean "you might not draw it for months on end").
  • Bread, Eggs, Breaded Eggs: One opportunity's story involves using fake cats. Some bite, some explode, some bite then explode. Another story involves you finding a courier delivering church candles having been temporarily killed by Jack-of-Smiles, you can choose to tend to him, steal his candles, or steal his candles then tend to him.
  • Break Them by Talking: A possible resolution for the Church/Great Game conflict card. You wait for the spy-turned-clergyman in the confessional, and...

    He enters, settles, asks you to begin. You open his dossier and begin to confess all his old sins back at him. He breaks before you’re halfway through, begging you to stop...

  • Bribing Your Way to Victory: The game is free to play, but you can buy Fate points with actual money. With Fate points, you can refill your actions instantly, refill the deck of opportunity cards, reset your Ambition, change your name or portrait, or open access to certain exclusive story branches, which might either avert this trope note premium stories, newspaper rename, naming for ships and spouses, Fate-locked conversations, downplay it note small, grindable storylets or play it straight note branches with little story that only serve to give better rewards for paying players.
  • Brick Joke: Early on in the Light Fingers! Ambition, you're led to believe it will be about stealing a "diamond the size of a cow" from Mr. Fires. Much later on, when it becomes clear it won't be what you're going after, your character remarks that, "there probably won't be a diamond at the end of this" when boarding a zeppelin for the roof of the Neath. Later still, when Mr. Fires offers to bribe you to get what they want (which happens to be what you're supposed to protect), they offer a diamond, and your character directly asks "is it the size of a cow?" It isn't, but it is not a normal diamond at all. Though if you trick Mr. Fires to protect it, and thus let the Hybrid escape and be free, in subsequent months of you getting the Rewards of Ambition your character might wonder how much it's grown, perhaps even to the size of a cow.
  • Britain is Only London: Justified: The city was the only part of Britain to be taken down to the Neath (except for a few Kentish suburbs, which form the Southern Archipelago, as well as Balmoral Castle), and the rest remained on the Surface. It's uncertain how much the rest of the British Isles (let alone the entire British Empire) still recognize the government's control, as the game doesn't describe the situation on the Surface in that much detail.
  • Brown Note: The Correspondence. Studying it makes your eyes bleed, your hair catch fire and will probably drive you insane. Not to mention the things that seeking knowledge of Mr Eaten does to the mind - specifically, compulsory self-destructive acts such as attempting to literally drown oneself in beer.
  • Build Like an Egyptian: There's a glimpse of the Blue Kingdom at the end of the Season of Skies:

    There are pyramids dwarfing Giza's; statues which make the Grecian Colossus seem a toy soldier.

  • Buried Alive: In part of the Light Fingers! ambition, an antagonist warns you that if you pursue your ambition any further, you will be buried alive. He fulfils that promise if he finds you continued the ambition, and you wind up in a coffin under the ground.
  • Butt-Monkey: Lucky Weasels. Despite their flavor text, they exist primarily to be sacrificed to the Boatman, used as plant food, exploded from singing "Pop Goes The Weasel" one too many times, and left half-devoured but still alive by the Bifurcated Owl.
  • By "No", I Mean "Yes": The flavor text for the Iron Hat.

    You can't go wrong with an iron hat. Except that you look ridiculous. That's a problem, certainly. Also, it rusts; it punishes the innocent vertebrae of the neck; it attracts urchins who enjoy the cheery ping of a hat-bounced pebble. It is, nevertheless, proof against dart, bullet, and light glim-fall.

  • Cap:
    • The four main stats are capped at 200, and advanced stats at 5 by default. Certain specific tasks can raise these to 230 and 7, respectively.
    • Favours are capped at 7 each: if you have 7 Favours for a faction, most actions that raise Favours for that faction will be temporarily inaccessible until the Favours are spent.
    • There are also many storylets that do not raise minor qualities (usually Quirks) if they are above a certain value.
    • During the Feast of the Exceptional Rose, Masquing is capped at 30 if you limit yourself to non-Fate-locked gifts.
  • Call-Back:
    • One of the earliest Persuasive storylines revolves around writing an epic poem about mushrooms. Far later, when you're at the Empress's Court being offered the position of Imperial Artist-in-Residence:

    My point is that the Court wishes to be entertained with original compositions. Your early works impressed the Empress, and she doesn't even like mushrooms. So, get to it, would you? We can't wait to see what you come up with.

    • Once you reach the Foreign Office, you can discreetly...borrow and examine a few of the reports there. One of them is entitled, oddly, Cheese: Made From Spiders? Your character, potentially recalling the above Blatant Lies, hopes that it's some sort of code.
    • If you fail at telling Blatant Liesfor your newspaper, you'll repeat word-for-word the same lies you told in the early Persuasive game, and gain nothing because it's not original.
  • Calling Card:
    • Employed by that most mysterious and flamboyant of burglars and agents, the notorious Civet. Their card is blank, but for a picture of some sort of animal - possibly an ocelot, or mongoose.
    • When trying to reduce Suspicion, one option involves leaving a fake one: stacking vases in the privy, leaving origami swans everywhere, and writing nonsense on the walls.
  • Cash Gate: You need to spend a certain amount of goods in order to open access to Mahogany Hall. In addition, visiting any location across the Unterzee (other than Polythreme and Apis Meet) requires a ship, and every time you go to Doubt Street you'll be charged 200 Silk Scraps before you become an editor of newspapers. Finally, there's the Hinterlands; none of the territories West of London can be accessed if you don't make some significant investments in order for the railway to actually reach the place; food and railway steel must be provided at every turn.
  • Catapult Nightmare: A side effect of your Nightmares stat getting too high. Made obvious by opting to go for a jog in the A Moment's Peace storylet, which states that "You wake up screaming, as is becoming usual." In January 2013, the Nightmare stat's image was changed from an eye to someone catapulting out of bed.
  • Cats Are Magic: Well, they talk, anyway. And they know secrets. White ones are deaf-mutes, but somehow this doesn't prevent them from having secrets tattooed on their bellies.
  • Cats Are Mean: The Starveling Cat! The Starveling Cat! Want to lose a hand? Give the beast a pat!
  • Cats Are Superior: The reason cats are so talented and powerful in the Neath? All cats have an inflated sense of self-worth and confidence. This means when they dream, their dream selves are not house-cats, but gigantic talking tigers, leopards, and panthers. As certain parts of the Neath blur with Parabola, the land of dreams - some aspects of their power can bleed into their waking lives, such as giving all cats the ability to speak and have human-like levels of sentience. The tigers of the Elder Continent are hinted to be not descended from surface tigers, but dreaming cats who escaped Parabola through mirrors and retained their idealized shapes.
  • Chain of Deals: You can do one with inventory items if you want. Most item categories have a stage where you can trade 50 of an item for 51 of an equivalent item from a different category; for example, 50 bottles of Strangling Willow Absinthe for 51 Whisper-Satin Scraps. You can then proceed to trade your Whisper-Satin Scraps for Journals of Infamy, and your Journals of Infamy for Correspondence Plaques, and so on until you've gone full-circle, having earned 1 of each item, some minor storyline progress, a decent amount of Making Waves and spent a large amount of actions.
  • Chess with Death: And dice, too, with the boatman, which brings you closer to life. Assuming you win.
  • Chokepoint Geography: You have to pass the dark cavern called the 'Roads Beneath' in order to reach Flute Street from London.
  • Christmas Episode: December is typically marked by "snow" falling in the Neath that has unique properties like being capable of dissolving souls, and Mr Sacks coming around to ask for you to give it gifts instead of the other way around. Except Eaten-Sacks, who actually will give you a gift.
  • Chronic Backstabbing Disorder: The player, if they desire. There are a multitude of opportunities to betray people, factions, causes, your ideals, and your good sense. This is not a good idea with the Affair of the Box story, though: you have options that support either the Powers That Be or their detractors, and if you waffle back and forth you'll acquire an "A Turncoat!" menace. If that gets too high, neither side will work with you.
  • Church Militant: During the "Bag a Legend" ambition, one encounters armored combat-trained nuns. Their rosaries have spikes. Other nuns and vicars aren't quite as violent, but they usually tend to know a thing or two about fighting. Especially those under the Bishop of Southwark, who both qualifies for this trope and enforces it.
  • Circus of Fear: Mrs Plenty's Most Distracting Carnival, at times. Especially if you're a Seeker of the Name.
  • The City Narrows: Spite, where the majority of the city's pickpockets seem to work their trade, and where you can get started on criminal enterprises in general. There's also The Flit, which has an odd relationship with the trope by way of being above the rest of the city. And the fact that going into the Flit if you aren't on shady business (or a courier) is just weird, what with the heightened chance of getting smeared on the cobblestones if you so much as trip with a rope, so getting robbed there is unlikely.
  • City of Adventure: London, naturally.
  • City of Spies:
    • While London partially does qualify, what qualifies the most is more of a District of Spies: Wilmot's End. If you want to play the Great Game directly, this is your place, and just about everyone you will meet between the cracked statues and old hedges is a spy for someone, be it a foreign power, the British Empire, a shadowy organization, or just themselves. There's also a few missionaries hiding in the bushes, who seem to be doing something else entirely that the spies themselves prefer not to talk about, and the occasional journalist to stumble into at the worst moments.
    • Khan's Heart, one of the battlegrounds of the Great Game, is a jewel that all the powers of the Neath grasp at, but can't quite hold. From the Khanate, players with access to a Cabinet Noir in Balmoral can plan, advance and carry out intrigues and espionage in the Great Game.
  • Clever Crows: Ravens are available as pets, and they come in both black and white varieties depending on whether you feed them blackmail material or mysteries, respectively. Most still feed on carrion, but they sing like nightingales according to the Flavor Text, and some even aspire to poetry. White ravens even have some aspects of The Phoenix, as you might be fortunate enough to witness your Dreamy Raven Advisor turn/burn itself into a Mystic Raven.
  • Cloak & Dagger: Spying is one of the non-combat employment options available to the community. Usually more Cloak than Dagger, but there's plenty of both.
  • Clueless Mystery: Spoofed in one University story arc in which you can investigate the murder of a research fellow. You can collect clues and even talk to the victim himself (as Death Is Cheap in Fallen London), but correctly identifying the culprit at the end of the term comes down to pure guessing — and the real culprit and their motive turns out to be the silliest and pettiest of the possible culprits/motives by a mile.
  • Cluster F-Bomb: One event card has a woman writing very scandalous things about you. One of the options is to unleash a Cluster F-Bomb of magnificent proportions in response.

    "You spit foul recriminations and vicious calumny. Ladies faint dead away and gentlemen stagger under the barrage. Your target runs, weeping, with her hands over her ears. You follow her! Your tirade continues in the street, where hansoms careen hastily off and urchins fall from rooftops. You pick up your victim's dropped letters and wave them as a final salute. You are spent."
    \\ If you fail that event you get this.

    "Three ladies faint. So do three gentleman and a passing waiter. Two cats fall off the roof and and an elderly horse outside keels over. You are denounced in two newspapers and a sermon. What words! You have definitely gone too far this time."

  • Coffin Contraband: In one storylet, the player can assist the Gracious Widow and her ring of smugglers in sneaking contraband out of the city in coffins. You're not told what exactly you're smuggling, but if you choose to peek in one of the coffins, you find out it's Clay Men — in other words, a Bodybag Trickdisguised as Coffin Contraband.
  • Color-Coded Eyes: Anyone with the Stormy-Eyed quality has gray eyes, meaning they completed Recurring Dreams: What the Thunder Said once.

    "Were your eyes always such a dark gray? Did you hear what the Thunder said?"

  • Colony Drop: What happens when a new City replaces the old one. The new city just lands on top of the old, and flattens it. Parts of it might survive down in Flute Street, however.
  • Color Motif: Each tier 3 Profession corresponds to one of the colours of the Neathbow except Viric:
    • Irrigo is the colour of things that need to be forgotten, like Midnighters' robes and Shrines to St Joshua.
    • Violant is a colour that lingers in one's memory. It's very hard to forget anything written in the violant ink Correspondents use.
    • Cosmogone is a colour heavily associated with Parabola, and it's the tint of a Silverer's spectacles.
    • Peligin is the colour of the eyes of Monster-Hunters, as they have consumed the peligin flesh of zee-monsters.
    • Crooked-Crosses often lacquer their crosses in Apocyan.
    • Gant ink is an invisible ink, meant for writing Licentiates' aliases.
  • Combat Pragmatist:
    • Dangerous challenges tend to make you do this. In particular, the Black Ribbon duels start off as honorable challenges, but inevitably turn into running battles and ambushes in the alleys and rooftops.
    • Another example is in one opportunity card, where you can goad multiple assassins into attacking you, and then take up a sniping position and pick them off one-by-one (nobody said you had to take them all on at once).
    • Yet another example (which doubles as a FireflyShout-Out), involves duelling a young buck who wants to kill you. When you agree to his terms and he asks when a good time for the duel would be, you shoot him immediately.
  • Comically Missing the Point: The player can go to church in order to reduce Scandal; regardless of whether they are successful, the character notes their fellow congregants were attractive enough to make it worth another visit.
  • Confusing Multiple Negatives: The image for the Smoky Flophouse opportunity card and two Newgate cards is of a brick wall with graffiti that reads, "Not to be blamed for nothing". So whoever scrawled it is being poetic or perhaps is responsible for... something.
  • Continuing is Painful: Typically, Death Is a Slap on the Wrist and only lasts as long as it takes for you to lower your Wounds quality. However, if you're Seeking Mr Eaten's Name around Hallowmas, you can potentially wind up as the quarry in a Devil's hunting party. If you fail to escape them, your wounds and nightmares are instantly maxed out and you lose all your money and any hell-related items of value. Ouch.
  • Controllable Helplessness:
    • Playing as a Clay Man. Until you remember...
    • A certain failure location in Ambition: Light Fingers. You've moved to a new area: A small, velvet lined box. You can't see anything. You have just enough space to twist onto your belly or your back. Oh dear God. Oh dear God.
  • Conveniently Interrupted Document: A sidebar snippet titled "A letter fragment, dated Singapore, 1821" goes:

    "I have, I fear, at last determined the cause of our poor Leopold's sad disappearance. You will recall that I sent by the Borneo a very considerable collection of [illegible] ... identified one variety as the sinister exile's rose of the Bosphorus. Sophia had long admired their colour [illegible] ... gardens here about the Government-house [illegible] ... although here they call it 'lion's rose'. Singapura is Lion City in the Sanskrit [illegible] ... There are of course no lions here, though many tigers. I would not mention this except that when I dream of Leopold, as still I often do, it has always seemed to me that there is a great cat present, the colour of sunset, which is also the colour of the roses..."

  • Cool Boat: The Zubmarine and Majestic Pleasure Yacht...if you're willing to pay exorbitant costs to build them.
  • Cool Pet: Many of the higher-level animal companions definitely count.
  • Cool Shades: The Set of Cosmogone Spectacles, the unique item for the Glassman profession. They give quite a large boost to Persuasive and Dangerous.
  • Correspondence Course: 'The Adventuress' Correspondence Course' is one of the fighting traditions you can select during the 'Making Your Name: Dangerous' storyline. Said course was set up by The Presbyterate Adventuress, and seems to be both in-depth and effective, given the feats you accomplish in the game.
  • Cosmetic Award:
    • Some of the story traits currently don't actually unlock any new actions. Presumably as the game grows they will become more useful.
    • In order to get a Noman tattoo, you need to buy a Noman from Penstock's Wicket in January and then keep it alive until the end of the Feast of the Exceptional Rose in February (which requires feeding a significant number of Vials of Tears of the Bazaar to the Noman to offset its decay), although the tattoo itself grants no tangible bonus compared to the other tattoos which are much easier to obtain.
    • You can pay 10 Fate to register the name of your Constant Companion or ship in the Bazaar Side-streets, or 30 Fate to change the 'exceptional reason' for which you entered the House of Chimes; this does not impact the gameplay in any meaningful way.
    • Reaching A Scholar of the Correspondence 21, also known as Courier's Footprint. There are various ways to reach SOTC 10 but once you get there the only way to reach higher is using Correspondence Plaques at the University and reaching SOTC 21 requires a whopping 300 Watchful, while you can only reach 282 Watchful (297 if you choose the Watchful POSI specialisation) without the Preternaturally Intent mood. Either way, you need to draw the rare Mood card once or twice, then spend a huge number of Correspondence Plaques and Aeolian Screams (and a Darkdrop Coffee cup if needed, so the Mood won't expire before you're done). However, while having SOTC higher than 10 can make a Making Waves generating check straightforward, it's just for bragging rights.
    • The Heptagoat, which is created by breeding together 7 Übergoats, each of which is bred from two Overgoats; this translates to a total cost of 163979.2 Echoes and 7 Fate, plus an Impossible Theorem which is even more difficult to obtain than an Übergoat. It only provides a bonus of 3 to Caprine Authority, and does not retain any Watchful/Dreaded/Bizarre bonus of its components, and any points of Caprine Authority over 1 doesn't provide any tangible reward, making the Heptagoat effectively a way to show that you are strong, powerful and wealthy enough to waste money on a worthless item.
    • Reaching 50 Renown for any faction is an extremely arduous task that requires you to either have had an extraordinarily high Connected level with that faction before its conversion to Renown or have a specific attribute at level 294 (which will require drawing a few rare Mood cards) and the patience to grind out Favours for an indeterminate amount of time. You don't get anything special for any Renown level above 40 (the level requirement for the best Renown items), other than a cool-sounding description of just how renowned you've become.
    • Becoming the Poet-Laureate requires you to be banished from the Empress' Court, serve at least six terms as governor of Port Carnelian, then come back to the Court and make a truly ridiculous number of works (each of which takes a fair bit of actions itself), as well as reach 290 Persuasive (which requires you to spend one or more Mood cards and/or have completed the 40 Renown grinds for a few factions beforehand). And in the end, you get some cool story text and can rightfully display your status as Poet-Laureate of the Neath on your mantelpiece, but the material reward for this ordeal is non-existent.
    • When Seeking Mr Eaten's Name, at the nightmare version of Mrs Plenty's Carnival, you have the option to spend 50 Fate for a ride ABOVE THE NEATH. The game warns (in very plain terms) that there's no interesting flavour text for you to read, your character will die, and you'll spend the Fate for nothing. And people have done it. It does not actually make your character unusable, but anyone doing this will be rewarded with the unique quality Scorched by the Sun.
  • Cosmic Horror Story: What is the Bazaar? A space crab in love with the Sun. What are the Masters? Space bats. Why are they collecting love stories? So the Bazaar can comfort a Judgement we know as the Sun when it inevitably has to go deliver a rejection from the Sun's crush. And if it fails, it'll be eaten by dragons.
  • Crazy Homeless People: The Topsy King, who is insane because he bet his mind on a card game and lost it.
  • Creature-Breeding Mechanic: In the Fourth Coil of the Labyrinth of Tigers, you can breed a variety of beasts to turn them in for rewards, or transform them into new creatures if you have the Empyrean Redolence formula.
  • Creepy Circus Music: The tracks for Mrs. Plenty'sCarnival in the mobile app.
  • Critical Hit: Never explicitly called as such in-game (and the wikis refer to them as "Rare Success"), but a number of storylets have them, usually granting a higher reward than normal.
  • Critical Existence Failure: You usually suffer no detriments whatsoever from a Menace until it hits the failure point. Exceptions to this include:
    • Nightmares 5 adds the undiscardable Merry Gentleman's card into your opportunity deck, whose Ubiquitous rarity will cause you to draw it again and again until you reduce your Nightmares. Nightmares 6 unlocks special red opportunity cards that increase your Nightmares even further.
    • The higher-end challenges for certain ranks of the "Making Your Name" questlines will forbid you from trying them if the associated Menace is too high. (You can't fight the best Black Ribboners if you have too many Wounds, you can't try the most lucrative Heists if you have too much Suspicion, etc...)
    • "Plagued by a Popular Song" unlocks a few Schmuck Bait options as it increases, and its failure state at level 5 isn't automatic like the basic Menaces (it's a red opportunity card), so you can theoretically raise it as high as you like without anything actually happening.
    • Having high Suspicion can bring some unwelcome attention at Zee, turning a good opportunity card into a bad one, but it's barely noticeable unless you spend a lot of time zailing.
  • Cryptic Background Reference: All over the place, though many of them are explained in the sidebars. Figuring them all out makes up much of the game's Jigsaw Puzzle Plot.
    • Epileptic Trees: Tons of theories are sprouting up throughout the internet about these, most notably the first four cities. Helps that there's always certain tidbits that remain completely unsolved to this day.
  • Crystal-Ball Scheduling: The banned play The Seventh Letter depicts how the Bazaar hired the Masters and came to the Neath. The Order Serpentine shows, in somewhat more literal terms, the Fingerkings getting the devils to make prisoner's honey, and later possessing people.
  • Cthulhumanoid: The Rubbery Men, moist green creatures with tentacled faces and hands. They don't speak English, but are still surprisingly polite and friendly.
  • Culture Chop Suey: The "Oriental Pleasure Garden" hosted by Mrs Plenty during the Feast of the Exceptional Rose is a mishmash of every Eastern culture she could think of, accuracy be damned. The narrative even lampshades a few of the inaccuracies for you, like a "Hindoo Philosopher" wearing a fez, "Turks" with Manchurian pigtails, and jugglers and roast chestnut stalls which are still from London.
  • Cultured Badass: Any player who focuses on Persuasive and Dangerous. An NPC example would be Mr Inch.
  • Curb-Stomp Battle: Several, but one of the crowner is the winning text for "Wade into the Ring Fights", where you character doesn't pay attention to the fight at all:

    "This isn't a fair fight. This is barely exercise. You outclass every fighter that the Medusa's Head has to offer, battering them senseless without needing to concentrate. Did you pay that bill? When is the coalman coming tomorrow? Why are people giving you rostygold? Oh, that's right."

  • Da Editor: The player character, once you have created your own newspaper.
  • Damned by Faint Praise: When finishing a short story, you choose what level of potential you believe it has, and the game rolls against your Potential quality to see if it succeeds. If it fails, the reviews are exactly the same as if you had succeeded two levels lower — as the attempted level increases, your character takes this as a greater and greater insult.

    "A storyteller of note and substance!"
    "Note and substance"? Clergymen are noted! Bankers have substance! Tear the filthy rag to pieces! Fling it in the fireplace!

  • Damn You, Muscle Memory!: The topmost option on the Guest Room at the Brass Embassy's card normally gives you Certifiable Scraps. However, during Neathmas, a new option used to be added at the top of that card for you to sell your soul that many a player reflexively clicked on before realizing in horror that they'd just signed their soul away. Later Neathmases rectified this somewhat by adding a second new option on the top of that card that only costs you another person's bottled Soul (much more replaceable than your own soul!) at worst if you click on it, but some players have still accidentally clicked on the "sell your soul" option below it.
  • Dead-End Room: The Avid Horizon, climax of the Seeking Mr Eaten's Name story. Once you reach it, your ship will be destroyed, and you have a last chance to turn back and be teleported to London. If you choose to knock instead, you're stuck. Forever.
  • Deader Than Dead: You can't come back from disease or old age, and if your body is completely destroyed, you obviously can't revive either. Death from Cantigaster venom is also permanent. A sort of middle ground exists, though; some people don't die permanently, but still sustain injuries too grievous for them to return to society. They're wrapped up in bandages and shipped off to the Tomb-Colonies instead.
  • Deal with the Devil: The Masters frequently offer such deals - there's always a catch. The devils are rather more straightforward - riches in exchange for your soul, for immediate collection. The Trickster career path offers a more elaborate recreation of the Faustus myth - beginning with simple confidence tricks, and progressing through black magic to your character being recruited to undermine Christian morality. Mr Eaten, too, makes deals of a sort, though he offers very little and asks for everything in return...
  • Death by Origin Story: Comes with the Nemesis Ambition. You even get to choose whether it was your character's lover, spouse, brother, or daughter who was murdered.
  • Death Is a Slap on the Wrist: Downplayed. All four failure states only require time to escape, so letting any Menace get too high is only an inconvenience, and sometimes it's necessary to go to these places to progress in a story or redeem a reward. However, there are side-effects for some of them:
    • The "state of some confusion" (the default Nightmares failure state) takes away some Dream qualities when you escape, unless if you're willing to spend Fate to buy a bottle of Honeyed Laudanum or move to the Mirror-Marches (the alternate Nightmares failure state if you have some Memories of Light, which still takes away the Is Someone There? dream progress).
    • Getting jailed (Suspicion) beyond the first time will cause subsequent sentences to be more severe, and being arrested for the fifth time will make it impossible to use Nikolas & Sons Instant Ablution Absolution (the Scandal- and Suspicion-reducing potion).
    • On the slow boat (Wounds), you can defeat the Boatman in a game of chess to reduce Wounds, but defeat him too many times and he'll up his game, meaning that the more times you die, the more actions it'd take to escape.
  • Death Is Cheap: Subverted: death in the Neath is more of a mild inconvenience than anything else. One storylet has you kill a journalist for being too interested in reporting certain things. "...He'll get better, obviously, but it'll serve as a lesson." However, dying in the Neath does prevent you from ever returning to the surface, unless you can get your hands on Hesperidean Cider. An advanced point in the old version of Seeking Mr Eaten's Name story allowed players to try to return to the surface, but since they must have killed themselves several times already to get to that point, you can guess the result. In the Game of Knife-And-Candle, being ambushed and murdered by another player is only a minor inconvenience...unless you were carrying Knife-And-Candle-specific equipment, which they can swipe from your corpse.
  • Death Seeker: Many of the Black Ribboners have strong overtones of this, and many of them are traumatized wrecks. There's heavy Driven to Suicide implications for some of them, too. Kind of depressing, really.
  • Death's Hourglass: The Noman's Friend quality measures how much health a Noman has. At creation, a Noman has 100 Noman's Friend, which will degrade by a random amount every week and can be increased with either Pails of So-Called Snow, Tears of the Bazaar or Taste of Lacre to keep the Noman alive. If it reaches zero, the Noman will melt.
  • Defeat Equals Friendship: You can take a contract against a Miniature Menace in the Department of Menace Eradication in Watchmaker's Hill; once you defeat it, it will join you as a Watchful Doll companion.
  • Deliberate Values Dissonance: Since this is set in the late 1800s, of course it'll appear.

    "Are we barbarians? Are weforeigners?"

    You hear murmurs of discontent about these 'Benthic Ladies' and their struggle for power. If it goes on like this, they say, women will be voting...

  • Determinator:
    • You, toward your Ambition. ...Unless you decide to ignore it in favour of other storylets.
    • Also, towards seeking Mr Eaten's name, if you choose to pursue the quest. After a while, it seems like it may be the only reason you still pursue it.
    • And figuring out what's in that painting...and attending to the needs of a singular plant... Come to think of it, a lot of opportunity cards are like this.
    • Also, you when getting out of the Wounds failure location. The text on almost every single card there ends with "You must find your way back!" You're getting away from Death on sheer willpower.
    • And if you spend the Fate to rescue your aunt from Hell. Pretty much to get to this point you have spent enough fate and warped reality enough through force of will to allow you to get a soul out of Hell.
  • Developer's Room: It's hidden in the Mirror-Marches, and you can see it as part of Ambition: Enigma.
  • Devil, but No God: Devils are quite omnipresent. While the Church still exists (and is quite influential), angels are nowhere to be seen, and God is rarely mentioned. The Bishop of Southwark and the Bishop of St Fiacre's both have plans to secure the assistance of the Heavenly Host, but it remains to be seen how successful this will be.Interestingly enough, for all the minor devils who show up all over the place, their boss hasn't been mentioned in the plot any more than God has. This could be explained by the fact that Hell's princes have been overthrown and forced into hiding by the Republic's ruthless efforts to hunt them down, and add a delicious bit of Irony: Creation's original rebel is in hiding because his minions rebelled againsthim. Of course the real answer is that the devils have no connection to Christian theology at all. They were servants and craftsmen (and bees!) of the Judgements who fled from their service to the edge of Parabola with no mention of a central leader. Souls are merely the raw material of their craft.
  • Developers' Foresight: Helped by the fact that the developers actively monitor the game and arehappy to add new elements in response to certain players' behavior.
    • From Christmas 2013: the acquaintance system had received an overhaul, allowing players to send calling cards to each other. One brave and foolish player sent a calling card to Mr Eaten's in-game account... and got one in return!
    • When selling an Eyeless Skull to the Bazaar, the shopkeeper will ask why you're selling it to them when you could get a better price from the Radical Factotum. Before Foreshadowing (or lampshading if you already know what he's talking about) that there might be some very good reasons why a player wouldn't want to sell it to the Revolutionaries.
  • Did We Just Have Tea with Cthulhu?: In the later parts of the Eater-of-Chains storyline, particularly after discovering that its real-world form is the Empress' puppy, the beast is much friendlier than it was when you first encountered it.
  • Difficulty Spike: Once you become a Person of Some Importance, all bets are off. Challenges become much harder and carry much steeper penalties for failure. Menaces are much harder to remove, Nightmares and Scandal especially. Items that were once commonplace and cheap suddenly become rare and expensive, and resources are far more scarce.
  • Diminishing Returns for Balance: Applies to both attribute grinding and items.
    • The Change Points needed to raise any attribute from level X-1 to level X equals to X, meaning that you'll need increasingly more CP to increase your stats until that attribute reaches 70, after which every level will only require 70 CP, but there's a trade-off in that the four training professions will no longer grant 250 CP each week if the corresponding attribute is higher than 70. And once an attribute reaches 200, the only way to increase it is to spend Notability, which is grossly inefficient.
    • When it comes to items, the cheaper items are vastly more cost-efficient than the expensive ones: compare the Emergency Blunderbuss, which costs half an Echo and grants 1 Dangerous, to the Infernal Sharpshooter's Rifle, which costs 420 Echoes and gives 10 Dangerous, or 840 times the cost for 10 times the benefits, but of course since you can only equip one item of each slot at a time, the expensive items are much more slot-efficient compared to the cheaper ones. This is even more prominent after you become a Person of Some Importance and gain access to the Affiliation/Home Comfort/Transportation/Spouse/Club items: you can equip them in new slots in addition to the older ones, but they are extremely cost-efficient (the Formidable Basalt Gymnasium, which gives a single point of Dangerous, costs 10 x Strong-Backed Labour, or 135 Echoes and 10 actions).
    • The same thing applies to lodgings: you can upgrade from the starting 2-card lodging to a 3-card lodging with a few hundreds of cheap items that will take a very short time to get, but if you want a 4-card lodging, then you'll need either tens of thousands of these aforementioned cheap items, or a bunch of much more expensive items (both of which will require a fair amount of grinding), and upgrading further to a 5-card lodging is even more prohibitively expensive, costing you one of the highest-tier goods in the game as well as a lot of Notability, while also requiring a fairly high amount of BDR.
  • Dirty Old Man: During a party, a "clingy octogenarian" whose gender is undisclosed may dance with you, and keeps groping your rear. Then there's that bandaged woman at the Tomb-Colonies, whom you can indulge.
  • Disc-One Nuke: Through access codes or events, it is often possible to acquire high-level items (like the Judgemental Hat or a Scuttering Squad) far earlier than you should be able to normally. These items trivialise a bunch of gear, but they are usually not best-in-slot, even when limited to Bazaar gear only (except the Portable Lamp-Post, which is the only 2 BDR Home Comfort that doesn't require spending Fate or completing an Ambition).
  • Discriminate and Switch: Subverted in a storylet, someone mentions "a large gentleman with a muddy complexion, if you know what I mean", but the player character automatically thinks "Clay Man".
  • Dissimile: Fighting a spider council is compared to fighting an elephant. A poisonous elephant. A poisonous elephant which can spit spiders.
  • Distracted by the Sexy: The Alluring Accomplice companion raises your Persuasive by 5... and your Shadowy by 2, the implication being that while people are distracted looking at her you have an easier time sneaking around.
  • Door to Before: Gameplay-wise, once you pass through the Roads Beneath and reach Flute Street for the first time, you'll discover a shortcut that allows you to travel back-and-forth between Mrs Plenty's Carnival and Flute Street in a single mouse click without having to spend candles to retrace your way through the Roads Beneath again.
  • Do Not Spoil This Ending:
    • The hidden Ambition: Enigma storyline contains no prize items and is played entirely through out-of-the-box puzzle solving. As such, Failbetter has politely asked players not to post the answers online, though privately messaging solutions to your friends is considered acceptable.
    • Players who reach the final part of Seeking Mr Eaten's Name are recommended to not give other players any information other than vague hints about its ending, although the recommendation does state that ultimately it's up to the player whether or not to follow their advice.
    • Anything that costs Fate is absolutely forbidden from being spoiled even the slightest bit on either of the wikis. This is a policy of the wikis themselves, not the game (though it is part of their agreement with Failbetter), so it's still fine to give details privately to your friends. A handful of branches cost a single point of Fate ($0.25 USD) specifically to invoke this clause.
  • Do Well, But Not Perfect: The path to becoming an author requires you to create a particular grade of short story in Veilgarden. Making a story of a higher grade is a waste of time and resources, since it only counts that specific type. Getting the unique items during the Fruits of the Zee Festival can be this too, as they each require a certain level of the Picking Through the Wrecker's Cove quality to obtain. That quality is in turned based off the quality of the Strange Catch you turn in to get it, and with high levels in several Quirks it becomes very difficult to get a low enough Picking quality to get some of the items.
  • Downer Ending:
    • Seeking Mr Eaten's Name requires you to accept an item called "A Bad End" and gives you constant sincere warnings that Seeking will bring nothing but misery for your character. The ending itself... well, we'd rather not say, but what we will say is that finishing it will brick your account and render it permanently unplayable.
    • The Dangerous path of the Mysterious Benefactor story. After pulling off a variety of jobs with him, Jack the Anarchist reveals that he is slowly turning into Jack of Smiles, and begs you to maim him so he can go to the Tomb Colonies. You either fulfill his wish, or leave him to turn, but either way, the man who helped you get a footing in Fallen London meets a grim fate, and either outcome weighs heavily on your conscience.
    • The final part of the Cheery Man and the Last Constable's story if you don't rig the game beforehand and fail the luck roll for it which causes the character you were supporting to be Killed Off for Real.
  • The Dreaded: The "Dreaded" attribute you find in certain pieces of equipment tracks this, tracking how much people think you're someone better off avoided, or at least not confronted. Seekers of the Name also scare the wits out of everyone, from urchin to Master. As they should be, because they're very unhinged, prone to violent fits of cannibalistic hunger (or just plain endless hunger for anything that could be remotely edible), eager to do horrible things to themselves and others, possibly seek something that may doom the very Bazaar, and in particular because they're horrifyingly determined, and nothing you can do to them can top what they've already done to themselves. Being anywhere near a Seeker, nevermind in the way of one, is bad, bad news.
  • Dream Land: Parabola is a dreamlike realm populated by strange creatures and featuring impossible geography. Those who enter into it disappear from the physical world for the duration of their stay and can reappear in other locations. The dreams of those living in the Neath have some influence over the geography of Parabola.
  • Drill Sergeant Nasty: One storylet has your character training up the Constables in the art of monster-hunting, with distinct overtones of this.

    "This is a sorrow-spider! Which end do you hold it by? TRICK QUESTION!"

  • Driven to Suicide:
    • Potentially you, while seeking Mr Eaten's name. A lot.
    • During the Dangerous route of a Mysterious Benefactor, the Anarchist went on a suicide bombing mission because he knows he'll be possessed by Jack-of-Smiles soon enough. You are given the option to kill him, so he can be shipped to the Tomb-Colonies and avoid possession.
  • Drowning My Sorrows: A frequent necessity to deal with nightmares. Specific examples:
    • Laudanum. Being a potent tincture of opium, it affects your physical health in exchange.
    • Greyfields 1868 First Sporing acts like laudanum, only better and without the Wounds increase. Bottles are hard to obtain, however.
    • The spiced wine from the Mrs Plenty's Carnival can reduce your Nightmares and even your Wounds if you're lucky; if you're unlucky you'll get plumb drunk and raise your Scandal instead from "regrettable incidents."
  • Drunk Rolling: The 'Rob a drunk' storylet allows you to do Exactly What It Says on the Tin.
  • Early-Bird Cameo: The Blue Kingdom, a location set to be properly introduced in Sunless Skies, is first seen in Fallen London at the end of the Season of Skies in early 2017.
  • Ear Worm: Failing challenges in Mahogany Hall gives you the Plagued by a Popular Song quality as a Menace stat similar to Wounds or Nightmares. The song is Pop Goes The Weasel, and something bad may happen to your pet weasels if it reaches 5. And if you try to be clever and don't have weasels, it'll instead messily pop some poor lady's pet weasel as you pass her on the street, which naturally doesn't please her in the least.
  • Earn Your Happy Ending: The Ambitions are incredibly expensive and difficult to complete, arguably the most arduous journeys in the game. If you see them through to the end, every possible outcome is a kind of Hell Yeah moment for your character. You either get exactly what you asked for when you began your journey in London, or you get something you didn't realize you wanted or, in the case of Nemesis, something you never knew was even possible in the first place. For some ambitions, this can apply to the characters you meet along the way, such as Clara from Light Finger or the monkey from Heart's Desire.
  • Easter Egg:
    • It used to be possible to play as a Clay Man by clicking the hidden gender option when creating a character.
    • Failbetter Games hinted on Twitter that the Where You and I Must Go Exceptional Story contained an easter egg, although it's more of a hidden branch that becomes available only if you do something truly stupid and then something truly cruel in response to the consequences of your stupid action.
  • Eaten Alive: If you're Seeking Mr Eaten's Name, it is possible to do this to your pets.
  • Eldritch Abomination: A great many, including but not limited to the Masters, the Rubbery creatures and Flukes, the Eater-of-Chains, the Vake, and more denizens of the Labyrinth of Tigers than have yet been named.
  • Eldritch Location: Just about every single area. London's only the least strange in comparison, and it's a place where trying to find your way without a map can be literally maddening, people usually don't stay dead, shimmery mist portals floating around the streets is a common happening, and it snows underground, the snow itself being practically a Noodle Substance in terms of the weird crap that happens when interacting with it in general.
  • Election Day Episode:
    • Starting in July 2016, Fallen London began holding annual elections for a mayor where players can campaign for the candidate of their choice. The candidates for the first election were Sinning Jenny, the Bishop of Southwark, and the Jovial Contrarian, and the victor was Jenny.
    • July 2017: The three new mayoral candidates were Feducci, the Implacable Detective, and the Dauntless Temperance Campaigner. New social actions were also made available, including collecting donations for Campaigners, helping fellow supporters with Scandal or Suspicion for Fixers, and raising mobs to attack opposing players for Agitators. This election ended with Feducci winning.
    • July 2018: The candidates were the Captivating Princess, Mr Slowcake, and the Jovial Contrarian...again. This year saw several changes: the Reputation and Career systems were reworked, most of the social actions added in the previous year were removed, voting was shifted to the start of the second week, and Mr Huffam ran polls throughout the election. The Contrarian emerged as the victor.
  • Equipment Upgrade: In the Cave of the Nadir, a few equippable items can be upgraded by enriching them with irrigo. During Hallowmas, the confessions acquired throughout the event can be used to upgrade companions.
  • Escape Rope: When planning for a heist, you can buy an escape route which lets you escape without getting caught.
  • Experience Booster: The Talkative Rattus Faber companion is this in effect, since it reduces all attributes by a substantial amount, which make all challenges harder, causing you to gain more CP on average (if you don't mind the menaces or other penalties caused by failing the challenge that is).
  • Evasive Fight-Thread Episode: The Black Ribbon duels are allegedly duels to the final death. However, only one of the duelists (Captain Vendrick) actually gets killed. Feducci comes back with Heroic Willpowerdespite getting hacked to bits, which is supposed to properly kill a person, and all the other duels get interrupted by various individuals, be it Bar Brawl participants, overly ambitious Sorrow Spiders, inebriated Vakehunters or the Things in the Cellar, before you kill your opponent. Even failing these duels will only put you at risk of the ordinary, recoverable death, at worst.
  • Even Evil Has Standards:
    • According to the "Advising the Loquacious Vicar" quest, even spirifers (soul-traders) find the idea of attaching a live soul to a dead body abhorrent.
    • In the old version of Seeking Mr Eaten's Name, the Starveling Cat asking a spirifier to stain your soul caused him to respond, "No, you damnable beast, I will not! A man's got to draw the line somewhere, and I won't, you hear me? I won't!"
    • The deviless Virginia will chew you out for releasing a vengeful Prince of Hell from its prison solely to force her to play the Marvellous early to further your Heart's Desire ambition. (That said, you might have chosen to only pretend to have released the prince from his prison...but you could only have done so if you convinced him that you were even worse than him.)
    • It's also easy to play this way, yourself, if you mostly indulge in earthly pleasures but refuse to deal with demons on principle. You'll raise both your Hedonist and Austere qualities quite a bit.
  • Everyone Is Bi: All the Non Player Characters are, and all characters potentially so - seduction storylets unlocked by increasing your Persuasion are the same regardless of the gender of your character, and include male and female (and ambiguous) targets.
  • Everything's Better with Monkeys: A Cardsharp Monkey is one of the companions gained from an ambition. However, if you have cause to incite his vengeance, he will not hesitate to cost you an awful lot of either time or money. Protip: Do not anger the monkey.
  • Evil Gloating: A great example in the Bag a Legend! Ambition, which you can exploit if so inclined: "What an agreeable little lamb you are... I have been grooming victims for the Vake since, oh, long before the Fall, but I've never found one as argh; damn you; ow; desist; REEEGH!"
  • Evil Pays Better: If you're confronted with a Heartless/Ruthless vs. Magnanimous/Steadfast choice, the choice often boils down to either "get a better monetary reward or do the right thing for a lesser paycheck" or "take the effortless option or work hard and expend resources to do the right thing".
  • Expansion Pack: You can play the game perfectly well without ever buying Fate, but some storylines might be expanded by spending Fate, some storylines are entirely Fate-locked, and you can subscribe to become an Exceptional Friend for £5 a month, which gives you access to the House of Chimes and the Exceptional Stories of that duration. Some Exceptional Stories add new options to normal parts of Fallen London after they've been concluded. For example, Cut With Moonlight adds an option to buy boxes of sunlight to the society faction card, which gives you hallucinations that can be experienced in several different areas.
  • Expospeak Gag: Using a fictional word. The Professor of Antiquarian Esquivalience. Or in other words, the ancient art of wilfully avoiding one's official duties.
  • Extreme Omnivore: The Starveling Cat is one, if the sidenotes are to be believed. Seekers of the Name can also drift into this when they let their hunger grow too big. Devouring their own entry in the local Phonebook of Important People comes to mind.
  • Eye Scream: Sorrow-spiders steal eyeballs, which hatch into new spiders.
  • Fantastic Drug: Prisoner's honey is a magic drug. It doesn't just give you the Mushroom Samba, it actually physically transports you into a dream. Just stay away from red honey...
  • Fantastic Racism: Nobody likes the Rubbery Men. This even extends to gameplay; they're one of three factions (the other two being the Church and the Urchins) who have conflict cards with three or more other factions, so trying to befriend them may clog up your opportunity deck if you're also allied with the Tomb-Colonies, the Revolutionaries, and/or the Constables. Clay Men and tomb-colonists are not popular either. The Rubbery Men have it worse, though.
  • Femme Fatale: The Sardonic Music-Hall Singer is a minor example, as associating with her is a good way to get dragged into criminal entanglements. The player can become a much stronger example, if she pursues Persuasive and Shadowy.
  • Fictional Colour: A number appear across the Neath: violant, cosmogone, gant, viric, apocyan, peligin and irrigo. Understanding what produces them and what effect they have on those who see them is the basis of the 'Luminosity' item category.
  • Fighter, Mage, Thief: Crops up in "Savage!", "Elusive!", and "Baroque!", the three qualities used by the Game of Knife and Candle.
  • First-Person Perspective: Usually everything in the game is in Third-Person, but plenty of content involving the Stormy-Eyed quality is instead narrated in First-Person. It can get very jarring when you hit a large slew of such cards/storylets which is bound to happen if you let it rise way too high and start thinking you are the Thunder.
  • Fisher King: The Fisher Kings are an urchin gang, based on the Arthurian legend, but it's not clear whether their domain reflects their character. The King with a Hundred Hearts is a Genius Loci example, whose very dreams shape his land and his subjects.
    • A few of the more esoteric storylets on Winking Isle, a late-game location in the Seeking Mr Eaten's Name storyline, draw parallels between the Fisher King of legend and Mr Eaten himself:

    "King Twelve, they say, was wounded in the thigh. He was robbed of what will be. You may bring him a candle or a heart. Or you may fly; you may fly."

    "Here he once stood, on the border between Parabola and the Wilderness, to look out across his wounded realm."

  • Fishing Minigame: The Fruits of the Zee Festival event lets you fish for "strange catches" that you can give to the Hooded Lady at the festival in exchange for unique/valuable items at the Wreckers' Cove. Getting the biggest catches to trade for the best cove items requires high Quirks, an assortment of Map items, and the Random Number God's favor.
  • Fluffy Tamer: The Labyrinth of Tigers is full of these, and you'll need to learn their ways if you want to make any sort of progress inside.
  • A Foggy Day in London Town: The weather changes every now and then, but it is very often foggy. Which is impressive, because in this universe, London is underneath the earth.
  • Foreshadowing: Because of how the game is written, a lot of seemingly innocuous comments in early stories or events hint at considerably larger secrets of the setting that don't come to light until your stats are over 150. And then there are bits that hint at stories that aren't explored in the game itself - for some hints, such as the some of the archaeology works in the Forgotten Quarter, pertain to Sunless Sea or Sunless Skies exclusively.
    • At least two instances in the ambition Heart's Desire.
      • When you examine the site where the Honour of a previous Marvellous had taken place, you find markings of previous players. Most of these come from people you have already met, except '10', which foreshadows a prior winner you will later meet, October, the 10th month of the Calendar Council.
      • During the match between Pages and the Cardsharp Monkey, the latter swiftly loses all its coins in a bet. It then offers you as its chance for a final match, which Pages accepts. Then the monkey begins playing for real, taking all of Pages's winning in one fell swoop, bypassing the need to chip at Pages's considerable lead. It then refuses to accept Pages's chance, cementing its victory. This mirrors how you will potentially win against the monkey in the final battle. Bonus points if you turn down its chance too.
  • Fortune Teller: Madame Shoshana, the city's most greatest Chiropteromancer. She writes predictions in the Gazette and can be encountered in Mrs. Plenty's carnival.
  • Freemium: Exceptional Friendship, an optional subscription that costs £5 per month and increases the action cap to 40, the opportunity deck size to 10 and gives access to the House of Chimes and the Exceptional Stories of that duration.
  • Funetik Aksent: An assistant of the Enterprising Astronomer:

    Hi have hay hitem... Hay cert-hain gentleman hat the hobservatory wanted you to have this here distressing hitem. Hi'm glad to be rid of the thing. Now, hif you'll hexcuse me, hi have matters to hattend to.

  • Fungus Humongous: They live in marshy areas. The player can meet some if they live in a cottage by the Observatory, go shroom-hopping, or are breeding creatures in the Labyrinth of Tigers.
  • Furry Confusion: Can come up in a conflict card if you have a Ratskin Suit and a Working Rat ally; one option is to reassure him that your suit was made from humanely-farmed non-sentient rats.
  • Game-Breaker: An unusual reverse occurrence. The quest for Mr Eaten's Name, essentially Self-Inflicted Hell, was considered so punishingly broken (being almost certain to take hours of grinding, destroy most of your character's positive attributes, and then become impossible to complete) that it went on hiatus for over 2 years. When it finally came back in 2016, it was heavily revamped and now starts with a confirmation card that warns the player exactly what they're getting into and gives them an item that they can use any time to bail out of the quest. invoked
  • Gameplay and Story Segregation: Sort of.
    • For some reason, moving from the Shuttered Palace to the Empress' Court takes an action, while travelling from there to, say, Watchmaker's Hill does not, even if the Shuttered Palace is located in the same building as the Empress' Court, while Watchmaker's Hill is on the other side of London. You can also freely access the Bazaar from the Foreign Office (which is also located on the opposite side of London), even if it costs an action and 3 Compromising Documents every time you need to normally move from Wilmot's End to the Foreign Office.
    • In some storylets, the text for failure seems to be more a matter of bad luck, or out-of-context issues unrelated to the stat required, than a lack of ability (examples including donating your body to science, and failing to keep quiet because your surgeon was drunk, someone at the pit fights giving one Curb-Stomp Battle after another, making the show too boring to distract your pickpocketing marks, or failing to decypher infernal contracts at the Brass Embassy because the cabinets are sentient and tried to eat your fingers). Also, when failing some storylets that punish you with some Menace, the raised Menace sometimes doesn't make sense. (e.g. You've failed to lecture some people and don't get paid. Wounds is increasing...)
    • In at least one case, fan remarks concerning raising the Heartless quality for leaving the Comtessa with her lover in the Finder of Heiresses storylet led to its removal because it didn't make sense to many why that was happening. Players felt that the Comtessa was there of her own free will and that they were respecting her wishes, not leaving her to a Fate Worse than Death.
    • In the Lab, Student Disgruntlement is a quality that starts appearing if you continue to work with your Students once they're at max level, representing their frustration at continuing to work under you when they are ready to graduate. Except that at least two of the students, if one read their flavour texts, (the Profound Student (who's very apathetic and slow and as such does not want to leave a position he likes) and the Gifted Student (who, as a noble, can't respectably indulge in her passion for science on her own)) are most certainly not in a hurry to leave your Lab and actually prefer staying under your tutelage.
    • Through Mr Chimes' Lost & Found, the player can acquire a number of items that callback to past Exceptional Stories, whether they've been done by the player or not. Some of these items are companions who featured in those story. However, the game does not care whether you've done those stories or not, and, if you have, what happened to those characters in those stories as a result of your choices. It is entirely possible to acquire a companion character who you saw died and the game would give no explanation whatsoever, such as the Stoic Classicist.
    • In the later stages of the Heart's Desire Ambition, Mr. Pages does everything it can to make you lose focus, such as turning off gas and water to your house, dumping fertilizer on your lawn, and informing you that a railway is being constructed where it's standing. The problem with this, however, is that to reach this point in the story you have to have bought a five-card lodging, making their actions highly improbable for a number of reasons: A Suite at the Royal Bethlehem is run by the Revolutionary, anti-Master Manager, A Sanctum at the Brass Embassy is headed by the Devils, and A Spire-Emporium of the Bazaar is managed by the Masters, which would mean that Pages would be driving a railway through his own home too.
  • Gargle Blaster: Amanita Sherry and Muscaria Brandy, two types of alcohol considered to be Infernal instead of Wines items. You might drink them if you can't read labels, but if you aren't a devil you aren't likely to survive to drink a second time.
  • Gaslamp Fantasy: Definitely Victorian, supernatural, and with Gothic roots, though it leans more towards horror.
  • Gemstone Assault: The Twelve-carat Diamond Ring increases your Dangerous by 3:

    "A huge diamond alwaysleaves an impression."

  • Genius Loci:
    • Polythreme, where everything is alive. Specifically, the King with a Hundred Hearts. He's the one who makes the Clay Men - they split off the buildings when the Hundreds dreams. Unfinished Men are what happens when he has a nightmare.
    • The Bazaar is alive in some sense. And it also appears to eat love.
    • Old Downy, the Urchins' tenement, is strongly implied to be alive in some sense too - its stairs and pipes writhe as you climb them.
  • Gentleman and a Scholar: Any player who focuses on Watchful and Persuasive. (Naturally, this includes players who choose the Heart's Desire ambition)
  • Gentleman Thief: Any player who focuses on Persuasive and Shadowy. (Naturally, this includes players who choose the Light Fingers ambition.)
  • Goggles Do Nothing: Thoroughly averted. They raise your Watchful score.
  • Go Mad from the Revelation: Possibly the Topsy King. Actually, he bet his mind as a stake on a certain card game. Also, knowing some secrets in the Neath pushes your Nightmares attribute, and when it gets high enough, this happens to you.
  • Golem: The Clay Men, who are employed to do various grunt work in the docks and pubs. They seem to have some form of independent thought, though.
  • Gone Horribly Right:
    • One opportunity card has you try to settle the differences between two gangs outside your house. Should you fail, you still succeed in making the gangs get along... by getting their leaders to fall in love with each other and causing a crime spree as they cooperate on several heists. Your neighbours are displeased.
    • A storylet in Ladybones Road has you lay a false trail for a spy to get rid of her. If you fail, it's so convincing that a half-dozen more spies show up to follow up on her investigations.
    • Another storylet lets you help training new Constables at the Department of Menace Eradication, available at higher Dangerous levels. If you fail, your tales of how you got all your old wounds and your exploits turn way too effective, and scare off one fourth of the applicants, pissing off the Department.
  • Good Feels Good: The main benefit of signing up with the C.V.R. - a secret organisation that works to return souls to their rightful owners. Dealing in souls is much more lucrative, but the CVR gives you a hideously expensive option that sets your Nightmare, Wounds, Scandal and Suspicion to zero.
  • Got Me Doing It:

    " 'It's a fierce shame - they's both sing like angels, so they do. She was s'posed come back from the Forgotten Quarter last week. I fears the worst for her.'
    You're well on your way to fearsing the worst too. Fearing the worst. You had better check the Forgotten Quarter. And you didn't know she had a sister."

    • The Enterprising Astronomer's assistant (see Funetik Aksent above) has this effect, too. You notice the parcel is hemitting... emitting a low wail.
    • Same with Zailors and their gratuitous Z usage.

    It's hard to know zenze from zuperzti- Argh! sense from superstition when it comes to zailors.

  • Gotta Catch Them All!: The accommodation keys. And several plotlines related to the Labyrinth of Tigers involve catching and/or training an assemblage of various wild monsters. The false saints' candles, if you're Seeking the Name.
  • Government Conspiracy:
    • The Masters are always scheming, but a particularly nasty one is unveiled in the Light Fingers ambition.
    • The entity Jack-of-Smiles is also revealed to be the product of a Gone Horribly Wrong attempt of the Masters to manufacture love stories for the Bazaar and the Nemesis ambition's biggest reveal is that at least one Master orchestrated the murder of not just your loved one, but six other people's loved ones too to lure them to the Neath.
  • Halfway Plot Switch: The Light Fingers! Ambition is initially presented as being a heist story, about stealing an enormous diamond from Mr. Fires, but it turns out partway through that it is actually about saving Clara from her unwanted pregnancy.
  • Hall of Mirrors: At Mrs Plenty's Carnival. Although these mirrors show you the future... possibly. Or they might drive you insane. Or kill you.
  • Halloween Episode: Starting in 2013, players were able to invite eccentric visitors to their lodgings and get a glimpse of their future/destiny and collect confessions from other Menace-ridden players which they could choose to keep secret or betray for a variety of rewards during a 2-week period at the end of October. 2014 added Mr Huffam who interviewed players who had gotten enough "Spirit of Hallowmas" from their experiences, 2015 added special confessions given by several established Fallen London NPCs, and 2016 revamped the confession mechanic so that players could only take confessions from a variety of Fallen London NPCs instead of other players (although they could still trade them for specific confessions) and could also use these confessions to upgrade certain Companions.
  • Hand of Glory: Hands of Glory can be sent as gifts during the Feast of the Exceptional Rose because nothing says love like a severed limb that helps you sneak around.

    It is possible that someone plucked an old love from the grave to send you this. More likely they bought it at Hangman's Arch. Possibly it means they value you more than their own right hand. It's hard to be certain.

  • Happy Place: The Mirror-Marches can be used like this when you're dangerously close to going insane. It acts like a less-punishing version of the State of Some Confusion, but requires you to have at least one Memory of Light in your possession when your Nightmares hit 8 (or you can access it manually from Mrs Plenty's Carnival with a high enough Watchful score).
  • Harmless Villain: Jack-of-Smiles is a dangerous, insane serial killer who likes to hide in snowmen and leap out at people with knives. He is rather annoyed by how most of them just get back up again when he's done.
  • Have a Gay Old Time: You can wear a Gay Bonnet or find a pair of Queer Souls. This is Victorian Era (underground) London, after all.
  • Healing Potion: F.F. Gebrandt's Tincture of Vigour, which reduces Wounds when drunk.
  • Hell Hotel: The only tourists to visit the Tomb-Colonies are Londoners looking for somewhere completely boring to hide from the public eye. Their hotels are as much mausoleums as residences, being staffed and patronised by the rotting dead.
  • Hell Is That Noise: If a certain shadowy task is failed, a priest gets a fishhook in his earlobe. From the narration: invoked

    "There is no sound on this earth or below it like the sound of a priest with a fishhook in his earlobe."

  • Hell of a Time: Hell's colony in the Neath, the Iron Republic, isn't so much a place of eternal torment as it is a place of total chaos, which amounts to the same thing. It's still dangerous, of course, but people come and go freely all the time... usually with massive holes in their memory.
  • Heroic Sacrifice: While Dreaming of Things to Come, you can blow up your ship (and yourself) in order to destroy the Lorn-Flukes.
  • Heroic Willpower: Instead of playing Chess with Death, you can do this to come Back from the Dead. Most, though not all, of the Opportunity cards drawn in the land of the dead reference your desire to come back to life to enjoy the things you enjoyed in London, finish businesses you have left unfinished, and so on.
  • Hide Your Children: Averted. One task involves starting a war between two rival urchin gangs. If you choose to do so rather than warn them, you'll hear that children are throwing each other off rooftops and into the river. Probably gets away with it because the character isn't actually inflicting the violence, and it's only a text description. Also, as Death Is Cheap in the Neath, the kids will likely be fine in the end.
    • Except for the ones ending up in the river. Drownies have it bad.
  • Historical Domain Character: A number of them appear, though never by the name they're best known by. There appear Sigmund Freud, Charles Dickens, Victoria and Albert, Pre-Raphaelite painter William Holman Hunt, Oscar Wilde (though it seems like he came to a tragic end), Charles Babbage, and one or more of the royal families of Pharaoh Akhenaten and Möngke Khan. The Player Character of The Silver Tree is based on William of Rubruck.
  • Historical Villain Upgrade: In this world, Jack the Ripper is a sentient set of knives capable of possessing anyone who comes into contact with him.
  • Hit Points: Your wounds quality - which increases primarily from failing high level Dangerous challenges, but can also be increased in other ways - acts as a reverse hit points gauge. When it reaches eight, you die. This is not notably more inconvenient than any of the other possible failure states... And is notably less annoying then the usual Nightmares failure state, which erases some of your progress in the reoccurring dreams storylines. Yes, going temporarily insane is literally a Fate Worse than Death.
  • Hold Your Hippogriffs:

    'You have to stop. You know what I mean. We're on to you, glimshine.'

  • Homeless Pigeon Person: The Topsy King. He has a bat! Also a little bit crazy.
  • A Homeowner Is You: You can buy houses at Penstock's Land Agency in the Bazaar: the more expensive ones allow you to hold more opportunity cards in your hand.
  • Horror Hunger: One of the symptoms of Seeking the Name is a gradually worsening hunger. Seekers are capable of consuming truly monstrous amounts of food, their own pets, and one option they can take when ravenous enough strongly implies that they killed and ate somebody.
  • Hub City: The city of London itself, where you are going to spend more than half of your playing time.
  • Humanoid Abomination:
    • The Snuffers, horrific creatures that disguise themselves as men by wearing sewn-together human faces. The Unfinished Men may also count, given that they're born from nightmares.
    • Playing through "The Gift" story heavily implies that the Captivating Princess has become this. The rest of the royal family stretch the label of 'humanoid' much further.
  • Hunting the Most Dangerous Game: Hell's Embassy tricks people into hunting expeditions in the Forgotten Quarter... and thanks to legal mumbo-jumbo, the target is them. And when the quarry is caught, whatever they do to them gives your character nightmares.
  • Hyperactive Metabolism: A lot of the Opportunity cards and storylets that reduce your Wounds are based around eating.
  • Sours: https://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pmwiki.php/VideoGame/FallenLondon


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