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Games Like Mega Man for PSP

#1 Sonic Rivals 2

Sonic Rivals 2 is an Action Racing, Single-player and Multiplayer video game developed by Backbone Entertainment and published Sega for PlayStation Portable. The game introduces eight playable characters including five characters from the previous entry. The playable characters are divided into two teams, and each team has its own story campaign that describes the events of the story of the game from their perspective. The storyline starts with the series of mysterious Chao disappearance, which Tails and Sonic decide to investigate and find out the entity who is responsible for this happen. The game has four Single-player modes, and the Story mode is the main all of them. During the gameplay, the player can go through the battle modes and levels to progress through the plot. Each area in the game has three acts and a boss, with the final zone. All characters are split into four teams, and each character offers his/her unique story. Sonic Rivals 2 offers prominent features such as Third-person Exploration, 3D Environment, Collectibles, and more. Try it out

 

 

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#2 Klonoa: Door to Phantomile

Klonoa: Door to Phantomile is an Adventure, Platform, Side-scroll, and Single-player video game developed and published by Namco for PlayStation and Nintendo platforms. The game represents exciting gameplay revolves around an anthropomorphic cat and a spirit, which is encapsulated in his ring. The game is played from a D perspective, and the player can command the protagonist named as Klonoa, through a variety of levels in a 2D fashion, but the game is rendered in a 3D setting. It enables the player to follow the curve and interact with an object outside of the path to advance through the game. The game is split into several levels known as Vision, where the player advances by following a path with solvable puzzles and enemies that must be defeated. The player needs to take down the boss (the powerful enemy) at the end of each level. During the battle against enemies, the player can use the variety of weapons like Win Bullet, a ring that releases a burst of wind. With prominent features, cool controls, and superb graphics, Klonoa: Door to Phantomile is the best game for those who love playing Platform games.

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#3 The Simpsons Game

The Simpsons Game is an Action, Platform, Co-op, Single and Multiplayer video game for PlayStation, Xbox, and Nintendo by EA Redwood Shores. The game based on an animated television series called The Simpsons. It revolves around the five family members of Simpson such as Lisa, Bart, Homer, and Marge with Maggie. You can control four of five members and each with their unique skills and abilities. According to the story, the five members of the Simpsons are captured in a video game and have superpowers to solve several missions. The main objective is to save your home world and its creator named Matt Groening. You must travel through four different environments to gather key cards to unlock the mansion and save the world from destruction. The game consists of sixteen challenging levels, and each needs a specific power to accomplish. Explore the gameplay, defeat enemies and clear each level to progress. The Simpsons Game offers exciting features, head-up display, attack meter, health meter, etc. The Simpsons Game is the best game to enjoy.

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Sours: https://www.moregameslike.com/mega-man/psp/

Mega Man Powered Up

2006 video game

2006 video game

Mega Man Powered Up[a] is a side-scrollingplatform video game developed and published by Capcom. It was released for the PlayStation Portable (PSP) handheld game console in March 2006. It is a remake of the original Mega Man game released in 1987 for the Nintendo Entertainment System (NES). Players control the eponymous star Mega Man who must stop Dr. Wily from conquering the world using eight robots called Robot Masters. Unlike the original game, players can control these eight Robot Masters under the right circumstances. Other new features include a level creator mode and a challenge mode.

First revealed in 2005, Powered Up was produced by series mainstay Keiji Inafune. It was released in a bundle alongside Mega Man: Maverick Hunter X (also for PSP) and was slated for release on the PSP's PlayStation Network (PSN). It was released for the PSN service in Japan, but a US release did not occur due to technical difficulties. The game uses a chibi-style that was intended for the original game but was not possible at the time. The designers intended to keep this design faithful to the way the characters worked and looked in the original. While it received generally positive reviews, the game sold poorly, and plans for a remake of Mega Man 2 titled Mega Man Powered Up 2 fell through.

Plot[edit]

See also: Mega Man (video game) § Plot

The robot creator Doctor Light created two human-like robots with advanced artificial intelligence named Rock and Roll. Following this, he created eight more robots intended for industrial use: Cut Man, Guts Man, Ice Man, Bomb Man, Fire Man, Elec Man, Time Man, and Oil Man. He received a Nobel Prize for Physics, and his old colleague and rival Doctor Wily has grown bitter for not being acknowledged for his work on the project. Wily discovered a prototype robot made by Doctor Light before Rock and Roll called Proto Man, who is in danger of having his energy generator go critical. Wily gave him a nuclear energy supply to extend his life. He later steals and reprograms the eight industrial robots to attempt world domination. Rock volunteered to stop Wily and rescue his friends, and Dr. Light converted him into a fighting robot, giving him a new name: Mega Man. After defeating all eight Robot Masters and returning them to normal, Mega Man goes through Dr. Wily's fortress and challenges him. After beating Wily, the mad scientist surrenders and asks Mega Man to spare him.[5] Mega Man then returns home, where he's greeted by Dr. Light, Roll, and his friends.

Gameplay[edit]

See also: Mega Man (video game) § Gameplay

A rectangular video game screenshot that depicts a blue character sprite facing a purple character sprite in front of a large clock.
Mega Man Powered Upfeatures updated visuals, a widescreen mode, and new Robot Masters.

The game is a remake of the original NESMega Man title and has similar gameplay and level designs. The game moves on a 2D plane and players are given control of the game's eponymous hero Mega Man. Unlike the original's 8-bit graphics, the game uses 3D character models with super deformed designs.[6] Mega Man's primary abilities include jumping and shooting, and when certain conditions are met, can also use a sliding maneuver to dodge obstacles, or charge his Mega Buster for a more powerful shot. Mega Man can lose health by touching enemies or their projectiles, while lives will be lost when Mega Man touches spikes, or falls into a pit.[7] Lives and health can be found either dropped by enemies or in fixed locations.

At the beginning of the game, players are given an introductory level and boss to overcome. Afterward, they are given access to eight different stages, each representing one of the above-mentioned Robot Masters. At the end of each stage, players must battle the Robot Master of that stage. When a Robot Master is defeated, he will relinquish to Mega Man their respective weapon, which can be used against other Robot Masters or enemies but has limited ammunition.[8] If Mega Man defeats the Robot Master using his Mega Buster, the Robot Master will instead be brought back to his senses. This allows players to play through stages as one of the Robot Masters.[9] In lieu of the missing Robot Master, an evil clone of Mega Man will be added to their respective spots and stages as a boss instead.

It features two styles of gameplay: "Old Style" is comparable to the NES version aside from the updated presentation, and "New Style" uses the PSP's entire widescreen and contains storyline cutscenes with voice acting, altered stage layouts, remixed music, and three difficulty modes for each stage. Additionally, the remake lets players unlock and play through the game as the eight Robot Masters, Roll, and Protoman. The New Style stages differ in structure from that of Old Style, with some pathways only accessible to specific Robot Masters. Mega Man Powered Up also features a Challenge Mode with 100 challenges to complete, a level editor for creating custom stages, and an option to distribute fan-made levels to the PlayStation Network online service.[8][10]

Development[edit]

Mega Man Powered Up was developed and published by Capcom for the PlayStation Portablehandheld game console. It was produced by Keiji Inafune.[11]Mega Man Powered Up was first seen on a list of games that would have demos at the 2005 Tokyo Game Show titled Rockman Rockman.[12] It was later revealed to be a remake of the NES Mega Man.[13] It was announced for a US release on November 8, 2005 under the title Mega Man Powered Up.[14] A European release was also announced.[3] It was bundled with Mega Man: Maverick Hunter X on UMD.[15] It was slated to be released on the PSP's PlayStation Network service along with other Capcom PSP titles.[16] While it was released for the Japanese PSN, a US release of Powered Up never occurred due to technical difficulties that neither Sony nor Capcom could resolve.[17]

Inafune had originally planned to use this chibi-style in the original Mega Man, but could not due to the hardware constraints of the NES.[11] Producer Tetsuya Kitabayashi stated that redesigning the character models was a result of the PSP's 16:9 widescreen ratio. The larger heads on the characters allowed the development team to create visible facial expressions.[18] Character designer Tatsuya Yoshikawa explained the concept of the design was "toys" and be "Geared towards little kids ... the kinds of characters that you'd see hanging off of keychains and such". He added that the design team made sure proportions and movements were accurately reflected on the models.[2] As the size of the remake's stages are not proportional to those of the original, the widescreen ratio also presented the developers with more space to fill.[18] The Robot Master Oil Man originally had black skin and pink lips, which GamesRadar identified as a "1920s caricature." The design was changed for the US release to blue skin and yellow lips to avoid controversy.[19]

Reception[edit]

Pre-release[edit]

Mega Man Powered Up received generally positive reception after it was revealed. It was perceived initially as a "straight port" of the NES game with graphical enhancements.[11]IGN writer Nix felt that the graphical update as seen at the 2005 Tokyo Game Show was well-designed. He noted that its biggest hang-up was the fact that the original Mega Man was improved upon by its sequels and that the original lacked functions such as the charge shot, the slide, and Rush.[20]Jeff Gerstmann felt the game was promising and praised its take on the original levels as well as its level editor.[21] Juan Castro felt that it would appeal to Mega Man fans and those looking for an "oldschool platformer."[22]

Post-release[edit]

Reception

Sales of Mega Man Powered Up in Japan were considered very poor, though it sold better in the US.[29] Speculation existed for the low sales which included the possibility that it came out too early in the PSP's life and a "lack of overlap between Mega Man gamers and PSP owners." Fan lamentation also existed for the fact that it was not available for the Nintendo DS (which featured several other Mega Man titles).[30] Inafune expressed an interest in making a Mega Man Powered Up 2, though he noted that it would take time to get to.[31] Due to the poor sales of the game, further remakes have been put on hold.[32]

Despite poor sales, it received generally positive reviews, currently holding aggregate scores of 83% on GameRankings and 82 out of 100 on Metacritic respectively.[23][24] It received positive attention from the Mega Man fanbase.[32]Game Revolution's Mike Reily praised the game' variety of challenges, playable bosses, level editor, and the gameplay variety but criticized its "trial and error" gameplay and graphical slowdown.[33]Gamasutra writer Connor Cleary praised its improvements of the original Mega Man and noted that those who do not love the art style would be able to get over it after playing.[34] David Oxford, from 1UP.com felt that it was the most notable remake of the original Mega Man.[30] In his review, Jeremy Parish, also from 1UP.com, called it "one of the most addictive PSP games to date" and felt that it reminded players of Mega Man's greatness.[25] He also praised its level editor, which he noted came before future Sony titles that featured a level editor such as LittleBigPlanet and Sound Shapes.[35] He later included it in his list of games to play on a short flight due to its quick levels and auto-save feature.[36]GameSpot's Alex Navarro called it the best remake of the original Mega Man due to a combination of the original game's quality and the quality of the additional features,[10] while IGN's Juan Castro felt that the quality and polish of the game would appeal to veteran Mega Man fans and newcomers to the franchise.[7]Detroit Free Press called it "a must-buy for fans of the long-running series, despite its super cute-ified new look."[37] Matt Keller from PALGN called the original an "all-time classic" and felt that Powered Up was "the remake it deserves."[27]

GameSpy placed Powered Up as the seventh best handheld game of 2006, as well as the fifth best PSP game.[38][39] IGN ranked it the ninth best PSP game ever made.[40] It was also nominated for "Best Action Game" for the "2006 1UP Awards", losing to another Capcom game Dead Rising.[41]

References[edit]

  1. ^known in Japan as Rockman Rockman (ロックマンロックマン)
  1. ^Thorsen, Tor (March 14, 2006). "Shippin' Out 3/13-3/17: Outfit, Parallel Lines, MGS3: Subsistence". GameSpot. Retrieved November 15, 2015.
  2. ^ abMega Man: Official Complete Works. Udon Entertainment. January 6, 2010. pp. 108–13. ISBN .
  3. ^ abGibson, Ellie (December 6, 2005). "Mega Man PSP titles dated". Eurogamer. Retrieved November 24, 2015.
  4. ^Famitsu staff (December 15, 2009). "『ロックマン』シリーズ4作品がPlayStation Storeで配信決定". Famitsu (in Japanese). Enterbrain. Retrieved May 31, 2010.
  5. ^Capcom (March 2006). Mega Man Powered Up (PlayStation Portable). Capcom.
  6. ^ abTheobald, Phil (March 14, 2006). "GameSpy: Mega Man Powered Up Review". GameSpy. IGN. p. 1. Archived from the original on March 8, 2007.
  7. ^ abcCastro, Juan (March 14, 2006). "Mega Man Powered Up - IGN". IGN. IGN. p. 2. Retrieved August 10, 2013.
  8. ^ abCastro, Juan (March 14, 2006). "Mega Man Powered Up - PlayStation Portable Review". IGN. Ziff Davis. p. 1. Retrieved May 8, 2010.
  9. ^Gantayat, Anoop (March 14, 2006). "No Playing in Japan". IGN. Ziff Davis. p. 2. Retrieved November 15, 2015.
  10. ^ abcNavarro, Alex (March 13, 2006). "Mega Man Powered Up Review for PSP". GameSpot. CBS Interactive. Retrieved May 8, 2010.
  11. ^ abcTheobald, Phil (September 17, 2005). "Mega Man on PSP -- Keiji Inafune and Tatsuya Kitabayashi Interview". GameSpy. IGN. Archived from the original on March 29, 2012. Retrieved May 8, 2010.
  12. ^Gantayat, Anoop (September 2, 2005). "New PSP Mega Man?". IGN. Retrieved November 15, 2015.
  13. ^Gantayat, Anoop; Nix (September 7, 2005). "Mega Man to be Remade on PSP". IGN. Ziff Davis. Retrieved November 15, 2015.
  14. ^Castro, Juan (November 8, 2005). "Mega Man Powered Up Announced". IGN. Retrieved November 15, 2015.
  15. ^Goulter, Tony (June 23, 2012). "Capcom announces Mega Man/Monster Hunter Dual Packs for PSP". GamesRadar. Retrieved November 15, 2015.
  16. ^Watts, Steve (July 2, 2009). "Capcom Classics Coming to PSN Throughout Summer". 1UP.com. Archived from the original on November 24, 2015. Retrieved November 15, 2015.
  17. ^Ishaan (February 28, 2012). "Why Is Mega Man Powered Up Not On The PlayStation Network?". Siliconera. Retrieved November 15, 2015.
  18. ^ abMcGarvey, Sterling (February 24, 2006). "Tetsuya Kitabayashi Discusses the Mega-Makeover (PSP)". GameSpy. IGN. Archived from the original on March 29, 2012. Retrieved March 22, 2011.
  19. ^Sullivan, Lucas (July 23, 2012). "The Top 7... Most ridiculous Mega Man bosses". GamesRadar. Retrieved November 15, 2015.
  20. ^Nix (September 17, 2005). "TGS 2005: Mega Man Revival". IGN. Retrieved November 15, 2015.
  21. ^Gerstmann, Jeff (September 16, 2005). "TGS 2005: Rockman Rockman Hands-On". GameSpot. Retrieved November 15, 2015.
  22. ^Castro, Juan (February 27, 2006). "Mega Man Powered Up Hands-On". IGN. Retrieved November 15, 2015.
  23. ^ ab"Mega Man Powered Up for PSP". GameRankings. CBS Interactive. Retrieved May 8, 2010.
  24. ^ ab"Mega Man Powered Up (psp) reviews". Metacritic. CBS Interactive. Retrieved May 8, 2010.
  25. ^ abParish, Jeremy (March 13, 2013). "Mega Man Powered Up Review for PSP from 1UP.com". 1UP.com. Ziff Davis. Archived from the original on November 17, 2015. Retrieved August 10, 2013.
  26. ^Turner, Benjamin (June 24, 2012). "Mega Man Powered Up I GamesRadar". GamesRadar. Future US. Retrieved January 25, 2014.
  27. ^ abKeller, Matt (April 9, 2006). "Mega Man Powered Up Review - Sony PSP Video Game Review". PALGN. Archived from the original on January 1, 2014. Retrieved August 10, 2013.
  28. ^"Collection of every PSP-game reviewed in Famitsu". NeoGAF. August 27, 2006.
  29. ^Nadia, Oxford (June 24, 2007). "Isle of Miscast Robots". 1UP.com. p. 2. Archived from the original on November 17, 2015. Retrieved November 15, 2015.
  30. ^ abOxford, David. "The Many Versions, Ports, and Re-Releases of Mega Man". 1UP.com. p. 2. Archived from the original on November 17, 2015. Retrieved November 15, 2015.
  31. ^Spencer (February 26, 2010). "Inafune "Passionate" About Making Mega Man Powered Up 2 Happen". Siliconera. Retrieved November 15, 2015.
  32. ^ abKlepek, Patrick (May 16, 2006). "Mega Man Creator Talks Future". 1UP.com. Archived from the original on November 17, 2015. Retrieved November 15, 2015.
  33. ^Reilly, Mike (March 24, 2006). "Mega Man Powered Up Review". Game Revolution. Retrieved November 15, 2015.
  34. ^Cleary, Connor (December 6, 2010). "Analysis: Upgrading Legends - How Classic Games Flower In The Remaking". Gamasutra. Retrieved November 15, 2015.
  35. ^Parish, Jeremy. "Why Mega Man Matters". 1UP.com. Archived from the original on January 1, 2014. Retrieved November 15, 2015.
  36. ^Parish, Jeremy (August 18, 2006). "Games on A Plane!". 1UP.com. p. 2. Archived from the original on November 17, 2015. Retrieved November 15, 2015.
  37. ^Huschka, Ryan (April 16, 2006). "Recent releases". Detroit Free Press. Gannett Company. Retrieved November 15, 2015.
  38. ^"GameSpy's Game of the Year 2006 - Handheld Top 10". GameSpy. Archived from the original on January 1, 2014. Retrieved November 15, 2015.
  39. ^"GameSpy's Game of the Year 2006 - PSP Top 5 & Genre Awards". GameSpy. Archived from the original on January 2, 2014. Retrieved November 15, 2015.
  40. ^"The Top 25 PSP Games". IGN. December 28, 2011. Retrieved November 15, 2015.
  41. ^1UP Staff (January 31, 2007). "The 2006 1UP Awards Winners". 1UP.com. Ziff Davis. Archived from the original on November 1, 2015. Retrieved November 15, 2015.

External links[edit]

Sours: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mega_Man_Powered_Up
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The 10 Best PSP Games You Totally Forgot About

First released in late , the Playstation Portable has accumulated a library of underrated games over its decade-long lifespan. Crisis Core: Final Fantasy and Metal Gear Solid: Peace Walker are just a few titles that come to mind when thinking about what great gems there are on the handheld console.

RELATED: 10 Best Fantasy RPGs, Ranked

However, there are some fantastic PSP games that many have overlooked, or even forgotten altogether. These ten games may be well-known to many, but the masses mostly missed out on them, and they deserve some time in the spotlight.

10 Half-Minute Hero

Half-Minute Hero looks like a typical top-down RPG with 8-bit graphics, but there's a twist. As implied by the title, Half-Minute Hero is also a real-time strategy game, with the player having thirty seconds to save the day.

Due to this thirty-second timeframe, the missions are predictably short, yet they are jam-packed with fast-paced action. The missions range from real-time events to shoot-em-ups and are pretty addictive, for the most part. If that isn't enough, the game also pokes fun at many RPG tropes, giving it a rather whimsical charm.

9 Mega Man Powered Up

Mega Man Powered Up is more or less a remake of the original Mega Man, albeit with 3D polygonal models and playable characters aside from Mega Man. The cutscenes and voice acting give this remake a fresh feel, and the action is ramped up compared to the original. Players can play either play in the "Old Style" or make use of the PSP's wider screen in "New Style."

RELATED: 10 Great Games Available For Free With PlayStation Plus Membership

Two separate game modes are included in Mega Man Powered Up. Challenge Mode boasts challenges: ten for each of the nine playable characters, and ten iconic Mega Man boss rushes. The other mode is a level editor.

8 Loco Roco 2

LocoRoco 2 has the same exact gameplay as its predecessor. The player must tilt the environment around, maneuvering the LocoRoco until it reaches the end of the level. However, this sequel comes with some new quirks not found in the first game; the LocoRoco can swim underwater and squeeze through tight spaces, among other abilities.

One thing that LocoRoco 2 is known for, much like the original, is its soundtrack. The quirky characters that the player will encounter along the way are pretty notable themselves, as well. All in all, LocoRoco 2 is a fun little romp that is bound to put a smile on anyone's face.

7 Hammerin' Hero

Hammerin' Hero is the eighth entry in the Hammerin' Harry series, and, obviously, there's a lot of hammering involved. The player controls Harry throughout twelve 2-D stages as they bash through everything in sight. The game also comes with multiplayer, as two players can work together to achieve the highest score.

For a fun little romp of an action platformer, Hammerin' Hero packs in a lot of charm. Players can unlock jobs such as baseball player or DJ, and each one comes with its separate costume and ability. Then there are the bosses; the player has to fight against an inflatable dinosaur and a battleship in space, among many others. Hammerin' Hero is as zany as any obscure Japanese video game is expected to be.

6 Prinny: Can I Really Be the Hero?

Prinny, a comic relief character from the Disgaea series, has his own adventure on the PSP. In Prinny: Can I Really Be the Hero?, the titular penguin goes on a quest to find the necessary ingredients for the Ultra Dessert. It's a hard quest on its own, and, due to the game's difficulty, the player gets a whopping lives.

RELATED: 8 Games Where The Handheld Version Was Better Than The Console One

While Prinny: Can I Really Be the Hero? is a side-scrolling platformer, it also functions as a hack-and-slash game with a few RPG elements included. The unique art style also helps this game have the same kind of feel that the Disgaea series is known for.

5 Tekken: Dark Ressurection

Gamers searching for a portable fighting game on the go may find precisely what they're looking for in Tekken: Dark Ressurection on the PSP. A port of an arcade game released in late , Dark Ressurection introduces three new characters to the Tekken fray, with Emile de Rochefort being the headliner.

Dark Ressurection comes with some customization options, allowing the player to tailor their favorite fighter as they see fit. There is also a Tekken Dojo mode for fighting off the ghosts of other players, and a Gold Rush mode for earning in-game cash.

4 Metal Gear Solid: Portable Ops

Taking place six years after Snake Eater, Metal Gear Solid: Portable Ops sees Naked Snake trying to fend off FOX while captured in Colombia. This game takes a lot of inspiration from Snake Eater, having the same camera system and gameplay as the classic.

Unlike the solo missions that other Metal Gear Solid games have, Portable Ops instead has a Comrade System. With it, one can recruit allies to a four-man squad and send them into the battlefield. For those who wish to play Portable Ops but with new content and an Infinity Mission mode, Portable Ops Plus is also available.

3 Patapon 3

While the first two games in the Patapon series get some recognition, Patapon 3 doesn't get nearly as much love. Unlike the past two entries, Patapon 3 has more detailed backgrounds and more expansive multiplayer gameplay. The game also has a competitive mode which allows for four-way battles to occur.

RELATED: 10 PS2 Games With The Best Replay Value

Patapon 3 was released very late in the PSP's lifespan, so, understandably, it tends to be overlooked by many. However, the rhythm-action and catchy music that the series is known for will surely make this game a must-have.

2 Ys Seven

Notably, this is the first game in the Ys series to be featured in 3D. Ys Seven follows Adol and Dogi as they work together to stop an evil force from taking over the kingdom of Altago. Some traditional RPG features are present, although Ys Seven has its own set of perks.

For instance, the game's combat system is predicated on what attack the player chooses. Whether it's striking with a weapon or using magic, the weapon used must fit with a character's damage type. Other than the gameplay, the simplistic story and music make Ys Seven a pretty enjoyable RPG on the PSP.

1 Jeanne d'Arc

Jeanne d'Arc offers its own spin on the Joan of Arc story, as the player leads the main character, Jeanne, through France during the Hundred Years War. Historical aggrandizements abound such as the ruler of England, King Edward VI, being possessed by demons. That aside, the game's story is still quite enjoyable.

Being a tactical RPG, Jeanne D'Arc involves a lot of strategy in its gameplay. There is also an RTS element in this game, revolving around three phases: Sol, Luna, and Stella. Characters and enemies alike have one of these three phases, and it's a matter of figuring which phase is strong against which attackers. All in all, the gameplay, along with the story, graphics, and animated cutscenes makes Jeanne D'Arcone of the best fantasy RPGs that the PSP has to offer.

NEXT: The 10 Underrated PS Vita Games You Totally Forgot About

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Mega Man Powered Up

video game

video game

Mega Man Powered Up[a] is a side-scrollingplatform video game developed and published by Capcom. It was released for the PlayStation Portable (PSP) handheld game console in March It is a remake of the original Mega Man game released in for the Nintendo Entertainment System (NES). Players control the eponymous star Mega Man who must stop Dr. Wily from conquering the world using eight robots called Robot Masters. Unlike the original game, players can control these eight Robot Masters under the right circumstances. Other new features include a level creator mode and a challenge mode.

First revealed in , Powered Up was produced by series mainstay Keiji Inafune. It was released in a bundle alongside Mega Man: Maverick Hunter X (also for PSP) and was slated for release on the PSP's PlayStation Network (PSN). It was released for the PSN service in Japan, but a US release did not occur due to technical difficulties. The game uses a chibi-style that was intended for the original game but was not possible at the time. The designers intended to keep this design faithful to the way the characters worked and looked in the original. While it received generally positive reviews, the game sold poorly, and plans for a remake of Mega Man 2 titled Mega Man Powered Up 2 fell through.

Plot[edit]

See also: Mega Man (video game) §&#;Plot

The robot creator Doctor Light created two human-like robots with advanced artificial intelligence named Rock and Roll. Following this, he created eight more robots intended for industrial use: Cut Man, Guts Man, Ice Man, Bomb Man, Fire Man, Elec Man, Time Man, and Oil Man. He received a Nobel Prize for Physics, and his old colleague and rival Doctor Wily has grown bitter for not being acknowledged for his work on the project. Wily discovered a prototype robot made by Doctor Light before Rock and Roll called Proto Man, who is in danger of having his energy generator go critical. Wily gave him a nuclear energy supply to extend his life. He later steals and reprograms the eight industrial robots to attempt world domination. Rock volunteered to stop Wily and rescue his friends, and Dr. Light converted him into a fighting robot, giving him a new name: Mega Man. After defeating all eight Robot Masters and returning them to normal, Mega Man goes through Dr. Wily's fortress and challenges him. After beating Wily, the mad scientist surrenders and asks Mega Man to spare him.[5] Mega Man then returns home, where he's greeted by Dr. Light, Roll, and his friends.

Gameplay[edit]

See also: Mega Man (video game) §&#;Gameplay

A rectangular video game screenshot that depicts a blue character sprite facing a purple character sprite in front of a large clock.
Mega Man Powered Upfeatures updated visuals, a widescreen mode, and new Robot Masters.

The game is a remake of the original NESMega Man title and has similar gameplay and level designs. The game moves on a 2D plane and players are given control of the game's eponymous hero Mega Man. Unlike the original's 8-bit graphics, the game uses 3D character models with super deformed designs.[6] Mega Man's primary abilities include jumping and shooting, and when certain conditions are met, can also use a sliding maneuver to dodge obstacles, or charge his Mega Buster for a more powerful shot. Mega Man can lose health by touching enemies or their projectiles, while lives will be lost when Mega Man touches spikes, or falls into a pit.[7] Lives and health can be found either dropped by enemies or in fixed locations.

At the beginning of the game, players are given an introductory level and boss to overcome. Afterward, they are given access to eight different stages, each representing one of the above-mentioned Robot Masters. At the end of each stage, players must battle the Robot Master of that stage. When a Robot Master is defeated, he will relinquish to Mega Man their respective weapon, which can be used against other Robot Masters or enemies but has limited ammunition.[8] If Mega Man defeats the Robot Master using his Mega Buster, the Robot Master will instead be brought back to his senses. This allows players to play through stages as one of the Robot Masters.[9] In lieu of the missing Robot Master, an evil clone of Mega Man will be added to their respective spots and stages as a boss instead.

It features two styles of gameplay: "Old Style" is comparable to the NES version aside from the updated presentation, and "New Style" uses the PSP's entire widescreen and contains storyline cutscenes with voice acting, altered stage layouts, remixed music, and three difficulty modes for each stage. Additionally, the remake lets players unlock and play through the game as the eight Robot Masters, Roll, and Protoman. The New Style stages differ in structure from that of Old Style, with some pathways only accessible to specific Robot Masters. Mega Man Powered Up also features a Challenge Mode with challenges to complete, a level editor for creating custom stages, and an option to distribute fan-made levels to the PlayStation Network online service.[8][10]

Development[edit]

Mega Man Powered Up was developed and published by Capcom for the PlayStation Portablehandheld game console. It was produced by Keiji Inafune.[11]Mega Man Powered Up was first seen on a list of games that would have demos at the Tokyo Game Show titled Rockman Rockman.[12] It was later revealed to be a remake of the NES Mega Man.[13] It was announced for a US release on November 8, under the title Mega Man Powered Up.[14] A European release was also announced.[3] It was bundled with Mega Man: Maverick Hunter X on UMD.[15] It was slated to be released on the PSP's PlayStation Network service along with other Capcom PSP titles.[16] While it was released for the Japanese PSN, a US release of Powered Up never occurred due to technical difficulties that neither Sony nor Capcom could resolve.[17]

Inafune had originally planned to use this chibi-style in the original Mega Man, but could not due to the hardware constraints of the NES.[11] Producer Tetsuya Kitabayashi stated that redesigning the character models was a result of the PSP's widescreen ratio. The larger heads on the characters allowed the development team to create visible facial expressions.[18] Character designer Tatsuya Yoshikawa explained the concept of the design was "toys" and be "Geared towards little kids the kinds of characters that you'd see hanging off of keychains and such". He added that the design team made sure proportions and movements were accurately reflected on the models.[2] As the size of the remake's stages are not proportional to those of the original, the widescreen ratio also presented the developers with more space to fill.[18] The Robot Master Oil Man originally had black skin and pink lips, which GamesRadar identified as a "s caricature." The design was changed for the US release to blue skin and yellow lips to avoid controversy.[19]

Reception[edit]

Pre-release[edit]

Mega Man Powered Up received generally positive reception after it was revealed. It was perceived initially as a "straight port" of the NES game with graphical enhancements.[11]IGN writer Nix felt that the graphical update as seen at the Tokyo Game Show was well-designed. He noted that its biggest hang-up was the fact that the original Mega Man was improved upon by its sequels and that the original lacked functions such as the charge shot, the slide, and Rush.[20]Jeff Gerstmann felt the game was promising and praised its take on the original levels as well as its level editor.[21] Juan Castro felt that it would appeal to Mega Man fans and those looking for an "oldschool platformer."[22]

Post-release[edit]

Reception

Sales of Mega Man Powered Up in Japan were considered very poor, though it sold better in the US.[29] Speculation existed for the low sales which included the possibility that it came out too early in the PSP's life and a "lack of overlap between Mega Man gamers and PSP owners." Fan lamentation also existed for the fact that it was not available for the Nintendo DS (which featured several other Mega Man titles).[30] Inafune expressed an interest in making a Mega Man Powered Up 2, though he noted that it would take time to get to.[31] Due to the poor sales of the game, further remakes have been put on hold.[32]

Despite poor sales, it received generally positive reviews, currently holding aggregate scores of 83% on GameRankings and 82 out of on Metacritic respectively.[23][24] It received positive attention from the Mega Man fanbase.[32]Game Revolution's Mike Reily praised the game' variety of challenges, playable bosses, level editor, and the gameplay variety but criticized its "trial and error" gameplay and graphical slowdown.[33]Gamasutra writer Connor Cleary praised its improvements of the original Mega Man and noted that those who do not love the art style would be able to get over it after playing.[34] David Oxford, from 1UP.com felt that it was the most notable remake of the original Mega Man.[30] In his review, Jeremy Parish, also from 1UP.com, called it "one of the most addictive PSP games to date" and felt that it reminded players of Mega Man's greatness.[25] He also praised its level editor, which he noted came before future Sony titles that featured a level editor such as LittleBigPlanet and Sound Shapes.[35] He later included it in his list of games to play on a short flight due to its quick levels and auto-save feature.[36]GameSpot's Alex Navarro called it the best remake of the original Mega Man due to a combination of the original game's quality and the quality of the additional features,[10] while IGN's Juan Castro felt that the quality and polish of the game would appeal to veteran Mega Man fans and newcomers to the franchise.[7]Detroit Free Press called it "a must-buy for fans of the long-running series, despite its super cute-ified new look."[37] Matt Keller from PALGN called the original an "all-time classic" and felt that Powered Up was "the remake it deserves."[27]

GameSpy placed Powered Up as the seventh best handheld game of , as well as the fifth best PSP game.[38][39] IGN ranked it the ninth best PSP game ever made.[40] It was also nominated for "Best Action Game" for the " 1UP Awards", losing to another Capcom game Dead Rising.[41]

References[edit]

  1. ^known in Japan as Rockman Rockman (ロックマンロックマン)
  1. ^Thorsen, Tor (March 14, ). "Shippin' Out 3// Outfit, Parallel Lines, MGS3: Subsistence". GameSpot. Retrieved November 15,
  2. ^ abMega Man: Official Complete Works. Udon Entertainment. January 6, pp.&#;– ISBN&#;.
  3. ^ abGibson, Ellie (December 6, ). "Mega Man PSP titles dated". Eurogamer. Retrieved November 24,
  4. ^Famitsu staff (December 15, ). "『ロックマン』シリーズ4作品がPlayStation Storeで配信決定". Famitsu (in Japanese). Enterbrain. Retrieved May 31,
  5. ^Capcom (March ). Mega Man Powered Up (PlayStation Portable). Capcom.
  6. ^ abTheobald, Phil (March 14, ). "GameSpy: Mega Man Powered Up Review". GameSpy. IGN. p.&#;1. Archived from the original on March 8,
  7. ^ abcCastro, Juan (March 14, ). "Mega Man Powered Up - IGN". IGN. IGN. p.&#;2. Retrieved August 10,
  8. ^ abCastro, Juan (March 14, ). "Mega Man Powered Up - PlayStation Portable Review". IGN. Ziff Davis. p.&#;1. Retrieved May 8,
  9. ^Gantayat, Anoop (March 14, ). "No Playing in Japan". IGN. Ziff Davis. p.&#;2. Retrieved November 15,
  10. ^ abcNavarro, Alex (March 13, ). "Mega Man Powered Up Review for PSP". GameSpot. CBS Interactive. Retrieved May 8,
  11. ^ abcTheobald, Phil (September 17, ). "Mega Man on PSP -- Keiji Inafune and Tatsuya Kitabayashi Interview". GameSpy. IGN. Archived from the original on March 29, Retrieved May 8,
  12. ^Gantayat, Anoop (September 2, ). "New PSP Mega Man?". IGN. Retrieved November 15,
  13. ^Gantayat, Anoop; Nix (September 7, ). "Mega Man to be Remade on PSP". IGN. Ziff Davis. Retrieved November 15,
  14. ^Castro, Juan (November 8, ). "Mega Man Powered Up Announced". IGN. Retrieved November 15,
  15. ^Goulter, Tony (June 23, ). "Capcom announces Mega Man/Monster Hunter Dual Packs for PSP". GamesRadar. Retrieved November 15,
  16. ^Watts, Steve (July 2, ). "Capcom Classics Coming to PSN Throughout Summer". 1UP.com. Archived from the original on November 24, Retrieved November 15,
  17. ^Ishaan (February 28, ). "Why Is Mega Man Powered Up Not On The PlayStation Network?". Siliconera. Retrieved November 15,
  18. ^ abMcGarvey, Sterling (February 24, ). "Tetsuya Kitabayashi Discusses the Mega-Makeover (PSP)". GameSpy. IGN. Archived from the original on March 29, Retrieved March 22,
  19. ^Sullivan, Lucas (July 23, ). "The Top Most ridiculous Mega Man bosses". GamesRadar. Retrieved November 15,
  20. ^Nix (September 17, ). "TGS Mega Man Revival". IGN. Retrieved November 15,
  21. ^Gerstmann, Jeff (September 16, ). "TGS Rockman Rockman Hands-On". GameSpot. Retrieved November 15,
  22. ^Castro, Juan (February 27, ). "Mega Man Powered Up Hands-On". IGN. Retrieved November 15,
  23. ^ ab"Mega Man Powered Up for PSP". GameRankings. CBS Interactive. Retrieved May 8,
  24. ^ ab"Mega Man Powered Up (psp) reviews". Metacritic. CBS Interactive. Retrieved May 8,
  25. ^ abParish, Jeremy (March 13, ). "Mega Man Powered Up Review for PSP from 1UP.com". 1UP.com. Ziff Davis. Archived from the original on November 17, Retrieved August 10,
  26. ^Turner, Benjamin (June 24, ). "Mega Man Powered Up I GamesRadar". GamesRadar. Future US. Retrieved January 25,
  27. ^ abKeller, Matt (April 9, ). "Mega Man Powered Up Review - Sony PSP Video Game Review". PALGN. Archived from the original on January 1, Retrieved August 10,
  28. ^"Collection of every PSP-game reviewed in Famitsu". NeoGAF. August 27,
  29. ^Nadia, Oxford (June 24, ). "Isle of Miscast Robots". 1UP.com. p.&#;2. Archived from the original on November 17, Retrieved November 15,
  30. ^ abOxford, David. "The Many Versions, Ports, and Re-Releases of Mega Man". 1UP.com. p.&#;2. Archived from the original on November 17, Retrieved November 15,
  31. ^Spencer (February 26, ). "Inafune "Passionate" About Making Mega Man Powered Up 2 Happen". Siliconera. Retrieved November 15,
  32. ^ abKlepek, Patrick (May 16, ). "Mega Man Creator Talks Future". 1UP.com. Archived from the original on November 17, Retrieved November 15,
  33. ^Reilly, Mike (March 24, ). "Mega Man Powered Up Review". Game Revolution. Retrieved November 15,
  34. ^Cleary, Connor (December 6, ). "Analysis: Upgrading Legends - How Classic Games Flower In The Remaking". Gamasutra. Retrieved November 15,
  35. ^Parish, Jeremy. "Why Mega Man Matters". 1UP.com. Archived from the original on January 1, Retrieved November 15,
  36. ^Parish, Jeremy (August 18, ). "Games on A Plane!". 1UP.com. p.&#;2. Archived from the original on November 17, Retrieved November 15,
  37. ^Huschka, Ryan (April 16, ). "Recent releases". Detroit Free Press. Gannett Company. Retrieved November 15,
  38. ^"GameSpy's Game of the Year - Handheld Top 10". GameSpy. Archived from the original on January 1, Retrieved November 15,
  39. ^"GameSpy's Game of the Year - PSP Top 5 & Genre Awards". GameSpy. Archived from the original on January 2, Retrieved November 15,
  40. ^"The Top 25 PSP Games". IGN. December 28, Retrieved November 15,
  41. ^1UP Staff (January 31, ). "The 1UP Awards Winners". 1UP.com. Ziff Davis. Archived from the original on November 1, Retrieved November 15,

External links[edit]

Sours: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mega_Man_Powered_Up

Psp games megaman

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