Course catalog berkeley

Course catalog berkeley DEFAULT

Courses

Terms offered: Fall 2021, Fall 2020, Fall 2019
This course is intended for lower division students interested in acquiring a foundation in biomedicine with topics ranging from evolutionary biology to human physiology. The emphasis is on the integration of engineering applications to biology and health. The specific lecture topics and exercises will include the key aspects of genomics and proteomics as well as topics on plant and animal evolution, stem cell biomedicine, and tissue regeneration and replacement. Medical physiology topics include relevant engineering aspects of human brain, heart, musculoskeletal, and other systems.
Introduction to Biomedicine for Engineers: Read More [+]

Objectives & Outcomes

Student Learning Outcomes: The goal is for undergraduate engineering students to gain sufficient biology and human physiology fundamentals so that they are better prepared to study specialized topics, e.g., biomechanics, imaging, computational biology, tissue engineering, biomonitoring, drug development, robotics, and other topics covered by upper division and graduate courses in UC Berkeley departments of Molecular and Cell Biology, Integrative Biology, Bioengineering, Electrical Engineering and Computer Science, Mechanical Engineering, and courses in the UC San Francisco Division of Bioengineering.

Rules & Requirements

Prerequisites:MATH 1A or MATH 16A or another introductory calculus course (can be taken concurrently)

Hours & Format

Fall and/or spring: 15 weeks - 3 hours of lecture and 1 hour of discussion per week

Additional Details

Subject/Course Level: Bioengineering/Undergraduate

Grading/Final exam status: Letter grade. Final exam required.

Instructors: Conboy, Kumar, Johnson

Introduction to Biomedicine for Engineers: Read Less [-]

Terms offered: Spring 2022, Spring 2021, Spring 2020
This course focuses on providing students with a foundation in organic chemistry and biochemistry needed to understand contemporary problems in synthetic biology, biomaterials and computational biology.
Engineering Molecules 1: Read More [+]

Objectives & Outcomes

Course Objectives: The goal of this course is to give students the background in organic chemistry and biochemistry needed understand problems in synthetic biology, biomaterials and molecular imaging. Emphasis is on basic mechanisms

Student Learning Outcomes: Students will learn aspects of organic and biochemistry required to begin the rational manipulation and/or design of biological systems and the molecules they are comprised of.

Hours & Format

Fall and/or spring: 15 weeks - 3 hours of lecture per week

Additional Details

Subject/Course Level: Bioengineering/Undergraduate

Grading/Final exam status: Letter grade. Final exam required.

Engineering Molecules 1: Read Less [-]

Terms offered: Spring 2022, Spring 2021, Fall 2020
The Berkeley Seminar Program has been designed to provide new students with the opportunity to explore an intellectual topic with a faculty member in a small-seminar setting. Berkeley seminars are offered in all campus departments, and topics vary from department to department and semester to semester.
Freshmen Seminar: Read More [+]

Rules & Requirements

Repeat rules: Course may be repeated for credit without restriction.

Hours & Format

Fall and/or spring: 15 weeks - 1 hour of seminar per week

Additional Details

Subject/Course Level: Bioengineering/Undergraduate

Grading/Final exam status: Offered for pass/not pass grade only. Final Exam To be decided by the instructor when the class is offered.

Freshmen Seminar: Read Less [-]

Terms offered: Spring 2022, Spring 2021, Spring 2020
This introductory seminar is designed to give freshmen and sophomores an opportunity to explore specialties related to engineering in the pharmaceutical/biotech field. A series of one-hour seminars will be presented by industry professionals, professors, and researchers. Topics may include biotechnology and pharmaceutical manufacturing; process and control engineering; drug inspection process; research and development; compliance and validation; construction process for a GMP facility; project management; and engineered solutions to environmental challenges. This course is of interest to students in all areas of engineering and biology, including industrial engineering and manufacturing, chemical engineering, and bioengineering.
Careers in Biotechnology: Read More [+]

Rules & Requirements

Repeat rules: Course may be repeated for credit without restriction.

Hours & Format

Fall and/or spring: 15 weeks - 1 hour of seminar per week

Additional Details

Subject/Course Level: Bioengineering/Undergraduate

Grading/Final exam status: Offered for pass/not pass grade only. Final exam required.

Careers in Biotechnology: Read Less [-]

Terms offered: Fall 2021, Fall 2020, Fall 2019
This introductory seminar is designed to give freshmen and sophomores a glimpse of a broad selection of bioengineering research that is currently underway at Berkeley and UCSF. Students will become familiar with bioengineering applications in the various concentration areas and see how engineering principles can be applied to biological and medical problems.
Introduction to Bioengineering: Read More [+]

Objectives & Outcomes

Course Objectives: This course is designed to expose students to current research and problems in bioengineering. As a freshman/sophomore class, its main purpose is to excite our students about the possibilities of bioengineering and to help them to choose an area of focus.

Student Learning Outcomes: This course demonstrates the rapid pace of new technology and the need for life-long learning (2). In addition, the course, because of its state-of-the-art research content, encourages our students to explore new horizons (3).

Hours & Format

Fall and/or spring: 15 weeks - 1 hour of seminar per week

Additional Details

Subject/Course Level: Bioengineering/Undergraduate

Grading/Final exam status: Offered for pass/not pass grade only. Final exam not required.

Instructors: T. Johnson, H. Lam

Introduction to Bioengineering: Read Less [-]

Terms offered: Spring 2018, Spring 2017, Spring 2013
Sophomore seminars are small interactive courses offered by faculty members in departments all across the campus. Sophomore seminars offer opportunity for close, regular intellectual contact between faculty members and students in the crucial second year. The topics vary from department to department and semester to semester. Enrollment limited to 15 sophomores.
Sophomore Seminar: Read More [+]

Rules & Requirements

Prerequisites: At discretion of instructor

Repeat rules: Course may be repeated for credit when topic changes.

Hours & Format

Fall and/or spring:
5 weeks - 3-6 hours of seminar per week
10 weeks - 1.5-3 hours of seminar per week
15 weeks - 1-2 hours of seminar per week

Summer:
6 weeks - 2.5-5 hours of seminar per week
8 weeks - 1.5-3.5 hours of seminar and 2-4 hours of seminar per week

Additional Details

Subject/Course Level: Bioengineering/Undergraduate

Grading/Final exam status: The grading option will be decided by the instructor when the class is offered. Final exam required.

Sophomore Seminar: Read Less [-]

Terms offered: Fall 2021, Spring 2021, Fall 2020
Organized group study on various topics under the sponsorship of a member of the Bioengineering faculty.
Supervised Independent Group Studies: Read More [+]

Rules & Requirements

Prerequisites: Consent of instructor

Credit Restrictions: Enrollment is restricted; see the Introduction to Courses and Curricul a section of this catalog.

Repeat rules: Course may be repeated for credit without restriction.

Hours & Format

Fall and/or spring: 15 weeks - 1-4 hours of directed group study per week

Summer: 8 weeks - 1-4 hours of directed group study per week

Additional Details

Subject/Course Level: Bioengineering/Undergraduate

Grading/Final exam status: Offered for pass/not pass grade only. Final exam not required.

Supervised Independent Group Studies: Read Less [-]

Terms offered: Spring 2020, Fall 2019, Spring 2019
Supervised independent study for lower division students.
Supervised Independent Study and Research: Read More [+]

Rules & Requirements

Prerequisites: Freshman or sophomore standing and consent of instructor

Credit Restrictions: Enrollment is restricted; see the Introduction to Courses and Curricula section of this catalog.

Repeat rules: Course may be repeated for credit without restriction.

Hours & Format

Fall and/or spring: 15 weeks - 1-4 hours of independent study per week

Summer:
8 weeks - 1.5-7.5 hours of independent study per week
10 weeks - 1.5-6 hours of independent study per week

Additional Details

Subject/Course Level: Bioengineering/Undergraduate

Grading/Final exam status: Offered for pass/not pass grade only. Final exam not required.

Supervised Independent Study and Research: Read Less [-]

Terms offered: Spring 2022, Fall 2021, Spring 2021
The goal of this semester course is to present the issues of professional conduct in the practice of engineering, research, publication, public and private disclosures, and in managing professional and financial conflicts. The method is through historical didactic presentations, case studies, presentations of methods for problem solving in ethical matters, and classroom debates on contemporary ethical issues. The faculty will be drawn from national experts and faculty from religious studies, journalism, and law from the UC Berkeley campus.
Ethics in Science and Engineering: Read More [+]

Hours & Format

Fall and/or spring: 15 weeks - 3 hours of lecture and 1 hour of discussion per week

Additional Details

Subject/Course Level: Bioengineering/Undergraduate

Grading/Final exam status: Letter grade. Final exam required.

Instructors: Lam, Hayley

Ethics in Science and Engineering: Read Less [-]

Terms offered: Spring 2022, Spring 2021, Spring 2020
This course teaches the fundamental principles underlying modern sensing and control instrumentation used in biology and medicine. The course takes an integrative analytic and hands-on approach to measurement theory and practice by presenting and analyzing example instruments currently used for biology and medical research, including EEG, ECG, pulsed oximeters, Complete Blood Count (CBC), etc.
Instrumentation in Biology and Medicine: Read More [+]

Objectives & Outcomes

Course Objectives: Students should understand the architecture and design principles of modern biomedical sensor data-acquisition (sensor-DAQ) systems. They should understand how to choose the appropriate biomedical sensor, instrumentation amplifier, number of bits, sampling rate, anti-aliasing filter, and DAQ system. They will learn how to design a low-noise instrumentation amplifier circuit. They should understand the crucial importance of suppressing 60 Hz and other interferences to acquire high quality low-level biomedical signals. They should understand the design principles of building, debugging.

Student Learning Outcomes: Students will achieve knowledge and skills in biomedical signal acquisition. They will be assessed in their success with the Course Objectives through tests, homeworks, and laboratories. In particular, the tests will ensure that the students have absorbed the theoretical concepts. The laboratories will provide assessment of learning practical skills (e.g., building an ECG circuit).

Hours & Format

Fall and/or spring: 15 weeks - 3 hours of lecture and 3 hours of laboratory per week

Additional Details

Subject/Course Level: Bioengineering/Undergraduate

Grading/Final exam status: Letter grade. Final exam required.

Instructor: Conolly

Instrumentation in Biology and Medicine: Read Less [-]

Terms offered: Spring 2022, Fall 2020, Fall 2019
This course introduces, develops and applies the methods of continuum mechanics to biomechanical phenomena abundant in biology and medicine. It is intended for upper level undergraduate students who have been exposed to vectors, differential equations, and undergraduate course(s) in physics and certain aspects of modern biology.

Biomechanics: Analysis and Design: Read More [+]

Objectives & Outcomes

Course Objectives: This course introduces, develops and applies scaling laws and the methods of continuum mechanics to biomechanical phenomena related to tissue or organ levels. It is intended for upper level undergraduate students who have been exposed to vectors, differential equations, and undergraduate course(s) in physics and certain aspects of modern biology.
Topics include:

Biosolid mechanics

Stress, strain, constitutive equation

Vector and tensor math

Equilibrium

Extension, torsion, bending, buckling

Material properties of tissues

Student Learning Outcomes: The course will equip the students with a deep understanding of principles of biomechanics. The intuitions gained in this course will help guide the analysis of design of biomedical devices and help the understanding of biological/medical phenomena in health and disease.
The students will develop insight, skills and tools in quantitative analysis of diverse biomechanical systems and topics, spanning various scales from cellular to tissue and organ levels.

Hours & Format

Fall and/or spring: 15 weeks - 3 hours of lecture and 1 hour of discussion per week

Additional Details

Subject/Course Level: Bioengineering/Undergraduate

Grading/Final exam status: Letter grade. Final exam required.

Instructor: Mofrad

Biomechanics: Analysis and Design: Read Less [-]

Terms offered: Fall 2021, Fall 2020, Fall 2019
Thermodynamic and kinetic concepts applied to understanding the chemistry and structure of biomolecules (proteins, membranes, DNA, and RNA) and their thermodynamic and kinetic features in the crowded cellular environment. Topics include entropy, bioenergetics, free energy, chemical potential, reaction kinetics, enzyme kinetics, diffusion and transport, non-equilibrium systems, and their connections to the cellular environment.
Engineering Molecules 2: Read More [+]

Objectives & Outcomes

Course Objectives: (1) To introduce the basics of thermodynamics and chemical kinetics for molecular to cellular biological systems; (2) To give students an understanding of biological size and timescales illustrated through computational exercises on model problems in physical biology.

Student Learning Outcomes: students will be able to (1) relate statistical thermodynamics and chemical kinetics to analyze molecular and cellular behavior beyond the ideal gas and Carnot cycle.

Hours & Format

Fall and/or spring: 15 weeks - 3 hours of lecture and 1 hour of discussion per week

Additional Details

Subject/Course Level: Bioengineering/Undergraduate

Grading/Final exam status: Letter grade. Final exam required.

Instructor: Head-Gordon

Engineering Molecules 2: Read Less [-]

Terms offered: Spring 2022, Spring 2021, Spring 2020
The transport of mass, momentum, and energy are critical to the function of living systems and the design of medical devices. Biological transport phenomena are present at a wide range of length scales: molecular, cellular, organ (whole and by functional unit), and organism. This course develops and applies scaling laws and the methods of continuum mechanics to biological transport phenomena over a range of length and time scales. The course is intended for undergraduate students who have taken a course in differential equations and an introductory course in physics. Students should be familiar with basic biology; an understanding of physiology is useful, but not assumed.
Biological Transport Phenomena: Read More [+]

Terms offered: Fall 2021, Fall 2020, Fall 2019
This course provides students with an introduction to medical device design through fundamentals of circuit design/analysis, signal processing, and instrumentation development from concept to market. Important concepts will include impulse responses of systems, op-amps, interference, and noise; the origin of biological signals and recording mechanisms; and design considerations including sensitivity, accuracy, and market potential. This course is designed to be an introduction to these tools and concepts to prepare students to engage deeply and mindfully with device design in their future courses
Engineering Devices 1: Read More [+]

Objectives & Outcomes

Course Objectives: ● To prepare students to engage in upper division device design work
● Establish a foundational understanding of biomedical device electronics, signal acquisition, sampling, and reconstruction
● To learn quantitative approaches to analyze biomedical signals
● Reinforce mathematical principles including linear algebra, differential equations
● Establish proficiency in the use of MATLAB as a tool for analyzing biomedical data

Student Learning Outcomes: To give students the mathematical and physical tools required to engage in device design.

Hours & Format

Fall and/or spring: 15 weeks - 3 hours of lecture and 1 hour of discussion per week

Additional Details

Subject/Course Level: Bioengineering/Undergraduate

Grading/Final exam status: Letter grade. Final exam required.

Instructor: Moriel Vandsburger

Engineering Devices 1: Read Less [-]

Terms offered: Fall 2021, Fall 2020, Spring 2020, Fall 2019
This course is an introduction to the field of robotics. It covers the fundamentals of kinematics, dynamics, control of robot manipulators, robotic vision, sensing, forward & inverse kinematics of serial chain manipulators, the manipulator Jacobian, force relations, dynamics, & control. We will present techniques for geometric motion planning & obstacle avoidance. Open problems in trajectory generation with dynamic constraints will also be discussed. The course also presents the use of the same analytical techniques as manipulation for the analysis of images & computer vision. Low level vision, structure from motion, & an introduction to vision & learning will be covered. The course concludes with current applications of robotics.
Introduction to Robotics: Read More [+]

Rules & Requirements

Prerequisites: Familiarity with linear algebra at the level of EECS 16A/EECS 16B or Math 54. Experience coding in python at the level of COMPSCI 61A. Preferred: experience developing software at the level of COMPSCI 61B and experience using Linux

Credit Restrictions: Students will receive no credit for Electrical Engineering and Computer Science C106A/Bioengineering C106A after completing EE C106A/BioE C125, Electrical Engineering 206A, or Electrical Engineering and Computer Science 206A.

Hours & Format

Fall and/or spring: 15 weeks - 3 hours of lecture, 1 hour of discussion, and 3 hours of laboratory per week

Summer: 8 weeks - 6 hours of lecture, 2 hours of discussion, and 6 hours of laboratory per week

Additional Details

Subject/Course Level: Bioengineering/Undergraduate

Grading/Final exam status: Letter grade. Alternative to final exam.

Instructor: Sastry

Also listed as: EECS C106A/MEC ENG C106A

Introduction to Robotics: Read Less [-]

Terms offered: Spring 2022, Spring 2021, Spring 2020, Spring 2019
This course is a sequel to EECS C106A/Bioengineering C106A, which covers kinematics, dynamics and control of a single robot. This course will cover dynamics and control of groups of robotic manipulators coordinating with each other and interacting with the environment. Concepts will include an introduction to grasping and the constrained manipulation, contacts and force control for interaction with the environment. We will also cover active perception guided manipulation, as well as the manipulation of non-rigid objects. Throughout, we will emphasize design and human-robot interactions, and applications to applications in manufacturing, service robotics, tele-surgery, and locomotion.
Robotic Manipulation and Interaction: Read More [+]

Rules & Requirements

Prerequisites:EECS C106A / BIO ENG C106A, or consent of the instructor

Credit Restrictions: Students will receive no credit for Electrical Engineering and Computer Science C106B/Bioengineering C106B after completing Electrical Engineering C106B/Bioengineering C125B, Electrical Engineering 206B, or Electrical Engineering and Computer Science 206B.

Hours & Format

Fall and/or spring: 15 weeks - 3 hours of lecture, 1 hour of discussion, and 3 hours of laboratory per week

Additional Details

Subject/Course Level: Bioengineering/Undergraduate

Grading/Final exam status: Letter grade. Alternative to final exam.

Instructors: Bajcsy, Sastry

Also listed as: EECS C106B

Robotic Manipulation and Interaction: Read Less [-]

Terms offered: Spring 2022, Spring 2021, Spring 2020
This course introduces students to the physiology of human organ systems, with an emphasis on quantitative problem solving, engineering-style modeling, and applications to clinical medicine.
Biomedical Physiology for Engineers: Read More [+]

Objectives & Outcomes

Course Objectives: This 15-week course will introduce students to the principles of medical physiology, with a strong emphasis on quantitative problem solving, the physiological basis of human disease, and applications to biomedical devices and prostheses.

Student Learning Outcomes: Students will be exposed to the basic physiological systems which govern the function of each organ system, examples of diseases in which these systems go awry, and medical devices which have been developed to correct the deficits.

Hours & Format

Fall and/or spring: 15 weeks - 3 hours of lecture and 1 hour of discussion per week

Additional Details

Subject/Course Level: Bioengineering/Undergraduate

Grading/Final exam status: Letter grade. Final exam required.

Instructor: Kumar

Biomedical Physiology for Engineers: Read Less [-]

Terms offered: Spring 2022, Spring 2021, Spring 2020
This course is intended for upper level engineering undergraduate students interested in the development of novel functional proteins and peptide motifs and characterization of their physical and biological properties using various instrumentation tools in quantitative manners. The emphasis of the class is how to develop novel proteins and peptide motifs, and to characterize their physical and biological functions using various analytical tools in quantitative manners.
Functional Biomaterials Development and Characterization: Read More [+]

Objectives & Outcomes

Course Objectives: To provide students with basic and extended concepts for the development of the functional proteins and their characterization for various bioengineering and biomedical purposes.

Student Learning Outcomes: Upon completing the course, the student should be able:
1.
To understand the directed evolution processes of functional proteins.
2.
To identify the natural protein products from proteomic database.
3.
To design various experiments to characterize the new protein products.
4.
To develop novel functional proteins and characterize their properties.
5.
To understand basic concepts and instrumentation of protein characterization tools.

Hours & Format

Fall and/or spring: 15 weeks - 3 hours of lecture and 1 hour of discussion per week

Additional Details

Subject/Course Level: Bioengineering/Undergraduate

Grading/Final exam status: Letter grade. Final exam required.

Instructor: SW Lee

Functional Biomaterials Development and Characterization: Read Less [-]

Terms offered: Spring 2022, Spring 2021, Spring 2020
This course applies methods of statistical continuum mechanics to subcellar biomechanical phenomena ranging from nanoscale (molecular) to microscale (whole cell and cell population) biological processes at the interface of mechanics, biology, and chemistry.
Molecular Biomechanics and Mechanobiology of the Cell: Read More [+]

Objectives & Outcomes

Course Objectives: This course, which is open to senior undergraduate students or graduate students in diverse disciplines ranging from engineering to biology to chemistry and physics, is aimed at exposing students to subcellular biomechanical phenomena spanning scales from molecules to the whole cell.

Student Learning Outcomes: The students will develop tools and skills to (1) understand and analyze subcelluar biomechanics and transport phenomena, and (2) ultimately apply these skills to novel biological and biomedical applications

Hours & Format

Fall and/or spring: 15 weeks - 3 hours of lecture and 1 hour of discussion per week

Additional Details

Subject/Course Level: Bioengineering/Undergraduate

Grading/Final exam status: Letter grade. Alternative to final exam.

Instructor: Mofrad

Also listed as: MEC ENG C115

Molecular Biomechanics and Mechanobiology of the Cell: Read Less [-]

Terms offered: Fall 2015, Fall 2014, Fall 2013
This course will teach the main concepts and current views on key attributes of embryonic stem cells (ESC), will introduce theory of their function in embryonic development, methods of ESC derivation, propagation, and characterization, and will discuss currently developing stem cell technologies.
Stem Cells and Technologies: Read More [+]

Hours & Format

Fall and/or spring: 15 weeks - 3 hours of lecture and 1 hour of discussion per week

Additional Details

Subject/Course Level: Bioengineering/Undergraduate

Grading/Final exam status: Letter grade. Final exam required.

Instructor: Conboy

Stem Cells and Technologies: Read Less [-]

Terms offered: Fall 2021, Fall 2020, Fall 2018
This course will teach the main concepts and current views on key attributes of animal cells (somatic, embryonic, pluripotent, germ-line; with the focus on mammalian cells), will introduce theory of the regulation of cell function, methods for deliberate control of cell properties and resulting biomedical and bioengineering technologies.
Cell Engineering: Read More [+]

Objectives & Outcomes

Course Objectives: The goal of this course to establish fundamental understanding of cell engineering technologies and of the key biological paradigms, upon which cell engineering is based, with the focus on biomedical applications of cell engineering.

Student Learning Outcomes: At the completion of this course students will understand how bioengineering technologies address the deliberate control of cell properties (and how this advances biomedicine); and students will learn the main concepts and current views on key attributes of animal cells (somatic, embryonic, pluripotent, germ-line; with the focus on mammalian cells).

Hours & Format

Fall and/or spring: 15 weeks - 3 hours of lecture and 2 hours of discussion per week

Additional Details

Subject/Course Level: Bioengineering/Undergraduate

Grading/Final exam status: Letter grade. Final exam required.

Instructor: Conboy

Cell Engineering: Read Less [-]

Terms offered: Spring 2022, Fall 2021, Spring 2021
This class provides a conceptual and practical understanding of cell and tissue bioengineering that is vital for careers in medicine, biotechnology, and bioengineering. Students are introduced to cell biology laboratory techniques, including immunofluorescence, quantitative image analysis, protein quantification, protein expression, gene expression, and cell culture.
Tissue Engineering Lab: Read More [+]

Objectives & Outcomes

Course Objectives: The goal of this course to provide students with conceptual and practical understanding of cell and tissue bioengineering.

Student Learning Outcomes: At the completion of this course, students will learn key cellular bioengineering laboratory techniques, will develop a conceptual and theoretical understanding of the reliability and limitations of these techniques and will enhance their skills in quantitative data analysis, interpretation and integration.

Hours & Format

Fall and/or spring: 15 weeks - 4 hours of laboratory and 2 hours of lecture per week

Additional Details

Subject/Course Level: Bioengineering/Undergraduate

Grading/Final exam status: Letter grade. Alternative to final exam.

Instructor: Conboy

Tissue Engineering Lab: Read Less [-]

Terms offered: Spring 2016, Spring 2015, Spring 2014
The goal of tissue engineering is to fabricate substitutes to restore tissue structure and functions. Understanding cell function in response to environmental cues will help us to establish design criteria and develop engineering tools for tissue fabrication. This course will introduce the basic concepts and approaches in the field, and train students to design and engineer biological substitutes.
Cell and Tissue Engineering: Read More [+]

Objectives & Outcomes

Course Objectives: (1) To introduce the basics of tissue engineering, including quantitative cell and tissue characterization, stem cells, cell-matrix interaction, cell migration, bioreactors, mechanical regulation, tissue preservation, and immuno-modulation/isolation; (2) To illustrate the cutting-edge research in tissue engineering; (3) To enhance the skills in analyzing and designing engineered tissue products.

Student Learning Outcomes: Students will be able to (1) use mathematical models to analyze cell functions (e.g., proliferation, apoptosis, migration) and mechanical property of tissues, (2) understand scientific and ethical issues of stem cells, (3) engineer natural matrix, biomaterials and drug delivery, (4) understand mass transport and design appropriate bioreactors, (5) understand clinical issues such as tissue preservation, immune responses, immunomodulation and immunoisolation, (6) apply the knowledge to engineering biological substitutes.

Hours & Format

Fall and/or spring: 15 weeks - 3 hours of lecture and 1 hour of discussion per week

Additional Details

Subject/Course Level: Bioengineering/Undergraduate

Grading/Final exam status: Letter grade. Final exam required.

Instructor: Li

Cell and Tissue Engineering: Read Less [-]

Terms offered: Fall 2020, Spring 2019, Spring 2018
This course covers the structure and mechanical functions of load bearing tissues and their replacements. Natural and synthetic load-bearing biomaterials for clinical applications are reviewed. Biocompatibility of biomaterials and host response to structural implants are examined. Quantitative treatment of biomechanical issues and constitutive relationships of tissues are covered in order to design biomaterial replacements for structural function. Material selection for load bearing applications including reconstructive surgery, orthopedics, dentistry, and cardiology are addressed. Mechanical design for longevity including topics of fatigue, wear, and fracture are reviewed. Case studies that examine failures of devices are presented.
Structural Aspects of Biomaterials: Read More [+]

Hours & Format

Fall and/or spring: 15 weeks - 3 hours of lecture and 1 hour of discussion per week

Additional Details

Subject/Course Level: Bioengineering/Undergraduate

Grading/Final exam status: Letter grade. Alternative to final exam.

Instructor: Pruitt

Also listed as: MEC ENG C117

Structural Aspects of Biomaterials: Read Less [-]

Terms offered: Fall 2021, Fall 2020, Fall 2019
This course is intended to give students the opportunity to expand their knowledge of topics related to biomedical materials selection and design. Structure-property relationships of biomedical materials and their interaction with biological systems will be addressed. Applications of the concepts developed include blood-materials compatibility, biomimetic materials, hard and soft tissue-materials interactions, drug delivery, tissue engineering, and biotechnology.
Biological Performance of Materials: Read More [+]

Objectives & Outcomes

Course Objectives: The course is separated into four parts spanning the principles of synthetic materials and surfaces, principles of biological materials, biological performance of materials and devices, and state-of-the-art materials design. Students are required to attend class and master the material therein. In addition, readings from the clinical, life and materials science literature are assigned. Students are encouraged to seek out additional reference material to complement the readings assigned. A mid-term examination is given on basic principles (parts 1 and 2 of the outline). A comprehensive final examination is given as well.
The purpose of this course is to introduce students to problems associated with the selection and function of biomaterials. Through class lectures and readings in both the physical and life science literature, students will gain broad knowledge of the criteria used to select biomaterials, especially in devices where the material-tissue or material-solution interface dominates performance. Materials used in devices for medicine, dentistry, tissue engineering, drug delivery, and the biotechnology industry will be addressed.

This course also has a significant design component (~35%). Students will form small teams (five or less) and undertake a semester-long design project related to the subject matter of the course. The project includes the preparation of a paper and a 20 minute oral presentation critically analyzing a current material-tissue or material-solution problem. Students will be expected to design improvements to materials and devices to overcome the problems identified in class with existing materials.

Student Learning Outcomes:
Apply math, science & engineering principles to the understanding of soft materials, surface chemistry, DLVO theory, protein adsorption kinetics, viscoelasticity, mass diffusion, and molecular (i.e., drug) delivery kinetics.


Design experiments and analyze data from the literature in the context of the class design project.
Apply core concepts in materials science to solve engineering problems related to the selection biomaterials, especially in devices where the material-tissue or material-solution interface dominates performance.
Develop an understanding of the social, safety and medical consequences of biomaterial use and regulatory issues associated with the selection of biomaterials in the context of the silicone breast implant controversy and subsequent biomaterials crisis.
Work independently and function on a team, and develop solid communication skills (oral, graphic & written) through the class design project.

Understanding of the origin of surface forces and interfacial free energy, and how they contribute to the development of the biomaterial interface and ultimately biomaterial performance.

Hours & Format

Fall and/or spring: 15 weeks - 3 hours of lecture and 1 hour of discussion per week

Additional Details

Subject/Course Level: Bioengineering/Undergraduate

Grading/Final exam status: Letter grade. Final exam required.

Instructor: Healy

Also listed as: MAT SCI C118

Biological Performance of Materials: Read Less [-]

Terms offered: Fall 2020, Fall 2019, Spring 2019
Statics, dynamics, optimization theory, composite beam theory, beam-on-elastic foundation theory, Hertz contact theory, and materials behavior. Forces and moments acting on human joints; composition and mechanical behavior of orthopedic biomaterials; design/analysis of artificial joint, spine, and fracture fixation prostheses; musculoskeletal tissues including bone, cartilage, tendon, ligament, and muscle; osteoporosis and fracture-risk predication of bones; and bone adaptation. MATLAB-based project to integrate the course material.
Orthopedic Biomechanics: Read More [+]

Hours & Format

Fall and/or spring: 15 weeks - 3 hours of lecture and 1 hour of laboratory per week

Additional Details

Subject/Course Level: Bioengineering/Undergraduate

Grading/Final exam status: Letter grade. Final exam required.

Instructor: Keaveny

Also listed as: MEC ENG C176

Orthopedic Biomechanics: Read Less [-]

Terms offered: Fall 2021, Fall 2020, Fall 2019
Biophysical and chemical principles of biomedical devices, bionanotechnology, bionanophotonics, and biomedical microelectromechanical systems (BioMEMS). Topics include basics of nano- and microfabrication, soft-lithography, DNA arrays, protein arrays, electrokinetics, electrochemical, transducers, microfluidic devices, biosensor, point of care diagnostics, lab-on-a-chip, drug delivery microsystems, clinical lab-on-a-chip, advanced biomolecular probes, etc.
BioMEMS and Medical Devices: Read More [+]

Terms offered: Spring 2022, Fall 2021, Spring 2020
Students will become familiar with BioMEMS and Lab-on-a-Chip research. Students will design and fabricate their own novel micro- or nano-scale device to address a specific problem in biotechnology using the latest micro- and nano-technological tools and fabrication techniques. This will involve an intensive primary literature review, experimental design, and quantitative data analysis. Results will be presented during class presentations and at a final poster symposium.
BioMems and BioNanotechnology Laboratory: Read More [+]

Objectives & Outcomes

Course Objectives: Students will become familiar with research associated with BioMEMS and Lab-on-a-Chip technologies. Students will gain experience in using creative design to solve a technological problem. Students will learn basic microfabrication techniques. Working in engineering teams, students will learn how to properly characterize a novel device
by choosing and collecting informative metrics. Students will design and carry out carefully controlled experiments that will result in the analysis of quantitative data.

Student Learning Outcomes: Students will learn how to critically read BioMEMS and Lab-on-a-Chip primary literature. Students will learn how to use AutoCAD software to design microscale device features. Students will gain hands-on experience in basic photolithography and soft lithography. Students will get experience with a variety of fluid loading interfaces and
microscopy techniques. Students will learn how to design properly controlled uantitative experiments. Students will gain experience in presenting data to their peers in the form of powerpoint presentations and also at a poster symposium.

Hours & Format

Fall and/or spring: 15 weeks - 6 hours of laboratory and 2 hours of lecture per week

Additional Details

Subject/Course Level: Bioengineering/Undergraduate

Grading/Final exam status: Letter grade. Alternative to final exam.

Instructor: Liepmann

BioMems and BioNanotechnology Laboratory: Read Less [-]

Terms offered: Fall 2021, Fall 2020, Fall 2019
This course focuses on providing students with the foundations needed to understand contemporary literature in drug delivery. Concepts in organic chemistry, biochemistry, and physical chemistry needed to understand current problems in drug delivery are emphasized.
Basic Principles of Drug Delivery: Read More [+]

Objectives & Outcomes

Course Objectives: The goal of this course is to give students the ability to understand problems in drug delivery. Emphasis is placed on the design and synthesis of new molecules for drug delivery.

Student Learning Outcomes: At the completion of this course students should be able to design new molecules to solve drug delivery problems.

Hours & Format

Fall and/or spring: 15 weeks - 3 hours of lecture per week

Additional Details

Subject/Course Level: Bioengineering/Undergraduate

Grading/Final exam status: Letter grade. Final exam required.

Instructor: Murthy

Basic Principles of Drug Delivery: Read Less [-]

Terms offered: Fall 2017, Fall 2016, Fall 2015
An introduction to the kinematics, dynamics, and control of robot manipulators, robotic vision, and sensing. The course covers forward and inverse kinematics of serial chain manipulators, the manipulator Jacobian, force relations, dynamics, and control. It presents elementary principles on proximity, tactile, and force sensing, vision sensors, camera calibration, stereo construction, and motion detection. The course concludes with current applications of robotics in active perception, medical robotics, and other areas.
Introduction to Robotics: Read More [+]

Hours & Format

Fall and/or spring: 15 weeks - 3 hours of lecture, 1 hour of discussion, and 3 hours of laboratory per week

Additional Details

Subject/Course Level: Bioengineering/Undergraduate

Grading/Final exam status: Letter grade. Final exam required.

Instructor: Bajcsy

Formerly known as: Electrical Engineering C125/Bioengineering C125

Also listed as: EL ENG C106A

Introduction to Robotics: Read Less [-]

Terms offered: Spring 2017, Spring 2016
This course is a sequel to Electrical Engineering C106A/Bioengineering C125, which covers kinematics, dynamics and control of a single robot. This course will cover dynamics and control of groups of robotic manipulators coordinating with each other and interacting with the environment. Concepts will include an introduction to grasping and the constrained manipulation, contacts and force control for interaction with the environment. We will also cover active perception guided manipulation, as well as the manipulation of non-rigid objects. Throughout, we will emphasize design and human-robot interactions, and applications to applications in manufacturing, service robotics, tele-surgery, and locomotion.
Robotic Manipulation and Interaction: Read More [+]

Hours & Format

Fall and/or spring: 15 weeks - 3 hours of lecture, 1 hour of discussion, and 3 hours of laboratory per week

Additional Details

Subject/Course Level: Bioengineering/Undergraduate

Grading/Final exam status: Letter grade. Alternative to final exam.

Instructors: Bajcsy, Sastry

Also listed as: EL ENG C106B

Robotic Manipulation and Interaction: Read Less [-]

Terms offered: Fall 2018, Fall 2017, Fall 2016
Topics include computational approaches and techniques to gene structure and genome annotation, sequence alignment using dynamic programming, protein domain analysis, RNA folding and structure prediction, RNA sequence design for synthetic biology, genetic and biochemical pathways and networks, UNIX and scripting languages, basic probability and information theory. Various "case studies" in these areas are reviewed; web-based computational biology tools will be used by students and programming projects will be given. Computational biology research connections to biotechnology will be explored.
Introduction to Computational Molecular and Cell Biology: Read More [+]

Objectives & Outcomes

Course Objectives: To introduce the biological databases and file formats commonly used in computational biology. (2) To familiarize students with the use of Unix scripting languages in bioinformatics workflows. (3) To introduce common algorithms for sequence alignment,
RNA structure prediction, phylogeny and clustering, along with fundamentals of probability, information theory and algorithmic complexity analysis.

Student Learning Outcomes: Students will be able to use knowledge from the lectures and lab sessions to write simple programs to parse bioinformatics file formats and execute basic algorithms, to analyze
algorithmic complexity, to navigate and (for simple cases) set up biological databases containing biological data (including sequences, genome annotations and protein structures), and to use basic statistics to interpret results of compbio analyses.

Hours & Format

Fall and/or spring: 15 weeks - 3 hours of lecture and 1.5 hours of laboratory per week

Additional Details

Subject/Course Level: Bioengineering/Undergraduate

Grading/Final exam status: Letter grade. Final exam required.

Instructor: Holmes

Introduction to Computational Molecular and Cell Biology: Read Less [-]

Terms offered: Fall 2021, Fall 2020, Fall 2019
This class teaches basic bioinformatics and computational biology, with an emphasis on alignment, phylogeny, and ontologies. Supporting foundational topics are also reviewed with an emphasis on bioinformatics topics, including basic molecular biology, probability theory, and information theory.
Introduction to Computational Molecular and Cell Biology: Read More [+]

Terms offered: Spring 2018, Fall 2014, Fall 2013
This senior-level course is a comprehensive survey of genetic devices. These DNA-based constructs are comprised of multiple "parts" that together encode a higher-level biological behavior and perform useful human-defined functions. Such constructs are the engineering target for most projects in synthetic biology. Included within this class of constructs are genetic circuits, sensors, biosynthetic pathways, and microbiological functions.
Genetic Devices: Read More [+]

Objectives & Outcomes

Course Objectives: (1) To introduce the basic biology and engineering principles for constructing genetic devices including biochemical devices, microbiological devices, genetic circuits, eukaryotic devices, and developmental devices, (2) To familiarize students with current literature examples of genetic devices and develop literature searching skills; (3) To develop the students' ability to apply computational tools to the design of genetic devices.

Student Learning Outcomes: Students will be able to (1) use mathematical models to describe the dynamics of genetic devices, (2) comprehend and evaluate publications related to any type of genetic device, (3) perform a thorough literature search, (4) evaluate the technical plausibility of a proposed genetic device, (5) analyze a design challenge and propose a plausible solution to it in the form of a genetic device, and (6) assess any ethical or safety issues associated with a proposed genetic device.

Hours & Format

Fall and/or spring: 15 weeks - 3 hours of lecture and 1 hour of discussion per week

Additional Details

Subject/Course Level: Bioengineering/Undergraduate

Grading/Final exam status: Letter grade. Final exam required.

Instructor: Anderson

Genetic Devices: Read Less [-]

Terms offered: Prior to 2007
This is an introductory course of biomolecular engineering and is required for all CBE graduate students. Undergraduates with knowledge of thermodynamics and transport are also welcome. The topics include structures, functions, and dynamics of biomolecules; molecular tools in biotechnology; metabolic and signaling networks in cellular engineering; and synthetic biology and biomedical engineering applications.
Biomolecular Engineering: Read More [+]

Objectives & Outcomes

Course Objectives:

Sours: http://guide.berkeley.edu/courses/bio_eng/

Courses

Terms offered: Spring 2022, Fall 2021, Spring 2021
This course aims to help students improve their writing skills, taking a particular type of music as its central material. The goal of the course is to help students prepare for academic writing, develop analytical skills appropriate to the subject matter, and receive an introduction to college-level research papers. Depending on the topic the course may include a section of one to two hours for further listening to musical examples in a group setting.
Reading and Writing about Music: Read More [+]

Rules & Requirements

Prerequisites: UC Entry Level Writing Requirement and 1A or equivalent

Requirements this course satisfies: Satisfies the second half of the Reading and Composition requirement

Hours & Format

Fall and/or spring: 15 weeks - 3 hours of lecture per week

Additional Details

Subject/Course Level: Music/Undergraduate

Grading/Final exam status: Alternate method of final assessment during regularly scheduled final exam group (e.g., presentation, final project, etc.).

Reading and Writing about Music: Read Less [-]

Terms offered: Spring 2022, Fall 2021, Spring 2021
A course in basic vocal techniques, only for students in the University Choruses, covering techniques of breathing, pronunciation, and articulation.
Vocal Technique: Read More [+]

Rules & Requirements

Prerequisites: Restricted to music majors or those enrolled in the University Choruses and consent of instructor

Repeat rules: Course may be repeated for credit without restriction.

Hours & Format

Fall and/or spring: 15 weeks - 1 hour of studio per week

Additional Details

Subject/Course Level: Music/Undergraduate

Grading/Final exam status: Letter grade. Alternative to final exam.

Formerly known as: Music 410

Vocal Technique: Read Less [-]

Terms offered: Spring 2022, Fall 2021, Summer 2021 Second 6 Week Session
Fundamentals of music, including notation, sight singing, ear training, and beginning linear analysis. For general students.
Basic Musicianship: Read More [+]

Rules & Requirements

Prerequisites: 20A is a prerequisite to 20B

Hours & Format

Fall and/or spring: 15 weeks - 3 hours of lecture per week

Summer:
3 weeks - 15 hours of lecture per week
6 weeks - 8 hours of lecture per week
8 weeks - 6 hours of lecture per week

Additional Details

Subject/Course Level: Music/Undergraduate

Grading/Final exam status: Letter grade. Final exam required.

Basic Musicianship: Read Less [-]

Terms offered: Spring 2021, Spring 2020, Fall 2014
The Freshman Seminar Program has been designed to provide new students with the opportunity to explore an intellectual topic with a faculty member in a small-seminar setting. Freshman seminars are offered in all campus departments, and topics vary from department to department and semester to semester. Enrollment is limited to 15 freshmen.
Freshman Seminar: Read More [+]

Rules & Requirements

Repeat rules: Course may be repeated for credit when topic changes.

Hours & Format

Fall and/or spring: 15 weeks - 1 hour of seminar per week

Additional Details

Subject/Course Level: Music/Undergraduate

Grading/Final exam status: The grading option will be decided by the instructor when the class is offered. Final Exam To be decided by the instructor when the class is offered.

Freshman Seminar: Read Less [-]

Terms offered: Spring 2022, Fall 2021, Summer 2021 Second 6 Week Session
A writing course based on traditional harmony. Beginning linear and vertical analysis. For general students. Emphasis on written exercises.
Introduction to Music Theory: Read More [+]

Rules & Requirements

Prerequisites: 20A or other basic musicianship course or consent of instructor

Hours & Format

Fall and/or spring: 15 weeks - 3 hours of lecture per week

Summer:
3 weeks - 15 hours of lecture per week
6 weeks - 8 hours of lecture per week
8 weeks - 6 hours of lecture per week

Additional Details

Subject/Course Level: Music/Undergraduate

Grading/Final exam status: Letter grade. Final exam required.

Formerly known as: Music 25A

Introduction to Music Theory: Read Less [-]

Terms offered: Fall 2020, Fall 2019, Fall 2018
Two perspectives are developed: 1) diverse music of groups in America, and 2) American music as a unique phenomenon. Groups considered are African, Asian, European, Hispanic/Latino, and Native American. Lectures and musical examples are organized by topics such as music of socio-economic subgroups within large groups, survival of culture, pan-ethnicity, religious and concert music, and the folk-popular music continuum.
Music in American Culture: Read More [+]

Hours & Format

Fall and/or spring: 15 weeks - 1 hour of lecture, 2 hours of lecture, and 1 hour of discussion per week

Additional Details

Subject/Course Level: Music/Undergraduate

Grading/Final exam status: Letter grade. Final exam required.

Music in American Culture: Read Less [-]

Terms offered: Summer 2020 First 6 Week Session, Summer 2020 Second 6 Week Session, Summer 2019 Second 6 Week Session
Two perspectives are developed: 1) diverse music of groups in America, and 2) American music as a unique phenomenon. Groups considered are African, Asian, European, Hispanic/Latino, and Native American. Lectures and musical examples are religious and concert music, and the folk-popular music continuum.
Music in American Cultures: Read More [+]

Rules & Requirements

Credit Restrictions: Students will receive no credit for Music N26AC after completing Music 26AC. A deficient grade in Music 26AC may be removed by taking Music N26AC.

Requirements this course satisfies: Satisfies the American Cultures requirement

Hours & Format

Summer: 6 weeks - 8 hours of lecture per week

Additional Details

Subject/Course Level: Music/Undergraduate

Grading/Final exam status: Letter grade. Final exam not required.

Music in American Cultures: Read Less [-]

Terms offered: Fall 2021, Summer 2021 8 Week Session
This course offers an introductory look at the diverse musical cultures of the U.S. We will primarily explore music associated with three racial/ethnic groups—Mexican Americans, African Americans, and European Americans—with smaller forays into Asian American and Native American forms. Focusing on several key themes, you will gain an understanding of the ways people use music to express individual and collective identities, the diverse ways people incorporate music into their lives, and how to understand music within a broader historical, political, and economic context. You will also be introduced to basic musical concepts and acquire listening skills that will enable you to better understand music in this course and beyond.
Music in American Cultures: Read More [+]

Objectives & Outcomes

Course Objectives: Analyze music as a reflection of and contributor to U.S. racial and cultural dynamics, along with other social and political
meanings
Apply course concepts to your own musical experiences
Articulate the racial and cultural dynamics of the U.S. in multiple eras
Evaluate and make decisions about real-world musical issues
Identify the aesthetic features of musical styles related to at least three racial/ethnic groups in the U.S. from the 19th, 20th, and 21st centuries

Hours & Format

Fall and/or spring: 15 weeks - 3 hours of web-based lecture and 1 hour of web-based discussion per week

Summer: 8 weeks - 6 hours of web-based lecture and 2 hours of web-based discussion per week

Online: This is an online course.

Additional Details

Subject/Course Level: Music/Undergraduate

Grading/Final exam status: Letter grade. Alternative to final exam.

Instructor: Roberts

Music in American Cultures: Read Less [-]

Terms offered: Spring 2022, Spring 2021, Spring 2020
Devoted to the development of listening skills, and a survey of major forms and types of Western art music.
Introduction to Western Music: Read More [+]

Hours & Format

Fall and/or spring: 15 weeks - 2 hours of lecture and 1 hour of discussion per week

Summer: 8 weeks - 6 hours of lecture per week

Additional Details

Subject/Course Level: Music/Undergraduate

Grading/Final exam status: Letter grade. Final exam required.

Introduction to Western Music: Read Less [-]

Terms offered: Spring 2000, Summer 1996 10 Week Session
Opening ears and minds to musical sounds and the people who make them, imparting basic concepts and ways of listening in order to deepen students' experience of music from a variety of cultures, including Western, Middle Eastern, and Southeast Asian traditions (specific traditions may vary depending on instructor). While the emphasis is on listening, students will become physically involved through hands-on workshops.
Listening to Many Musics: Read More [+]

Hours & Format

Fall and/or spring: 15 weeks - 3 hours of lecture and 1 hour of laboratory per week

Summer:
6 weeks - 8 hours of lecture and 2 hours of laboratory per week
8 weeks - 5.5 hours of lecture and 1.5 hours of laboratory per week

Additional Details

Subject/Course Level: Music/Undergraduate

Grading/Final exam status: Letter grade. Final exam required.

Listening to Many Musics: Read Less [-]

Terms offered: Spring 2022, Summer 2021 First 6 Week Session, Summer 2021 Second 6 Week Session
This course explores the basic materials and models that set the boundaries for various present-day musical experiences. Students are exposed to terminology and modes of engagement with the aim of inspiring new paradigms of listening (e.g., listening to silence, noise, space, and timbre). Composers and musicians of today continue to explore new ways of defining and organizing sounds into music. The course focuses on the most adventurous music of our time, but the concepts learned can be applied to any style of music. The course is designed to enrich and deepen the students' musical abilities through direct involvement with musical materials. Direct engagement through listening and participatory learning is accomplished in part with software created at the Center for New Music and Audio Technologies. The course does not require students to be able to read music nor to own a personal computer.
Music Now: Read More [+]

Hours & Format

Fall and/or spring: 15 weeks - 2 hours of lecture and 1 hour of laboratory per week

Summer: 6 weeks - 5.5 hours of lecture and 2.5 hours of laboratory per week

Additional Details

Subject/Course Level: Music/Undergraduate

Grading/Final exam status: Letter grade. Final exam required.

Instructors: Campion, Ueno

Music Now: Read Less [-]

Terms offered: Spring 2022
The advancements in machine learning, especially the recent breakthrough of artificial neural networks, promoted novel art practices in which computers play a fundamental role and fostered research in the field of computational creativity.
Music 30 (Computational creativity for music and the arts) aims at exploring the
potential that computers have to support, enhance and challenge music creation.
The course is divided into three modules. The first module introduces the essential
mathematical and machine learning tools and gives a general introduction to sound.
The second module shows real applications of creative computing for music. The
third module focuses on the connection between the society and computational
creativity at large.
Computational Creativity for Music and the Arts: Read More [+]

Terms offered: Spring 2022, Spring 2021
Radical Listening (MUS 31) considers music through the lenses of extra-musical epistemologies - aesthetics and philosophies related to culture, memory, identity, gender, etc. Listening to music with such considerations can foster and illuminate personal emotional stakes. Cultivating personal stakes in listening has the benefit of moving us towards a greater capacity for empathy - what we do in our most personal aesthetic spaces can project outwards into how we engage with others, publicly, as caring citizens. Tactically, we will rehearse applying “radical listening” concepts on some of the most ubiquitous and influential music in Western culture in tandem with important, though esoteric, exponents of experimental music (e.g. Vocaloids).
Radical Listening: Read More [+]

Hours & Format

Fall and/or spring: 15 weeks - 2 hours of lecture and 1 hour of laboratory per week

Additional Details

Subject/Course Level: Music/Undergraduate

Grading/Final exam status: Letter grade. Final exam required, with common exam group.

Instructor: Ueno

Radical Listening: Read Less [-]

Terms offered: Spring 2020, Fall 2013, Fall 2012
Freshman and sophomore seminars offer lower division students the opportunity to explore an intellectual topic with a faculty member and a group of peers in a small-seminar setting. These seminars are offered in all campus departments; topics vary from department to department and from semester to semester.
Freshman/Sophomore Seminar: Read More [+]

Rules & Requirements

Prerequisites: Priority given to freshmen and sophomores

Repeat rules: Course may be repeated for credit without restriction.

Hours & Format

Fall and/or spring: 15 weeks - 2-4 hours of seminar per week

Additional Details

Subject/Course Level: Music/Undergraduate

Grading/Final exam status: The grading option will be decided by the instructor when the class is offered. Final exam required.

Freshman/Sophomore Seminar: Read Less [-]

Terms offered: Spring 2022, Fall 2021, Spring 2020
A course designed for students who wish to attain a beginner's level of proficiency on the carillon. Prospective students must have a working knowledge of the keyboard, read treble and bass clefs fluently, be secure in key signatures through three sharps and flats, and be comfortable with common duple and triple meters.
Group Carillon Lessons for Beginning Students: Read More [+]

Rules & Requirements

Prerequisites: Consent of instructor

Repeat rules: Course may be repeated for credit without restriction.

Hours & Format

Fall and/or spring: 15 weeks - 1 hour of laboratory per week

Additional Details

Subject/Course Level: Music/Undergraduate

Grading/Final exam status: Letter grade. Final exam not required.

Instructor: Davis

Group Carillon Lessons for Beginning Students: Read Less [-]

Terms offered: Spring 2022, Fall 2021, Spring 2020
Private carillon lessons to develop a personal repertory. In this course, students will begin to learn different practice techniques.
Private Carillon Lessons for Beginning Students: Read More [+]

Rules & Requirements

Prerequisites: 40 or consent of instructor

Repeat rules: Course may be repeated for credit up to a total of 6 units.

Hours & Format

Fall and/or spring: 15 weeks - .5 hours of laboratory per week

Additional Details

Subject/Course Level: Music/Undergraduate

Grading/Final exam status: Letter grade. Final exam not required.

Instructor: Davis

Private Carillon Lessons for Beginning Students: Read Less [-]

Terms offered: Spring 2022, Fall 2021, Spring 2021
Private carillon lessons stressing musical questions and de-emphasizing technical and repertory issues. Composition and arranging may be included. Personal musicianship is examined and musical horizons are extended.
Private Carillon Lessons for Intermediate Students: Read More [+]

Rules & Requirements

Prerequisites: 41A or consent of instructor

Repeat rules: Course may be repeated for credit up to a total of 6 units.

Hours & Format

Fall and/or spring: 15 weeks - .5 hours of laboratory per week

Additional Details

Subject/Course Level: Music/Undergraduate

Grading/Final exam status: Letter grade. Final exam not required.

Instructor: Jeff Davis

Private Carillon Lessons for Intermediate Students: Read Less [-]

Terms offered: Spring 2014, Spring 2013
This course is designed for students to reach an advanced level of proficiency. Students are required to play one ten-minute concert per week plus participate in the student recital.
Private Carillon Lessons for Advanced Students: Read More [+]

Rules & Requirements

Prerequisites: 41A, 41B, and/or consent of instructor

Repeat rules: Course may be repeated for credit up to a total of 12 units.

Hours & Format

Fall and/or spring: 15 weeks - 1 hour of laboratory per week

Additional Details

Subject/Course Level: Music/Undergraduate

Grading/Final exam status: Letter grade. Final exam not required.

Instructor: Davis

Formerly known as: 42

Private Carillon Lessons for Advanced Students: Read Less [-]

Terms offered: Spring 2022, Fall 2021, Spring 2015
This course is a requirement for those students who are studying for examination by the Guild of Carillonneurs in North America.
Carillon Lessons for Advanced Students: Read More [+]

Rules & Requirements

Prerequisites: 41A, 41B, or consent of instructor

Repeat rules: Course may be repeated for credit up to a total of 6 units.

Hours & Format

Fall and/or spring: 15 weeks - 1 hour of laboratory per week

Additional Details

Subject/Course Level: Music/Undergraduate

Grading/Final exam status: Letter grade. Final exam not required.

Instructor: Davis

Carillon Lessons for Advanced Students: Read Less [-]

Terms offered: Spring 2022, Fall 2021, Summer 2021 Second 6 Week Session
Students will learn the fundaments of healthy singing. The classical style will be learned and applied to other styles of singing. Students will receive group instruction and individual feedback throughout the semester. Singers will perform two solos: one in English and one in a foreign language. The course is open to all undergraduates. Students involved in campus vocal ensembles are encouraged to enroll. No prior music experience required.
Voice Class: Read More [+]

Rules & Requirements

Prerequisites: Students must undergo an initial vocal assessment in the first class session before being admitted into the class

Repeat rules: Course may be repeated for credit without restriction.

Hours & Format

Fall and/or spring: 15 weeks - 2 hours of studio per week

Summer: 6 weeks - 5 hours of studio per week

Additional Details

Subject/Course Level: Music/Undergraduate

Grading/Final exam status: Letter grade. Alternative to final exam.

Instructor: Johnson

Voice Class: Read Less [-]

Terms offered: Summer 2021 10 Week Session, Summer 2020 10 Week Session, Summer 2019 10 Week Session
Piano instruction includes music theory (musical notation, triads, scales and primary chords) at the keyboard. Repertoire draws from simple classical pieces and melodies accompanied with chords. Mastery of the material will be demonstrated at the keyboard and through three written assignments.
Weekly class attendance and daily practice (5 hours weekly) are expected.

Beginning Piano Class 1 for Non-Music Majors: Read More [+]

Hours & Format

Summer:
8 weeks - 2 hours of studio per week
10 weeks - 1.5 hours of studio per week

Additional Details

Subject/Course Level: Music/Undergraduate

Grading/Final exam status: Letter grade. Alternative to final exam.

Instructor: Chew

Beginning Piano Class 1 for Non-Music Majors: Read Less [-]

Terms offered: Summer 2018 10 Week Session, Summer 2017 10 Week Session, Summer 2016 10 Week Session
Continuing from MUSIC 45, pianists will build on their musical skills through understanding music theory. Course covers minor scales (relative/parallel keys; three forms of the minor scale; primary chords in minor scales), chord inversions, chord progressions, and dominant seventh chords. Repertoire will include classical works and music suggested by students. Weekly class attendance and daily practice (five hours weekly) are expected.

Advanced Beginning Piano Class for Non-Music Majors: Read More [+]

Terms offered: Spring 2022, Fall 2021, Spring 2021
Two semesters are strongly recommended for music majors who lack the basic keyboard skills needed for musicianship and harmony classes.
Elementary Piano: Read More [+]

Rules & Requirements

Prerequisites: Restricted to music majors by audition

Repeat rules: Course may be repeated for credit without restriction.

Hours & Format

Fall and/or spring: 15 weeks - 1 hour of studio per week

Additional Details

Subject/Course Level: Music/Undergraduate

Grading/Final exam status: Offered for pass/not pass grade only. Alternative to final exam.

Formerly known as: Music 405

Elementary Piano: Read Less [-]

Terms offered: Summer 2021 First 6 Week Session, Summer 2021 Second 6 Week Session, Summer 2020 Second 6 Week Session
Fundamentals of guitar performance, including tuning, basic pitch and rhythm reading, melody and chord playing.
Fundamentals of Guitar Performance: Read More [+]

Hours & Format

Summer: 6 weeks - 5 hours of lecture per week

Additional Details

Subject/Course Level: Music/Undergraduate

Grading/Final exam status: Letter grade. Alternative to final exam.

Instructor: Hough

Fundamentals of Guitar Performance: Read Less [-]

Terms offered: Spring 2022, Fall 2020, Fall 2019
This course is designed to introduce students to the field of music therapy with an overview of: what music therapy is, bases for uses of music in therapy, key theoretical models of music therapy, and clinical applications of music therapy with various populations. Through didactic and experiential assignments and classroom discussions, we will create a collaborative and process-oriented learning environment. Pre-requisites: Open to all interested students.
Introduction to Music Therapy: Read More [+]

Objectives & Outcomes

Course Objectives: •Students will learn definitions of music therapy and be able to define music therapy in their own words.
•Students will understand the rationale for the use of music in therapy.
•Students will gain a foundational understanding of various music therapy treatment models and approaches.
•Students will gain an understanding of the application of music therapy with various populations.

Hours & Format

Fall and/or spring: 15 weeks - 3 hours of lecture per week

Additional Details

Subject/Course Level: Music/Undergraduate

Grading/Final exam status: Letter grade. Alternate method of final assessment during regularly scheduled final exam group (e.g., presentation, final project, etc.).

Introduction to Music Therapy: Read Less [-]

Terms offered: Spring 2022, Fall 2021, Spring 2021
Diatonic sight singing, ear training, and keyboard harmony.
Musicianship I: Read More [+]

Rules & Requirements

Prerequisites: Music Placement Examination

Credit Restrictions: Students will receive no credit for Music 52A after completing Music 52B. Students cannot receive credit for 52A after having completed 49B.

Hours & Format

Fall and/or spring: 15 weeks - 3 hours of lecture per week

Additional Details

Subject/Course Level: Music/Undergraduate

Grading/Final exam status: Letter grade. Alternative to final exam.

Musicianship I: Read Less [-]

Terms offered: Spring 2022, Fall 2021, Spring 2021
Continuation of diatonic sight singing and ear training, introduction to chromatic sight singing, ear training, keyboard harmony, and score reading.
Musicianship II: Read More [+]

Rules & Requirements

Prerequisites: Advanced placement in Music Placement Exam or successful completion of Music 52A

Credit Restrictions: Students cannot receive credit for 52B after having completed 50.

Hours & Format

Fall and/or spring: 15 weeks - 3 hours of lecture per week

Additional Details

Subject/Course Level: Music/Undergraduate

Grading/Final exam status: Letter grade. Alternative to final exam.

Musicianship II: Read Less [-]

Terms offered: Spring 2022, Fall 2021, Spring 2021
Diatonic harmony, chorale harmonization, and analytical studies. Emphasis on written exercises.
Harmony I: Read More [+]

Rules & Requirements

Prerequisites: Music Placement Examination

Credit Restrictions: Students will receive no credit for Music 53A after taking Music 53B. Students cannot receive credit for 53A after having completed 49C.

Hours & Format

Fall and/or spring: 15 weeks - 3 hours of lecture per week

Additional Details

Subject/Course Level: Music/Undergraduate

Grading/Final exam status: Letter grade. Alternative to final exam.

Harmony I: Read Less [-]

Terms offered: Spring 2022, Fall 2021, Spring 2021
Introduction to chromatic harmony and analytical studies. Emphasis on written exercises.
Harmony II: Read More [+]

Rules & Requirements

Prerequisites: Advanced placement in Harmony Placement Exam or successful completion of Music 53A

Credit Restrictions: Students cannot receive credit for 53B after having completed 60.

Hours & Format

Fall and/or spring: 15 weeks - 3 hours of lecture per week

Additional Details

Subject/Course Level: Music/Undergraduate

Grading/Final exam status: Letter grade. Final exam required.

Harmony II: Read Less [-]

Terms offered: Fall 2021, Fall 2020, Fall 2019
Introduction to the study of music history; required for music majors. This writing-intensive course offers an in-depth study of musical genres and styles in relation to conditions of production and reception. Through listening, reading musical scores, and studying historical documents, students will draw connections between specific features of music and the ways in which listening, performance, and the function of music have changed over time.
History of Music I: Read More [+]

Rules & Requirements

Prerequisites: Must have taken and passed the Musicianship Placement Exam; be fluent in reading music notation; or have consent of instructor

Hours & Format

Fall and/or spring: 15 weeks - 3 hours of lecture and 1 hour of discussion per week

Additional Details

Subject/Course Level: Music/Undergraduate

Grading/Final exam status: Letter grade. Final exam required.

History of Music I: Read Less [-]

Terms offered: Spring 2022, Spring 2021, Spring 2020

Studies of selected traditional and popular musical practices from an ethnomusicological perspective. Taking into account local, regional, and transnational connections among the selected practices, this will include approaches to music making and listening, relevant music theory, issues of identity and power, connections to ritual, dance, and theater, and social, economic, and aesthetic values. Topic and geocultural area will vary. Music majors should take this course in the first two years of the bachelor degree program if at all possible, but no later than their junior year. Transfer students must take the course in their junior year.
Studies of Musics of the World: Read More [+]

Rules & Requirements

Prerequisites: Music majors and intended music majors only

Repeat rules: Course may be repeated for credit when topic changes.

Hours & Format

Fall and/or spring: 15 weeks - 3 hours of lecture and 1 hour of discussion per week

Summer: 6 weeks - 8 hours of lecture and 2 hours of discussion per week

Additional Details

Subject/Course Level: Music/Undergraduate

Grading/Final exam status: Letter grade. Final exam required.

Studies of Musics of the World: Read Less [-]

Terms offered: Spring 2018, Spring 2017, Spring 2016
Department organized and supervised field programs involving experiences in tutoring and related activities. Students taking the course for the first time will be provided with training suitable to the subject matter being tutored.
Field Studies: Read More [+]

Rules & Requirements

Prerequisites: Music major

Repeat rules: Course may be repeated for credit without restriction.

Hours & Format

Fall and/or spring: 15 weeks - 1-3 hours of fieldwork per week

Summer:
6 weeks - 2.5-7.5 hours of fieldwork per week
8 weeks - 1.5-5.5 hours of fieldwork per week
10 weeks - 1.5-4.5 hours of fieldwork per week

Additional Details

Subject/Course Level: Music/Undergraduate

Grading/Final exam status: Offered for pass/not pass grade only. Final exam not required.

Field Studies: Read Less [-]

Terms offered: Spring 2016, Fall 2015, Spring 2015
Group study in a field that may not coincide with that of any regular course. See the Introduction to Courses and Curricula section of the General Catalog for enrollment restrictions.
Directed Group Study for Freshmen and Sophomores: Read More [+]

Rules & Requirements

Prerequisites: Lower division standing and consent of instructor

Credit Restrictions: Enrollment is restricted; see the section on Academic Policies-Course Number Guide in the Berkeley Guide.

Repeat rules: Course may be repeated for credit without restriction.

Hours & Format

Fall and/or spring: 15 weeks - 1-4 hours of directed group study per week

Summer:
6 weeks - 2.5-10 hours of directed group study per week
8 weeks - 2-7.5 hours of directed group study per week

Additional Details

Subject/Course Level: Music/Undergraduate

Grading/Final exam status: Offered for pass/not pass grade only. Final exam not required.

Directed Group Study for Freshmen and Sophomores: Read Less [-]

Terms offered: Spring 2022, Fall 2021, Spring 2021
Berkeley Connect is a mentoring program, offered through various academic departments, that helps students build intellectual community. Over the course of a semester, enrolled students participate in regular small-group discussions facilitated by a graduate student mentor (following a faculty-directed curriculum), meet with their graduate student mentor for one-on-one academic advising, attend lectures and panel discussions featuring department faculty and alumni, and go on field trips to campus resources. Students are not required to be declared majors in order to participate.
Berkeley Connect: Read More [+]

Rules & Requirements

Repeat rules: Course may be repeated for credit without restriction.

Hours & Format

Fall and/or spring: 15 weeks - 1 hour of lecture per week

Additional Details

Subject/Course Level: Music/Undergraduate

Grading/Final exam status: Offered for pass/not pass grade only. Final exam not required.

Berkeley Connect: Read Less [-]

Terms offered: Fall 2018, Spring 2016, Fall 2015
Directed individual study in a field that may not coincide with that of any regular course. See the Introduction to Courses and Curricula section of the General Catalog for enrollment restrictions.
Independent Study for Freshmen and Sophomores: Read More [+]

Rules & Requirements

Prerequisites: Lower division standing and consent of instructor

Repeat rules: Course may be repeated for credit without restriction.

Hours & Format

Fall and/or spring: 15 weeks - 1-4 hours of independent study per week

Summer:
6 weeks - 2.5-10 hours of independent study per week
8 weeks - 2-7.5 hours of independent study per week

Additional Details

Subject/Course Level: Music/Undergraduate

Grading/Final exam status: Offered for pass/not pass grade only. Final exam not required.

Independent Study for Freshmen and Sophomores: Read Less [-]

Terms offered: Fall 2021
This course will cover the fundamentals of music production, including (but not limited to): the science of sound, signal flow and recording chain, intro to various Digital Audio Workstations (Logic, Reaper, Pro Tools, Garage Band and the differences between them), with a focus on music production using Ableton Live, effects processing, and mixing and mastering. If time and interest allow, basics of Max for Live. This course is best suited for those with little to no experience with DAWs or Ableton.
Introduction to Music Production using Ableton Live: Read More [+]

Objectives & Outcomes

Course Objectives: Provide a strong conceptual foundation and technical skill set when using Ableton Live and comfort using common Digital Audio Workstation interfaces, with emphasis on producing original music using a variety of setups, troubleshooting, and listening to/discussing other students’ tracks using musical vocabulary.

Student Learning Outcomes: Create at least 4 dynamic and thoughtful tracks in Ableton from start to finish using any combination of recorded audio and MIDI clips. These tracks will demonstrate progressively advanced production techniques within the style(s) of music that students are interested in.
Demonstrate an increased awareness and use of musical terminology when discussing their own and other students’ tracks, based on an overview of relevant music theory concepts (writing chord progressions, rhythm and syncopation exercises).
Select a microphone (from a given list) to use in various recording contexts (which are based on the student setups in the class). If no fellow student setups allow, common recording studio contexts (i.e. 5 piece band, acoustic duo).
Set up and check from start to finish an Ableton Live session using their personal setup (could include analog/MIDI devices, microphones, acoustic instruments) or if none of the above, a setup with built in microphone and laptop MIDI keyboard. This includes recording and editing MIDI and Audio clips in both Session and Arrangement view while understanding the differences between them.
Understand and apply basic mixing and mastering techniques and plugins available in Ableton, including but not limited to: compression, EQ, delay, and reverb and the use of return tracks.

Hours & Format

Fall and/or spring: 15 weeks - 2-2 hours of lecture and 2-2 hours of laboratory per week

Summer: 6 weeks - 5-5 hours of lecture and 5-5 hours of laboratory per week

Additional Details

Subject/Course Level: Music/Undergraduate

Grading/Final exam status: Letter grade. Alternative to final exam.

Formerly known as: Music 160

Introduction to Music Production using Ableton Live: Read Less [-]

Terms offered: Spring 2020, Fall 2019, Fall 2018
Students will develop, in consultation with the instructor, a semester length project that focuses on creating a piece of music, and/or researching and building new software tools for music.
Independent Projects in Computer Music: Read More [+]

Rules & Requirements

Prerequisites: Completion of Music 158A with letter grade of A or A+ and consent of instructor

Repeat rules: Course may be repeated for credit when topic changes.

Hours & Format

Fall and/or spring: 15 weeks - 3 hours of lecture per week

Additional Details

Subject/Course Level: Music/Undergraduate

Grading/Final exam status: Letter grade. Alternative to final exam.

Instructor: Campion

Independent Projects in Computer Music: Read Less [-]

Terms offered: Fall 2021, Fall 2020, Spring 2020
A review of the sensory, perceptual, and cognitive foundations of listening, performing, and composing. Topics include relations among various acoustical and perceptual characterizations of sound; perceptions of pitch, time, temporal relations, timbre, stability conditions, and auditory space; auditory scene analysis and perceptual grouping mechanisms; perceptual principles for melodic, rhythmic, and harmonic organization; orchestration as spectral composition. A course research project is required.
Music Perception and Cognition: Read More [+]

Hours & Format

Fall and/or spring: 15 weeks - 3 hours of lecture per week

Additional Details

Subject/Course Level: Music/Undergraduate

Grading/Final exam status: Letter grade. Alternative to final exam.

Music Perception and Cognition: Read Less [-]

Terms offered: Fall 2021, Fall 2020, Spring 2020
A review of the sensory, perceptual, and cognitive foundations of listening, performing, and composing. Topics include relations among various acoustical and perceptual characterizations of sound; perceptions of pitch, time, temporal relations, timbre, stability conditions, and auditory space; auditory scene analysis and perceptual grouping mechanisms; perceptual principles for melodic, rhythmic, and harmonic organization; orchestration as spectral composition. This course is restricted to declared Music Majors. These students will hold an individual meeting with the instructor to insure that their final projects are aligned closely with their musical skills and other coursework in the major. A course research project is required.
Music Perception and Cognition: Read More [+]

Hours & Format

Fall and/or spring: 15 weeks - 3 hours of lecture per week

Additional Details

Subject/Course Level: Music/Undergraduate

Grading/Final exam status: Letter grade. Alternative to final exam.

Music Perception and Cognition: Read Less [-]

Terms offered: Fall 2020, Fall 2019, Fall 2018
The goal of this class is to interrogate and make explicit the powerful musical intuitions that are at work as you make sense of the music all around you. What is the nature of the knowledge that is guiding these intuitions? How does this knowledge develop in ordinary and extraordinary ways? To approach these questions, small composition-like projects aided by a specially designed computer music environment will function as a workplace. You will explore, experiment, question, and reflect on how and what you know how to do as you generate the musical coherence that you seem simply to find.
Music Cognition: The Mind Behind the Musical Ear: Read More [+]

Terms offered: Fall 2020, Fall 2019, Fall 2018
The goal of this class is to interrogate and make explicit the powerful musical intuitions that are at work as you make sense of the music all around you. What is the nature of the knowledge that is guiding these intuitions? How does this knowledge develop in ordinary and extraordinary ways? To approach these questions, small composition-like projects aided by a specially designed computer music environment will function as a workplace.
Music Cognition: The Mind Behind the Musical Ear: Read More [+]

Rules & Requirements

Prerequisites: Music majors only

Hours & Format

Fall and/or spring: 15 weeks - 3 hours of lecture per week

Additional Details

Subject/Course Level: Music/Undergraduate

Grading/Final exam status: Letter grade. Final exam not required.

Instructor: Bamberger

Music Cognition: The Mind Behind the Musical Ear: Read Less [-]

Terms offered: Spring 2022, Spring 2006, Spring 2005
Research and practical experience in the art of musical improvisation, through study and internalization of the Black American music known as jazz.
This is a class for acquiring knowledge and skills necessary for improvising in the jazz tradition, with the goal of creating a personal and ensemble language. Through transcription, harmonic analysis, and exercises in tonality we will develop methods and routines for linking knowledge, skills, and imagination.
Models for study will include the work of practitioners from across the history of jazz such as Louis Armstrong, Duke Ellington, Charlie Parker, Mary Lou Williams, Thelonious Monk, Sun Ra, and Steve Lacy.
Open to both music majors and non-majors by audition at the start of term.
Improvisation in the Jazz Tradition: Read More [+]

Rules & Requirements

Prerequisites: This class is open to both music majors and non-majors by audition at the beginning of the term. Prospective students should be able to demonstrate proficiency on their instrument, have taken one year of university-level music theory or the equivalent, and possess a keen interest in jazz and improvised music

Repeat rules: Course may be repeated for credit up to a total of 2 times.

Hours & Format

Fall and/or spring: 15 weeks - 3 hours of lecture and 1 hour of studio per week

Additional Details

Subject/Course Level: Music/Undergraduate

Grading/Final exam status: Letter grade. Final exam required.

Instructor: Goldberg

Improvisation in the Jazz Tradition: Read Less [-]

Terms offered: Fall 2021, Fall 2020, Fall 2019
A systematic study of jazz theory including scales, chords, keyboard voicings, solo transcription, and tune study approached through playing, singing, listening, writing, improvization, analysis, and small ensemble playing.
Jazz Theory and Performance 1: Read More [+]

Rules & Requirements

Prerequisites: Audition

Credit Restrictions: Students will receive no credit for 116A after taking 116 or 116M.

Hours & Format

Fall and/or spring: 15 weeks - 3 hours of lecture and 1 hour of studio per week

Additional Details

Subject/Course Level: Music/Undergraduate

Grading/Final exam status: Letter grade. Final exam required.

Instructor: Dana

Formerly known as: 116

Jazz Theory and Performance 1: Read Less [-]

Terms offered: Fall 2021, Fall 2020, Fall 2019
A systematic study of jazz theory including scales, chords, keyboard voicings, solo transcription, and tune study approached through playing, singing, listening, writing, improvization, analysis, and small ensemble playing.
Jazz Theory and Performance 1: Read More [+]

Rules & Requirements

Prerequisites: Audition

Credit Restrictions: Students will receive no credit for 116AM after taking 116 or 116M.

Hours & Format

Fall and/or spring: 15 weeks - 3 hours of lecture and 1 hour of studio per week

Additional Details

Subject/Course Level: Music/Undergraduate

Grading/Final exam status: Letter grade. Final exam required.

Instructor: Dana

Formerly known as: 116M

Jazz Theory and Performance 1: Read Less [-]

Terms offered: Spring 2021, Spring 2020, Spring 2019
Advanced concepts in theory and performance in the jazz vernacular tradition, including melodic minor and diminished chords and scales, reharmonization, changes, Coltrane changes, use of pentatonics and 4ths, playing outside, solo analysis, piano voicings, and an introduction to jazz arranging and composition. Activities will include short writing and playing exercises, transcription and analysis, historical and analytical readings, arranging and composition projects for small ensemble, and three hours of small ensemble rehearsal each week.
Jazz Theory and Performance 2: Read More [+]

Rules & Requirements

Prerequisites: 116, 116M, 116A, or 116AM, or consent of instructor; Audition

Hours & Format

Fall and/or spring: 15 weeks - 2 hours of lecture and 3 hours of studio per week

Additional Details

Subject/Course Level: Music/Undergraduate

Grading/Final exam status: Letter grade. Final exam required.

Instructor: Dana

Jazz Theory and Performance 2: Read Less [-]

Terms offered: Spring 2021, Spring 2020, Spring 2019
Advanced concepts in theory and performance in the jazz vernacular tradition, including melodic minor and diminished chords and scales, reharmonization, changes, Coltrane changes, use of pentatonics and 4ths, playing outside, solo analysis, piano voicings, and an introduction to jazz arranging and composition. Activities will include short writing and playing exercises, transcription and analysis, historical and analytical readings, arranging and composition projects for small ensemble, and three hours of small ensemble rehearsal each week.
Jazz Theory and Performance 2: Read More [+]

Rules & Requirements

Prerequisites: 116, 116M, 116A, or 116AM, or consent of instructor; Audition

Hours & Format

Fall and/or spring: 15 weeks - 2 hours of lecture and 3 hours of studio per week

Additional Details

Subject/Course Level: Music/Undergraduate

Grading/Final exam status: Letter grade. Final exam required.

Instructor: Dana

Jazz Theory and Performance 2: Read Less [-]

Terms offered: Spring 2022, Fall 2021, Summer 2021 Second 6 Week Session
For non-majors. A study of issues in the history of music and sound. Topic will vary each semester.
Topics in the History of Music: Read More [+]

Rules & Requirements

Prerequisites: 27 or consent of instructor

Repeat rules: Course may be repeated for credit without restriction.

Hours & Format

Fall and/or spring: 15 weeks - 3 hours of lecture per week

Summer:
6 weeks - 8 hours of lecture per week
8 weeks - 6 hours of lecture per week

Additional Details

Subject/Course Level: Music/Undergraduate

Grading/Final exam status: Letter grade. Final exam required.

Topics in the History of Music: Read Less [-]

Terms offered: Fall 2020, Spring 2020, Fall 2016
A study of musical and dramatic aspects of opera. Lectures on selected operas will be supplemented by assigned recordings and films or videotapes of notable performances.
Opera: Read More [+]

Rules & Requirements

Prerequisites: 27 or consent of instructor

Hours & Format

Fall and/or spring: 15 weeks - 3 hours of lecture per week

Additional Details

Subject/Course Level: Music/Undergraduate

Grading/Final exam status: Letter grade. Final exam required.

Opera: Read Less [-]

Terms offered: Spring 2020, Fall 2016, Fall 2015
A study of musical and dramatic aspects of opera. Lectures on selected operas will be supplemented by assigned recordings and films or videotapes of notable performances. Analytical studies and a term paper required.
Opera: Read More [+]

Rules & Requirements

Prerequisites: 61B, and 75 or 76. Restricted to music majors

Credit Restrictions: Students will not receive credit for 128AM after taking 128A.

Hours & Format

Fall and/or spring: 15 weeks - 3 hours of lecture per week

Additional Details

Subject/Course Level: Music/Undergraduate

Grading/Final exam status: Letter grade. Final exam required.

Opera: Read Less [-]

Terms offered: Spring 2018, Spring 2015, Spring 2013
This course is an introduction to Beethoven's music and its historical contexts. While closely analyzing individual works, this course also examines how Beethoven and his music have been represented and interpreted until our own day, exploring the values--musical and cultural--that have ensured Beethoven's towering position in Western music.
Beethoven: Read More [+]

Rules & Requirements

Prerequisites: 27 or consent of instructor

Hours & Format

Fall and/or spring: 15 weeks - 3 hours of lecture per week

Additional Details

Subject/Course Level: Music/Undergraduate

Grading/Final exam status: Letter grade. Final exam required.

Beethoven: Read Less [-]

Terms offered: Spring 2018, Spring 2015, Spring 2013
This course is an introduction to Beethoven's music and its historical contexts. While closely analyzing individual works, this course also examines how Beethoven and his music have been represented and interpreted until our own day, exploring the values--musical and cultural--that have ensured Beethoven's towering position in Western music.
Beethoven: Read More [+]

Rules & Requirements

Prerequisites: Restricted to music majors

Hours & Format

Fall and/or spring: 15 weeks - 3 hours of lecture per week

Additional Details

Subject/Course Level: Music/Undergraduate

Grading/Final exam status: Letter grade. Final exam required.

Instructor: Mathew

Beethoven: Read Less [-]

Terms offered: Spring 2012, Summer 2011 8 Week Session, Spring 2009
An introduction to the music of J. S. Bach (1685-1750), a central figure in the history of Western Art Music. The course includes discussion of his organ music, harpsichord works, cantatas, Passion settings, and instrumental chamber music, discusses the relationship between Bach's biography and his compositions, and places study of the man and his music in its cultural and historical context. Required work will include one short paper and one longer paper. There will also be weekly reading and listening assignments.
J. S. Bach: Read More [+]

Rules & Requirements

Prerequisites: 27 or consent of instructor

Hours & Format

Fall and/or spring: 15 weeks - 3 hours of lecture per week

Summer:
6 weeks - 8 hours of lecture per week
8 weeks - 6 hours of lecture per week

Additional Details

Subject/Course Level: Music/Undergraduate

Grading/Final exam status: Letter grade. Final exam required.

J. S. Bach: Read Less [-]

Terms offered: Spring 2012, Summer 2011 8 Week Session, Spring 2009
An introduction to the music of J. S. Bach (1685-1750), a central figure in the history of Western Art Music. The course includes discussion of his organ music, harpsichord works, cantatas, Passion settings, and instrumental chamber music, discusses the relationship between Bach's biography and his compositions, and places study of the man and his music in its cultural and historical context. Required work will include one medium-length paper, one longer research paper, and one analytical study. There will also be weekly reading and listening assignments.
J. S. Bach: Read More [+]

Rules & Requirements

Prerequisites: Restricted to music majors

Hours & Format

Fall and/or spring: 15 weeks - 3 hours of lecture per week

Summer:
6 weeks - 8 hours of lecture per week
8 weeks - 6 hours of lecture per week

Additional Details

Subject/Course Level: Music/Undergraduate

Grading/Final exam status:

Sours: http://guide.berkeley.edu/courses/music/
  1. Arne and carlos
  2. Intel i210 driver
  3. Dank meme 2018
  4. Wood display cubes
  5. Dmv louisiana hours

Courses

Terms offered: Summer 2016 10 Week Session, Summer 2015 10 Week Session, Summer 2014 10 Week Session
This course assists entering Freshman students with basic statistical concepts and problem solving. Designed for students who do not meet the prerequisites for 2. Offered through the Student Learning Center.
Preparatory Statistics: Read More [+]

Rules & Requirements

Prerequisites: Consent of instructor

Hours & Format

Summer:
6 weeks - 5 hours of lecture and 4.5 hours of workshop per week
8 weeks - 5 hours of lecture and 4.5 hours of workshop per week

Additional Details

Subject/Course Level: Statistics/Undergraduate

Grading/Final exam status: Offered for pass/not pass grade only. Final exam required.

Instructor: Purves

Preparatory Statistics: Read Less [-]

Terms offered: Spring 2022, Fall 2021, Summer 2021 8 Week Session
Population and variables. Standard measures of location, spread and association. Normal approximation. Regression. Probability and sampling. Binomial distribution. Interval estimation. Some standard significance tests.
Introduction to Statistics: Read More [+]

Rules & Requirements

Credit Restrictions: Students who have taken 2X, 5, 20, 21, 21X, or 25 will receive no credit for 2.

Hours & Format

Fall and/or spring: 15 weeks - 3 hours of lecture and 2 hours of laboratory per week

Summer:
6 weeks - 7.5 hours of lecture and 5 hours of laboratory per week
8 weeks - 5 hours of lecture and 4 hours of laboratory per week

Additional Details

Subject/Course Level: Statistics/Undergraduate

Grading/Final exam status: Letter grade. Final exam required.

Introduction to Statistics: Read Less [-]

Terms offered: Prior to 2007
An introduction to computational thinking and quantitative reasoning, preparing students for further coursework, especially Foundations of Data Science (CS/Info/Stat C8). Emphasizes the use of computation to gain insight about quantitative problems with real data. Expressions, data types, collections, and tables in Python. Programming practices, abstraction, and iteration. Visualizing univariate and bivariate data with bar charts, histograms, plots, and maps. Introduction to statistical concepts including averages and distributions, predicting one variable from another, association and causality, probability and probabilistic simulation. Relationship between numerical functions and graphs. Sampling and introduction to inference.
Introduction to Computational Thinking with Data: Read More [+]

Objectives & Outcomes

Course Objectives: C6 also includes quantitative reasoning concepts that aren’t covered in Data 8. These include certain topics in: principles of data visualization; simulation of random processes; and understanding numerical functions through their graphs. This will help prepare students for computational and quantitative courses other than Data 8.
C6 takes advantage of the complementarity of computing and quantitative reasoning to enliven abstract ideas and build students’ confidence in their ability to solve real problems with quantitative tools. Students learn computer science concepts and immediately apply them to plot functions, visualize data, and simulate random events.

Foundations of Data Science (CS/Info/Stat C8, a.k.a. Data 8) is an increasingly popular class for entering students at Berkeley. Data 8 builds students’ computing skills in the first month of the semester, and students rely on these skills as the course progresses. For some students, particularly those with little prior exposure to computing, developing these skills benefits from further time and practice. C6 is a rapid introduction to Python programming, visualization, and data analysis, which will prepare students for success in Data 8.

Student Learning Outcomes: Students will be able to perform basic computations in Python, including working with tabular data.
Students will be able to understand basic probabilistic simulations.
Students will be able to understand the syntactic structure of Python code.
Students will be able to use good practices in Python programming.
Students will be able to use visualizations to understand univariate data and to identify associations or causal relationships in bivariate data.

Hours & Format

Summer: 6 weeks - 4 hours of lecture, 2 hours of discussion, and 4 hours of laboratory per week

Additional Details

Subject/Course Level: Statistics/Undergraduate

Grading/Final exam status: Letter grade. Final exam required.

Formerly known as: Computer Science C8R/Statistics C8R

Also listed as: COMPSCI C6/DATA C6

Introduction to Computational Thinking with Data: Read Less [-]

Terms offered: Spring 2022, Fall 2021, Summer 2021 8 Week Session, Spring 2021, Fall 2020
Foundations of data science from three perspectives: inferential thinking, computational thinking, and real-world relevance. Given data arising from some real-world phenomenon, how does one analyze that data so as to understand that phenomenon? The course teaches critical concepts and skills in computer programming and statistical inference, in conjunction with hands-on analysis of real-world datasets, including economic data, document collections, geographical data, and social networks. It delves into social and legal issues surrounding data analysis, including issues of privacy and data ownership.
Foundations of Data Science: Read More [+]

Hours & Format

Fall and/or spring: 15 weeks - 3-3 hours of lecture and 2-2 hours of laboratory per week

Summer: 8 weeks - 6 hours of lecture and 4 hours of laboratory per week

Additional Details

Subject/Course Level: Statistics/Undergraduate

Grading/Final exam status: Letter grade. Final exam required.

Formerly known as: Computer Science C8/Statistics C8/Information C8

Also listed as: COMPSCI C8/DATA C8/INFO C8

Foundations of Data Science: Read Less [-]

Terms offered: Spring 2022, Fall 2021, Summer 2021 8 Week Session
For students with mathematical background who wish to acquire basic concepts. Relative frequencies, discrete probability, random variables, expectation. Testing hypotheses. Estimation. Illustrations from various fields.
Introduction to Probability and Statistics: Read More [+]

Rules & Requirements

Prerequisites: One semester of calculus

Credit Restrictions: Students who have taken 2, 2X, 5, 21, 21X, or 25 will receive no credit for 20.

Hours & Format

Fall and/or spring: 15 weeks - 3 hours of lecture and 2 hours of laboratory per week

Summer: 8 weeks - 6 hours of lecture and 3 hours of laboratory per week

Additional Details

Subject/Course Level: Statistics/Undergraduate

Grading/Final exam status: Letter grade. Final exam required.

Introduction to Probability and Statistics: Read Less [-]

Terms offered: Fall 2016, Fall 2015, Fall 2014
Descriptive statistics, probability models and related concepts, sample surveys, estimates, confidence intervals, tests of significance, controlled experiments vs. observational studies, correlation and regression.
Introductory Probability and Statistics for Business: Read More [+]

Rules & Requirements

Prerequisites: One semester of calculus

Credit Restrictions: Students will receive no credit for Statistics 21 after completing Statistics 2, 2X, 5, 20, 21X, N21, W21 or 25 . A deficiency in Statistics 21 may be moved by taking W21.

Hours & Format

Fall and/or spring: 15 weeks - 3 hours of lecture and 2 hours of laboratory per week

Summer: 8 weeks - 5 hours of lecture and 4 hours of laboratory per week

Additional Details

Subject/Course Level: Statistics/Undergraduate

Grading/Final exam status: Letter grade. Final exam required.

Introductory Probability and Statistics for Business: Read Less [-]

Terms offered: Summer 2021 8 Week Session, Summer 2020 8 Week Session, Summer 2019 8 Week Session
Reasoning and fallacies, descriptive statistics, probability models and related concepts, combinatorics, sample surveys, estimates, confidence intervals, tests of significance, controlled experiments vs. observational studies, correlation and regression.
Introductory Probability and Statistics for Business: Read More [+]

Rules & Requirements

Prerequisites: One semester of calculus

Credit Restrictions: Students will receive no credit for Statistics W21 after completing Statistics 2, 20, 21, N21 or 25. A deficient grade in Statistics 21, N21 maybe removed by taking Statistics W21.

Hours & Format

Fall and/or spring: 15 weeks - 3 hours of web-based lecture per week

Summer: 8 weeks - 7.5 hours of web-based lecture per week

Online: This is an online course.

Additional Details

Subject/Course Level: Statistics/Undergraduate

Grading/Final exam status: Letter grade. Final exam required.

Formerly known as: N21

Introductory Probability and Statistics for Business: Read Less [-]

Terms offered: Spring 2021, Fall 2016, Fall 2003
The Berkeley Seminar Program has been designed to provide new students with the opportunity to explore an intellectual topic with a faculty member in a small-seminar setting. Berkeley seminars are offered in all campus departments, and topics vary from department to department and semester to semester. Enrollment limited to 15 freshmen.
Freshman Seminars: Read More [+]

Rules & Requirements

Repeat rules: Course may be repeated for credit when topic changes.

Hours & Format

Fall and/or spring: 15 weeks - 1 hour of seminar per week

Additional Details

Subject/Course Level: Statistics/Undergraduate

Grading/Final exam status: The grading option will be decided by the instructor when the class is offered. Final exam required.

Freshman Seminars: Read Less [-]

Terms offered: Spring 2022, Fall 2021, Spring 2021
An introduction to the R statistical software for students with minimal prior experience with programming. This course prepares students for data analysis with R. The focus is on the computational model that underlies the R language with the goal of providing a foundation for coding. Topics include data types and structures, such as vectors, data frames and lists; the REPL evaluation model; function calls, argument matching, and environments; writing simple functions and control flow. Tools for reading, analyzing, and plotting data are covered, such as data input/output, reshaping data, the formula language, and graphics models.

Introduction to Programming in R: Read More [+]

Terms offered: Spring 2022, Fall 2021, Spring 2021
The course is designed primarily for those who are already familiar with programming in another language, such as python, and want to understand how R works, and for those who already know the basics of R programming and want to gain a more in-depth understanding of the language in order to improve their coding. The focus is on the underlying paradigms in R, such as functional programming, atomic vectors, complex data structures, environments, and object systems. The goal of this course is to better understand programming principles in general and to write better R code that capitalizes on the language's design.

Introduction to Advanced Programming in R: Read More [+]

Rules & Requirements

Prerequisites: Compsci 61A or equivalent programming background

Credit Restrictions: Students will receive no credit for STAT 33B after completing STAT 133. A deficient grade in STAT 33B may be removed by taking STAT 133.

Hours & Format

Fall and/or spring: 15 weeks - 1 hour of lecture and 1 hour of laboratory per week

Summer: 6 weeks - 2 hours of lecture and 3 hours of laboratory per week

Additional Details

Subject/Course Level: Statistics/Undergraduate

Grading/Final exam status: Letter grade. Final exam required.

Introduction to Advanced Programming in R: Read Less [-]

Terms offered: Fall 2008, Fall 2007
Freshman and sophomore seminars offer lower division students the opportunity to explore an intellectual topic with a faculty member and a group of peers in a small-seminar setting. These seminars are offered in all campus departments; topics vary from department to department and from semester to semester.
Freshman/Sophomore Seminar: Read More [+]

Rules & Requirements

Prerequisites: Priority given to freshmen and sophomores

Repeat rules: Course may be repeated for credit without restriction.

Hours & Format

Fall and/or spring: 15 weeks - 2-4 hours of seminar per week

Additional Details

Subject/Course Level: Statistics/Undergraduate

Grading/Final exam status: The grading option will be decided by the instructor when the class is offered. Final exam required.

Freshman/Sophomore Seminar: Read Less [-]

Terms offered: Spring 2013
Defining, perceiving, quantifying and measuring risk; identifying risks and estimating their importance; determining whether laws and regulations can protect us from these risks; examining how well existing laws work and how they could be improved; evaluting costs and benefits. Applications may vary by term. This course cannot be used to complete engineering unit or technical elective requirements for students in the College of Engineering.
Societal Risks and the Law: Read More [+]

Hours & Format

Fall and/or spring: 15 weeks - 3 hours of lecture and 1 hour of discussion per week

Additional Details

Subject/Course Level: Statistics/Undergraduate

Grading/Final exam status: Letter grade. Final exam not required.

Also listed as: COMPSCI C79/POL SCI C79

Societal Risks and the Law: Read Less [-]

Terms offered: Spring 2022, Fall 2021, Summer 2021 8 Week Session
In this connector course we will state precisely and prove results discovered while exploring data in Data 8. Topics include: probability, conditioning, and independence; random variables; distributions and joint distributions; expectation, variance, tail bounds; Central Limit Theorem; symmetries in random permutations; prior and posterior distributions; probabilistic models; bias-variance tradeoff; testing hypotheses; correlation and the regression model.
Probability and Mathematical Statistics in Data Science: Read More [+]

Hours & Format

Fall and/or spring: 15 weeks - 3 hours of lecture and 2 hours of discussion per week

Summer: 8 weeks - 6 hours of lecture and 4 hours of discussion per week

Additional Details

Subject/Course Level: Statistics/Undergraduate

Grading/Final exam status: Letter grade. Final exam required.

Probability and Mathematical Statistics in Data Science: Read Less [-]

Terms offered: Spring 2022, Spring 2021, Spring 2020
An introduction to linear algebra for data science. The course will cover introductory topics in linear algebra, starting with the basics; discrete probability and how prob- ability can be used to understand high-dimensional vector spaces; matrices and graphs as popular mathematical structures with which to model data (e.g., as models for term-document corpora, high-dimensional regression problems, ranking/classification of web data, adjacency properties of social network data, etc.); and geometric approaches to eigendecompositions, least-squares, principal components analysis, etc.
Linear Algebra for Data Science: Read More [+]

Hours & Format

Fall and/or spring: 15 weeks - 3 hours of lecture and 2 hours of laboratory per week

Additional Details

Subject/Course Level: Statistics/Undergraduate

Grading/Final exam status: Letter grade. Final exam required.

Linear Algebra for Data Science: Read Less [-]

Terms offered: Fall 2015, Spring 2012
Supervised experience relevant to specific aspects of statistics in off-campus settings. Individual and/or group meetings with faculty.
Field Study in Statistics: Read More [+]

Rules & Requirements

Repeat rules: Course may be repeated for credit without restriction.

Hours & Format

Fall and/or spring: 15 weeks - 1-3 hours of fieldwork per week

Summer:
6 weeks - 2.5-7.5 hours of fieldwork per week
8 weeks - 1.5-5.5 hours of fieldwork per week

Additional Details

Subject/Course Level: Statistics/Undergraduate

Grading/Final exam status: Offered for pass/not pass grade only. Final exam not required.

Field Study in Statistics: Read Less [-]

Terms offered: Fall 2021, Spring 2021, Fall 2014
Must be taken at the same time as either Statistics 2 or 21. This course assists lower division statistics students with structured problem solving, interpretation and making conclusions.
Directed Group Study: Read More [+]

Rules & Requirements

Prerequisites: Consent of instructor

Repeat rules: Course may be repeated for credit without restriction.

Hours & Format

Fall and/or spring: 15 weeks - 2-3 hours of directed group study per week

Summer: 8 weeks - 4-6 hours of directed group study per week

Additional Details

Subject/Course Level: Statistics/Undergraduate

Grading/Final exam status: Offered for pass/not pass grade only. Final exam not required.

Directed Group Study: Read Less [-]

Terms offered: Spring 2022, Fall 2021, Summer 2021 8 Week Session, Spring 2021, Fall 2020, Summer 2020 8 Week Session
In this course, students will explore the data science lifecycle, including question formulation, data collection and cleaning, exploratory data analysis and visualization, statistical inference and prediction​, and decision-making.​ This class will focus on quantitative critical thinking​ and key principles and techniques needed to carry out this cycle. These include languages for transforming, querying and analyzing data; algorithms for machine learning methods including regression, classification and clustering; principles behind creating informative data visualizations; statistical concepts of measurement error and prediction; and techniques for scalable data processing.
Principles & Techniques of Data Science: Read More [+]

Terms offered: Spring 2022, Fall 2021, Spring 2021
This course develops the probabilistic foundations of inference in data science, and builds a comprehensive view of the modeling and decision-making life cycle in data science including its human, social, and ethical implications. Topics include: frequentist and Bayesian decision-making, permutation testing, false discovery rate, probabilistic interpretations of models, Bayesian hierarchical models, basics of experimental design, confidence intervals, causal inference, Thompson sampling, optimal control, Q-learning, differential privacy, clustering algorithms, recommendation systems and an introduction to machine learning tools including decision trees, neural networks and ensemble methods.
Data, Inference, and Decisions: Read More [+]

Rules & Requirements

Prerequisites: Mathematics 54 or Mathematics 110 or Statistics 89A or Physics 89 or both of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science 16A and Electrical Engineering and Computer Science 16B; Statistics/Computer Science C100; and any of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science 126, Statistics 140, Statistics 134, Industrial Engineering and Operations Research 172. Statistics 140 or Electrical Engineering and Computer Science 126 are preferred

Credit Restrictions: Students will receive no credit for DATA C102 after completing STAT 102, or DATA 102. A deficient grade in DATA C102 may be removed by taking STAT 102, STAT 102, or DATA 102.

Hours & Format

Fall and/or spring: 15 weeks - 3 hours of lecture, 1 hour of discussion, and 1 hour of laboratory per week

Additional Details

Subject/Course Level: Statistics/Undergraduate

Grading/Final exam status: Letter grade. Final exam required.

Formerly known as: Statistics 102

Also listed as: DATA C102

Data, Inference, and Decisions: Read Less [-]

Terms offered: Spring 2022, Fall 2021, Spring 2021
This course teaches a broad range of statistical methods that are used to solve data problems. Topics include group comparisons and ANOVA, standard parametric statistical models, multivariate data visualization, multiple linear regression, logistic regression and classification, regression trees and random forests. An important focus of the course is on statistical computing and reproducible statistical analysis. The course and lab include hands-on experience in analyzing real world data from the social, life, and physical sciences. The R statistical language is used.

Statistical Methods for Data Science: Read More [+]

Rules & Requirements

Prerequisites: Statistics/Computer Science/Information C8 or Statistics 20; and Mathematics 1A, Mathematics 16A, or Mathematics 10A/10B. Strongly recommended corequisite: Statistics 33A or Statistics 133

Hours & Format

Fall and/or spring: 15 weeks - 3 hours of lecture and 2 hours of laboratory per week

Additional Details

Subject/Course Level: Statistics/Undergraduate

Grading/Final exam status: Letter grade. Final exam required.

Formerly known as: Statistics 131A

Also listed as: DATA C131A

Statistical Methods for Data Science: Read Less [-]

Terms offered: Spring 2022, Fall 2021, Spring 2021
An introduction to computationally intensive applied statistics. Topics will include organization and use of databases, visualization and graphics, statistical learning and data mining, model validation procedures, and the presentation of results.
Concepts in Computing with Data: Read More [+]

Hours & Format

Fall and/or spring: 15 weeks - 3 hours of lecture and 2 hours of laboratory per week

Summer: 10 weeks - 4 hours of lecture and 3 hours of laboratory per week

Additional Details

Subject/Course Level: Statistics/Undergraduate

Grading/Final exam status: Letter grade. Final exam required.

Concepts in Computing with Data: Read Less [-]

Terms offered: Spring 2022, Fall 2021, Summer 2021 8 Week Session
An introduction to probability, emphasizing concepts and applications. Conditional expectation, independence, laws of large numbers. Discrete and continuous random variables. Central limit theorem. Selected topics such as the Poisson process, Markov chains, characteristic functions.
Concepts of Probability: Read More [+]

Rules & Requirements

Prerequisites: One year of calculus

Credit Restrictions: Students will not receive credit for 134 after taking 140 or 201A.

Hours & Format

Fall and/or spring: 15 weeks - 3 hours of lecture and 2 hours of discussion per week

Summer: 8 weeks - 6 hours of lecture and 4 hours of discussion per week

Additional Details

Subject/Course Level: Statistics/Undergraduate

Grading/Final exam status: Letter grade. Final exam required.

Concepts of Probability: Read Less [-]

Terms offered: Spring 2022, Fall 2021, Summer 2021 8 Week Session
A comprehensive survey course in statistical theory and methodology. Topics include descriptive statistics, maximum likelihood estimation, non-parametric methods, introduction to optimality, goodness-of-fit tests, analysis of variance, bootstrap and computer-intensive methods and least squares estimation. The laboratory includes computer-based data-analytic applications to science and engineering.
Concepts of Statistics: Read More [+]

Hours & Format

Fall and/or spring: 15 weeks - 3 hours of lecture and 2 hours of laboratory per week

Summer: 8 weeks - 6 hours of lecture and 4 hours of laboratory per week

Additional Details

Subject/Course Level: Statistics/Undergraduate

Grading/Final exam status: Letter grade. Final exam required.

Concepts of Statistics: Read Less [-]

Terms offered: Spring 2022, Fall 2021, Spring 2021
An introduction to probability, emphasizing the combined use of mathematics and programming to solve problems. Random variables, discrete and continuous families of distributions. Bounds and approximations. Dependence, conditioning, Bayes methods. Convergence, Markov chains. Least squares prediction. Random permutations, symmetry, order statistics. Use of numerical computation, graphics, simulation, and computer algebra.
Probability for Data Science: Read More [+]

Objectives & Outcomes

Course Objectives: The emphasis on simulation and the bootstrap in Data 8 gives students a concrete sense of randomness and sampling variability. Stat 140 will capitalize on this, abstraction and computation complementing each other throughout.

The syllabus has been designed to maintain a mathematical level at least equal to that in Stat 134. So Stat 140 will start faster than Stat 134 (due to the Data 8 prerequisite), avoid approximations that are unnecessary when SciPy is at hand, and replace some of the routine calculus by symbolic math done in SymPy. This will create time for a unit on the convergence and reversibility of Markov Chains as well as added focus on conditioning and Bayes methods.
With about a thousand students a year taking Foundations of Data Science (Stat/CS/Info C8, a.k.a. Data 8), there is considerable demand for follow-on courses that build on the skills acquired in that class. Stat 140 is a probability course for Data 8 graduates who have also had a year of calculus and wish to go deeper into data science.

Student Learning Outcomes: Understand the difference between math and simulation, and appreciate the power of both
Use a variety of approaches to problem solving
Work with probability concepts algebraically, numerically, and graphically

Rules & Requirements

Prerequisites: Statistics/Computer Science/Information C8, or Statistics/Computer Science C100, or both Stat 20 and Computer Science 61A; and one year of calculus at the level of Mathematics 1A-1B or higher. Corequisite: Mathematics 54, Electrical Engineering 16A, Statistics 89A, Mathematics 110 or equivalent linear algebra

Credit Restrictions: Students will receive no credit for STAT C140 after completing STAT 134. A deficient grade in STAT C140 may be removed by taking STAT 134.

Hours & Format

Fall and/or spring: 15 weeks - 3 hours of lecture, 2 hours of discussion, and 1 hour of supplement per week

Additional Details

Subject/Course Level: Statistics/Undergraduate

Grading/Final exam status: Letter grade. Final exam required.

Formerly known as: Statistics 140

Also listed as: DATA C140

Probability for Data Science: Read Less [-]

Terms offered: Spring 2022, Fall 2021, Spring 2021
Random walks, discrete time Markov chains, Poisson processes. Further topics such as: continuous time Markov chains, queueing theory, point processes, branching processes, renewal theory, stationary processes, Gaussian processes.
Stochastic Processes: Read More [+]

Rules & Requirements

Prerequisites: 101 or 103A or 134

Hours & Format

Fall and/or spring: 15 weeks - 3 hours of lecture per week

Additional Details

Subject/Course Level: Statistics/Undergraduate

Grading/Final exam status: Letter grade. Final exam required.

Stochastic Processes: Read Less [-]

Terms offered: Fall 2021, Spring 2021, Fall 2020
A coordinated treatment of linear and generalized linear models and their application. Linear regression, analysis of variance and covariance, random effects, design and analysis of experiments, quality improvement, log-linear models for discrete multivariate data, model selection, robustness, graphical techniques, productive use of computers, in-depth case studies.
Linear Modelling: Theory and Applications: Read More [+]

Terms offered: Spring 2020, Spring 2019, Spring 2018
Theory and practice of sampling from finite populations. Simple random, stratified, cluster, and double sampling. Sampling with unequal probabilities. Properties of various estimators including ratio, regression, and difference estimators. Error estimation for complex samples.
Sampling Surveys: Read More [+]

Rules & Requirements

Prerequisites: 101 or 134. 133 and 135 recommended

Hours & Format

Fall and/or spring: 15 weeks - 3 hours of lecture and 2 hours of laboratory per week

Additional Details

Subject/Course Level: Statistics/Undergraduate

Grading/Final exam status: Letter grade. Final exam required.

Sampling Surveys: Read Less [-]

Terms offered: Spring 2022, Fall 2021, Spring 2021
An introduction to time series analysis in the time domain and spectral domain. Topics will include: estimation of trends and seasonal effects, autoregressive moving average models, forecasting, indicators, harmonic analysis, spectra.
Introduction to Time Series: Read More [+]

Rules & Requirements

Prerequisites: 101, 134 or consent of instructor. 133 or 135 recommended

Hours & Format

Fall and/or spring: 15 weeks - 3 hours of lecture and 2 hours of laboratory per week

Additional Details

Subject/Course Level: Statistics/Undergraduate

Grading/Final exam status: Letter grade. Final exam required.

Introduction to Time Series: Read Less [-]

Terms offered: Spring 2022, Fall 2021, Spring 2021
Theory and practice of statistical prediction. Contemporary methods as extensions of classical methods. Topics: optimal prediction rules, the curse of dimensionality, empirical risk, linear regression and classification, basis expansions, regularization, splines, the bootstrap, model selection, classification and regression trees, boosting, support vector machines. Computational efficiency versus predictive performance. Emphasis on experience with real data and assessing statistical assumptions.
Modern Statistical Prediction and Machine Learning: Read More [+]

Rules & Requirements

Prerequisites: Mathematics 53 or equivalent; Mathematics 54, Electrical Engineering 16A, Statistics 89A, Mathematics 110 or equivalent linear algebra; Statistics 135 or equivalent; experience with some programming language. Recommended prerequisite: Mathematics 55 or equivalent exposure to counting arguments

Hours & Format

Fall and/or spring: 15 weeks - 3 hours of lecture and 2 hours of laboratory per week

Summer: 10 weeks - 4.5 hours of lecture and 3 hours of laboratory per week

Additional Details

Subject/Course Level: Statistics/Undergraduate

Grading/Final exam status: Letter grade. Final exam required.

Modern Statistical Prediction and Machine Learning: Read Less [-]

Terms offered: Spring 2022, Summer 2021 8 Week Session, Spring 2021
General theory of zero-sum, two-person games, including games in extensive form and continuous games, and illustrated by detailed study of examples.
Game Theory: Read More [+]

Rules & Requirements

Prerequisites: 101 or 134

Hours & Format

Fall and/or spring: 15 weeks - 3 hours of lecture per week

Summer: 8 weeks - 6 hours of lecture per week

Additional Details

Subject/Course Level: Statistics/Undergraduate

Grading/Final exam status: Letter grade. Final exam required.

Game Theory: Read Less [-]

Terms offered: Fall 2021, Fall 2020, Fall 2000
This course will focus on approaches to causal inference using the potential outcomes framework. It will also use causal diagrams at an intuitive level. The main topics are classical randomized experiments, observational studies, instrumental variables, principal stratification and mediation analysis. Applications are drawn from a variety of fields including political science, economics, sociology, public health, and medicine. This course is a mix of statistical theory and data analysis. Students will be exposed to statistical questions that are relevant to decision and policy making.
Causal Inference: Read More [+]

Rules & Requirements

Prerequisites: Statistics 135

Hours & Format

Fall and/or spring: 15 weeks - 3 hours of lecture and 2 hours of laboratory per week

Additional Details

Subject/Course Level: Statistics/Undergraduate

Grading/Final exam status: Letter grade. Final exam required.

Causal Inference: Read Less [-]

Terms offered: Spring 2022, Fall 2020, Spring 2020
Substantial student participation required. The topics to be covered each semester that the course may be offered will be announced by the middle of the preceding semester; see departmental bulletins. Recent topics include: Bayesian statistics, statistics and finance, random matrix theory, high-dimensional statistics.
Seminar on Topics in Probability and Statistics: Read More [+]

Rules & Requirements

Prerequisites: Mathematics 53-54, Statistics 134, 135. Knowledge of scientific computing environment (R or Matlab) often required. Prerequisites might vary with instructor and topics

Repeat rules: Course may be repeated for credit with instructor consent.

Hours & Format

Fall and/or spring: 15 weeks - 3 hours of seminar per week

Additional Details

Subject/Course Level: Statistics/Undergraduate

Grading/Final exam status: Letter grade. Final exam required.

Seminar on Topics in Probability and Statistics: Read Less [-]

Terms offered: Spring 2021, Spring 2020, Spring 2019
An introduction to the design and analysis of experiments. This course covers planning, conducting, and analyzing statistically designed experiments with an emphasis on hands-on experience. Standard designs studied include factorial designs, block designs, latin square designs, and repeated measures designs. Other topics covered include the principles of design, randomization, ANOVA, response surface methodoloy, and computer experiments.
The Design and Analysis of Experiments: Read More [+]

Rules & Requirements

Prerequisites: Statistics 134 and 135 or consent of instructor. Statistics 135 may be taken concurrently. Statistics 133 is recommended

Hours & Format

Fall and/or spring: 15 weeks - 3 hours of lecture and 2 hours of laboratory per week

Additional Details

Subject/Course Level: Statistics/Undergraduate

Grading/Final exam status: Letter grade. Final exam required.

The Design and Analysis of Experiments: Read Less [-]

Terms offered: Spring 2022, Spring 2021, Fall 2018
A project-based introduction to statistical data analysis. Through case studies, computer laboratories, and a term project, students will learn practical techniques and tools for producing statistically sound and appropriate, reproducible, and verifiable computational answers to scientific questions. Course emphasizes version control, testing, process automation, code review, and collaborative programming. Software tools may include Bash, Git, Python, and LaTeX.
Reproducible and Collaborative Statistical Data Science: Read More [+]

Rules & Requirements

Prerequisites: Statistics 133, Statistics 134, and Statistics 135 (or equivalent)

Hours & Format

Fall and/or spring: 15 weeks - 3 hours of lecture and 2 hours of laboratory per week

Additional Details

Subject/Course Level: Statistics/Undergraduate

Grading/Final exam status: Letter grade. Alternative to final exam.

Reproducible and Collaborative Statistical Data Science: Read Less [-]

Terms offered: Spring 2015, Fall 2014, Fall 2010

Special Study for Honors Candidates: Read More [+]

Rules & Requirements

Repeat rules: Course may be repeated for credit without restriction.

Hours & Format

Fall and/or spring: 15 weeks - 0 hours of independent study per week

Summer:
6 weeks - 1-5 hours of independent study per week
8 weeks - 1-4 hours of independent study per week

Additional Details

Subject/Course Level: Statistics/Undergraduate

Grading/Final exam status: Letter grade. Final exam not required.

Special Study for Honors Candidates: Read Less [-]

Terms offered: Fall 2021, Fall 2020, Spring 2017
Supervised experience relevant to specific aspects of statistics in on-campus or off-campus settings. Individual and/or group meetings with faculty.
Field Study in Statistics: Read More [+]

Rules & Requirements

Credit Restrictions: Enrollment is restricted; see the Introduction to Courses and Curricula section of this catalog.

Repeat rules: Course may be repeated for credit without restriction.

Hours & Format

Fall and/or spring: 15 weeks - 2-9 hours of fieldwork per week

Summer:
6 weeks - 3-22 hours of fieldwork per week
8 weeks - 2-16 hours of fieldwork per week
10 weeks - 2-12 hours of fieldwork per week

Additional Details

Subject/Course Level: Statistics/Undergraduate

Grading/Final exam status: Offered for pass/not pass grade only. Final exam not required.

Field Study in Statistics: Read Less [-]

Terms offered: Fall 2021, Spring 2021, Fall 2020
Special tutorial or seminar on selected topics.
Directed Study for Undergraduates: Read More [+]

Rules & Requirements

Prerequisites: Consent of instructor

Repeat rules: Course may be repeated for credit without restriction.

Hours & Format

Fall and/or spring: 15 weeks - 1-3 hours of directed group study per week

Summer:
6 weeks - 2.5-7.5 hours of directed group study per week
8 weeks - 1.5-5.5 hours of directed group study per week

Additional Details

Subject/Course Level: Statistics/Undergraduate

Grading/Final exam status: Offered for pass/not pass grade only. Final exam not required.

Directed Study for Undergraduates: Read Less [-]

Terms offered: Fall 2019, Fall 2018, Spring 2017

Supervised Independent Study and Research: Read More [+]

Rules & Requirements

Repeat rules: Course may be repeated for credit without restriction.

Hours & Format

Fall and/or spring: 15 weeks - 1-3 hours of independent study per week

Summer:
6 weeks - 1-4 hours of independent study per week
8 weeks - 1-3 hours of independent study per week
10 weeks - 1-3 hours of independent study per week

Additional Details

Subject/Course Level: Statistics/Undergraduate

Grading/Final exam status: Offered for pass/not pass grade only. Final exam not required.

Supervised Independent Study and Research: Read Less [-]

Terms offered: Fall 2018, Fall 2011, Fall 2010
Probability spaces, random variables, distributions in probability and statistics, central limit theorem, Poisson processes, transformations involving random variables, estimation, confidence intervals, hypothesis testing, linear models, large sample theory, categorical models, decision theory.
Introduction to Probability and Statistics at an Advanced Level: Read More [+]

Rules & Requirements

Prerequisites: Multivariable calculus and one semester of linear algebra

Credit Restrictions: Students will receive no credit for Statistics 200A after completing Statistics 201A-201B.

Hours & Format

Fall and/or spring: 15 weeks - 3 hours of lecture and 2 hours of laboratory per week

Additional Details

Subject/Course Level: Statistics/Graduate

Grading: Letter grade.

Introduction to Probability and Statistics at an Advanced Level: Read Less [-]

Terms offered: Spring 2019, Spring 2012, Spring 2011
Probability spaces, random variables, distributions in probability and statistics, central limit theorem, Poisson processes, transformations involving random variables, estimation, confidence intervals, hypothesis testing, linear models, large sample theory, categorical models, decision theory.
Introduction to Probability and Statistics at an Advanced Level: Read More [+]

Rules & Requirements

Prerequisites: Multivariable calculus and one semester of linear algebra

Credit Restrictions: Students will receive no credit for Statistics 200A-200B after completing Statistics 201A-201B.

Hours & Format

Fall and/or spring: 15 weeks - 3 hours of lecture and 2 hours of laboratory per week

Additional Details

Subject/Course Level: Statistics/Graduate

Grading: Letter grade.

Introduction to Probability and Statistics at an Advanced Level: Read Less [-]

Terms offered: Spring 2022, Fall 2021, Spring 2021, Spring 2020
Explores the data science lifecycle: question formulation, data collection and cleaning, exploratory, analysis, visualization, statistical inference, prediction, and decision-making. Focuses on quantitative critical thinking and key principles and techniques: languages for transforming, querying and analyzing data; algorithms for machine learning methods: regression, classification and clustering; principles of informative visualization; measurement error and prediction; and techniques for scalable data processing. Research term project.
Principles and Techniques of Data Science: Read More [+]

Rules & Requirements

Prerequisites: Computer Science/Information/Statistics C8 or Engineering 7; and either Computer Science 61A or Computer Science 88. Corequisite: Mathematics 54 or Electrical Engineering 16A

Credit Restrictions: Students will receive no credit for DATA C200\COMPSCI C200A\STAT C200C after completing DATA C100.

Hours & Format

Fall and/or spring:
8 weeks - 6 hours of lecture, 2 hours of discussion, and 2 hours of laboratory per week
15 weeks - 3 hours of lecture, 1 hour of discussion, and 1 hour of laboratory per week

Summer: 8 weeks - 6 hours of lecture, 2 hours of discussion, and 2 hours of laboratory per week

Additional Details

Subject/Course Level: Statistics/Graduate

Grading: Letter grade.

Formerly known as: Statistics C200C/Computer Science C200A

Also listed as: COMPSCI C200A/DATA C200

Principles and Techniques of Data Science: Read Less [-]

Terms offered: Fall 2021, Fall 2020, Fall 2019
Distributions in probability and statistics, central limit theorem, Poisson processes, modes of convergence, transformations involving random variables.
Introduction to Probability at an Advanced Level: Read More [+]

Rules & Requirements

Prerequisites: Undergraduate probability at the level of Statistics 134, multivariable calculus (at the level of Berkeley’s Mathematics 53) and linear algebra (at the level of Berkeley’s Mathematics 54)

Credit Restrictions: Students will receive no credit for STAT 201A after completing STAT 200A.

Hours & Format

Fall and/or spring: 15 weeks - 3 hours of lecture and 2 hours of laboratory per week

Additional Details

Subject/Course Level: Statistics/Graduate

Grading: Letter grade.

Introduction to Probability at an Advanced Level: Read Less [-]

Terms offered: Fall 2021, Fall 2020, Fall 2019
Estimation, confidence intervals, hypothesis testing, linear models, large sample theory, categorical models, decision theory.
Introduction to Statistics at an Advanced Level: Read More [+]

Rules & Requirements

Prerequisites: Undergraduate probability at the level of Statistics 134, multivariable calculus (at the level of Berkeley’s Mathematics 53) and linear algebra (at the level of Berkeley’s Mathematics 54)

Credit Restrictions: Students will receive no credit for Statistics 201B after completing Statistics 200B.

Hours & Format

Fall and/or spring: 15 weeks - 3 hours of lecture and 2 hours of laboratory per week

Additional Details

Subject/Course Level: Statistics/Graduate

Grading: Letter grade.

Introduction to Statistics at an Advanced Level: Read Less [-]

Terms offered: Fall 2019, Spring 2017, Spring 2015
A treatment of ideas and techniques most commonly found in the applications of probability: Gaussian and Poisson processes, limit theorems, large deviation principles, information, Markov chains and Markov chain Monte Carlo, martingales, Brownian motion and diffusion.
Probability for Applications: Read More [+]

Rules & Requirements

Credit Restrictions: Students will receive no credit for Statistics 204 after completing Statistics 205A-205B.

Hours & Format

Fall and/or spring: 15 weeks - 3 hours of lecture per week

Additional Details

Subject/Course Level: Statistics/Graduate

Grading: Letter grade.

Instructor: Evans

Probability for Applications: Read Less [-]

Terms offered: Fall 2021, Fall 2020, Fall 2019, Fall 2018, Fall 2017
The course is designed as a sequence with Statistics C205B/Mathematics C218B with the following combined syllabus. Measure theory concepts needed for probability. Expection, distributions. Laws of large numbers and central limit theorems for independent random variables. Characteristic function methods. Conditional expectations, martingales and martingale convergence theorems. Markov chains. Stationary processes. Brownian motion.
Probability Theory: Read More [+]

Hours & Format

Fall and/or spring: 15 weeks - 3 hours of lecture per week

Additional Details

Subject/Course Level: Statistics/Graduate

Grading: Letter grade.

Also listed as: MATH C218A

Probability Theory: Read Less [-]

Terms offered: Spring 2022, Spring 2021, Spring 2020
The course is designed as a sequence with with Statistics C205A/Mathematics C218A with the following combined syllabus. Measure theory concepts needed for probability. Expection, distributions. Laws of large numbers and central limit theorems for independent random variables. Characteristic function methods. Conditional expectations, martingales and martingale convergence theorems. Markov chains. Stationary processes. Brownian motion.
Probability Theory: Read More [+]

Hours & Format

Fall and/or spring:

Sours: http://guide.berkeley.edu/courses/stat/

Courses

Terms offered: Fall 2021, Spring 2021, Fall 2020
The Berkeley Seminar Program has been designed to provide new students with the opportunity to explore an intellectual topic with a faculty member in a small-seminar setting. Berkeley Seminars are offered in all campus departments, and topics vary from department to department and semester to semester.
Freshman Seminars: Read More [+]

Rules & Requirements

Repeat rules: Course may be repeated for credit when topic changes.

Hours & Format

Fall and/or spring: 15 weeks - 1 hour of seminar per week

Additional Details

Subject/Course Level: Mechanical Engineering/Undergraduate

Grading/Final exam status: Offered for pass/not pass grade only. Final Exam To be decided by the instructor when the class is offered.

Freshman Seminars: Read Less [-]

Terms offered: Spring 2022, Fall 2021, Summer 2021 10 Week Session
This course introduces the scientific principles that deal with energy conversion among different forms, such as heat, work, internal, electrical, and chemical energy. The physical science of heat and temperature, and their relations to energy and work, are analyzed on the basis of the four fundamental thermodynamic laws (zeroth, first, second, and third). These principles are applied to various practical systems, including heat engines, refrigeration cycles, air conditioning, and chemical reacting systems.
Thermodynamics: Read More [+]

Objectives & Outcomes

Course Objectives: 2) to develop analytic ability in real-world engineering applications using thermodynamics principles.
The objectives of this course are:
1) to provide the fundamental background of thermodynamics principles, and

Student Learning Outcomes: (a) an ability to apply knowledge of mathematics, science, and engineering
(e) an ability to identify, formulate, and solve engineering problems
(f) an understanding of professional and ethical responsibility
(h) the broad education necessary to understand the impact of engineering solutions in a global, economic, environmental, and societal context
(i) a recognition of the need for, and an ability to engage in life-long learning
(j) a knowledge of contemporary issues
(k) an ability to use the techniques, skills, and modern engineering tools necessary for engineering practice.

Hours & Format

Fall and/or spring: 15 weeks - 3 hours of lecture and 1 hour of discussion per week

Summer: 10 weeks - 4.5 hours of lecture and 1.5 hours of discussion per week

Additional Details

Subject/Course Level: Mechanical Engineering/Undergraduate

Grading/Final exam status: Letter grade. Final exam required.

Thermodynamics: Read Less [-]

Terms offered: Spring 2022, Fall 2021, Spring 2021
A review of equilibrium for particles and rigid bodies. Application to truss structures. The concepts of deformation, strain, and stress. Equilibrium equations for a continuum. Elements of the theory of linear elasticity. The states of plane stress and plane strain. Solution of elementary elasticity problems (beam bending, torsion of circular bars). Euler buckling in elastic beams.
Introduction to Solid Mechanics: Read More [+]

Rules & Requirements

Prerequisites: Mathematics 53 and 54 (may be taken concurrently); Physics 7A

Credit Restrictions: Students will receive no credit for Mechanical Engineering C85/Civil and Environmental Engineering C30 after completing Mechanical Engineering W85. A deficient grade in Mechanical Engineering W85 may be removed by taking Mechanical Engineering C85/Civil and Environmental Engineering C30.

Hours & Format

Fall and/or spring: 15 weeks - 3 hours of lecture and 1 hour of discussion per week

Summer:
6 weeks - 7.5 hours of lecture and 2.5 hours of discussion per week
10 weeks - 4.5 hours of lecture and 1.5 hours of discussion per week

Additional Details

Subject/Course Level: Mechanical Engineering/Undergraduate

Grading/Final exam status: Letter grade. Final exam required.

Instructors: Armero, Papadopoulos, Zohdi, Johnson

Also listed as: CIV ENG C30

Introduction to Solid Mechanics: Read Less [-]

Terms offered: Summer 2021 8 Week Session, Summer 2020 8 Week Session, Summer 2019 8 Week Session
A review of equilibrium for particles and rigid bodies. Application to truss structures. The concepts of deformation, strain, and stress. Equilibrium equations for a continuum. Elements of the theory of linear elasticity. The states of plane stress and plane strain. Solution of elementary elasticity problems (beam bending, torsion of circular bars). Euler buckling in elastic beams.
Introduction to Solid Mechanics: Read More [+]

Objectives & Outcomes

Course Objectives: To learn statics and mechanics of materials

Student Learning Outcomes: -
Correctly draw free-body
-
Apply the equations of equilibrium to two and three-dimensional solids
-
Understand the concepts of stress and strain
-
Ability to calculate deflections in engineered systems
-
Solve simple boundary value problems in linear elastostatics (tension, torsion, beam bending)

Hours & Format

Fall and/or spring: 15 weeks - 3 hours of web-based lecture and 1 hour of web-based discussion per week

Summer:
6 weeks - 7.5 hours of web-based lecture and 2.5 hours of web-based discussion per week
8 weeks - 6 hours of web-based lecture and 2 hours of web-based discussion per week
10 weeks - 4.5 hours of web-based lecture and 1.5 hours of web-based discussion per week

Online: This is an online course.

Additional Details

Subject/Course Level: Mechanical Engineering/Undergraduate

Grading/Final exam status: Letter grade. Final exam required.

Instructor: Govindjee

Also listed as: CIV ENG W30

Introduction to Solid Mechanics: Read Less [-]

Terms offered: Spring 2022, Fall 2021, Spring 2021
Organized group study on various topics under the sponsorship and direction of a member of the Mechanical Engineering faculty.
Supervised Independent Group Studies: Read More [+]

Rules & Requirements

Prerequisites: Consent of instructor

Repeat rules: Course may be repeated for credit without restriction.

Hours & Format

Fall and/or spring: 15 weeks - 1-4 hours of directed group study per week

Summer: 10 weeks - 1.5-6 hours of directed group study per week

Additional Details

Subject/Course Level: Mechanical Engineering/Undergraduate

Grading/Final exam status: Offered for pass/not pass grade only. Final exam not required.

Supervised Independent Group Studies: Read Less [-]

Terms offered: Spring 2022, Fall 2021, Spring 2021
Electronics and Electrical Engineering has become pervasive in our lives as a powerful technology with applications in a wide range of fields including healthcare, environmental monitoring, robotics, or entertainment. This course offers a broad survey of Electrical Engineering ideas to non-majors. In the laboratory students will learn in-depth how to design and build systems that exchange information with or are controlled from the cloud. Examples include solar harvesters, robots, and smart home devices. In the course project, the students will integrate what they have learned and build an Internet-of-Things application of their choice. The course has a mandatory lab fee.
Electronics for the Internet of Things: Read More [+]

Objectives & Outcomes

Course Objectives: Electronics has become a powerful and ubiquitous technology supporting solutions to a wide range of applications in fields ranging from science, engineering, healthcare, environmental monitoring, transportation, to entertainment. This course teaches students majoring in these and related subjects how to use electronic devices to solve problems in their areas of expertise. Through the lecture and laboratory, students gain insight into the possibilities and limitations of the technology and how to use electronics to help solve problems.
Students learn to use electronics to interact with the environment through sound, light, temperature, motion using sensors and actuators, and how to use electronic computation to orchestrate the interactions and exchange information wirelessly over the internet.
The course has two objectives: (a) to teach students how to build electronic circuits that interact with the environment through sensors and actuators and how to communicate wirelessly with the internet to cooperate with other devices and with humans, and (b) to offer a broad survey of modern Electrical Engineering including analog electronics: analysis of RLC circuits, filtering, diodes and rectifiers, op-amps, A2D and D2A converters; digital electronics: combinatorial and sequential logic, flip-flops, counters, memory; applications: communication systems, signal processing, computer architecture; basics of manufacturing of integrated circuits.

Student Learning Outcomes: an ability to communicate effectively
an ability to design a system, component, or process to meet desired needs within realistic constraints such as economic, environmental, social, political, ethical, health and safety, manufacturability, and sustainability
an ability to identify, formulate, and solve engineering problems
an ability to use the techniques, skills, and modern engineering tools necessary for engineering practice.

Hours & Format

Fall and/or spring: 15 weeks - 3 hours of lecture, 2 hours of discussion, and 3 hours of laboratory per week

Additional Details

Subject/Course Level: Mechanical Engineering/Undergraduate

Grading/Final exam status: Letter grade. Alternative to final exam.

Instructor: Poolla

Electronics for the Internet of Things: Read Less [-]

Terms offered: Spring 2021, Spring 2019, Spring 2018
Fundamentals of lean manufacturing systems including manufacturing fundamentals, unit operations and manufacturing line considerations for work in process (WIP), manufacturing lead time (MLT), economics, quality monitoring; high mix/low volume (HMLV) systems fundamentals including just in time (JIT), kanban, buffers and line balancing; class project/case studies for design and analysis of competitive manufacturing systems.
Introduction to Lean Manufacturing Systems: Read More [+]

Objectives & Outcomes

Course Objectives: This course will enable students to analyze manufacturing lines in order to understand the production process and improve production efficiency. The course provides practical knowledge and skills that can be applied in industry, covering the complete manufacturing system from production planning to quality control. Students are given a chance to practice and implement what they learn during lectures by conducting projects with local or global manufacturing companies.

Student Learning Outcomes: Students will understand the whole scope of manufacturing systems from production planning to quality control, which can be helpful to set up manufacturing lines for various products. Students will be capable of identifying sources of manufacturing problems by analyzing the production line and produce multi-level solutions to optimize manufacturing efficiency.

Rules & Requirements

Prerequisites: Completion of all lower division requirements for an engineering major, or consent of instructor

Hours & Format

Fall and/or spring: 15 weeks - 3 hours of lecture and 1 hour of discussion per week

Summer: 6 weeks - 7.5 hours of lecture and 3 hours of discussion per week

Additional Details

Subject/Course Level: Mechanical Engineering/Undergraduate

Grading/Final exam status: Letter grade. Final exam required.

Instructors: Dornfeld, McMains

Introduction to Lean Manufacturing Systems: Read Less [-]

Terms offered: Spring 2022, Fall 2021, Spring 2021
Introduction to design and realization of mechatronics systems. Micro computer architectures. Basic computer IO devices. Embedded microprocessor systems and control, IO programming such as analogue to digital converters, PWM, serial and parallel outputs. Electrical components such as power supplies, operational amplifiers, transformers and filters. Shielding and grounding. Design of electric, hydraulic and pneumatic actuators. Design of sensors. Design of power transmission systems. Kinematics and dynamics of robotics devices. Basic feedback design to create robustness and performance.
Mechatronics Design: Read More [+]

Objectives & Outcomes

Course Objectives: Introduce students to design and design techniques of mechatronics systems; provide guidelines to and experience with design of variety of sensors and actuators; design experience in programming microcomputers and various IO devices; exposure to and design experience in synthesis of mechanical power transfer components; understanding the role of dynamics and kinematics of robotic devices in design of mechatronics systems; exposure to and design experience in synthesis of feedback systems; provide experience in working in a team to design a prototype mechatronics device.

Student Learning Outcomes: By the end of this course, students should: Know how to set up micro computers and interface them with various devices; know how to understand the microcomputers architectures, IO devices and be able to program them effectively; understand the design of actuators and sensors; know how to do shielding and grounding for various mechatronics projects, know how to create feedback systems, know the role of dynamics and kinematics of robotic devices in design and control of mechatronics systems; know how to design mechanical components such as transmissions, bearings, shafts, and fasteners.

Hours & Format

Fall and/or spring: 15 weeks - 2 hours of lecture and 3 hours of laboratory per week

Additional Details

Subject/Course Level: Mechanical Engineering/Undergraduate

Grading/Final exam status: Letter grade. Alternative to final exam.

Mechatronics Design: Read Less [-]

Terms offered: Spring 2022, Fall 2021, Spring 2021
This course introduces students to modern experimental techniques for mechanical engineering, and improves students’ teamwork and communication skills. Students will work in a laboratory setting on systems ranging in complexity from desktop experiments with only a few instruments up to systems such as an internal combustion engine with a wide variety of sensors. State-of-the-art software for data acquisition and analysis will be introduced and used throughout the course. The role of error and uncertainty, and uncertainty propagation, in measurements and analysis will be examined. Design of experiments will be addressed through examples and homework. The role and limitations of spectral analysis of digital data will be discussed.
Experimentation and Measurements: Read More [+]

Objectives & Outcomes

Course Objectives: Introduce students to modern experimental techniques for mechanical engineering; provide exposure to and experience with a variety of sensors, including those to measure temperature, displacement, velocity, acceleration and strain; examine the role of error and uncertainty in measurements and analysis; exposure to and experience in using commercial software for data acquisition and analysis; discuss the role and limitations of spectral analysis of digital data; provide experience in working in a team in all aspects of the laboratory exercises, including set-up, data collection, analysis, technical report writing and oral presentation.

Student Learning Outcomes: (a) an ability to apply knowledge of mathematics, science, and engineering
(b) an ability to design and conduct experiments, as well as to analyze and interpret data
(c) an ability to function on multi-disciplinary teams
(d) an ability to identify, formulate, and solve engineering problems
(e) an understanding of professional and ethical responsibility
(f) an ability to communicate effectively
(g) the broad education necessary to understand the impact of engineering solutions in a global, economic, environmental, and societal context
(h) a recognition of the need for, and an ability to engage in life-long learning
(j) a knowledge of contemporary issues
(i) an ability to use the techniques, skills, and modern engineering tools necessary for engineering practice.

Hours & Format

Fall and/or spring: 15 weeks - 2 hours of lecture, 1 hour of discussion, and 3 hours of laboratory per week

Additional Details

Subject/Course Level: Mechanical Engineering/Undergraduate

Grading/Final exam status: Letter grade. Alternative to final exam.

Instructors: Johnson, Makiharju, Chen

Experimentation and Measurements: Read Less [-]

Terms offered: Spring 2022, Fall 2021, Summer 2021 10 Week Session
This course is an introduction to the dynamics of particles and rigid bodies. The material, based on a Newtonian formulation of the governing equations, is illustrated with numerous examples ranging from one-dimensional motion of a single particle to planar motions of rigid bodies and systems of rigid bodies.
Engineering Mechanics II: Read More [+]

Hours & Format

Fall and/or spring: 15 weeks - 3 hours of lecture and 1 hour of discussion per week

Summer: 10 weeks - 4.5 hours of lecture and 1.5 hours of discussion per week

Additional Details

Subject/Course Level: Mechanical Engineering/Undergraduate

Grading/Final exam status: Letter grade. Final exam required.

Instructor: Ma

Engineering Mechanics II: Read Less [-]

Terms offered: Spring 2022, Fall 2021, Summer 2021 10 Week Session
This course introduces the fundamentals and techniques of fluid mechanics with the aim of describing and controlling engineering flows.
Fluid Mechanics: Read More [+]

Hours & Format

Fall and/or spring: 15 weeks - 3 hours of lecture and 1 hour of discussion per week

Summer: 10 weeks - 4.5 hours of lecture and 1.5 hours of discussion per week

Additional Details

Subject/Course Level: Mechanical Engineering/Undergraduate

Grading/Final exam status: Letter grade. Final exam required.

Fluid Mechanics: Read Less [-]

Terms offered: Fall 2021, Fall 2020, Spring 2020, Fall 2019
This course is an introduction to the field of robotics. It covers the fundamentals of kinematics, dynamics, control of robot manipulators, robotic vision, sensing, forward & inverse kinematics of serial chain manipulators, the manipulator Jacobian, force relations, dynamics, & control. We will present techniques for geometric motion planning & obstacle avoidance. Open problems in trajectory generation with dynamic constraints will also be discussed. The course also presents the use of the same analytical techniques as manipulation for the analysis of images & computer vision. Low level vision, structure from motion, & an introduction to vision & learning will be covered. The course concludes with current applications of robotics.
Introduction to Robotics: Read More [+]

Rules & Requirements

Prerequisites: Familiarity with linear algebra at the level of EECS 16A/EECS 16B or Math 54. Experience coding in python at the level of COMPSCI 61A. Preferred: experience developing software at the level of COMPSCI 61B and experience using Linux

Credit Restrictions: Students will receive no credit for Electrical Engineering and Computer Science C106A/Bioengineering C106A after completing EE C106A/BioE C125, Electrical Engineering 206A, or Electrical Engineering and Computer Science 206A.

Hours & Format

Fall and/or spring: 15 weeks - 3 hours of lecture, 1 hour of discussion, and 3 hours of laboratory per week

Summer: 8 weeks - 6 hours of lecture, 2 hours of discussion, and 6 hours of laboratory per week

Additional Details

Subject/Course Level: Mechanical Engineering/Undergraduate

Grading/Final exam status: Letter grade. Alternative to final exam.

Instructor: Sastry

Also listed as: BIO ENG C106A/EECS C106A

Introduction to Robotics: Read Less [-]

Terms offered: Spring 2022, Fall 2021, Spring 2021
This course covers elastic and plastic deformation under static and dynamic loads. Failure by yielding, fracture, fatigue, wear, and environmental factors are also examined. Topics include engineering materials, heat treatment, structure-property relationships, elastic deformation and multiaxial loading, plastic deformation and yield criteria, dislocation plasticity and strengthening mechanisms, creep, stress concentration effects, fracture, fatigue, and contact deformation.
Mechanical Behavior of Engineering Materials: Read More [+]

Objectives & Outcomes

Course Objectives: The central theme of this course is the mechanical behavior of engineering materials, such as metals, ceramics, polymers, and composites, subjected to different types of loading. The main objectives are to provide students with basic understanding of phase transformation by heat treating and stress-induced hardening, linear and nonlinear elastic behavior, deformation under multiaxial loading, plastic deformation and yield criteria, dislocation plasticity and strengthening mechanisms, creep, stress concentration effects, brittle versus ductile fracture, fracture mechanisms at different scales, fatigue, contact deformation, and wear.

Student Learning Outcomes: (a) an ability to apply knowledge of mathematics, science, and engineering
(b) an ability to design and conduct experiments, as well as to analyze and interpret data
(c) an ability to design a system, component, or process to meet desired needs within realistic constraints such as economic, environmental, social, political, ethical, health and safety, manufacturability, and sustainability
(e) an ability to identify, formulate, and solve engineering problems
(i) a recognition of the need for, and an ability to engage in life-long learning
(k) an ability to use the techniques, skills, and modern engineering tools necessary for engineering practice.

Hours & Format

Fall and/or spring: 15 weeks - 3 hours of lecture and 1 hour of discussion per week

Additional Details

Subject/Course Level: Mechanical Engineering/Undergraduate

Grading/Final exam status: Letter grade. Final exam required.

Instructors: Komvopoulos, Grace O'Connell

Mechanical Behavior of Engineering Materials: Read Less [-]

Terms offered: Spring 2022, Fall 2021, Summer 2021 10 Week Session
This course covers transport processes of mass, momentum, and energy from a macroscopic view with emphasis both on understanding why matter behaves as it does and on developing practical problem solving skills. The course is divided into four parts: introduction, conduction, convection, and radiation.
Heat Transfer: Read More [+]

Hours & Format

Fall and/or spring: 15 weeks - 3 hours of lecture and 1 hour of discussion per week

Summer:
8 weeks - 5.5 hours of lecture and 1.5 hours of discussion per week
10 weeks - 4.5 hours of lecture and 1.5 hours of discussion per week

Additional Details

Subject/Course Level: Mechanical Engineering/Undergraduate

Grading/Final exam status: Letter grade. Final exam required.

Heat Transfer: Read Less [-]

Terms offered: Spring 2022, Summer 2021 10 Week Session, Spring 2021
The course provides project-based learning experience in innovative new product development, with a focus on mechanical engineering systems. Design concepts and techniques are introduced, and the student's design ability is developed in a design or feasibility study chosen to emphasize ingenuity and provide wide coverage of engineering topics. Relevant software will be integrated into studio sessions, including solid modeling and environmental life cycle analysis. Design optimization and social, economic, and political implications are included.
Introduction to Product Development: Read More [+]

Rules & Requirements

Prerequisites: Junior or higher standing

Hours & Format

Fall and/or spring: 15 weeks - 3-3 hours of lecture and 0-1 hours of voluntary per week

Summer: 10 weeks - 4.5-4.5 hours of lecture and 0-1 hours of voluntary per week

Additional Details

Subject/Course Level: Mechanical Engineering/Undergraduate

Grading/Final exam status: Letter grade. Final exam not required.

Introduction to Product Development: Read Less [-]

Terms offered: Spring 2022, Spring 2021, Spring 2020
This course applies methods of statistical continuum mechanics to subcellar biomechanical phenomena ranging from nanoscale (molecular) to microscale (whole cell and cell population) biological processes at the interface of mechanics, biology, and chemistry.
Molecular Biomechanics and Mechanobiology of the Cell: Read More [+]

Objectives & Outcomes

Course Objectives: This course, which is open to senior undergraduate students or graduate students in diverse disciplines ranging from engineering to biology to chemistry and physics, is aimed at exposing students to subcellular biomechanical phenomena spanning scales from molecules to the whole cell.

Student Learning Outcomes: The students will develop tools and skills to (1) understand and analyze subcelluar biomechanics and transport phenomena, and (2) ultimately apply these skills to novel biological and biomedical applications

Hours & Format

Fall and/or spring: 15 weeks - 3 hours of lecture and 1 hour of discussion per week

Additional Details

Subject/Course Level: Mechanical Engineering/Undergraduate

Grading/Final exam status: Letter grade. Alternative to final exam.

Instructor: Mofrad

Also listed as: BIO ENG C112

Molecular Biomechanics and Mechanobiology of the Cell: Read Less [-]

Terms offered: Fall 2020, Spring 2019, Spring 2018
This course covers the structure and mechanical functions of load bearing tissues and their replacements. Natural and synthetic load-bearing biomaterials for clinical applications are reviewed. Biocompatibility of biomaterials and host response to structural implants are examined. Quantitative treatment of biomechanical issues and constitutive relationships of tissues are covered in order to design biomaterial replacements for structural function. Material selection for load bearing applications including reconstructive surgery, orthopedics, dentistry, and cardiology are addressed. Mechanical design for longevity including topics of fatigue, wear, and fracture are reviewed. Case studies that examine failures of devices are presented.
Structural Aspects of Biomaterials: Read More [+]

Hours & Format

Fall and/or spring: 15 weeks - 3 hours of lecture and 1 hour of discussion per week

Additional Details

Subject/Course Level: Mechanical Engineering/Undergraduate

Grading/Final exam status: Letter grade. Alternative to final exam.

Instructor: Pruitt

Also listed as: BIO ENG C117

Structural Aspects of Biomaterials: Read Less [-]

Terms offered: Spring 2021, Spring 2020, Spring 2017
This course introduces engineering students (juniors and seniors) to the field of nanotechnology and nanoscience. The course has two components: (1) Formal lectures. Students receive a set of formal lectures introducing them to the field of nanotechnology and nanoscience. The material covered includes nanofabrication technology (how one achieves the nanometer length scale, from "bottom up" to "top down" technologies), the interdisciplinary nature of nanotechnology and nanoscience (including areas of chemistry, material science, physics, and molecular biology), examples of nanoscience phenomena (the crossover from bulk to quantum mechanical properties), and applications (from integrated circuits, quantum computing, MEMS, and bioengineering). (2) Projects. Students are asked to read and present a variety of current journal papers to the class and lead a discussion on the various works.
Introduction to Nanotechnology and Nanoscience: Read More [+]

Rules & Requirements

Prerequisites: Chemistry 1A and Physics 7B. Physics 7C and Engineering 45 (or the equivalent) recommended

Hours & Format

Fall and/or spring: 15 weeks - 3 hours of lecture per week

Additional Details

Subject/Course Level: Mechanical Engineering/Undergraduate

Grading/Final exam status: Letter grade. Final exam required.

Instructors: Lin, Sohn

Introduction to Nanotechnology and Nanoscience: Read Less [-]

Terms offered: Fall 2021, Fall 2020, Fall 2019
Fundamentals of microelectromechanical systems including design, fabrication of microstructures; surface-micromachining, bulk-micromachining, LIGA, and other micro machining processes; fabrication principles of integrated circuit device and their applications for making MEMS devices; high-aspect-ratio microstructures; scaling issues in the micro scale (heat transfer, fluid mechanics and solid mechanics); device design, analysis, and mask layout.
Introduction to MEMS (Microelectromechanical Systems): Read More [+]

Terms offered: Fall 2016, Spring 2015, Spring 2014
This course applies the methods of computational modeling and continuum mechanics to biomedical phenomena spanning various length scales ranging from molecular to cellular to tissue and organ levels. The course is intended for upper level undergraduate students who have been exposed to undergraduate continuum mechanics (statics and strength of materials.)
Computational Biomechanics Across Multiple Scales: Read More [+]

Terms offered: Spring 2020, Spring 2018, Spring 2017
Fundamentals of manufacturing processes (metal forming, forging, metal cutting, welding, joining, and casting); selection of metals, plastics, and other materials relative to the design and choice of manufacturing processes; geometric dimensioning and tolerancing of all processes.
Processing of Materials in Manufacturing: Read More [+]

Terms offered: Spring 2018
iACME provide opportunities for Mechanical Engineering undergraduates to tackle real-world engineering problems. Student teams, consisting of no more than four students, will apply to work on specific industry- initiated projects. Teams will be selected based on prior experience in research/internships, scholastic achievements in ME courses, and most importantly, proposed initial approaches toward tackling the specific project. ME faculty, alumni of the Mechanical Engineering Department, and industry participants will mentor selected teams. Projects fall within a wide range of mechanical engineering disciplines, e.g. biomedical, automotive/transportation, energy, design, etc.
Industry-Associated Capstones in Mechanical Engineering (iACME): Read More [+]

Objectives & Outcomes

Course Objectives: The purpose of this course is to:

learn the fundamental concepts of approaching practical engineering problems;

enhance skills in communication with clients and other engineers;

enhance skills in design, prototyping, testing, and analysis.

Student Learning Outcomes: (a) an ability to apply knowledge of mathematics, science, and engineering
(b) an ability to design and conduct experiments, as well as to analyze and interpret data
(c) an ability to design a system, component, or process to meet desired needs within realistic constraints such as economic, environmental, social, political, ethical, health and safety, manufacturability, and sustainability
(d) an ability to function on multi-disciplinary teams
(e) an ability to identify, formulate, and solve engineering problems
(f) an understanding of professional and ethical responsibility
(g) an ability to communicate effectively
(h) the broad education necessary to understand the impact of engineering solutions in a global, economic, environmental, and societal context
(i) a recognition of the need for, and an ability to engage in life-long learning
(j) a knowledge of contemporary issues
(k) an ability to use the techniques, skills, and modern engineering tools necessary for engineering practice.

Rules & Requirements

Prerequisites: Senior standing and a minimum GPA of 3.0

Hours & Format

Fall and/or spring: 15 weeks - 3 hours of lecture per week

Additional Details

Subject/Course Level: Mechanical Engineering/Undergraduate

Grading/Final exam status: Letter grade. Alternate method of final assessment during regularly scheduled final exam group (e.g., presentation, final project, etc.).

Instructors: O'Connell , Sohn

Industry-Associated Capstones in Mechanical Engineering (iACME): Read Less [-]

Terms offered: Spring 2022
This course will discuss concepts from the physical sciences and engineering (e.g. heat and mass transfer, phase transitions, fluid mechanics, etc.) that serve as a foundation for everyday cooking and haute cuisine. The course will integrate the expertise of visiting chefs from the Bay Area (and beyond) who will serve as guest lecturers and present their cooking techniques. These unique opportunities will be complemented by lectures that investigate in-depth the science and engineering that underlie these techniques.
The Science and Engineering of Cooking: Read More [+]

Terms offered: Spring 2022, Spring 2021, Spring 2011
Imagine a material that offers mechanical properties that are competitive with aluminum and steel but are at fractions of their weight – these materials are termed as composites. Composite materials are used for many applications such as aircraft structures, biomedical devices, racing car bodies, and many others for their capability to be stronger, lighter, and cheaper when compared to traditional materials. In this class, students will delve into the theory to design composite structures, processing techniques to manufacture them, and structural testing methods for validation. Starting from traditional fiber-reinforced composite materials, this course will also bring in new concepts such as nanocomposites and bioinspired composites.
Introduction to Composite Materials: Read More [+]

Objectives & Outcomes

Course Objectives: The course objectives are to train students to be able to design composite structures, select composite materials, conduct stress analyses of selected practical applications using laminated plate theories and appropriate strength criteria, and be familiar with the properties and response of composite structures subjected to mechanical loading under static and cyclic conditions.

Student Learning Outcomes: A knowledge of contemporary issues.
An ability to design and conduct experiments, as well as to analyze and interpret data.
An understanding of professional and ethical responsibility.
The broad education necessary to understand the impact of engineering solutions in a global, economic, environmental, and societal context.
A recognition of the need for, and an ability to engage in life-long learning.
An ability to apply knowledge of mathematics, science, and engineering.
An ability to communicate effectively.
An ability to design a system, component, or process to meet desired needs within realistic constraints such as economic, environmental, social, political, ethical, health and safety, manufacturability, and sustainability.

An ability to function on multi-disciplinary teams.
An ability to identify, formulate, and solve engineering problems.
An ability to use the techniques, skills, and modern engineering tools necessary for engineering practice.
Students completing this course will have the facility for designing robust composite structures subjected to various types of loads. Students will also be able to assess the effects of long-term loading, including damage generation, delamination fracture and fatigue failure. Additionally, students will be exposed to how composites are used in various applications in aerospace, biomedical, sports, among other fields.

Hours & Format

Fall and/or spring: 15 weeks - 3 hours of lecture per week

Additional Details

Subject/Course Level: Mechanical Engineering/Undergraduate

Grading/Final exam status: Letter grade. Alternative to final exam.

Instructor: Gu

Introduction to Composite Materials: Read Less [-]

Terms offered: Fall 2021, Fall 2020, Fall 2019
Synthesis, analysis, and design of planar machines. Kinematic structure, graphical, analytical, and numerical analysis and synthesis. Linkages, cams, reciprocating engines, gear trains, and flywheels.
Design of Planar Machinery: Read More [+]

Hours & Format

Fall and/or spring: 15 weeks - 3 hours of lecture and 1 hour of laboratory per week

Additional Details

Subject/Course Level: Mechanical Engineering/Undergraduate

Grading/Final exam status: Letter grade. Final exam required.

Instructor: Youssefi

Design of Planar Machinery: Read Less [-]

Terms offered: Spring 2021, Spring 2020, Spring 2019
Physical understanding of automotive vehicle dynamics including simple lateral, longitudinal and ride quality models. An overview of active safety systems will be introduced including the basic concepts and terminology, the state-of-the-art development, and basic principles of systems such as ABS, traction control, dynamic stability control, and roll stability control. Passive, semi-active and active suspension systems will be analyzed. Concepts of autonomous vehicle technology including drive-by-wire and steer-by-wire systems, adaptive cruise control and lane keeping systems. Design of software control systems for an actual 1/10 scale race vehicle.
Vehicle Dynamics and Control: Read More [+]

Objectives & Outcomes

Course Objectives: At the end of the course the students should be able to:
a.
Formulate simple but accurate dynamic models for automotive longitudinal, lateral and ride quality analysis.
b.
Assess the stability of dynamic systems using differential equation theory, apply frequency-response methods to assess system response to external disturbances, sensor noise and parameter variations.
c.
Have a basic understanding of modern automotive safety systems including ABS, traction control, dynamic stability control and roll control.
d.
Follow the literature on these subjects and perform independent design, research and development work in this field.
e.
Expected to design feedback control systems for an actual 1/010 scaled vehicle platform which will be distributed to every group of two students in the class

Student Learning Outcomes: (a) an ability to apply knowledge of mathematics, science, and engineering
(b) an ability to design and conduct experiments, as well as to analyze and interpret data
(c) an ability to design a system, component, or process to meet desired needs within realistic constraints such as economic, environmental, social, political, ethical, health and safety, manufacturability, and sustainability
(d) an ability to function on multi-disciplinary teams
(e) an ability to identify, formulate, and solve engineering problems
(g) an ability to communicate effectively
(j) a knowledge of contemporary issues
(k) an ability to use the techniques, skills, and modern engineering tools necessary for engineering practice.

Hours & Format

Fall and/or spring: 15 weeks - 3 hours of lecture and 1 hour of discussion per week

Additional Details

Subject/Course Level: Mechanical Engineering/Undergraduate

Grading/Final exam status: Letter grade. Final exam required.

Instructor: Borrelli

Vehicle Dynamics and Control: Read Less [-]

Terms offered: Fall 2021, Summer 2021 10 Week Session, Fall 2020
Physical understanding of dynamics and feedback. Linear feedback control of dynamic systems. Mathematical tools for analysis and design. Stability. Modeling systems with differential equations. Linearization. Solution to linear, time-invariant differential equations.
Dynamic Systems and Feedback: Read More [+]

Terms offered: Spring 2022, Spring 2021, Spring 2020
An introduction to the theory of mechanical vibrations including topics of harmonic motion, resonance, transient and random excitation, applications of Fourier analysis and convolution methods. Multidegree of freedom discrete systems including principal mode, principal coordinates and Rayleigh's principle.
Mechanical Vibrations: Read More [+]

Objectives & Outcomes

Course Objectives: Introduce basic aspects of vibrational analysis, considering both single and multi-degree-of-freedom systems. Discuss the use of exact and approximate methods in the analysis of complex systems. Familiarize students with the use of MATLAB as directed toward vibration problems.

Student Learning Outcomes: (a) an ability to apply knowledge of mathematics, science, and engineering
(b) an ability to design and conduct experiments, as well as to analyze and interpret data
(c) an ability to design a system, component, or process to meet desired needs within realistic constraints such as economic, environmental, social, political, ethical, health and safety, manufacturability, and sustainability
(e) an ability to identify, formulate, and solve engineering problems
(f) an understanding of professional and ethical responsibility
(g) an ability to communicate effectively
(i) a recognition of the need for, and an ability to engage in life-long learning
(j) a knowledge of contemporary issues
(k) an ability to use the techniques, skills, and modern engineering tools necessary for engineering practice.

Upon completion of the course students shall be able to: Derive the equations of motion for vibratory systems. Linearize nonlinear systems so as to allow a linear vibrational analysis. Compute the natural frequency (or frequencies) of vibratory systems and determine the system's modal response. Determine the overall response based upon the initial conditions and/or steady forcing input. Design a passive vibration absorber to ameliorate vibrations in a forced system.

Hours & Format

Fall and/or spring: 15 weeks - 3 hours of lecture per week

Summer: 10 weeks - 5 hours of lecture per week

Additional Details

Subject/Course Level: Mechanical Engineering/Undergraduate

Grading/Final exam status: Letter grade. Final exam required.

Mechanical Vibrations: Read Less [-]

Terms offered: Spring 2022, Fall 2021, Spring 2021, Fall 2020
Analysis and synthesis of linear feedback control systems in transform and time domains. Control system design by root locus, frequency response, and state space methods. Applications to electro-mechanical and mechatronics systems.
Feedback Control Systems: Read More [+]

Terms offered: Spring 2022, Spring 2020, Spring 2019
This course provides preparation for the conceptual design and prototyping of mechanical systems that use microprocessors to control machine activities, acquire and analyze data, and interact with operators. The architecture of microprocessors is related to problems in mechanical systems through study of systems, including electro-mechanical components, thermal components and a variety of instruments. Laboratory exercises lead through studies of different levels of software.
Design of Microprocessor-Based Mechanical Systems: Read More [+]

Hours & Format

Fall and/or spring: 15 weeks - 3 hours of lecture and 3 hours of laboratory per week

Summer: 10 weeks - 4.5 hours of lecture and 4.5 hours of laboratory per week

Additional Details

Subject/Course Level: Mechanical Engineering/Undergraduate

Grading/Final exam status: Letter grade. Final exam not required.

Instructor: Kazerooni

Design of Microprocessor-Based Mechanical Systems: Read Less [-]

Terms offered: Fall 2021, Fall 2020, Fall 2019
This course introduces students to the control of unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs). The course will cover modeling and dynamics of aerial vehicles, and common control strategies. Laboratory exercises allow students to apply knowledge on a real system, by programming a microcontroller to control a UAV.
Introduction to Control of Unmanned Aerial Vehicles: Read More [+]

Objectives & Outcomes

Course Objectives: Introduce the students to analysis, modeling, and control of unmanned aerial vehicles. Lectures will cover:

Principle forces acting on a UAV, including aerodynamics of propellers

The kinematics and dynamics of rotations, and 3D modeling of vehicle dynamics

Typical sensors, and their modeling

Typical control strategies, and their pitfalls

Programming a microcontroller
During the laboratory sessions, students will apply these skills to create a model-based controller for a UAV.

Student Learning Outcomes: (a) an ability to apply knowledge of mathematics, science, and engineering
(b) an ability to design and conduct experiments, as well as to analyze and interpret data
(g) an ability to communicate effectively
(k) an ability to use the techniques, skills, and modern engineering tools necessary for engineering practice

Rules & Requirements

Prerequisites:MEC ENG 104 is recommended. Corequisite: MEC ENG 132

Credit Restrictions: Student will not receive credit for this course if they have taken Mechanical Engineering 236U.

Hours & Format

Fall and/or spring: 15 weeks - 3 hours of lecture and 3 hours of laboratory per week

Additional Details

Subject/Course Level: Mechanical Engineering/Undergraduate

Grading/Final exam status: Letter grade. Final exam required.

Instructor: Mueller

Introduction to Control of Unmanned Aerial Vehicles: Read Less [-]

Terms offered: Fall 2021
This course provides students with a basic understanding of robotic locomotion and the use of kinematics, dynamics, control algorithms, embedded microcomputers and mechanical components in designing artificial legs such as prosthetics, orthotics and exoskeletons.
Robotic Locomotion: Read More [+]

Objectives & Outcomes

Course Objectives: Conduct various analyses on the legs’ performance, propose and study practical applications
such as orthotics and prosthetics in medical field, back support, knee support and shoulder support
exoskeletons in industrial field and recreational exoskeletons.
The course objectives are to train students to be able to design artificial legs, select and design components of
the robotic legs.

Student Learning Outcomes: (a) An ability to apply knowledge of mathematics, science, and engineering.
(b) An ability to design and conduct experiments, as well as to analyze and interpret data.
(c) An ability to design a system, component, or process to meet desired needs within realistic constraints such
as economic, environmental, social, political, ethical, health and safety, manufacturability, and sustainability.
(d) An ability to function on multi-disciplinary teams.
(e) An ability to identify, formulate, and solve engineering problems.
(f) An understanding of professional and ethical responsibility.
(g) An ability to communicate effectively.
(h) The broad education necessary to understand the impact of engineering solutions in a global, economic,
environmental, and societal context.
(i) A recognition of the need for, and an ability to engage in life-long learning.
(j) A knowledge of contemporary issues.
(k) An ability to use the techniques, skills, and modern engineering tools necessary for engineering practice.

Hours & Format

Fall and/or spring:
15 weeks - 3 hours of lecture and 3 hours of laboratory per week
15 weeks - 3 hours of lecture and 3 hours of laboratory per week

Additional Details

Subject/Course Level: Mechanical Engineering/Undergraduate

Grading/Final exam status: Letter grade. Final exam required.

Instructor: Kazerooni

Robotic Locomotion: Read Less [-]

Sours: http://guide.berkeley.edu/courses/mec_eng/

Catalog berkeley course

Courses

Terms offered: Spring 2016, Spring 2015, Spring 2014
Introduction to personal and community health, drawing on physical and social sciences. Specific areas include stress, alcohol and drugs, nutrition, exercise, the environment, communication, and sexuality. Readings, lectures, and discussions explore key issues for students and examine those issues in the context of contemporary American society. Public health approaches to disease prevention and health promotion are explored for each topic.
Healthy People: Introduction to Health Promotion: Read More [+]

Terms offered: Spring 2019, Spring 2018, Spring 2017
This seminar provides an overview of the intersection between global health and social justice, with a specific focus on the ways in which inequity, specifically the conditions that lead to poverty, disproportionately affect health outcomes. Students will learn about the historical and theoretical underpinnings of global health, how social determinants affect medical outcomes and health policy, the principles of international law and health economics, and the structure of health delivery models. In the process, students will engage in topics related to social factors that impact health, including class, race, gender, and poverty. Class discussions will address contemporary global health priorities through the lens of human rights activism.
Introduction to Global Health Equity: Read More [+]

Hours & Format

Fall and/or spring: 15 weeks - 2 hours of lecture and 1 hour of discussion per week

Additional Details

Subject/Course Level: Public Health/Undergraduate

Grading/Final exam status: Letter grade. Final exam required.

Instructor: LE

Introduction to Global Health Equity: Read Less [-]

Terms offered: Fall 2021, Spring 2021, Spring 2014
Seminar limited to 15 freshmen led by senior faculty on broad topics in public health such as financing health care, promoting preventive behavior, controlling major public health problems such as world hunger, AIDS, drugs, and the population explosion.
Freshman Seminar in Public Health: Read More [+]

Rules & Requirements

Repeat rules: Course may be repeated for credit without restriction.

Hours & Format

Fall and/or spring: 15 weeks - 1 hour of lecture per week

Additional Details

Subject/Course Level: Public Health/Undergraduate

Grading/Final exam status: The grading option will be decided by the instructor when the class is offered. Final exam required.

Freshman Seminar in Public Health: Read Less [-]

Terms offered: Spring 2022, Spring 2020, Spring 2019
Sophomore seminars are small interactive courses offered by faculty members in departments all across the campus. Sophomore seminars offer opportunity for close, regular intellectual contact between faculty members and students in the crucial second year. The topics vary from department to department and semester to semester. Enrollment limited to 15 sophomores.
Sophomore Seminar: Read More [+]

Rules & Requirements

Prerequisites: At discretion of instructor

Repeat rules: Course may be repeated for credit when topic changes.

Hours & Format

Fall and/or spring:
5 weeks - 3-6 hours of seminar per week
10 weeks - 1.5-3 hours of seminar per week
15 weeks - 1-2 hours of seminar per week

Summer:
6 weeks - 2.5-5 hours of seminar per week
8 weeks - 1.5-3.5 hours of seminar and 2-4 hours of seminar per week

Additional Details

Subject/Course Level: Public Health/Undergraduate

Grading/Final exam status: The grading option will be decided by the instructor when the class is offered. Final Exam To be decided by the instructor when the class is offered.

Sophomore Seminar: Read Less [-]

Terms offered: Spring 2016, Fall 2015, Spring 2015

Directed Group Study: Read More [+]

Rules & Requirements

Credit Restrictions: Enrollment is restricted; see the Introduction to Courses and Curricula section of this catalog.

Repeat rules: Course may be repeated for credit without restriction.

Hours & Format

Fall and/or spring: 15 weeks - 1-4 hours of directed group study per week

Additional Details

Subject/Course Level: Public Health/Undergraduate

Grading/Final exam status: Offered for pass/not pass grade only. Final exam not required.

Directed Group Study: Read Less [-]

Terms offered: Spring 2016, Fall 2015, Spring 2015

Supervised Independent Study: Read More [+]

Rules & Requirements

Prerequisites: Consent of instructor

Hours & Format

Fall and/or spring: 15 weeks - 1-4 hours of independent study per week

Summer:
6 weeks - 2.5-10 hours of independent study per week
8 weeks - 1.5-7.5 hours of independent study per week
10 weeks - 1.5-6 hours of independent study per week

Additional Details

Subject/Course Level: Public Health/Undergraduate

Grading/Final exam status: Offered for pass/not pass grade only. Final exam not required.

Supervised Independent Study: Read Less [-]

Terms offered: Spring 2022, Fall 2021, Spring 2021
Human activity and human numbers threaten the possibility of irreversible damage to the fragile biosphere on which all life depends. The current generation of students is the first one to face this existential problem and it may be the last one that can solve it. The goal of this course is for faculty with expertise in the many variables involved-energy consumption, food security, population growth and family planning, climate change, governance, migration, resource consumption, etc.-to give one-hour presentations on their specific topic. Teacher Scholars supervised by a GSI will facilitate student discussion groups, who will then prepare brief statements responding to the challenge presented, and suggest ways of ameliorating the problems
A Sustainable World: Challenges and Opportunities: Read More [+]

Hours & Format

Fall and/or spring: 15 weeks - 2 hours of lecture and 1 hour of discussion per week

Additional Details

Subject/Course Level: Public Health/Undergraduate

Grading/Final exam status: Letter grade. Alternate method of final assessment during regularly scheduled final exam group (e.g., presentation, final project, etc.).

Instructor: Potts

A Sustainable World: Challenges and Opportunities: Read Less [-]

Terms offered: Fall 2016, Fall 2015, Fall 2014
Topics include health promotion, medical self-care, and delivery of health care service. Through a combined theory and practice approach, topics are covered as they apply to the campus community. The course is divided into three sections corresponding to particular campus health field experiences in which students may be involved.
Health Promotion in a College Setting: Read More [+]

Rules & Requirements

Prerequisites: Consent of instructor

Repeat rules: Course may be repeated for credit without restriction.

Hours & Format

Fall and/or spring: 15 weeks - 1.5 hours of lecture and 1 hour of discussion per week

Additional Details

Subject/Course Level: Public Health/Undergraduate

Grading/Final exam status: Offered for pass/not pass grade only. Final exam not required.

Instructor: Kodama

Health Promotion in a College Setting: Read Less [-]

Terms offered: Spring 2017, Spring 2016, Spring 2015
Topics include health promotion, medical self-care, and delivery of health care service. Through a combined theory and practice approach, topics are covered as they apply to the campus community. The course is divided into three sections corresponding to particular campus health field experiences in which students may be involved.
Health Promotion in a College Setting: Read More [+]

Rules & Requirements

Prerequisites: Consent of instructor

Repeat rules: Course may be repeated for credit without restriction.

Hours & Format

Fall and/or spring: 15 weeks - 1.5 hours of lecture and 1 hour of discussion per week

Additional Details

Subject/Course Level: Public Health/Undergraduate

Grading/Final exam status: Offered for pass/not pass grade only. Final exam not required.

Instructor: Kodama

Health Promotion in a College Setting: Read Less [-]

Terms offered: Summer 2021 First 6 Week Session, Summer 2020 First 6 Week Session, Summer 2019 First 6 Week Session
This course addresses violence as a public health issue, using an interdisciplinary public health approach to enable undergraduate students to explore and analyze violence from personal, social, community and political perspectives. Students will learn to apply public health strategies to identify causes of violence and develop practical community-based plans to prevent violence and promote safety. This course will examine violence through the lens of the college campus, paying particular attention to the types of violence more commonly seen on, or associated with, collegiate life, and will include a term paper component.
Violence, Social Justice, and Public Health: Read More [+]

Hours & Format

Fall and/or spring: 15 weeks - 2 hours of lecture per week

Summer: 6 weeks - 6 hours of lecture per week

Additional Details

Subject/Course Level: Public Health/Undergraduate

Grading/Final exam status: Letter grade. Alternate method of final assessment during regularly scheduled final exam group (e.g., presentation, final project, etc.).

Instructor: Gamble

Violence, Social Justice, and Public Health: Read Less [-]

Terms offered: Spring 2022, Spring 2021, Spring 2020
The course will provide core knowledge and skills from several disciplines on how to improve women's health and well-being globally, and it will follow a life course framework. It aims to expand students’ understanding of the interconnected factors that influence women’s health and empowerment - including foundations of sexual and reproductive health, economic development, political frameworks and global reproductive rights, demographic and social changes, basic principles of empowerment theory, educational opportunities, and efforts to ensure gender equity.
Women's Health, Gender And Empowerment: Read More [+]

Objectives & Outcomes

Course Objectives: A.[KNOWLEDGE]: To expand students’ understanding of the interconnected cultural, demographic, social, and economic factors that influence women’s health and empowerment globally.
B.[KNOWLEDGE]: To gain knowledge of the historical and present-day contexts of politics, policies, and laws related to women’s health outcomes, human rights, sexual and reproductive rights, and gender inequities.
C.[SKILLS]: To critically engage with contrasting perspectives and changing paradigms about women’s health and empowerment among epidemiologists, clinicians, public health experts, demographers, economists, human rights activists, and development specialists.
D.[SKILLS]: Assess policies, development frameworks and case studies of interventions designed to improve women’s health and empowerment in differing cultural and national contexts with specific attention to gender norms.

Student Learning Outcomes: Analyze case studies applying the relevant historical context of politics, policies, and laws related to women’s health and human rights.
Analyze the contrasting perspectives and changing paradigms among epidemiologists, public health experts, demographers, economists, human rights activists and development specialists related to women’s health and empowerment
Assess the impact of women’s health on advances in other sectors including child health, education, economic development, and social stability
Compare macro level political, institutional, and structural factors that influence women’s health and empowerment in relation to local, cultural, and regional contexts
Critically examine how gender and women’s empowerment is addressed in the Sustainable Development Goals and other development frameworks
Evaluate case studies of interventions designed to improve women’s health and empowerment in differing cultural and national contexts and recommend improvements
Examine how girls’ education contributes to individual, community, and national development.
Explain the ways in which social, economic, and cultural factors can both promote and impede women’s and girls’ health.
Identify the major institutions and non-governmental organizations that influence women’s health and empowerment and suitable approaches for implementing interventions to ensure gender equity
Identify and analyze gender inequities in health care needs and access to care.

Hours & Format

Fall and/or spring: 15 weeks - 1.5 hours of web-based lecture and 1 hour of web-based discussion per week

Online: This is an online course.

Additional Details

Subject/Course Level: Public Health/Undergraduate

Grading/Final exam status: Letter grade. Alternative to final exam.

Instructors: Hemmerling, Decker, Mindry

Women's Health, Gender And Empowerment: Read Less [-]

Terms offered: Summer 2017 First 6 Week Session, Spring 2016, Spring 2015
This course examines health at the individual and community/global level by examining the interplay of many factors, including the legal, social, political, and physical environments; economic forces; access to food, safe water, sanitation, and affordable preventive/medical care; nutrition; cultural beliefs and human behaviors; and religion; among others. Students will be expected to read, understand, and use advanced materials from diverse disciplines. Class accompanied by case-based discussions.
Global Health: A Multidisciplinary Examination: Read More [+]

Rules & Requirements

Credit Restrictions: Students who complete PH N112 receive no credit for completing PH 112

Hours & Format

Fall and/or spring: 15 weeks - 3 hours of lecture and 1 hour of discussion per week

Summer: 6 weeks - 9 hours of lecture and 3 hours of discussion per week

Additional Details

Subject/Course Level: Public Health/Undergraduate

Grading/Final exam status: Letter grade. Final exam required.

Instructors: Krishnan, Reingold

Global Health: A Multidisciplinary Examination: Read Less [-]

Terms offered: Summer 2021 First 6 Week Session, Summer 2020 First 6 Week Session, Summer 2019 First 6 Week Session
This course examines health at the individual and community/global level by examining the interplay of many factors, including the legal, social, political, and physical environments; economic forces; access to food, safe water, sanitation, and affordable preventive/medical care; nutrition; cultural beliefs and human behaviors; and religion; among others. Students will be expected to read, understand, and use advanced materials from diverse disciplines. Class accompanied by case-based discussions.
This class is the Summer Session version of PH 112; same units and content, increased lecture and discussion hours.
Global Health: A Multidisciplinary Examination: Read More [+]

Rules & Requirements

Credit Restrictions: Students who complete PH 112 receive no credit for completing PH N112.

Hours & Format

Summer: 6 weeks - 6 hours of lecture and 6 hours of discussion per week

Additional Details

Subject/Course Level: Public Health/Undergraduate

Grading/Final exam status: Letter grade. Final exam required.

Instructors: Reingold, Colford

Global Health: A Multidisciplinary Examination: Read Less [-]

Terms offered: Summer 2021 Second 6 Week Session, Summer 2020 Second 6 Week Session
This lecture will provide an overview of the intersection between global health and social justice, with a specific focus on ways in which inequity, specifically conditions that lead to poverty, disproportionately affect health outcomes. Students will learn about historical and theoretical underpinnings of global health, how social and structural determinants affect health outcomes and policy, the principles of international law and health economics, and the structure of health delivery models. In the process, students will engage in topics related to social factors that impact health, including class, race, gender, and poverty. Class discussions will address contemporary global health priorities through the lens of human rights activism.
Introduction to Global Health Equity: Read More [+]

Objectives & Outcomes

Student Learning Outcomes: Critically analyze and critique key grassroots global health advocacy efforts and models 

Formulate comprehensive and equitable policy recommendations on global health cases
Think critically about and articulate the history, pathology, and causation of contemporary global health inequity
Utilize basic research methods and work collaboratively in a team setting to complete a group case project

Hours & Format

Summer: 6 weeks - 4 hours of lecture and 4 hours of discussion per week

Additional Details

Subject/Course Level: Public Health/Undergraduate

Grading/Final exam status: Letter grade. Final exam required.

Instructor: Le

Introduction to Global Health Equity: Read Less [-]

Terms offered: Spring 2022, Fall 2021, Spring 2021
This course offers an introduction to issues and perspectives related to health and medicine. Guest lecturers speak about the week’s topic, which can include a variety of topics such as public health, violence, chronic illnesses, environmental health, and health care economics. Speakers share their first-hand experiences in their fields, discuss current issues, debate ethical dilemmas, and pose and answer questions. During the weekly discussion sections, students delve deeper into the issues, not only exploring and perhaps questioning their own thoughts and beliefs, but also learning from the experiences and perspectives of their fellow students.
Seminar on Social, Political, and Ethical Issues in Health and Medicine: Read More [+]

Terms offered: Spring 2020, Spring 2019, Spring 2018
This course prepares students to conduct a 10-week global health research project in a low or middle-income country (LMIC); provides a background in global health, emphasizing infectious disease research, international research ethics, and the conduct of health research in low-resource settings. Leads students through the process of preparing for, conducting, and completing a short-term research project, with modules focused on cultural communication, the role and pace of research in these other countries, presentation preparation, project development, and troubleshooting skills; gaining perspective into the relationship between global health and health disparities in the USA
Introduction to Global Health Disparities Research: Read More [+]

Hours & Format

Fall and/or spring: 15 weeks - 2 hours of lecture per week

Additional Details

Subject/Course Level: Public Health/Undergraduate

Grading/Final exam status: Letter grade. Alternate method of final assessment during regularly scheduled final exam group (e.g., presentation, final project, etc.).

Instructor: Reingold

Also listed as: INTEGBI C195

Introduction to Global Health Disparities Research: Read Less [-]

Terms offered: Summer 2021 First 6 Week Session, Spring 2021, Summer 2020 First 6 Week Session
We will focus on low- and middle-income countries because they experience the greatest burden of malnutrition, and because they face a unique context of limited financial and government resources. In this course, we will discuss the effects of nutrition throughout the lifecycle in pregnancy, infancy, childhood, and adulthood. We will focus on nutrition broadly including issues of undernutrition, micronutrient deficiencies, and obesity. We will also analyze and evaluate actions taken to ameliorate the major nutritional problems facing vulnerable populations in low- and middle-income countries.
Nutrition in Developing Countries: Read More [+]

Hours & Format

Fall and/or spring: 15 weeks - 3 hours of lecture per week

Summer: 6 weeks - 8 hours of lecture per week

Additional Details

Subject/Course Level: Public Health/Undergraduate

Grading/Final exam status: Letter grade. Alternative to final exam.

Instructor: Fernald

Nutrition in Developing Countries: Read Less [-]

Terms offered: Spring 2021, Spring 2020, Spring 2019
This course focuses on a selected set of the major health policy issues and uses economics to uncover and better understand the issues. The course examines the scope for government intervention in health markets.
Health Economics and Public Policy: Read More [+]

Rules & Requirements

Prerequisites: Public Health major or consent of instructor

Hours & Format

Fall and/or spring: 15 weeks - 3 hours of lecture and 1 hour of discussion per week

Summer: 8 weeks - 6 hours of lecture and 2 hours of discussion per week

Additional Details

Subject/Course Level: Public Health/Undergraduate

Grading/Final exam status: Letter grade. Final exam required.

Instructor: Fulton

Health Economics and Public Policy: Read Less [-]

Terms offered: Fall 2021, Fall 2019, Fall 2017
The course will survey the field of the human brain, with introductory lectures on the concepts of aging, and brief surveys of normal neuroanatomy, neurophysiology, neurochemistry, and neuropsychology as well as methods such as imaging, epidemiology, and pathology. The neurobiological changes associated with aging will be covered from the same perspectives: neuropsychology, anatomy, biochemistry, and physiology. Major neurological diseases of aging including Alzheimer's and Parkinson's disease will be covered, as will compensatory mechanisms, neuroendocrine changes with aging, depression and aging, epidemiology of aging, and risk factors for decline.
The Aging Human Brain: Read More [+]

Hours & Format

Fall and/or spring: 15 weeks - 2 hours of lecture and 1 hour of discussion per week

Additional Details

Subject/Course Level: Public Health/Undergraduate

Grading/Final exam status: Letter grade. Final exam required, with common exam group.

Instructor: Jagust

The Aging Human Brain: Read Less [-]

Terms offered: Spring 2022, Spring 2021, Spring 2020
This course will give you the opportunity to build upon your understanding of the organization, financing and current policy issues of the US health care delivery system obtained in PH 150D. In this course you will become engaged health policy analysts, applying policy making tools (e.g., policy memos/briefs, legislative analysis, regulatory comments, media advocacy, public testimony) to actual health issues and problems. Through individual and group work, you will draw upon both verbal and written communication skills to effectuate health policy change.
Advanced Health Policy: Read More [+]

Rules & Requirements

Prerequisites: PH 150D: Introduction to Health Policy and Management

Hours & Format

Fall and/or spring: 15 weeks - 2 hours of lecture and 1 hour of discussion per week

Additional Details

Subject/Course Level: Public Health/Undergraduate

Grading/Final exam status: Letter grade. Alternative to final exam.

Instructor: Flagg

Advanced Health Policy: Read Less [-]

Terms offered: Fall 2021
Over the coming decades, data and algorithms will transform medicine and our health care system. Whether you plan to be a doctor, an algorithm developer, or a manager or policy maker in the health sector, this course will help you understand: (1) the tremendous upside of artificial intelligence for health, and (2) how well-intentioned efforts to apply these tools can do harm. The course will be quantitative (e.g., technical readings; problem sets requiring statistical software), and is designed for students with at least intermediate coursework in statistics, economics, computer science,etc.
Artificial Intelligence for Health and Healthcare: Read More [+]

Objectives & Outcomes

Course Objectives: Finally, students will learn to identify new unsolved problems where data and algorithms could improve health and medicine, and start to think about developing solutions.
Students will also come away with a list of several ‘red flags’ -- unique challenges of health data that make it difficult to apply algorithms that have been successful in other fields. This will help them become better and more critical consumers of literature and news in this area.
Students will learn about several problems in health care where artificial intelligence is helping doctors and policy makers.

Rules & Requirements

Prerequisites: An intermediate coursework in statistics (e.g., C100), economics(e.g., 100A/B), computer science(e.g., CS88), etc. is recommended

Hours & Format

Fall and/or spring: 15 weeks - 1.5 hours of lecture and 1.5 hours of discussion per week

Additional Details

Subject/Course Level: Public Health/Undergraduate

Grading/Final exam status: Letter grade. Alternative to final exam.

Instructor: Obermeyer

Artificial Intelligence for Health and Healthcare: Read Less [-]

Terms offered: Summer 2017 Second 6 Week Session, Summer 2016 10 Week Session, Summer 2016 Second 6 Week Session
An intensive introductory course in statistical methods used in applied research. Emphasis on principles of statistical reasoning, underlying assumptions, and careful interpretation of results. Topics covered: descriptive statistics, graphical displays of data, introduction to probability, expectations and variance of ramdom variables, confidence intervals and tests for means, differences of means, proportions, differences of proportions, chi-square tests for categorical variables, regression and multiple regression, an introduction to analysis of variance. Statistical software will be used to supplement hand calculation. Students who successfully complete Public Health 141 are prepared to continue their biostatistics course work in 200-level courses. With the approval of their degree program, MPH students may use Public Health 141 to fulfill the biostatistics course requirement (contact program manager for approval). Public Health 141 also fulfills the biostatistics course requirement for the Public Health Undergraduate Major.
Introduction to Biostatistics: Read More [+]

Rules & Requirements

Prerequisites: High school algebra

Hours & Format

Fall and/or spring: 15 weeks - 3 hours of lecture, 1 hour of discussion, and 2 hours of laboratory per week

Summer: 6 weeks - 12.5 hours of lecture and 7.5 hours of laboratory per week

Additional Details

Subject/Course Level: Public Health/Undergraduate

Grading/Final exam status: Letter grade. Final exam required.

Introduction to Biostatistics: Read Less [-]

Terms offered: Spring 2022, Fall 2021, Summer 2021 Second 6 Week Session
Descriptive statistics, probability, probability distributions, point and interval estimation, hypothesis testing, chi-square, correlation and regression with biomedical applications.
Introduction to Probability and Statistics in Biology and Public Health: Read More [+]

Rules & Requirements

Prerequisites: High school algebra

Hours & Format

Fall and/or spring: 15 weeks - 3 hours of lecture, 1 hour of discussion, and 1 hour of laboratory per week

Summer: 6 weeks - 7.5 hours of lecture, 2.5 hours of discussion, and 2.5 hours of laboratory per week

Additional Details

Subject/Course Level: Public Health/Undergraduate

Grading/Final exam status: Letter grade. Final exam required.

Instructor: Selvin

Introduction to Probability and Statistics in Biology and Public Health: Read Less [-]

Terms offered: Spring 2022, Spring 2021, Spring 2020
Descriptive statistics, probability, probability distributions, point and interval estimation, hypothesis testing, chi-square, correlation, and regression with biomedical applications.
Introduction to Probability and Statistics in Biology and Public Health: Read More [+]

Terms offered: Spring 2016, Spring 2015, Spring 2014
This course is intended to serve as an introduction to the SAS programming language for Windows in an applied, workshop environment. Emphasis is on data management and programming in a public health research setting. Topics include SAS language to compute, recode, label, and format variables as well as sort, subset, concatenate, and merge data sets. SAS statistical procedures will be used to compute univariate and bivariate summary statistics and tests, simple linear models,graphical plots, and statistical output data sets.
Introduction to SAS Programming: Read More [+]

Rules & Requirements

Prerequisites: 142 or consent of instructor

Credit Restrictions: This course (or equivalent) is required for students who plan to enroll in 251, Practicum in Epidemiological Methods. Enrollment is limited to School of Public Health students. If space permits, others may enroll with consent of instructor.

Hours & Format

Fall and/or spring: 8 weeks - 2 hours of lecture and 3 hours of laboratory per week

Additional Details

Subject/Course Level: Public Health/Undergraduate

Grading/Final exam status: Letter grade. Final exam required.

Instructor: Lein

Introduction to SAS Programming: Read Less [-]

Terms offered: Spring 2016, Spring 2015, Spring 2014
Topics include data step flow control, looping and automated processing, implicit and explicit arrays, data simulation strategies, data set reconfiguration, use of SAS Macro variables, and writing simple SAS Macro programs.
Intermediate SAS Programming: Read More [+]

Rules & Requirements

Prerequisites: 144A

Credit Restrictions: Enrollment is limited to School of Public Health students. If space permits, others may enroll with consent of instructor.

Hours & Format

Fall and/or spring: 8 weeks - 2 hours of lecture and 3 hours of laboratory per week

Additional Details

Subject/Course Level: Public Health/Undergraduate

Grading/Final exam status: Letter grade. Final exam required.

Instructor: Lein

Intermediate SAS Programming: Read Less [-]

Terms offered: Fall 2016, Fall 2015, Spring 2013
Regression models for continuous outcome data: least squares estimates and their properties, interpreting coefficients, prediction, comparing models, checking model assumptions, transformations, outliers, and influential points. Categorical explanatory variables: interaction and analysis of covariance, correlation and partial correlation. Appropriate graphical methods and statistical computing. Analysis of variance for one- and two-factor models: F tests, assumption checking, multiple comparisons. Random effects models and variance components. Introduction to repeated measures models.
Statistical Analysis of Continuous Outcome Data: Read More [+]

Rules & Requirements

Prerequisites: 142 or equivalent

Hours & Format

Fall and/or spring: 15 weeks - 3 hours of lecture and 2 hours of laboratory per week

Additional Details

Subject/Course Level: Public Health/Undergraduate

Grading/Final exam status: Letter grade. Final exam required.

Instructor: Lahiff

Formerly known as: 142B

Statistical Analysis of Continuous Outcome Data: Read Less [-]

Terms offered: Spring 2022, Spring 2021, Spring 2020
There are four facets to the course. 1) Core knowledge of the epidemiology of the major causes of vision loss globally 2) The role of ophthalmology and surgical interventions in global health 3) novel teaching methods in group dynamics, public speaking, video making, physician shadowing, surgery observation and leadership opportunities 4) Hands on public health work with an intervention, such as vision screening for the homeless. A multidisciplinary approach will be employed to study what interventions are taking place to alleviate the burden of ophthalmic disease.
Global Perspective on Vision: Read More [+]

Hours & Format

Fall and/or spring: 15 weeks - 2 hours of lecture per week

Additional Details

Subject/Course Level: Public Health/Undergraduate

Grading/Final exam status: Letter grade. Final exam required.

Instructor: Lee

Formerly known as: Public Health 247

Global Perspective on Vision: Read Less [-]

Terms offered: Spring 2022, Spring 2021, Spring 2020
This course introduces epidemiological methods with the goal of teaching students to read critically and interpret published epidemiologic studies in humans. The course also exposes students to the epidemiology of diseases and conditions of current public health importance in the United States and internationally.
Introduction to Epidemiology and Human Disease: Read More [+]

Rules & Requirements

Prerequisites: A course in statistics, preferably 142

Hours & Format

Fall and/or spring: 15 weeks - 4 hours of lecture and 1 hour of discussion per week

Additional Details

Subject/Course Level: Public Health/Undergraduate

Grading/Final exam status: Letter grade. Final exam required.

Instructors: Abrams, Barcellos, Buffler

Formerly known as: 150

Introduction to Epidemiology and Human Disease: Read Less [-]

Terms offered: Fall 2021, Fall 2020, Fall 2019
The course will present the major human and natural activities that lead to release of hazardous materials into the environment as well as the causal links between chemical, physical, and biological hazards in the environment and their impact on human health. The basic principles of toxicology will be presented including dose-response relationships, absorption, distribution, metabolism, and excretion of chemicals. The overall role of environmental risks in the pattern of human disease, both nationally and internationally, will be covered. The engineering and policy strategies, including risk assessment, used to evaluate and control these risks will be introduced.
Human Health and the Environment in a Changing World: Read More [+]

Terms offered: Fall 2021, Summer 2021 First 6 Week Session, Fall 2020
This course is intended to introduce students to health policy making and health care organizations in the United States. Students will be introduced to concepts from public policy, economics, organizational behavior, and political science. Students will also be introduced to current issues in U.S. health policy and the present organization of the U.S. health care system.
Introduction to Health Policy and Management: Read More [+]

Hours & Format

Fall and/or spring: 15 weeks - 3 hours of lecture and 1 hour of discussion per week

Summer:
6 weeks - 8 hours of lecture and 2 hours of discussion per week
8 weeks - 6 hours of lecture and 2 hours of discussion per week

Additional Details

Subject/Course Level: Public Health/Undergraduate

Grading/Final exam status: Letter grade. Final exam required.

Instructor: Flagg

Introduction to Health Policy and Management: Read Less [-]

Terms offered: Spring 2022, Spring 2021, Spring 2020
This course will consist of a survey of the major social, cultural, and bio-behavioral patterns of health and well-being among individuals, families, neighborhoods, and communities. The course also will address the design, implementation, and evaluation of leading social and behavioral interventions and social policies designed to improve community and population health. This course will satisfy one of the core requirements for the undergraduate major in public health.
Introduction to Community Health and Human Development: Read More [+]

Rules & Requirements

Prerequisites: Third or fourth undergraduate standing or consent of instructor

Requirements this course satisfies: Satisfies the American Cultures requirement

Hours & Format

Fall and/or spring: 15 weeks - 3 hours of lecture and 1 hour of discussion per week

Additional Details

Subject/Course Level: Public Health/Undergraduate

Grading/Final exam status: Letter grade. Final exam required.

Instructor: Satariano

Introduction to Community Health and Human Development: Read Less [-]

Terms offered: Summer 2021 First 6 Week Session, Summer 2020 First 6 Week Session
The course will present the major human and natural activities that lead to release of hazardous materials into the environment as well as the causal links between chemical, physical, and biological hazards in the environment and their impact on human health. The basic principles of toxicology, microbial ecology, GIS, exposure assessment and risk assessment among others, are covered. The overall role of environmental risks in the pattern of human disease, both nationally and internationally, are covered. The policy strategies, used to evaluate and control these risks are discussed.
Human Health and the Environment in a Changing World: Read More [+]

Objectives & Outcomes

Student Learning Outcomes: 1.
Ability to describe the basic model of environmental health.
2.
Ability to demonstrate an understanding of environmental health sciences (EHS) core areas: toxicology, microbial ecology, GIS, exposure assessment, risk assessment and environmental epidemiology at a basic level.
3.
Demonstration of oral and written communication skills in the context of environmental health sciences.
4.
Ability to describe methods used to mitigate or control adverse health impacts from environmental hazards.
5.
Demonstrate proficiency in finding primary literature sources in search engines such PubMed and WebofScience and manage citations using Zotero or equivalent software.

Hours & Format

Summer: 6 weeks - 8 hours of lecture and 1 hour of discussion per week

Additional Details

Subject/Course Level: Public Health/Undergraduate

Grading/Final exam status: Letter grade. Alternative to final exam.

Instructor: Smith

Human Health and the Environment in a Changing World: Read Less [-]

Terms offered: Fall 2021, Fall 2020
This applied course will help students understand how to conduct and interpret research in human health and disease, building on knowledge of epidemiology and biostatistics. The course will provide skills in: critically reading the literature related to public-health-related research, developing a research question and a testable hypothesis creating an analysis plan, applied statistical analysis of epidemiologic data, developing a research protocol for human subjects research, and case-based approaches to health issues.
Senior Research Seminar in Public Health: Read More [+]

Objectives & Outcomes

Course Objectives: 1.
Develop and define a research question.
10.
Conduct case-based analysis in areas of public health and medicine.
2.
Be proficient in finding primary literature sources and managing literature citations using bibliographic management software (such as EndNote, RefWorks, or Zoltero).
3.
Be able to critically interpret information from peer reviewed medical, public health or social science literature.
4.
Know basic data management skills and have working knowledge of R.
5.
Know how to appropriately visualize data & select appropriate statistical tests.
6.
Be able to execute & interpret basic statistical tests in R (bivariate, non-regression).
7.
Be able to execute & interpret regression analyses in R (bivariate & multivariate).
8.
Develop a research protocol and consent form for study of human subjects.
9.
Be familiar with laboratory, analytic, survey/questionnaire and other methods used in human research.

Student Learning Outcomes: LEARN: Laboratory, analytic, survey/questionnaire and other methods used in human research.
SKILLS: Be able to critically interpret information from peer reviewed medical, public health or social science literature.
SKILLS: Be proficient in finding primary literature sources and managing literature citations using bibliographic management software (such as EndNote, RefWorks, or Zoltero).
SKILLS: Develop a research protocol for study of human subjects.
SKILLS: Develop and define a research question/write Specific Aims.
SKILLS: Learn basic data management skills and have working knowledge of R software in research.

Rules & Requirements

Prerequisites: Completion of PH 142 and PH 150A (or approval from instructors). Note, it is expected that capstone students will be 4th year graduating seniors, unless otherwise given permission to enroll by the course instructors. It is expected that capstone students will have no more than two Public Health Major core course to complete at time of enrollment

Repeat rules: Course may be repeated for credit with instructor consent.

Hours & Format

Fall and/or spring: 15 weeks - 2 hours of lecture per week

Additional Details

Subject/Course Level: Public Health/Undergraduate

Grading/Final exam status: Letter grade. Alternate method of final assessment during regularly scheduled final exam group (e.g., presentation, final project, etc.).

Instructors: Barcellos, Madsen

Senior Research Seminar in Public Health: Read Less [-]

Terms offered: Summer 2021 Second 6 Week Session, Summer 2020 Second 6 Week Session
The course will provide core knowledge and skills from several disciplines on how to improve women's health and well-being globally. It aims to expand students’ understanding of the interconnected factors that influence women’s health and empowerment - including foundations of sexual and reproductive health, economic development, political frameworks and global reproductive rights, demographic and social changes, basic principles of empowerment theory, educational opportunities, and advances in gender equality.
The sessions follow a life course framework, and will be taught in a seminar style with plenty of opportunities for group discussions and case studies.

Women's Global Health and Empowerment: Read More [+]

Objectives & Outcomes

Student Learning Outcomes: 1.
Identify and analyze gender inequities in health care needs and access to care.
10.
Analyze the contrasting perspectives and changing paradigms among epidemiologists, public health experts, demographers, economists, human rights activists and development specialists related to women’s health and empowerment.
11.
Explain the major theories of gender, sexuality and power.
12.
Demonstrate foundational knowledge of female anatomy, physiology and health conditions when discussing broader issues of women’s health and empowerment.
2.
Explain the ways in which social, economic, and cultural factors can both promote and impede women’s and girls’ health.
3.
Examine how girls’ education contributes to individual, community, and national development.
4.
Critically examine how gender and women’s empowerment is addressed in the Sustainable Development Goals and other development frameworks.
5.
Evaluate case studies of interventions designed to improve women’s health and empowerment in differing cultural and national contexts and recommend improvements.
6.
Compare macro level political, institutional, and structural factors that differentially influence men’s and women’s health and empowerment in relation to local, cultural, and regional contexts.
7.
Identify the major institutions and non-governmental organizations that influence women’s health and empowerment and suitable approaches for implementing interventions to ensure gender equity.
8.
Assess the impact of women’s health on advances in other sectors including child health, education, economic development, and social stability.
9.
Analyze case studies applying the relevant historical context of politics, policies, and laws related to women’s health and human rights.

Hours & Format

Summer: 6 weeks - 6-6 hours of lecture per week

Additional Details

Subject/Course Level: Public Health/Undergraduate

Grading/Final exam status: Letter grade. Alternate method of final assessment during regularly scheduled final exam group (e.g., presentation, final project, etc.).

Instructors: Hemmerling, Decker, Dunning

Women's Global Health and Empowerment: Read Less [-]

Terms offered: Summer 2021 First 6 Week Session
Course covers global Public Health effects of war in context of war's destruction of the health care infrastructure within the Social Ecological framework. Topics include war’s impact on infectious disease & as barrier to control of vaccine-preventable diseases; maternal child health; health of those displaced; psychosocial toll & environmental health consequences. Curriculum focuses on ongoing global conflicts & ramifications of U.S. wars in Iraq and Afghanistan, includes modules focusing on public health prevention approach to war & research methods for studying health outcomes in conflict zones. Students work in teams & apply the course material to a specific war that they will follow. Panel discussions to feature veterans & refugees.
War and Public Health: Read More [+]

Objectives & Outcomes

Course Objectives: The course will provide students with a foundation on which they can build their own line of future inquiry exploring how war impacts public health.
The objectives of this course include providing students a new paradigm through which they can identify the sustained impact of armed conflict on communities, families and individuals, and understand that those effects linger long after the dead are buried or buildings are reconstructed.

Student Learning Outcomes: Finally, they will be able to evaluate how public health’s prevention approach can be applied to armed conflict.
In addition, students should be able to place the public health effects of war within the Social Ecological framework.
Moreover, upon completion of the course, students should be able to explain the effects of war on environmental health, nutrition and psychological health.
Students should also be able to explain how war can prevent control of infectious diseases, has contributed to outbreaks or re-emergence of diseases that were previously eliminated, and has prevented the eradication of vaccine preventable diseases.
Students who take the course will apply critical thought to media reports about community violence or adverse health and place them in the framework of the public health consequences of war.
The learning outcomes of the course include the ability to explain how war’s destruction of the health care infrastructure impedes Public Health’s mission globally — particularly in war zones in low-resource countries — and how war has also impacted Public Health in US communities.

Hours & Format

Summer: 6 weeks - 6 hours of lecture per week

Additional Details

Subject/Course Level: Public Health/Undergraduate

Grading/Final exam status: Final exam required.

Instructor: Lubens

War and Public Health: Read Less [-]

Terms offered: Spring 2022, Summer 2020 First 6 Week Session, Spring 2019, Summer 2018 First 6 Week Session, Spring 2018, Summer 2017 First 6 Week Session
This course covers several topics, including distributive justice in health care, the organization and politics of the health system, the correlates of health (by race, sex, class, income), pandemics (e.g., AIDS, Avian Flu and other influenzas, etc.), and the experience of illness and interactions with doctors and the medical system.
Sociology of Health and Medicine: Read More [+]

Rules & Requirements

Prerequisites: Sociology 1, 3, 3AC or consent of instructor

Credit Restrictions: Students will receive no credit for Sociology C115 after taking Sociology 155, Sociology C155/Public Health C155. A deficient grade in Sociology 155 may be removed by taking Sociology C115/Public Health C155.

Hours & Format

Fall and/or spring: 15 weeks - 3-3 hours of lecture and 0-2 hours of discussion per week

Summer:
6 weeks - 7.5-7.5 hours of lecture and 0-2 hours of discussion per week
8 weeks - 6-6 hours of lecture and 0-2 hours of discussion per week

Additional Details

Subject/Course Level: Public Health/Undergraduate

Grading/Final exam status: Letter grade. Final exam required.

Also listed as: SOCIOL C115

Sociology of Health and Medicine: Read Less [-]

Terms offered: Fall 2021
This capstone course will enhance student preparation to be effective public health practitioners and leaders through application of core knowledge, strengthening essential professional skills and development of post-graduation career and graduate education plans. Students will tackle real-world public health cases and emerging local challenges to enhance essential problem solving and innovation skills. Students will also enhance key communication, team and project skills. Through these activities, students will strengthen their ability to lead themselves, work effectively with others and lead health improvement.
Preparation for Public Health Practice and Leadership Seminar: Read More [+]

Objectives & Outcomes

Course Objectives: Through lecture, readings, and course activities, students will develop the capacity to:

Apply public health knowledge acquired in core courses to case-based scenarios.


Analyze the impact of a public health problem on a community/population level.

Develop and apply innovative approaches to addressing public health issues and present recommendations.

Develop interpersonal skill building, conflict resolution, and practical problem-solving skills.

Enhance oral and written communication and other key skills necessary for effectiveness as a professional and in demand by employers including: project management, human centered design and process improvement.

Increase knowledge of public health career and graduate education options and how to choose a path.

Prepare career-related materials. Strengthen interviewing and networking skills.

Strengthen effectiveness at working in teams to address public health challenges.

Rules & Requirements

Prerequisites: Completion/concurrent enrollment of Public Health Major core courses: PH142, PH150A, PH150B, and P150D. Note, it is expected that capstone students will be 4th year graduating seniors, unless otherwise given permission to enroll by the Course Instructor. It is expected that capstone students will have no more than two Public Health Major core course to complete at time of enrollment

Hours & Format

Fall and/or spring: 15 weeks - 2 hours of lecture per week

Additional Details

Subject/Course Level: Public Health/Undergraduate

Grading/Final exam status: Letter grade. Alternate method of final assessment during regularly scheduled final exam group (e.g., presentation, final project, etc.).

Instructor: Williams

Preparation for Public Health Practice and Leadership Seminar: Read Less [-]

Terms offered: Spring 2022, Summer 2021 Second 6 Week Session, Spring 2021
The health effects of environmental alterations caused by development programs and other human activities in both developing and developed areas. Case studies will contextualize methodological information and incorporate a global perspective on environmentally mediated diseases in diverse populations. Topics include water management; population change; toxics; energy development; air pollution; climate change; chemical use, etc.
Environmental Health and Development: Read More [+]

Hours & Format

Fall and/or spring: 15 weeks - 3 hours of lecture and 1 hour of discussion per week

Summer: 6 weeks - 6.5 hours of lecture and 2 hours of discussion per week

Additional Details

Subject/Course Level: Public Health/Undergraduate

Grading/Final exam status: Letter grade. Final exam required.

Instructor: Morello-Frosch

Also listed as: ESPM C167

Environmental Health and Development: Read Less [-]

Terms offered: Fall 2021, Summer 2021 Second 6 Week Session, Fall 2020
Introduction to properties of microorganisms; their relationships with humans in causing infectious diseases and in maintaining health. With 162L, satisfies most requirements for a laboratory course in microbiology. May be taken without 162L.
Public Health Microbiology: Read More [+]

Rules & Requirements

Prerequisites: One year each of college-level biology and chemistry

Hours & Format

Fall and/or spring: 15 weeks - 3 hours of lecture and 1 hour of discussion per week

Summer: 6 weeks - 8 hours of lecture and 2 hours of discussion per week

Additional Details

Subject/Course Level: Public Health/Undergraduate

Grading/Final exam status: Letter grade. Final exam required.

Instructors: Harris, Liu, Stanley

Public Health Microbiology: Read Less [-]

Terms offered: Fall 2021, Fall 2020, Fall 2019
This laboratory course was designed to accompany PH162A, Public Health microbiology. The primary emphasis in the laboratory will be on properties of microorganisms, particularly those that cause infectious disease in humans. Examples will be presented of laboratory applications of microbiology and immunology as they relate to the diagnosis and treatment of disease, and control of the environment to prevent transmission of infectious agents.
Public Health Microbiology Laboratory: Read More [+]

Rules & Requirements

Prerequisites: College level courses in elementary biology and chemistry. PH162a (can be taken concurrently)

Hours & Format

Fall and/or spring: 15 weeks - 2.5 hours of laboratory and 1 hour of lecture per week

Summer:
6 weeks - 8 hours of laboratory and 2 hours of lecture per week
8 weeks - 5 hours of laboratory and 2 hours of lecture per week

Additional Details

Subject/Course Level: Public Health/Undergraduate

Grading/Final exam status: Letter grade. Final exam required.

Instructor: Liu

Public Health Microbiology Laboratory: Read Less [-]

Terms offered: Spring 2022, Spring 2021, Spring 2020
The course covers monitoring, control and regulatory policy of microbial, chemical and radiological drinking water contaminants. Additional subjects include history and iconography of safe water, communicating risks to water consumers and a bottled water versus tap water taste test as part of the discussion on aesthetic water quality parameters. A field trip to a local water treatment plant in included.
Drinking Water and Health: Read More [+]

Objectives & Outcomes

Student Learning Outcomes: By the end of this course, students will be expected to:
Recognize the global occurrence of waterborne contaminants and related health impacts.
Understand water quality monitoring and control of key water quality constituents.
Appreciate the complexities of the regulatory process as it pertains to public drinking water systems in the US and abroad.
Read and synthesize published and unpublished sources of information regarding drinking water and health. Prepare a literature review in journal submission format.

Hours & Format

Fall and/or spring: 15 weeks - 3 hours of lecture per week

Additional Details

Subject/Course Level: Public Health/Undergraduate

Grading/Final exam status: Letter grade. Alternative to final exam.

Instructor: Smith

Drinking Water and Health: Read Less [-]

Terms offered: Summer 2021 8 Week Session
Course is to familiarize students with principles, methods, & techniques necessary to apply GIS in public health settings. Weekly readings, discussions, case studies are presented to introduce application of GIS technologies; maps for visualizing clusters, mobile phone-Apps for data collection, & spatial analyses such as proximity analysis or site suitability. Course includes assignments aimed & acquiring experience on the use of GIS for infectious disease control, disease cluster detection, environmental justice, health services data mapping, & spatial risk assessment. Culminating project: Story Map where students use maps they’ve created as well as additional narrative text images & optional videos for community health education or policy
Applied GIS for Public Health: Read More [+]

Objectives & Outcomes

Sours: http://guide.berkeley.edu/courses/pb_hlth/
course enrollment @ uc berkeley -- enrolling at cal (old version)

Courses

Terms offered: Spring 2022, Spring 2021, Spring 2020
Students in this course will critically examine modern methods of biological investigations and their social implications. Relevant literature will be used to present basic biological concepts that address the cultural, technological and health aspects of current topics in the biological sciences. Designing and evaluating scientific questions will be stressed.
Current Topics in the Biological Sciences: Read More [+]

Rules & Requirements

Prerequisites: Suitable for freshmen who plan to major in a biological science

Repeat rules: Course may be repeated for credit when topic changes.

Hours & Format

Fall and/or spring: 15 weeks - 2 hours of lecture and 1 hour of discussion per week

Additional Details

Subject/Course Level: Molecular and Cell Biology/Undergraduate

Grading/Final exam status: Letter grade. Final exam not required.

Instructor: Matsui

Current Topics in the Biological Sciences: Read Less [-]

Terms offered: Spring 2014, Spring 2012
An introduction for students who do not intend to major in biology but who wish to satisfy their breadth requirement in Biological Sciences. Some major concepts of modern biology, ranging from the role of DNA and the way cells communicate, to interactions of cells and creatures with their environment, will be discussed without jargon and with attention to their relevance in contemporary life and culture.
Big Ideas in Cell Biology: Read More [+]

Hours & Format

Fall and/or spring: 15 weeks - 2 hours of lecture and 1 hour of discussion per week

Additional Details

Subject/Course Level: Molecular and Cell Biology/Undergraduate

Grading/Final exam status: Letter grade. Final exam required.

Instructor: Wilt

Also listed as: L & S C30X

Big Ideas in Cell Biology: Read Less [-]

Terms offered: Fall 2021, Summer 2021 8 Week Session, Fall 2020
A comprehensive introduction to human biology. The course will concentrate on basic mechanisms underlying human life processes, including cells and membranes; nerve and muscle function; cardiovascular, respiratory, renal, and gastrointestinal physiology; metabolism, endocrinology, and reproduction.
Introduction to Human Physiology: Read More [+]

Rules & Requirements

Prerequisites: One year high school or college chemistry

Hours & Format

Fall and/or spring: 15 weeks - 3 hours of lecture and 1 hour of discussion per week

Summer: 8 weeks - 6 hours of lecture and 2 hours of discussion per week

Additional Details

Subject/Course Level: Molecular and Cell Biology/Undergraduate

Grading/Final exam status: Letter grade. Final exam required.

Instructor: Ball

Introduction to Human Physiology: Read Less [-]

Terms offered: Fall 2021, Summer 2021 Second 6 Week Session, Fall 2020
Experiments and demonstrations are designed to amplify and reinforce information presented in 32. Exercises include investigations into the structure and function of muscle, nerve, cardiovascular, renal, respiratory, endocrine, and blood systems.
Introduction to Human Physiology Laboratory: Read More [+]

Rules & Requirements

Prerequisites: 32 or may be taken concurrently

Hours & Format

Fall and/or spring: 15 weeks - 1 hour of lecture and 3 hours of laboratory per week

Summer:
6 weeks - 2 hours of lecture and 8 hours of laboratory per week
8 weeks - 2 hours of lecture and 6 hours of laboratory per week

Additional Details

Subject/Course Level: Molecular and Cell Biology/Undergraduate

Grading/Final exam status: Letter grade. Final exam not required.

Instructor: Ball

Introduction to Human Physiology Laboratory: Read Less [-]

Terms offered: Spring 2022, Spring 2021, Spring 2020
Innovations in bioengineering and use of stem cells will significantly impact our ability to combat human disease, genetic disorders and physiological dysfunction. An understanding of human stem cell biology will be critical to make informed decisions on our health and public policy.
Stem Cell Biology, Ethics and Societal Impact: Read More [+]

Rules & Requirements

Repeat rules: Course may be repeated for credit with instructor consent.

Hours & Format

Fall and/or spring: 15 weeks - 3 hours of lecture and 1 hour of discussion per week

Additional Details

Subject/Course Level: Molecular and Cell Biology/Undergraduate

Grading/Final exam status: Letter grade. Final exam required.

Instructors: Firestone, Ball

Stem Cell Biology, Ethics and Societal Impact: Read Less [-]

Terms offered: Spring 2016, Spring 2013, Summer 2012 8 Week Session
Basic communication of inheritance; gene mapping; gene expression and genetic disease in animals and humans; social inheritance of genetics.
Genetics and Society: Read More [+]

Rules & Requirements

Prerequisites: Primarily for students not specializing in biology

Credit Restrictions: Students will receive no credit for Molecular and Cell Biology 41 after completing Biology 1A, Biology 1B, or Letters and Science 18.

Hours & Format

Fall and/or spring: 15 weeks - 2 hours of lecture and 1 hour of discussion per week

Summer:
6 weeks - 7.5 hours of lecture per week
8 weeks - 6 hours of lecture and 2 hours of discussion per week

Additional Details

Subject/Course Level: Molecular and Cell Biology/Undergraduate

Grading/Final exam status: Letter grade. Final exam required.

Genetics and Society: Read Less [-]

Terms offered: Spring 2017, Spring 2015, Spring 2014
This is a Discovery Course for non-Biology majors designed to introduce lower-division college students to biology through the lens of the contemporary problems facing people, the planet and the species of the planet. Modern genetic contributions will be presented on such issues as genetic engineering of plants and animals, the emergence of new pathogens, the role of genetic variation among individuals, and the extent to which DNA is and isn’t destiny. Each week will close with the presentation and discussion of a defining biological challenge facing the world.
Biology for Voters: Read More [+]

Objectives & Outcomes

Student Learning Outcomes: The learning objectives will be, at one end, to understand what an experiment is, how is it controlled and what does one need to know about an experiment to be able to rely upon any conclusion. That is the fundamental issue in all science, and is frequently overlooked in many media accounts of science. A second objective is to learn enough of the language of biology to be able to ask the kind of informed questions that we would want all elected representatives to pay attention to. A third objective is for students to cultivate confidence that through non-specialized information sources they can become informed consumers of contemporary scientific thought, and to develop those habits of intellect to think about evidence in a scientific manner. A fourth objective is for students to enjoy the abundance of high quality books, articles and multimedia that will enable a lifetime of discovery outside the structure of a college course.

Hours & Format

Fall and/or spring: 15 weeks - 3 hours of lecture and 1 hour of discussion per week

Additional Details

Subject/Course Level: Molecular and Cell Biology/Undergraduate

Grading/Final exam status: Letter grade. Final exam required.

Instructors: Rine, Urnov

Also listed as: L & S C30Y

Biology for Voters: Read Less [-]

Terms offered: Spring 2022, Spring 2021, Spring 2020
Course will discuss how the immune system resolves, prevents, or causes disease. A general overview of the immune system will be covered in the first five weeks followed by five weeks discussing infectious diseases including anthrax, mad cow, herpes, malaria, tuberculosis, and HIV. In addition, other lectures will focus on current immunology topics including vaccines, autoimmunity, allergy, transplantation, and cancer.
The Immune System and Disease: Read More [+]

Rules & Requirements

Prerequisites: High school chemistry or Chemistry 1A and high school biology or Biology 1A. Biology 1AL is not required

Credit Restrictions: Students will receive no credit for Molecular and Cell Biology 50 after completing Molecular and Cell Biology 102, C100A/Chemistry C130, or Chemistry 135.

Hours & Format

Fall and/or spring: 15 weeks - 3 hours of lecture and 1 hour of discussion per week

Additional Details

Subject/Course Level: Molecular and Cell Biology/Undergraduate

Grading/Final exam status: Letter grade. Final exam required.

Instructor: Beatty

The Immune System and Disease: Read Less [-]

Terms offered: Fall 2021, Fall 2020, Fall 2019
Discussion of how infectious agents cause disease and impact society at large. We will examine historical and current examples of plagues and pandemics and consider the question of what we should do to ameliorate the impact of infectious disease in the future. The course is intended for non-majors and will begin by briefly providing necessary background in microbiology and immunology. The primary focus in each subsequent week, however, will be on discussing a particular infectious disease. The course will be broad in scope covering biological, historical, ethical and social implications of each disease.
Plagues and Pandemics: Read More [+]

Rules & Requirements

Credit Restrictions: Students will receive no credit for Molecular and Cell Biology 55 after completing Molecular and Cell Biology 100, C100A/Chemistry C130,, 100B, 102, 103, C103/Plant and Microbial Biology C103/Public Health C102, 150, or Chemistry 135.

Hours & Format

Fall and/or spring: 15 weeks - 3 hours of lecture per week

Additional Details

Subject/Course Level: Molecular and Cell Biology/Undergraduate

Grading/Final exam status: Letter grade. Final exam required.

Instructors: Beatty, Vance

Plagues and Pandemics: Read Less [-]

Terms offered: Spring 2022, Spring 2021, Spring 2020
Introduction to human brain mechanisms of sensation, movement, perception, thinking, learning, memory, and emotion in terms of anatomy, physiology, and chemistry of the nervous system in health and disease. Intended for students in the humanities and social sciences and others not majoring in the biological sciences.
Brain, Mind, and Behavior: Read More [+]

Rules & Requirements

Credit Restrictions: Students will receive no credit for Molecular and Cell Biology/Psychology C61 after taking Molecular and Cell Biology 61, N61, W61, Molecular and Cell Biology 104, C100A/Chemistry C130, Molecular and Cell Biology 110, 130A, 136, 160, C160/Neuroscience C160 or Integrative Biology 132. A deficient grade in Molecular and Cell Biology 61, N61, or W61 can be removed with Molecular and Cell Biology C61. Students cannot credit for both MCELLBI/PSYCH C61 AND Psych 110.

Hours & Format

Fall and/or spring: 15 weeks - 3 hours of lecture and 1 hour of discussion per week

Additional Details

Subject/Course Level: Molecular and Cell Biology/Undergraduate

Grading/Final exam status: Letter grade. Final exam required.

Instructor: Presti

Also listed as: PSYCH C61

Brain, Mind, and Behavior: Read Less [-]

Terms offered: Summer 2021 First 6 Week Session, Summer 2020 First 6 Week Session, Summer 2019 First 6 Week Session
This course deals with the structure and function of the human nervous system, with an emphasis on how brain physiology and chemistry are related to human behavior. This is a comprehensive introduction to the exciting field of contemporary neuroscience for students of all backgrounds and interests, including those from the humanities and social sciences, as well as physical and biological sciences. The Final Examination will be administered in a proctored setting. See Schedule of Classes for meeting information. This course is web-based.
Brain, Mind, and Behavior: Read More [+]

Rules & Requirements

Credit Restrictions: Students will receive no credit for MCELLBI/PSYCH W61 after taking MCELLBI 61, N61, C61, MCELLBI 104, C100A/Chemistry C130, MCELLBI 110, 130A, 136, 160, C160/Neuroscience C160 or Integrative Biology 132. A deficient grade in MCELLBI 61, N61, OR C61 can be removed with W61. Students cannot credit for both MCELLBI/PSYCH C61 AND Psych 110.

Hours & Format

Summer: 6 weeks - 7 hours of web-based lecture and 2.5 hours of web-based discussion per week

Online: This is an online course.

Additional Details

Subject/Course Level: Molecular and Cell Biology/Undergraduate

Grading/Final exam status: Letter grade. Final exam required.

Instructor: Presti

Brain, Mind, and Behavior: Read Less [-]

Terms offered: Fall 2020, Fall 2019, Fall 2018
The history, chemical nature, botanical origins, and effects on the human brain and behavior of drugs such as stimulants, depressants, psychedelics, analgesics, antidepressants, antipsychotics, steroids, and other psychoactive substances of both natural and synthetic origin. The necessary biological, chemical, and psychological background material for understanding the content of this course will be contained within the course itself.
Drugs and the Brain: Read More [+]

Rules & Requirements

Credit Restrictions: Students will receive no credit for Molecular and Cell Biology C62/Letters and Science C30T after completing Molecular and Cell Biology C100A/Chemistry C130, 104, 110, 130, 136, 160 Integrative Biology 132.

Hours & Format

Fall and/or spring: 15 weeks - 3 hours of lecture and 1 hour of discussion per week

Summer: 8 weeks - 4.5 hours of lecture and 2 hours of discussion per week

Additional Details

Subject/Course Level: Molecular and Cell Biology/Undergraduate

Grading/Final exam status: Letter grade. Final exam not required.

Instructor: Presti

Also listed as: L & S C30T

Drugs and the Brain: Read Less [-]

Terms offered: Summer 2021 Second 6 Week Session, Summer 2020 Second 6 Week Session, Summer 2019 Second 6 Week Session
This course emphasizes beginning anatomy of the brain and spinal cord to individuals interested in understanding the dynamics of motor and sensory functions in the human body. Students in the Departments of Education, Psychology, and Integrative Biology, as well as students interested in medicine and the life sciences, are especially encouraged to attend.
Introduction to Functional Neuroanatomy: Read More [+]

Rules & Requirements

Credit Restrictions: Students will receive no credit for Molecular and Cell Biology 63 after completing Molecular and Cell Biology 104, C100A/Chemistry C130, Molecular and Cell Biology 110, 130A, 136, 160, 161, C160/Neuroscience C160 or Integrative Biology 132.

Hours & Format

Summer:
4 weeks - 12 hours of lecture per week
6 weeks - 7.5 hours of lecture per week
8 weeks - 6 hours of lecture per week

Additional Details

Subject/Course Level: Molecular and Cell Biology/Undergraduate

Grading/Final exam status: Letter grade. Final exam required.

Introduction to Functional Neuroanatomy: Read Less [-]

Terms offered: Summer 2019 Second 6 Week Session
This lab course is an introduction to mammalian neuroanatomy for non-MCB majors. We will do dissections, explore physical anatomical models, and observe microscopic structures within preserved brain slices from a variety of mammalian species. The hands-on exploration of anatomy is key to understanding how the different functional regions of the nervous system are interconnected. Besides gaining a better understanding of anatomy, you will gain important scientific skills such as conducting parts of a neurological exam, fluorescent and light microscopy, reading MRI scans and conducting fine dissections. The course will culminate with a group project using the online Allen Brain Atlas to investigate a novel scientific question.
Introduction to Neuroanatomy Lab: Read More [+]

Rules & Requirements

Prerequisites:MCELLBI 63 (may be taken concurrently) or equivalent

Credit Restrictions: Students will receive no credit for Molecular and Cell Biology 63L after taking Molecular and Cell Biology 160L or 163L

Hours & Format

Summer: 6 weeks - 8 hours of laboratory per week

Additional Details

Subject/Course Level: Molecular and Cell Biology/Undergraduate

Grading/Final exam status: Letter grade. Alternative to final exam.

Instructor: Ball

Introduction to Neuroanatomy Lab: Read Less [-]

Terms offered: Summer 2021 8 Week Session, Summer 2020 8 Week Session, Summer 2019 8 Week Session
This course will introduce lower division undergraduates to the fundamentals of neuroscience. The first part of the course covers basic membrane properties, synapses, action potentials, chemical and electrical synaptic interactions, receptor potentials, and receptor proteins. The second part of the course covers networks in invertebrates, memory and learning behavior, modulation, vertebrate brain and spinal cord, retina, visual cortex architecture, hierarchy, development, and higher cortical centers.
Exploring the Brain: Introduction to Neuroscience: Read More [+]

Rules & Requirements

Prerequisites: High school chemistry or Chemistry 1A; high school biology or Biology 1A. Biology 1AL is not required

Credit Restrictions: Students will receive no credit for Molecular and Cell Biology/Psychology C64 after taking Molecular and Cell Biology C61/Letters and Science C30W, Molecular and Cell Biology C104, 100A/Chemistry C130, Molecular and Cell Biology 110, 130A, 136, 160, C160/Neuroscience C160, or Integrative Biology 132. Students may remove a deficient grade in Molecular and Cell Biology C64/Psychology C64 after Molecular and Cell Biology 64.

Hours & Format

Fall and/or spring: 15 weeks - 2 hours of lecture and 1 hour of discussion per week

Summer: 8 weeks - 4 hours of lecture and 2 hours of discussion per week

Additional Details

Subject/Course Level: Molecular and Cell Biology/Undergraduate

Grading/Final exam status: Letter grade. Final exam required.

Instructor: Caporale

Also listed as: PSYCH C64

Exploring the Brain: Introduction to Neuroscience: Read Less [-]

Terms offered: Spring 2019
This course offers an introduction to the field of biotechnology and will cover the history of the field, its impact on medicine and society, key methodologies, important therapeutic areas, and the range of career options available in the biopharmaceutical industry. In addition to lectures on innovation and entrepreneurship, students will hear from lecturers with expertise ranging from molecular biology to clinical trial design and interpretation. Several case studies of historically impactful scientists, entrepreneurs, and biotherapeutic companies will be presented. Students will work in teams to create and develop novel biotechnology company ideas to present in class. Intended for students interested in the Biology+Business program.
Introduction to the Biotechnology Field and Industry: Read More [+]

Hours & Format

Fall and/or spring: 15 weeks - 2 hours of lecture per week

Additional Details

Subject/Course Level: Molecular and Cell Biology/Undergraduate

Grading/Final exam status: Offered for pass/not pass grade only. Alternative to final exam.

Instructors: Kirn, Lasky

Formerly known as: Molecular and Cell Biology C95B/Undergrad. Business Administration C95B

Also listed as: UGBA C95B

Introduction to the Biotechnology Field and Industry: Read Less [-]

Terms offered: Fall 2013, Spring 2013, Fall 2012
Sophomore seminars are small interactive courses offered by faculty members in departments all across the campus. Sophomore seminars offer opportunity for close, regular intellectual contact between faculty members and students in the crucial second year. The topics vary from department to department and semester to semester. Enrollment limited to 15 sophomores.
Sophomore Seminar: Read More [+]

Rules & Requirements

Prerequisites: At discretion of instructor

Repeat rules: Course may be repeated for credit without restriction.

Hours & Format

Fall and/or spring: 15 weeks - 1-2 hours of seminar per week

Summer:
6 weeks - 4-6 hours of seminar per week
8 weeks - 3-4 hours of seminar per week

Additional Details

Subject/Course Level: Molecular and Cell Biology/Undergraduate

Grading/Final exam status: The grading option will be decided by the instructor when the class is offered. Final exam required.

Sophomore Seminar: Read Less [-]

Terms offered: Spring 2018, Spring 2017
We will work with a variety of datasets that describe a molecular view of cells and how they divide. We will learn about the processes that cause cells to become specialized (differentiate) and to give rise to cancer (transform). We will analyze data on genetic mutations in cancer that distinguish tumor cells from normal cells. We will learn how mutations are detected by the immune system and the basis of cancer immunotherapy. Finally we will analyze data on clinical trials of cancer immunotherapy to define the correlates of success in curing the disease. The students are expected to gain an understanding of data that reveals the basics of cell physiology and cancer, how immunotherapies of cancer work and their current limitations.
Immunotherapy of Cancer: Success and Failures: Read More [+]

Terms offered: Fall 2020, Fall 2019, Fall 2018
The Berkeley Seminar Program has been designed to provide new students with the opportunity to explore an intellectual topic with a faculty member in a small-seminar setting. Berkeley Seminars are offered in all campus departments, and topics vary from department to department and semester to semester. Final assessment to be decided by the instructor when the class is offered.
Freshman Seminars: Biochemistry and Molecular Biology: Read More [+]

Rules & Requirements

Prerequisites: Open to freshmen only

Repeat rules: Course may be repeated for credit without restriction.

Hours & Format

Fall and/or spring: 15 weeks - 1 hour of seminar per week

Additional Details

Subject/Course Level: Molecular and Cell Biology/Undergraduate

Grading/Final exam status: The grading option will be decided by the instructor when the class is offered. Alternative to final exam.

Freshman Seminars: Biochemistry and Molecular Biology: Read Less [-]

Terms offered: Fall 2021, Spring 2018, Fall 2017
The Berkeley Seminar Program has been designed to provide new students with the opportunity to explore an intellectual topic with a faculty member in a small-seminar setting. Berkeley Seminars are offered in all campus departments, and topics vary from department to department and semester to semester. Final assessment to be decided by the instructor when the class is offered.
Freshman Seminars: Cell and Developmental Biology: Read More [+]

Rules & Requirements

Prerequisites: Open to freshmen only

Repeat rules: Course may be repeated for credit without restriction.

Hours & Format

Fall and/or spring: 15 weeks - 1 hour of seminar per week

Additional Details

Subject/Course Level: Molecular and Cell Biology/Undergraduate

Grading/Final exam status: The grading option will be decided by the instructor when the class is offered. Alternative to final exam.

Freshman Seminars: Cell and Developmental Biology: Read Less [-]

Terms offered: Fall 2019, Fall 2018, Fall 2016
The Berkeley Seminar Program has been designed to provide new students with the opportunity to explore an intellectual topic with a faculty member in a small-seminar setting. Berkeley Seminars are offered in all campus departments, and topics vary from department to department and semester to semester. Final assessment to be decided by the instructor when the class is offered.
Freshman Seminars: Genetics and Development: Read More [+]

Rules & Requirements

Prerequisites: Open to freshmen only

Repeat rules: Course may be repeated for credit without restriction.

Hours & Format

Fall and/or spring: 15 weeks - 1 hour of seminar per week

Additional Details

Subject/Course Level: Molecular and Cell Biology/Undergraduate

Grading/Final exam status: The grading option will be decided by the instructor when the class is offered. Alternative to final exam.

Freshman Seminars: Genetics and Development: Read Less [-]

Terms offered: Fall 2021, Fall 2020, Fall 2019
The Berkeley Seminar Program has been designed to provide new students with the opportunity to explore an intellectual topic with a faculty member in a small-seminar setting. Berkeley Seminars are offered in all campus departments, and topics vary from department to department and semester to semester. Final assessment to be decided by the instructor when the class is offered.
Freshman Seminars: Immunology: Read More [+]

Rules & Requirements

Prerequisites: Open to freshmen only

Repeat rules: Course may be repeated for credit without restriction.

Hours & Format

Fall and/or spring: 15 weeks - 1 hour of seminar per week

Additional Details

Subject/Course Level: Molecular and Cell Biology/Undergraduate

Grading/Final exam status: The grading option will be decided by the instructor when the class is offered. Alternative to final exam.

Freshman Seminars: Immunology: Read Less [-]

Terms offered: Fall 2021, Spring 2021, Fall 2020
The Berkeley Seminar Program has been designed to provide new students with the opportunity to explore an intellectual topic with a faculty member in a small-seminar setting. Berkeley Seminars are offered in all campus departments, and topics vary from department to department and semester to semester. Final assessment to be decided by the instructor when the class is offered.
Freshman Seminars: Neurobiology: Read More [+]

Rules & Requirements

Prerequisites: Open to freshmen only

Repeat rules: Course may be repeated for credit without restriction.

Hours & Format

Fall and/or spring: 15 weeks - 1 hour of seminar per week

Additional Details

Subject/Course Level: Molecular and Cell Biology/Undergraduate

Grading/Final exam status: The grading option will be decided by the instructor when the class is offered. Alternative to final exam.

Freshman Seminars: Neurobiology: Read Less [-]

Terms offered: Fall 2021, Fall 2020, Fall 2019
Students will be introduced to the "culture" of the biological sciences, along with an in-depth orientation to the academic life and the culture of the university as they relate to majoring in biology. Students will learn concepts, skills, and information that they can use in their major courses, and as future science professionals.
Studying the Biological Sciences: Read More [+]

Rules & Requirements

Prerequisites: Consent of instructor

Hours & Format

Fall and/or spring: 15 weeks - 2 hours of lecture per week

Additional Details

Subject/Course Level: Molecular and Cell Biology/Undergraduate

Grading/Final exam status: Offered for pass/not pass grade only. Final exam required.

Instructor: Matsui

Also listed as: INTEGBI C96/PLANTBI C96

Studying the Biological Sciences: Read Less [-]

Terms offered: Fall 2021, Spring 2021, Fall 2020
Lectures and small group discussions focusing on topics of interest, varying from semester to semester.
Directed Group Study: Read More [+]

Rules & Requirements

Prerequisites: Freshmen and sophomores only

Repeat rules: Course may be repeated for credit without restriction.

Hours & Format

Fall and/or spring: 15 weeks - 1-4 hours of directed group study per week

Additional Details

Subject/Course Level: Molecular and Cell Biology/Undergraduate

Grading/Final exam status: Offered for pass/not pass grade only. Final exam not required.

Directed Group Study: Read Less [-]

Terms offered: Spring 2012, Fall 2009, Spring 2009

Supervised Independent Study: Read More [+]

Rules & Requirements

Prerequisites: 3.3 GPA and consent of instructor

Credit Restrictions: One unit of credit is given for every three hours of work in the lab per week to a maximum of 4 units.

Repeat rules: Course may be repeated for credit without restriction.

Hours & Format

Fall and/or spring: 15 weeks - 1-4 hours of independent study per week

Summer:
8 weeks - 1.5-7.5 hours of independent study per week
10 weeks - 1.5-6 hours of independent study per week

Additional Details

Subject/Course Level: Molecular and Cell Biology/Undergraduate

Grading/Final exam status: Offered for pass/not pass grade only. Final exam not required.

Supervised Independent Study: Read Less [-]

Terms offered: Spring 2022, Spring 2021, Spring 2020
This course surveys cellular metabolism with a focus on the underlying bioenergetics, mechanisms, and chemistry. Lectures will cover major principles in the biochemistry of metabolism and also highlight selected topics including signaling, transport, metabolic engineering, and human diseases related to metabolic dysfunction. The course is designed for majors in the biochemistry and molecular biology, genetics and development, or immunology emphases.
Biochemistry: Pathways, Mechanisms, and Regulation: Read More [+]

Rules & Requirements

Prerequisites: C100A/Chemistry C130

Hours & Format

Fall and/or spring: 15 weeks - 3 hours of lecture and 1 hour of discussion per week

Additional Details

Subject/Course Level: Molecular and Cell Biology/Undergraduate

Grading/Final exam status: Letter grade. Final exam required.

Instructors: Savage, Zoncu, Marletta

Biochemistry: Pathways, Mechanisms, and Regulation: Read Less [-]

Terms offered: Spring 2022, Fall 2021, Spring 2021
Thermodynamic and kinetic concepts applied to understanding the chemistry and structure of biomolecules (proteins, DNA, and RNA). Molecular distributions, reaction kinetics, enzyme kinetics. Bioenergetics, energy transduction, and motor proteins. Electrochemical potential, membranes, and ion channels.
Biophysical Chemistry: Physical Principles and the Molecules of Life: Read More [+]

Rules & Requirements

Prerequisites: Chemistry 3A or 112A, Mathematics 1A, Biology 1A and 1AL; Chemistry 3B or 112B recommended

Hours & Format

Fall and/or spring: 15 weeks - 3 hours of lecture and 1 hour of discussion per week

Summer: 8 weeks - 5.5 hours of lecture and 2 hours of discussion per week

Additional Details

Subject/Course Level: Molecular and Cell Biology/Undergraduate

Grading/Final exam status: Letter grade. Final exam required.

Also listed as: CHEM C130

Biophysical Chemistry: Physical Principles and the Molecules of Life: Read Less [-]

Terms offered: Spring 2022, Fall 2021, Summer 2021 8 Week Session
A comprehensive survey of the fundamentals of biological chemistry, including the properties of intermediary metabolites, the structure and function of biological macromolecules, the logic of metabolic pathways (both degradative and biosynthetic) and the molecular basis of genetics and gene expression.
Survey of the Principles of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology: Read More [+]

Rules & Requirements

Prerequisites: Biology 1A, 1AL, and Chemistry 3B (or equivalent courses). Recommended: a course in physical chemistry

Credit Restrictions: Students will receive no credit for 102 after taking 100B or C100A/Chemistry C130 or Chemistry 135.

Hours & Format

Fall and/or spring: 15 weeks - 3 hours of lecture and 1 hour of discussion per week

Summer:
8 weeks - 6 hours of lecture and 2 hours of discussion per week
10 weeks - 4 hours of lecture and 2 hours of discussion per week

Additional Details

Subject/Course Level: Molecular and Cell Biology/Undergraduate

Grading/Final exam status: Letter grade. Final exam required.

Survey of the Principles of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology: Read Less [-]

Terms offered: Spring 2022, Spring 2021, Spring 2020
This course for upper division and graduate students will explore the molecular and cellular basis of microbial pathogenesis. The course will focus on model microbial systems which illustrate mechanisms of pathogenesis. Most of the emphasis will be on bacterial pathogens of mammals, but there will be some discussion of viral and protozoan pathogens. There will be an emphasis on experimental approaches. The course will also include some aspects of bacterial genetics and physiology, immune response to infection, and the cell biology of host-parasite interactions.
Bacterial Pathogenesis: Read More [+]

Hours & Format

Fall and/or spring: 15 weeks - 3 hours of lecture per week

Additional Details

Subject/Course Level: Molecular and Cell Biology/Undergraduate

Grading/Final exam status: Letter grade. Final exam required.

Instructor: Portnoy

Also listed as: PLANTBI C103

Bacterial Pathogenesis: Read Less [-]

Terms offered: Spring 2022, Fall 2021, Summer 2021 8 Week Session
This course will introduce students to key concepts in genetic analysis, eukaryotic cell biology, and state-of-the-art approaches in genomic medicine. Lectures will highlight basic knowledge of cellular processes with the basis for human diseases, particularly cancer. Prerequisite courses will have introduced students to the concepts of cells, the central dogma of molecular biology, and gene regulation. Emphasis in this course will be on eukaryotic cell processes, including cellular organization, dynamics, and signaling.
Genetics, Genomics, and Cell Biology: Read More [+]

Rules & Requirements

Prerequisites: 102

Hours & Format

Fall and/or spring: 15 weeks - 3 hours of lecture and 1 hour of discussion per week

Summer: 8 weeks - 6 hours of lecture and 2 hours of discussion per week

Additional Details

Subject/Course Level: Molecular and Cell Biology/Undergraduate

Grading/Final exam status: Letter grade. Final exam required.

Genetics, Genomics, and Cell Biology: Read Less [-]

Terms offered: Spring 2022, Fall 2021, Spring 2021
Molecular biology of prokaryotic and eukaryotic cells and their viruses. Mechanisms of DNA replication, transcription, translation. Structure of genes and chromosomes. Regulation of gene expression. Biochemical processes and principles in membrane structure and function, intracellular trafficking and subcellular compartmentation, cytoskeletal architecture, nucleocytoplasmic transport, signal transduction mechanisms, and cell cycle control.
Molecular Biology: Macromolecular Synthesis and Cellular Function: Read More [+]

Rules & Requirements

Prerequisites: C100A (may not be taken concurrently); Plan 1 Emphasis 1 (BMB) majors should take 100B prior to 110

Hours & Format

Fall and/or spring: 15 weeks - 3 hours of lecture and 1 hour of discussion per week

Additional Details

Subject/Course Level: Molecular and Cell Biology/Undergraduate

Grading/Final exam status: Letter grade. Final exam required.

Molecular Biology: Macromolecular Synthesis and Cellular Function: Read Less [-]

Terms offered: Spring 2022, Fall 2021, Spring 2021
Experimental techniques of biochemistry and molecular biology, designed to accompany the lectures in Molecular and Cell Biology 100B and 110.
General Biochemistry and Molecular Biology Laboratory: Read More [+]

Rules & Requirements

Prerequisites: 110 (may be taken concurrently)

Hours & Format

Fall and/or spring: 15 weeks - 2-2 hours of lecture and 6-8 hours of laboratory per week

Additional Details

Subject/Course Level: Molecular and Cell Biology/Undergraduate

Grading/Final exam status: Letter grade. Final exam not required.

Also listed as: CHEM C110L

General Biochemistry and Molecular Biology Laboratory: Read Less [-]

Terms offered: Fall 2021, Summer 2021 10 Week Session, Fall 2020
This course will explore the molecular bases for physiological and biochemical diversity among members of the two major domains, Bacteria and Archaea. The ecological significance and evolutionary origins of this diversity will be discussed. Molecular, genetic, and structure-function analyses of microbial cell cycles, adaptive responses, metabolic capability, and macromolecular syntheses will be emphasized.
General Microbiology: Read More [+]

Rules & Requirements

Prerequisites: Biology 1A and 1B

Hours & Format

Fall and/or spring: 15 weeks - 3 hours of lecture and 1 hour of discussion per week

Summer: 10 weeks - 5 hours of lecture and 1.5 hours of discussion per week

Additional Details

Subject/Course Level: Molecular and Cell Biology/Undergraduate

Grading/Final exam status: Letter grade. Final exam required.

Instructor: Ryan

Also listed as: PLANTBI C112

General Microbiology: Read Less [-]

Terms offered: Fall 2021, Summer 2021 10 Week Session, Spring 2021
Experimental techniques of microbiology designed to accompany the lecture in C112 and C148. The primary emphasis in the laboratory will be on the cultivation and physiological and genetic characterization of bacteria. Laboratory exercises will include the observation, enrichment, and isolation of bacteria from selected environments.
General Microbiology Laboratory: Read More [+]

Rules & Requirements

Prerequisites: C112 (may be taken concurrently)

Hours & Format

Fall and/or spring: 15 weeks - 4 hours of laboratory and 1 hour of discussion per week

Summer: 10 weeks - 6 hours of laboratory and 1.5 hours of discussion per week

Additional Details

Subject/Course Level: Molecular and Cell Biology/Undergraduate

Grading/Final exam status: Letter grade. Final exam not required.

Instructors: Komeili, Traxler

Also listed as: PLANTBI C112L

General Microbiology Laboratory: Read Less [-]

Terms offered: Spring 2022, Spring 2021, Spring 2020
This course will provide a comparative overview of virus life cycles and strategies viruses use to infect and replicate in hosts. We will discuss virus structure and classification and the molecular basis of viral reproduction, evolution, assembly, and virus-host interactions. Common features used during virus replication and host cellular responses to infection will be covered. Topics also included are common and emerging virus diseases, their control, and factors affecting their spread.
Introduction to Comparative Virology: Read More [+]

Rules & Requirements

Prerequisites: Introductory chemistry (Chemistry 1A or 3A-3B or equivalent) and introductory biology (Biology 1A, 1AL, and 1B or equivalent) and general biochemistry (Molecular and Cell Biology C100A or equivalent--preferably completed but may be taken concurrently)

Hours & Format

Fall and/or spring: 15 weeks - 3 hours of lecture and 1.5 hours of discussion per week

Additional Details

Subject/Course Level: Molecular and Cell Biology/Undergraduate

Grading/Final exam status: Letter grade. Final exam required.

Instructor: Glaunsinger

Also listed as: ESPM C138/PLANTBI C114

Introduction to Comparative Virology: Read Less [-]

Terms offered: Fall 2021, Fall 2020, Fall 2019
This course for upper-division and graduate students will broadly survey myriad types of microbial organisms, both procaryote and eucaryote, using a phylogenetic framework to organize the concept of "biodiversity." Emphasis will be on the evolutionary development of the many biochemical themes, how they mold our biosphere, and the organisms that affect the global biochemistry. Molecular mechanisms that occur in different lineages will be compared and contrasted to illustrate fundamental biological strategies. Graduate students additionally should enroll in C216, Microbial Diversity Workshop.
Microbial Diversity: Read More [+]

Rules & Requirements

Prerequisites: Upper-division standing. C112 or consent of instructor and organic chemistry (may be taken concurrently)

Hours & Format

Fall and/or spring: 15 weeks - 3 hours of lecture and 1 hour of discussion per week

Additional Details

Subject/Course Level: Molecular and Cell Biology/Undergraduate

Grading/Final exam status: Letter grade. Final exam required.

Instructor: Coates

Formerly known as: 116

Also listed as: PLANTBI C116

Microbial Diversity: Read Less [-]

Terms offered: Fall 2019, Spring 2019, Fall 2018
The prevailing mutation theory holds that 3-6 gene mutations convert normal to cancer cells. But, this theory does not explain why cancers: 1) are autonomous and immortal – unlike any conventional mutations; 2) have individual clonal karyotypes and parallel clonal transcriptomes – much like conventional species; 3) Carcinogens generate cancer only after conspicuous latent periods of years to decades – but mutations change phenotypes immediately; 4) are at once clonal and heterogeneous within clonal margins; and 5) form metastatic and drug-resistant subspecies with variant karyotypes. To explain these unexplained characteristics, this course tests a new theory that carcinogenesis is a form of speciation.
The Cancer Karyotype: What it is and What it Does: Read More [+]

Rules & Requirements

Prerequisites: 102. 104 recommended

Hours & Format

Fall and/or spring: 15 weeks - 1 hour of lecture per week

Additional Details

Subject/Course Level: Molecular and Cell Biology/Undergraduate

Grading/Final exam status: Letter grade. Alternative to final exam.

Instructor: Duesberg

The Cancer Karyotype: What it is and What it Does: Read Less [-]

Terms offered: Spring 2022, Spring 2021, Spring 2020
This course will provide a detailed discussion of a wide range of topics in cell biology emphasizing experimental approaches and key experiments that have provided important insights. The course is aimed at conveying an understanding of how cellular structure and function arise as a result of the properties of cellular macromolecules. An emphasis will be placed on the dynamic nature of cellular organization and will include a description of physical properties of cells (dimensions, concepts of free energy, diffusion, biophysical properties). Students will be introduced to quantitative aspects of cell biology and a view of cellular function that is based on integrating multiple pathways and modes of regulation (systems biology).
Cell and Systems Biology: Read More [+]

Rules & Requirements

Prerequisites: 102 and 104. Instructors may waive 104 prerequisite for non-Molecular and Cell Biology majors

Credit Restrictions: Students will receive no credit for 130A after taking 130.

Hours & Format

Fall and/or spring: 15 weeks - 3 hours of lecture and 1 hour of discussion per week

Additional Details

Subject/Course Level: Molecular and Cell Biology/Undergraduate

Grading/Final exam status: Letter grade. Final exam required.

Formerly known as: Molecular and Cell Biology 130A

Cell and Systems Biology: Read Less [-]

Terms offered: Fall 2021, Fall 2020, Fall 2019
The course is designed for students interested in learning about the molecular and cell biology of cancer and how this knowledge is being applied to the prevention, diagnosis and therapy of cancer. Topics covered include tumor pathology and epidemiology; tumor viruses and oncogenes; intracellular signaling; tumor suppressors; multi-step carcinogenesis and tumor progression; genetic instability in cancer; tumor-host interactions; invasion and metastasis; tumor immunology; cancer therapy.
Biology of Human Cancer: Read More [+]

Hours & Format

Fall and/or spring: 15 weeks - 3 hours of lecture and 1 hour of discussion per week

Additional Details

Subject/Course Level: Molecular and Cell Biology/Undergraduate

Grading/Final exam status: Letter grade. Final exam required.

Formerly known as: 135G

Biology of Human Cancer: Read Less [-]

Terms offered: Spring 2022, Fall 2021, Spring 2021
Experimental analyses of central problems in cell biology and physiology using modern techniques, including DNA cloning and protein biochemistry, fluorescence microscopy of the cytoskeleton and organelles, DNA transfection and cell cycle analysis of cultured mammalian cells, RNA interference and drug treatments to analyze ion channel function in cell contractility and intracellular signaling, and somatosensation.
Physiology and Cell Biology Laboratory: Read More [+]

Rules & Requirements

Prerequisites:MCELLBI 104 recommended (may be taken concurrently)

Credit Restrictions: Students will receive no credit for 133L after taking 130L.

Hours & Format

Fall and/or spring: 15 weeks - 1 hour of lecture and 7 hours of laboratory per week

Additional Details

Subject/Course Level: Molecular and Cell Biology/Undergraduate

Grading/Final exam status: Letter grade. Final exam not required.

Physiology and Cell Biology Laboratory: Read Less [-]

Terms offered: Spring 2022, Spring 2021, Spring 2019
Survey of behavior, structure, and function of chromosomes with emphasis on behavior in model organisms. Topics include mitosis, meiosis, chromosome aberrations, genome function, dosage compensation, transposons, repetitive DNA, and modern cytological imaging.
Chromosome Biology/Cytogenetics: Read More [+]

Hours & Format

Fall and/or spring: 15 weeks - 2 hours of lecture and 1 hour of discussion per week

Additional Details

Subject/Course Level: Molecular and Cell Biology/Undergraduate

Grading/Final exam status: Letter grade. Final exam required.

Instructors: Dernburg, Karpen

Also listed as: PLANTBI C134

Chromosome Biology/Cytogenetics: Read Less [-]

Terms offered: Fall 2021, Fall 2020, Fall 2019
Molecular mechanisms by which hormones elicit specific responses and regulate gene expression; hormone-receptor interaction; synthesis, transport and targeting of hormones, growth factors and receptors.
Topics in Cell and Developmental Biology: Molecular Endocrinology: Read More [+]

Rules & Requirements

Prerequisites: Molecular and Cell Biology 102, Biology 1A, 1AL, 1B, Chemistry 3A-3B or equivalent, or consent of instructor

Credit Restrictions: Students will receive no credit for Molecular and Cell Biology 135A after taking Physiology 142.

Hours & Format

Fall and/or spring: 15 weeks - 3 hours of lecture and 1 hour of discussion per week

Additional Details

Subject/Course Level: Molecular and Cell Biology/Undergraduate

Grading/Final exam status: Letter grade. Final exam required.

Instructor: Firestone

Topics in Cell and Developmental Biology: Molecular Endocrinology: Read Less [-]

Terms offered: Spring 2022, Fall 2021, Fall 2020
Principles of mammalian (primarily human) physiology emphasizing physical, chemical, molecular and cellular bases of functional biology. The following topics will be covered: cellular and membrane ion and nonelectrolyte transport; cell and endocrine regulation; autonomic nervous system regulation; skeletal, smooth and cardiac muscle; cardiovascular physiology; respiration; renal physiology; gastrointestinal physiology. Discussion section led by Graduate Student Instructor will review material covered in lecture.
Physiology: Read More [+]

Rules & Requirements

Prerequisites: Biology 1A, 1AL, 1B, Physics 8A. Physics 8B recommended

Credit Restrictions: Students will receive no credit for Molecular and Cell Biology 136 after completing Integrative Biology 132.

Hours & Format

Fall and/or spring: 15 weeks - 3 hours of lecture and 1 hour of discussion per week

Summer:
6 weeks - 8 hours of lecture and 3 hours of discussion per week
8 weeks - 6 hours of lecture and 2 hours of discussion per week

Additional Details

Subject/Course Level: Molecular and Cell Biology/Undergraduate

Grading/Final exam status: Letter grade. Final exam required.

Physiology: Read Less [-]

Terms offered: Spring 2022, Spring 2020, Spring 2019
Biology is being revolutionized by new experimental techniques that have made it possible to measure the inner workings of molecules, cells and multicellular organisms with unprecedented precision. The objective of this course is to explore this deluge of quantitative data through the use of biological numeracy. We will develop theoretical models that make precise predictions about biological phenomena. These predictions will be tested through the hands-on analysis of experimental data and by performing numerical simulations using Matlab. A laptop is required for this course, but no previous programming experience is required.
Physical Biology of the Cell: Read More [+]

Hours & Format

Fall and/or spring: 15 weeks - 3 hours of lecture and 1 hour of laboratory per week

Summer: 8 weeks - 6 hours of lecture and 2 hours of laboratory per week

Additional Details

Subject/Course Level: Molecular and Cell Biology/Undergraduate

Grading/Final exam status: Letter grade. Alternative to final exam.

Instructor: Garcia

Physical Biology of the Cell: Read Less [-]

Terms offered: Spring 2022, Fall 2021, Spring 2021
An in depth introduction to genes, their sexual and asexual transmission in individuals and populations, and gene regulation in prokaryotes and eukaryotes. Gene manipulation by recombination, molecular cloning and genome editing is presented in contexts ranging from fundamental mechanisms of chromosome biology to applications in development, aging and disease. Human genetic variation and quantitative evaluation are illuminated. Non-Mendelian and epigenetic modes of inheritance of transposable elements, prions and chromatin states are paired with discussions of groundbreaking technology rewriting the rules of how the genome is analyzed, with attention to the ethical considerations ranging from the history of eugenics to modern controversies.
General Genetics: Read More [+]

Rules & Requirements

Prerequisites: Biology 1A and 1AL

Hours & Format

Fall and/or spring: 15 weeks - 3 hours of lecture and 1 hour of discussion per week

Additional Details

Subject/Course Level: Molecular and Cell Biology/Undergraduate

Grading/Final exam status: Letter grade. Final exam required.

General Genetics: Read Less [-]

Terms offered: Spring 2022, Spring 2021, Spring 2020
Experimental techniques in classical and molecular genetics.
Genetics Laboratory: Read More [+]

Rules & Requirements

Prerequisites: Molecular and Cell Biology 104 or 140. May be taken concurrently

Hours & Format

Fall and/or spring: 15 weeks - 2 hours of lecture and 6 hours of laboratory per week

Additional Details

Subject/Course Level: Molecular and Cell Biology/Undergraduate

Grading/Final exam status: Letter grade. Final exam not required.

Genetics Laboratory: Read Less [-]

Terms offered: Spring 2022, Spring 2021, Spring 2020
An introduction to principles and processes of embryonic and post-embryonic development, stressing mechanisms of cell and tissue interactions, morphogenesis and regulation of gene expression.
Developmental Biology: Read More [+]

Rules & Requirements

Prerequisites: 102 or C100A; Biology 1A, 1AL, and 1B; 110 or 130 recommended

Hours & Format

Fall and/or spring: 15 weeks - 3 hours of lecture and 1 hour of discussion per week

Additional Details

Subject/Course Level: Molecular and Cell Biology/Undergraduate

Grading/Final exam status: Letter grade. Final exam required.

Formerly known as: 131

Developmental Biology: Read Less [-]

Terms offered: Fall 2016, Fall 2015, Fall 2014

Sours: http://guide.berkeley.edu/courses/mcellbi/

You will also like:

Terms offered: Spring 2022, Spring 2021
This course engages students with fundamental questions of justice in relation to data and computing in American society. Data collection, visualization, and analysis have been entangled in the struggle for racial and social justice because they can make injustice visible, imaginable, and thus actionable. Data has also been used to oppress minoritized communities and institutionalize, rationalize, and naturalize systems of racial violence. The course examines key sites of justice involving data (such as citizenship, policing, prisons, environment, and health). Along with critical social science tools, students gain introductory experience and do collaborative and creative projects with data science using real-world data.
Data and Justice: Read More [+]

Hours & Format

Fall and/or spring: 15 weeks - 3 hours of lecture and 1.5 hours of discussion per week

Additional Details

Subject/Course Level: Data Science, Undergraduate/Undergraduate

Grading/Final exam status: Letter grade. Alternative to final exam.

Data and Justice: Read Less [-]

Terms offered: Prior to 2007
An introduction to computational thinking and quantitative reasoning, preparing students for further coursework, especially Foundations of Data Science (CS/Info/Stat C8). Emphasizes the use of computation to gain insight about quantitative problems with real data. Expressions, data types, collections, and tables in Python. Programming practices, abstraction, and iteration. Visualizing univariate and bivariate data with bar charts, histograms, plots, and maps. Introduction to statistical concepts including averages and distributions, predicting one variable from another, association and causality, probability and probabilistic simulation. Relationship between numerical functions and graphs. Sampling and introduction to inference.
Introduction to Computational Thinking with Data: Read More [+]

Objectives & Outcomes

Course Objectives: C6 also includes quantitative reasoning concepts that aren’t covered in Data 8. These include certain topics in: principles of data visualization; simulation of random processes; and understanding numerical functions through their graphs. This will help prepare students for computational and quantitative courses other than Data 8.
C6 takes advantage of the complementarity of computing and quantitative reasoning to enliven abstract ideas and build students’ confidence in their ability to solve real problems with quantitative tools. Students learn computer science concepts and immediately apply them to plot functions, visualize data, and simulate random events.

Foundations of Data Science (CS/Info/Stat C8, a.k.a. Data 8) is an increasingly popular class for entering students at Berkeley. Data 8 builds students’ computing skills in the first month of the semester, and students rely on these skills as the course progresses. For some students, particularly those with little prior exposure to computing, developing these skills benefits from further time and practice. C6 is a rapid introduction to Python programming, visualization, and data analysis, which will prepare students for success in Data 8.

Student Learning Outcomes: Students will be able to perform basic computations in Python, including working with tabular data.
Students will be able to understand basic probabilistic simulations.
Students will be able to understand the syntactic structure of Python code.
Students will be able to use good practices in Python programming.
Students will be able to use visualizations to understand univariate data and to identify associations or causal relationships in bivariate data.

Hours & Format

Summer: 6 weeks - 4 hours of lecture, 2 hours of discussion, and 4 hours of laboratory per week

Additional Details

Subject/Course Level: Data Science, Undergraduate/Undergraduate

Grading/Final exam status: Letter grade. Final exam required.

Formerly known as: Computer Science C8R/Statistics C8R

Also listed as: COMPSCI C6/STAT C6

Introduction to Computational Thinking with Data: Read Less [-]

Terms offered: Spring 2022, Fall 2021, Summer 2021 8 Week Session, Spring 2021, Fall 2020
Foundations of data science from three perspectives: inferential thinking, computational thinking, and real-world relevance. Given data arising from some real-world phenomenon, how does one analyze that data so as to understand that phenomenon? The course teaches critical concepts and skills in computer programming and statistical inference, in conjunction with hands-on analysis of real-world datasets, including economic data, document collections, geographical data, and social networks. It delves into social and legal issues surrounding data analysis, including issues of privacy and data ownership.
Foundations of Data Science: Read More [+]

Rules & Requirements

Prerequisites: This course may be taken on its own, but students are encouraged to take it concurrently with a data science connector course (numbered 88 in a range of departments)

Credit Restrictions: Students will receive no credit for DATA C8\COMPSCI C8\INFO C8\STAT C8 after completing COMPSCI 8, or DATA 8. A deficient grade in DATA C8\COMPSCI C8\INFO C8\STAT C8 may be removed by taking COMPSCI 8, COMPSCI 8, or DATA 8.

Hours & Format

Fall and/or spring: 15 weeks - 3-3 hours of lecture and 2-2 hours of laboratory per week

Summer: 8 weeks - 6 hours of lecture and 4 hours of laboratory per week

Additional Details

Subject/Course Level: Data Science, Undergraduate/Undergraduate

Grading/Final exam status: Letter grade. Final exam required.

Formerly known as: Computer Science C8/Statistics C8/Information C8

Also listed as: COMPSCI C8/INFO C8/STAT C8

Foundations of Data Science: Read Less [-]

Terms offered: Spring 2021, Fall 2020, Spring 2020
Designed to be taken in conjunction with the Foundations of Data Science (COMPSCI/INFO/STAT C8) course, each connector course will flesh out data science ideas in the context of one particular field. Blending inferential thinking and computational thinking, the course relies on the increasing availability of datasets across a wide range of human endeavor, and students' natural interest in such data, to teach students to work actively with data in a field of their interest and to interpret and critique their analyses of data. Topics vary by field, and several topics will be offered each term.
Data Science Connector: Read More [+]

Objectives & Outcomes

Course Objectives: Discuss how to formulate and substantiate an argument with evidence
Explain a variety of analytic and visualization techniques
Explore approaches to effective communication
Explore the challenges with working with primary and secondary data

Student Learning Outcomes: Apply data analysis to evaluate everyday problems
Communicate effectively in written, spoken, and graphical form about specific issues
Interpret statistical results
Know how to locate and use primary data sources
Obtain and/or collect relevant data using specific qualitative and/or quantitative research methods
Understand how to use empirical evidence to evaluate an argument

Rules & Requirements

Prerequisites: Instructors may require students to enroll concurrently or have completed Data 8 (COMPSCI/STAT/INFO C8)

Repeat rules: Course may be repeated for credit without restriction. Students may enroll in multiple sections of this course within the same semester.

Hours & Format

Fall and/or spring: 15 weeks - 2-4 hours of seminar per week

Additional Details

Subject/Course Level: Data Science, Undergraduate/Undergraduate

Grading/Final exam status: Letter grade. Alternative to final exam.

Data Science Connector: Read Less [-]

Terms offered: Spring 2022, Fall 2021, Spring 2021
This class aims to motivate and illustrate key concepts in economics through a series of exercises and examples that use Python Jupyter notebooks. The class covers concepts from introductory economics, microeconomic theory, econometrics, development economics, environmental economics and public economics. The course provides data science students a pathway to apply Python programming and data science concepts within the discipline of economics. The course will also gives economics students a pathway to apply programming to reinforce fundamental concepts and to advance the level of study in upper division coursework and possible thesis work.
Economic Models: Read More [+]

Objectives & Outcomes

Course Objectives: Demonstrate how to construct understanding of concepts in economics by developing and coding examples
Illustrate topics in economics through coding applications
Motivate basics of econometrics from a data science perspective

Student Learning Outcomes: Programmatically create and interpret graphs of simple equations used in microeconomics
Reason about and solve simple equations used in microeconomics through coding
Understand basic concepts in economics

Rules & Requirements

Prerequisites: You must have taken Data C8 or be concurrently enrolled in Data C8 to take this course. That being said, we are able to make exceptions if you have prior programming or data science experience; please email the course staff if you have any questions. Prior economics knowledge may be helpful but is not necessary

Hours & Format

Fall and/or spring: 15 weeks - 2 hours of lecture per week

Summer: 6 weeks - 5 hours of lecture per week

Additional Details

Subject/Course Level: Data Science, Undergraduate/Undergraduate

Grading/Final exam status: Letter grade. Alternative to final exam.

Economic Models: Read Less [-]

Terms offered: Spring 2021
Topics will vary semester to semester.
Special Topics in Data Science: Read More [+]

Hours & Format

Fall and/or spring: 15 weeks - 1-3 hours of lecture, 0-2 hours of discussion, and 0-2 hours of laboratory per week

Summer: 8 weeks - 2-6 hours of lecture, 0-4 hours of discussion, and 0-4 hours of laboratory per week

Additional Details

Subject/Course Level: Data Science, Undergraduate/Undergraduate

Grading/Final exam status: Letter grade. Final exam required, with common exam group.

Special Topics in Data Science: Read Less [-]

Terms offered: Spring 2022, Fall 2021, Summer 2021 8 Week Session, Spring 2021, Fall 2020, Summer 2020 8 Week Session
In this course, students will explore the data science lifecycle, including question formulation, data collection and cleaning, exploratory data analysis and visualization, statistical inference and prediction​, and decision-making.​ This class will focus on quantitative critical thinking​ and key principles and techniques needed to carry out this cycle. These include languages for transforming, querying and analyzing data; algorithms for machine learning methods including regression, classification and clustering; principles behind creating informative data visualizations; statistical concepts of measurement error and prediction; and techniques for scalable data processing.
Principles & Techniques of Data Science: Read More [+]

Terms offered: Spring 2022, Fall 2021, Spring 2021
This course develops the probabilistic foundations of inference in data science, and builds a comprehensive view of the modeling and decision-making life cycle in data science including its human, social, and ethical implications. Topics include: frequentist and Bayesian decision-making, permutation testing, false discovery rate, probabilistic interpretations of models, Bayesian hierarchical models, basics of experimental design, confidence intervals, causal inference, Thompson sampling, optimal control, Q-learning, differential privacy, clustering algorithms, recommendation systems and an introduction to machine learning tools including decision trees, neural networks and ensemble methods.
Data, Inference, and Decisions: Read More [+]

Rules & Requirements

Prerequisites: Mathematics 54 or Mathematics 110 or Statistics 89A or Physics 89 or both of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science 16A and Electrical Engineering and Computer Science 16B; Statistics/Computer Science C100; and any of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science 126, Statistics 140, Statistics 134, Industrial Engineering and Operations Research 172. Statistics 140 or Electrical Engineering and Computer Science 126 are preferred

Credit Restrictions: Students will receive no credit for DATA C102 after completing STAT 102, or DATA 102. A deficient grade in DATA C102 may be removed by taking STAT 102, STAT 102, or DATA 102.

Hours & Format

Fall and/or spring: 15 weeks - 3 hours of lecture, 1 hour of discussion, and 1 hour of laboratory per week

Additional Details

Subject/Course Level: Data Science, Undergraduate/Undergraduate

Grading/Final exam status: Letter grade. Final exam required.

Formerly known as: Statistics 102

Also listed as: STAT C102

Data, Inference, and Decisions: Read Less [-]

Terms offered: Spring 2022, Fall 2021, Spring 2021, Fall 2020, Spring 2020
This course teaches you to use the tools of applied historical thinking and Science, Technology, and Society (STS) to recognize, analyze, and shape the human contexts and ethics of data. It addresses key topics such as doing ethical data science amid shifting definitions of human subjects, consent, and privacy; the changing relationship between data, democracy, and law; the role of data analytics in how corporations and governments provide public goods such as health and security to citizens; sensors, machine learning and artificial intelligence and changing landscapes of labor, industry, and city life. It prepares you to engage as a knowledgeable and responsible citizen and professional in the varied arenas of our datafied world.
Human Contexts and Ethics of Data - DATA/History/STS: Read More [+]

Hours & Format

Fall and/or spring: 15 weeks - 3-3 hours of lecture and 0-1.5 hours of discussion per week

Summer:
6 weeks - 7.5-7.5 hours of lecture and 0-3.5 hours of discussion per week
8 weeks - 6-6 hours of lecture and 0-3 hours of discussion per week

Additional Details

Subject/Course Level: Data Science, Undergraduate/Undergraduate

Grading/Final exam status: Letter grade. Final exam required.

Formerly known as: History C184D/Science and Technology Studies C104D

Also listed as: HISTORY C184D/STS C104D

Human Contexts and Ethics of Data - DATA/History/STS: Read Less [-]

Terms offered: Spring 2022, Fall 2021, Spring 2021
This course teaches a broad range of statistical methods that are used to solve data problems. Topics include group comparisons and ANOVA, standard parametric statistical models, multivariate data visualization, multiple linear regression, logistic regression and classification, regression trees and random forests. An important focus of the course is on statistical computing and reproducible statistical analysis. The course and lab include hands-on experience in analyzing real world data from the social, life, and physical sciences. The R statistical language is used.

Statistical Methods for Data Science: Read More [+]

Rules & Requirements

Prerequisites: Statistics/Computer Science/Information C8 or Statistics 20; and Mathematics 1A, Mathematics 16A, or Mathematics 10A/10B. Strongly recommended corequisite: Statistics 33A or Statistics 133

Hours & Format

Fall and/or spring: 15 weeks - 3 hours of lecture and 2 hours of laboratory per week

Additional Details

Subject/Course Level: Data Science, Undergraduate/Undergraduate

Grading/Final exam status: Letter grade. Final exam required.

Formerly known as: Statistics 131A

Also listed as: STAT C131A

Statistical Methods for Data Science: Read Less [-]

Terms offered: Spring 2022, Fall 2021, Spring 2021
An introduction to probability, emphasizing the combined use of mathematics and programming to solve problems. Random variables, discrete and continuous families of distributions. Bounds and approximations. Dependence, conditioning, Bayes methods. Convergence, Markov chains. Least squares prediction. Random permutations, symmetry, order statistics. Use of numerical computation, graphics, simulation, and computer algebra.
Probability for Data Science: Read More [+]

Objectives & Outcomes

Course Objectives: The emphasis on simulation and the bootstrap in Data 8 gives students a concrete sense of randomness and sampling variability. Stat 140 will capitalize on this, abstraction and computation complementing each other throughout.

The syllabus has been designed to maintain a mathematical level at least equal to that in Stat 134. So Stat 140 will start faster than Stat 134 (due to the Data 8 prerequisite), avoid approximations that are unnecessary when SciPy is at hand, and replace some of the routine calculus by symbolic math done in SymPy. This will create time for a unit on the convergence and reversibility of Markov Chains as well as added focus on conditioning and Bayes methods.
With about a thousand students a year taking Foundations of Data Science (Stat/CS/Info C8, a.k.a. Data 8), there is considerable demand for follow-on courses that build on the skills acquired in that class. Stat 140 is a probability course for Data 8 graduates who have also had a year of calculus and wish to go deeper into data science.

Student Learning Outcomes: Understand the difference between math and simulation, and appreciate the power of both
Use a variety of approaches to problem solving
Work with probability concepts algebraically, numerically, and graphically

Rules & Requirements

Prerequisites: Statistics/Computer Science/Information C8, or Statistics/Computer Science C100, or both Stat 20 and Computer Science 61A; and one year of calculus at the level of Mathematics 1A-1B or higher. Corequisite: Mathematics 54, Electrical Engineering 16A, Statistics 89A, Mathematics 110 or equivalent linear algebra

Credit Restrictions: Students will receive no credit for STAT C140 after completing STAT 134. A deficient grade in STAT C140 may be removed by taking STAT 134.

Hours & Format

Fall and/or spring: 15 weeks - 3 hours of lecture, 2 hours of discussion, and 1 hour of supplement per week

Additional Details

Subject/Course Level: Data Science, Undergraduate/Undergraduate

Grading/Final exam status: Letter grade. Final exam required.

Formerly known as: Statistics 140

Also listed as: STAT C140

Probability for Data Science: Read Less [-]

Terms offered: Fall 2021, Fall 2020, Fall 2019
Data Mining and Analytics introduces students to practical fundamentals of data mining and emerging paradigms of data mining and machine learning with enough theory to aid intuition building. The course is project-oriented, with a project beginning in class every week. The in-class portion of the project is meant to be collaborative and a time for the instructor and GSIs to work closely with project groups to understand the objectives, help work through software logistics, and connect project work to lecture. Lectures will introduce theories, concepts, practical contexts, and algorithms. Students should expect to leave the class with hands-on, contemporary data mining skills they can confidently apply in research and industry.
Data Mining and Analytics: Read More [+]

Objectives & Outcomes

Course Objectives: Conduct manual feature engineering (from domain knowledge) vs. machine induced featurization (representation learning)
Develop intuition in various machine learning classification algorithms (e.g. decision trees, feed-forward neural networks, recurrent neural networks, skip-grams) and clustering techniques (e.g. k-means, spectral)
Foster critical thinking about real-world actionability from analytics
Provide an overview of issues in research and practice that will affect the practice of data science in a variety of domains

Student Learning Outcomes: Develop capabilities in a range of data mining techniques
Gain the ability to solve problems in data mining research and practice
Think critically about how to assess analytics
Use data mining and analytics in a domain of application

Rules & Requirements

Prerequisites: Data 100 (COMPSCI/STAT C100) recommended

Credit Restrictions: Students will receive no credit for DATA 144 after completing INFO 154. A deficient grade in DATA 144 may be removed by taking INFO 154.

Hours & Format

Fall and/or spring: 15 weeks - 3 hours of lecture per week

Additional Details

Subject/Course Level: Data Science, Undergraduate/Undergraduate

Grading/Final exam status: Letter grade. Alternative to final exam.

Instructor: Pardos

Data Mining and Analytics: Read Less [-]

Terms offered: Prior to 2007
The senior honors thesis seminar gives students an opportunity to experience firsthand what it means to do data science research. Over two semesters, students will learn to formulate a research problem, design a research strategy, collect evidence, and write up the findings and analysis. The first semester focuses primarily on the preparation and implementation of a research proposal, as well as data management strategies. During the second semester, we will emphasize analysis and writing. The final result will be a hybrid product with a 20-25 page research paper, with data visualizations and analysis tables, along with a documented data source, annotated code, well documented Github repository, and open science posting of the project.
Data Science Honors Thesis Seminar: Read More [+]

Objectives & Outcomes

Course Objectives: Assist students with project organization and management.
Convey approaches to effective writing and visual communication.
Discuss how to formulate and substantiate an argument with evidence.
Explain approaches to designing a research question and project.
Explore a variety of analytic and visualization techniques and discuss their appropriateness to different research questions.
Identify the challenges in data acquisition and management.

Student Learning Outcomes: Communicate effectively in written, spoken, and graphical form.
Develop an understanding of data availability, constraints, and ethics.
Develop data management skills.
Develop reproducible research and interpret results.
Formulate a proposal for a research project.
Learn how to develop a research question and project.
Understand how to organize empirical work into a written document.
Understand how to use empirical evidence to construct an argument.

Rules & Requirements

Prerequisites: There are no specific prerequisites. Students must be accepted into the data science honors program in order to take this course. Students must complete H195A in order to enroll in H195B

Hours & Format

Fall and/or spring: 15 weeks - 2 hours of seminar per week

Additional Details

Subject/Course Level: Data Science, Undergraduate/Undergraduate

Grading/Final exam status: Letter grade. Alternative to final exam.

Data Science Honors Thesis Seminar: Read Less [-]

Terms offered: Spring 2020
The senior honors thesis seminar gives students an opportunity to experience firsthand what it means to do data science research. Over two semesters, students will learn to formulate a research problem, design a research strategy, collect evidence, and write up the findings and analysis. The first semester focuses primarily on the preparation and implementation of a research proposal, as well as data management strategies. During the second semester, we will emphasize analysis and writing. The final result will be a hybrid product with a 20-25 page research paper, with data visualizations and analysis tables, along with a documented data source, annotated code, well documented Github repository, and open science posting of the project.
Data Science Honors Thesis Seminar: Read More [+]

Objectives & Outcomes

Course Objectives: Assist students with project organization and management.
Convey approaches to effective writing and visual communication.
Discuss how to formulate and substantiate an argument with evidence.
Explain approaches to designing a research question and project.
Explore a variety of analytic and visualization techniques and discuss their appropriateness to different research questions.
Identify the challenges in data acquisition and management.

Student Learning Outcomes: Communicate effectively in written, spoken, and graphical form.
Develop an understanding of data availability, constraints, and ethics.
Develop data management skills.
Develop reproducible research and interpret results.
Formulate a proposal for a research project.
Learn how to develop a research question and project.
Understand how to organize empirical work into a written document.
Understand how to use empirical evidence to construct an argument.

Rules & Requirements

Prerequisites: There are no specific prerequisites. Students must be accepted into the data science honors program in order to take this course. Students must complete H195A in order to enroll in H195B

Hours & Format

Fall and/or spring: 15 weeks - 2 hours of seminar per week

Additional Details

Subject/Course Level: Data Science, Undergraduate/Undergraduate

Grading/Final exam status: Letter grade. Alternative to final exam.

Data Science Honors Thesis Seminar: Read Less [-]

Terms offered: Fall 2019
Students take part in organized individual field sponsored programs with off-campus organizations or tutoring/mentoring relevant to specific aspects and applications of data science on or off campus. Note Summer CPT or OPT students: written report required. Course may not count toward major requirements but will be counted in the cumulative units toward graduation.
Field Studies in Data Science: Read More [+]

Rules & Requirements

Prerequisites: Consent of instructor (see department advisor). Upper-division standing

Repeat rules: Course may be repeated for credit with advisor consent.

Hours & Format

Fall and/or spring: 15 weeks - 1-4 hours of fieldwork per week

Summer:
6 weeks - 2.5-10 hours of fieldwork per week
8 weeks - 2-7.5 hours of fieldwork per week
10 weeks - 1.5-6 hours of fieldwork per week

Additional Details

Subject/Course Level: Data Science, Undergraduate/Undergraduate

Grading/Final exam status: Offered for pass/not pass grade only. Alternative to final exam.

Field Studies in Data Science: Read Less [-]

Terms offered: Spring 2021
Written proposal must be approved by a faculty sponsor, who will serve as Instructor of Record. Seminars for the group study of selected topics, which will vary from semester to semester. Topics may be initiated by students.
Directed Group Studies for Advanced Undergraduates: Read More [+]

Rules & Requirements

Prerequisites: Instructors may require students to enroll concurrently or have completed Data 8 (COMPSCI/STAT/INFO C8). Upper-division standing and consent of instructor

Repeat rules: Course may be repeated for credit without restriction. Students may enroll in multiple sections of this course within the same semester.

Hours & Format

Fall and/or spring: 15 weeks - 1-4 hours of directed group study per week

Additional Details

Subject/Course Level: Data Science, Undergraduate/Undergraduate

Grading/Final exam status: Offered for pass/not pass grade only. Final exam not required.

Directed Group Studies for Advanced Undergraduates: Read Less [-]

Terms offered: Prior to 2007
Independent study and research by arrangement with faculty or staff. This course allows students to obtain course credit for participation in undergraduate research. Students may opt either to participate in a semester-long series of workshops which provide a guided research experience with project milestone assignments and regular feedback, or they may opt to work independently with supervision from one faculty research mentor.
Supervised Independent Study and Research: Read More [+]

Objectives & Outcomes

Student Learning Outcomes: Develop and refine skills acquired in other courses in a hands-on, self-directed research project.
Identify how to properly manage data and describe best practices in programming and analytics.
Integrate feedback from an instructor into research on a regular basis.
Learn how to structure and complete a research project working independently.

Rules & Requirements

Prerequisites: Instructors may require students to enroll concurrently or have completed Data 8 (COMPSCI/STAT/INFO C8). Upper-division standing and consent of instructor

Repeat rules: Course may be repeated for credit without restriction.

Hours & Format

Fall and/or spring: 15 weeks - 3-12 hours of independent study per week

Summer:
6 weeks - 7.5-30 hours of independent study per week
8 weeks - 5.5-22.5 hours of independent study per week

Additional Details

Subject/Course Level: Data Science, Undergraduate/Undergraduate

Grading/Final exam status: Offered for pass/not pass grade only. Alternative to final exam.

Supervised Independent Study and Research: Read Less [-]

Terms offered: Spring 2022, Fall 2021, Spring 2021, Spring 2020
Explores the data science lifecycle: question formulation, data collection and cleaning, exploratory, analysis, visualization, statistical inference, prediction, and decision-making. Focuses on quantitative critical thinking and key principles and techniques: languages for transforming, querying and analyzing data; algorithms for machine learning methods: regression, classification and clustering; principles of informative visualization; measurement error and prediction; and techniques for scalable data processing. Research term project.
Principles and Techniques of Data Science: Read More [+]

Rules & Requirements

Prerequisites: Computer Science/Information/Statistics C8 or Engineering 7; and either Computer Science 61A or Computer Science 88. Corequisite: Mathematics 54 or Electrical Engineering 16A

Credit Restrictions: Students will receive no credit for DATA C200\COMPSCI C200A\STAT C200C after completing DATA C100.

Hours & Format

Fall and/or spring:
8 weeks - 6 hours of lecture, 2 hours of discussion, and 2 hours of laboratory per week
15 weeks - 3 hours of lecture, 1 hour of discussion, and 1 hour of laboratory per week

Summer: 8 weeks - 6 hours of lecture, 2 hours of discussion, and 2 hours of laboratory per week

Additional Details

Subject/Course Level: Data Science, Undergraduate/Graduate

Grading: Letter grade.

Formerly known as: Statistics C200C/Computer Science C200A

Also listed as: COMPSCI C200A/STAT C200C

Principles and Techniques of Data Science: Read Less [-]

Sours: http://guide.berkeley.edu/courses/data/


7734 7735 7736 7737 7738