Hypertension patient teaching

Hypertension patient teaching DEFAULT

This site is designed to help you understand high blood pressure, or hypertension, and learn the best ways to manage it.

Introduction

There are a number of things that you can do to help control your blood pressure and this site will help you understand how you can help. Keep in mind that:

  1. This site has a lot of information and you will learn more each time you read it…take your time!
  2. Your health care provider can answer any questions you have.
  3. It will take time to make changes.

Most importantly, remember that when you work with your health care team to make changes with your medicines and lifestyle, you will be improving your heart and kidney health in addition to your general health and wellness.

What is hypertension?

Hypertension is the medical term for high blood pressure.

What is blood pressure?

Blood pressure refers to the pressure that blood applies to the inner walls of the arteries. Arteries carry blood from the heart to other organs and parts of the body.

Your blood pressure gives you information about how well your heart is working and what condition your arteries are in. For example, when the amount of blood your heart pumps out increases or your arteries become stiff, your blood pressure increases.

What are the symptoms of hypertension?

Hypertension does not usually cause symptoms. That is why it is important to have routine monitoring of your blood pressure to determine whether it is high.

How do I know if I have high blood pressure?

Blood pressure can be measured in your health care provider’s office, at home, or even at your local pharmacy or grocery store. Blood pressure is measured with a device called a sphygmomanometer. Blood pressure is recorded in millimeters of mercury (mmHg).

There are two types of sphygmomanometers: manual and digital.

  • Manual sphygmomanometers require a stethoscope and are used by trained personnel in the office setting.
  • Digital sphygmomanometers (like this picture) do not require specialized training or a stethoscope. Because they are easier to operate, digital sphygmomanometers are a good option for home use.

What do the numbers mean?

Your blood pressure is made up of two numbers. For example, your health care provider may tell you that your blood pressure is “150 over 90.” The first (or top) number is called the systolic pressure. This is the pressure inside your arteries when your heart is contracting (at the time of a heart beat). The second (or bottom) number is called the diastolic pressure. This is the pressure inside your arteries when your heart is relaxed (between heart beats).

Blood pressure is reported as the systolic over diastolic pressure, as illustrated BELOW. Both numbers are important. As we get older, blood vessels usually become stiff or rigid, so that they are less able to dilate or expand when blood enters from the heart. Therefore, the systolic pressure usually increases with age.

Systolic Pressure: Pressure inside your arteries when your heart is contracting
(at the time of a heart beat)

Diastolic Pressure: Pressure inside your arteries when your heart is relaxed
(between heart beats)

Normal blood pressure is below 120/80. If your systolic pressure is 120 to 129, and your diastolic pressure is less than 80, you have elevated blood pressure. A blood pressure above 130/80 is considered hypertension, or high blood pressure. Ask your health care provider for guidelines on what a high blood pressure is for you and what your target blood pressure should be.

What other diseases are related to hypertension?

High blood pressure is a condition that puts you at risk for heart attack, stroke, heart failure and kidney disease. Untreated high blood pressure increases the strain on the heart and arteries, and eventually damages the heart, brain and kidneys.

What causes hypertension?

Hypertension is very common, especially as people grow older. For example, among people over age 60 years, hypertension occurs in 65% of Black men, 80% of Black women, 55% of Caucasian men, and 65% of Caucasian women.

Most adults have “primary hypertension,” which means that the cause of high blood pressure is not known. A small subgroup of adults has “secondary hypertension,” which means that there is an underlying and possibly correctable cause, usually a kidney or hormone disorder. Your health care provider will determine if you have a treatable cause for your high blood pressure.

It is believed that primary hypertension is affected by genetics (heredity), obesity, high salt intake and emotional stress. The following factors sometimes also play a role: excessive alcohol use, smoking, sleep apnea, herbal remedies, diet pills and other stimulants, and lack of physical activity.

Can hypertension be cured?

Hypertension usually cannot be cured. Sometimes, people who lose a large amount of excess weight, or greatly lower their use of alcohol and/or salt, and relieve stress, may see their blood pressure return to a normal level.

How is hypertension treated?

Treatment of hypertension always includes improving unhealthy lifestyle habits, including:

  • Eating the right kinds of foods
  • Reducing salt intake
  • Losing excess weight
  • Drinking alcohol in moderation (one drink*/day for women; two drinks/day for men); *12 ounces of beer, 4 ounces of wine, 1.5 ounces of whiskey
  • Increasing physical activity
  • Stopping smoking

In addition, your health care provider may prescribe medicine to lower your blood pressure.

Important things to do every day

If your health care provider has prescribed medicine to lower your blood pressure, the most important thing that you can do is to take it as instructed. If the medicine causes side effects, do not stop taking it. Instead, talk with your health care provider about the side effects you are having. Your dose may be lowered or the medicine may be changed. If the cost of your medicine is a problem, tell your provider. Your provider can change the medication or help you enroll in a medication assistance program. Taking your blood pressure medicine can keep you from having a heart attack or stroke, and can even save your life!

What else can you do?

In the past, only blood pressure measurements in the doctor’s office were used to determine the degree of hypertension. Now, home measurements with a battery-operated, semi-automatic device can be used to regularly measure blood pressure, particularly when changes in the type or doses of hypertension medicines are made. Research has shown that people who measure their blood pressure at home and report the results to their doctor or health care team member have better blood pressure control.

Sours: https://www.med.unc.edu/medicine/patient-care/hypertension/patient-education/understanding-hypertension/

Discharge Instructions for High Blood Pressure (Hypertension)

You have been diagnosed with high blood pressure (also called hypertension). This means the force of blood against your artery walls is too strong. It also means your heart is working hard to move blood. High blood pressure usually has no symptoms, but over time, it can damage your heart, blood vessels, eyes, kidneys, and other organs. With help from your doctor, you can manage your blood pressure and protect your health.

Taking medicine

  • Learn to take your own blood pressure. Keep a record of your results. Ask your doctor which readings mean that you need medical attention.

  • Take your blood pressure medicine exactly as directed. Don’t skip doses. Missing doses can cause your blood pressure to get out of control.

  • If you do miss a dose (or doses) check with your healthcare provider about what to do.

  • Avoid medicine that contain heart stimulants, including over-the-counter drugs. Check for warnings about high blood pressure on the label. Ask the pharmacist before purchasing something you haven't used before

  • Check with your doctor or pharmacist before taking a decongestant. Some decongestants can worsen high blood pressure.

Lifestyle changes

  • Maintain a healthy weight. Get help to lose any extra pounds.

  • Cut back on salt.

    • Limit canned, dried, packaged, and fast foods.

    • Don’t add salt to your food at the table.

    • Season foods with herbs instead of salt when you cook.

    • Request no added salt when you go to a restaurant.

    • The American Heart Association’s (AHA) "ideal" sodium intake recommendation is 1,500 milligrams per day.  However, since American's eat so much salt, the AHA says a positive change can occur by cutting back to even 2,400 milligrams of sodium a day. 

  • Follow the DASH (Dietary Approaches to Stop Hypertension) eating plan. This plan recommends vegetables, fruits, whole gains, and other heart healthy foods.

  • Begin an exercise program. Ask your doctor how to get started. The American Heart Association recommends aerobic exercise 3 to 4 times a week for an average of 40 minutes at a time, with your doctor's approval. Simple activities like walking or gardening can help.

  • Break the smoking habit. Enroll in a stop-smoking program to improve your chances of success. Ask your healthcare provider about programs and medicines to help you stop smoking.

  • Limit drinks that contain caffeine (coffee, black or green tea, cola) to 2 per day.

  • Never take stimulants such as amphetamines or cocaine; these drugs can be deadly for someone with high blood pressure.

  • Control your stress. Learn stress-management techniques.

  • Limit alcohol to no more than 1 drink a day for women and 2 drinks a day for men.

Follow-up care

Make a follow-up appointment as directed by our staff.

When to seek medical care

Call your doctor immediately or seek emergency care if you have any of the following:

  • Chest pain or shortness of breath (call 911)

  • Moderate to severe headache

  • Weakness in the muscles of your face, arms, or legs

  • Trouble speaking

  • Extreme drowsiness

  • Confusion

  • Fainting or dizziness

  • Pulsating or rushing sound in your ears

  • Unexplained nosebleed

  • Weakness, tingling, or numbness of your face, arms, or legs

  • Change in vision

  • Blood pressure measured at home that is greater than 180/110

Sours: https://www.saintlukeskc.org/health-library/discharge-instructions-high-blood-pressure-hypertension
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Hypertension Patient Education Handouts

Female doctor laughs with patient during paperwork.

Stay up to date on the latest facts about hypertension and related conditions from the CDC.

Fact Sheets About Hypertension and Related Conditions and Behaviors

Facts About Hypertension: Stay up to date on the latest facts about hypertension from the CDC.

High Blood Pressure: Medicines to Help Youexternal icon: This guide from the U.S. Food and Drug Administration can help you better understand blood pressure medicines and talk to a health care provider about what is right for you.

Fact Sheets and Information About Conditions and Behaviors Related to Hypertension

Resources from Other Organizations

The following web sites include patient-friendly links and resources about hypertension (high blood pressure):

Tools for Community Health Workers (CHWs)

Hispanic populations have low control rates for hypertension, a major risk factor for heart disease and stroke. Also, they have high prevalence of high blood cholesterol, and their diets are often high in salt and saturated fats. Reaching these audiences with effective messages about prevention can be challenging.

Promotoras and other CHWs are encouraged to read this fotonovela with participants:

A Promotora/CHW Guide accompanies the How to Control Your Fat and Cholesterol fotonovela and gives these members of the health care team a brief summary of objectives, tips, additional activities, reviews, and reminders:

This is an easy-to-understand fact sheet about heart health (aspirin use when appropriate, blood pressure control, cholesterol management, and smoking cessation):

Sours: https://www.cdc.gov/bloodpressure/materials_for_patients.htm

Discharge Instructions for High Blood Pressure (Hypertension)

You have been diagnosed with high blood pressure (hypertension). This means the force of blood against your artery walls is too strong. It also means your heart is working hard to move blood. High blood pressure usually has no symptoms, but over time, it can cause serious health problems. High blood pressure raises your risk for heart attack, stroke, heart disease, heart failure, kidney disease, and vision loss. With help from your doctor, you can manage your blood pressure and protect your health.

Blood pressure measurements are given as 2 numbers. Systolic blood pressure is the upper number. This is the pressure when the heart contracts or pumps. Diastolic blood pressure is the lower number. This is the pressure when the heart relaxes between beats.

Blood pressure is categorized as normal, elevated, or stage 1 or stage 2 high blood pressure:

  • Normal blood pressure is systolic of less than 120 and diastolic of less than 80 (120/80) at rest

  • Elevated blood pressure is systolic of 120 to 129 and diastolic less than 80 at rest

  • Stage 1 high blood pressure is systolic is 130 to 139 or diastolic between 80 to 89 at rest

  • Stage 2 high blood pressure is when systolic is 140 or higher or the diastolic is 90 or higher at rest

Taking medicine

  • Learn to measure your own blood pressure. Keep a record of your results. Ask your doctor which readings mean that you need medical attention.

  • Take your blood pressure medicine exactly as directed. Don’t skip doses. Missing doses can cause your blood pressure to get out of control.

  • If you do miss a dose (or doses) check with your healthcare provider about what to do.

  • Don't take medicines that contain heart stimulants, including over-the-counter medicines. Check for warnings about high blood pressure on the label. Ask the pharmacist before purchasing something you haven't used before

  • Check with your doctor or pharmacist before taking a decongestant such as pseudoephedrine or phenylephrine. Some decongestants can worsen high blood pressure.

Lifestyle changes

  • Stay at a healthy weight. Get help to lose any extra pounds (kilograms). Often times meeting with a dietitian can help you identify changes that can be made to your diet to help with weight loss.

  • Cut back on salt.

    • Limit canned, dried, packaged, and fast foods.

    • Don’t add salt to your food at the table.

    • Season foods with herbs instead of salt when you cook.

    • Request no added salt when you go to a restaurant.

    • The American Heart Association (AHA) says the ideal amount of sodium is no more than 1,500 mg a day.  But because Americans eat so much salt, you can make a positive change by cutting back to even 2,300 mg of sodium a day (1 teaspoon). 

  • Follow the DASH (Dietary Approaches to Stop Hypertension) eating plan. This plan recommends vegetables, fruits, whole gains, and other heart healthy foods.

  • Eat food rich in potassium.

  • Begin an exercise program. Ask your healthcare provider how to get started. The AHA recommends aerobic exercise 3 to 4 times a week for an average of 40 minutes at a time to lower blood pressure, with your provider's approval. Simple activities such as walking or gardening can help.

  • Break the smoking habit. Enroll in a stop-smoking program to improve your chances of success. Ask your healthcare provider about programs and medicines to help you stop smoking.

  • Limit drinks that contain caffeine such as coffee, black or green tea, and cola to 2 per day.

  • Never take stimulants such as amphetamines or cocaine. These drugs can be deadly for someone with high blood pressure.

  • Control your stress. Learn ways to manage stress.

  • Limit alcohol to no more than 1 drink a day for women and 2 drinks a day for men.

Follow-up care

Make a follow-up appointment as directed.

When to call your healthcare provider

Call your healthcare provider right away if you have any of the following:

  • Chest pain or shortness of breath ( call 911)

  • Moderate to severe headache

  • Weakness in the muscles of your face, arms, or legs

  • Trouble speaking

  • Extreme drowsiness

  • Confusion

  • Fainting or dizziness

  • Pulsating or rushing sound in your ears

  • Unexplained nosebleed

  • Weakness, tingling, or numbness of your face, arms, or legs

  • Change in vision

  • Blood pressure measured at home that is greater than 180/110

© 2000-2020 The StayWell Company, LLC. All rights reserved. This information is not intended as a substitute for professional medical care. Always follow your healthcare professional's instructions.

Sours: https://www.fairview.org/Patient-Education/Articles/English/d/i/s/c/h/Discharge_Instructions_for_High_Blood_Pressure_Hypertension_86357

Patient teaching hypertension

Hypertension Teaching 2622

Instructed patient Rising slowly from a sitting or lying position may help ease symptoms. Avoiding alcohol, drinking plenty of water, and eating small, low-carbohydrate meals along with fruits and vegetables may also help. See a doctor immediately if you Faint, Break out in cold sweats, breathe rapidly and shallowly, Notice blood in your stool.

Hypertension Teaching 2409

SN explained that long standing hypertension leads to heart damage that is called heart failure. This means your heart "fails" to pump your blood to your body effectively. You may notice swelling in your extremities, that you are easily fatigued with normal activity, and weight gain. Any of these symptoms or worsening of them should be reported to SN or MD.

Hypertension Teaching 2393

Instructed patient that Hypertensive heart disease refers to heart conditions caused by high blood pressure. The heart working under increased pressure causes some different heart disorders. Hypertensive heart disease can lead to complications such as : thickening of the heart muscle, coronary artery disease, chronic kidney disease and other conditions such as heart failure if not controlled. Follow your MD's orders for Heart Healthy diet, exercise as tolerated and take medications as prescribed.

Hypertension Teaching 2387

Instructed patient on medication Irbesartan, it is used to treat high blood pressure (hypertension). Lowering high blood pressure helps prevent strokes, heart attacks, and kidney problems. It works by relaxing blood vessels so that blood can flow more easily. Dizziness, lightheadedness, or upset stomach may occur. If any of these effects persist or worsen, tell your doctor or pharmacist promptly. To reduce the risk of dizziness and lightheadedness, get up slowly when rising from a sitting or lying position.

Hypertension Teaching 2358

Patient has Dx of hypertensive heart disease without heart failure. Hypertensive heart disease refers to heart conditions caused by high blood pressure. The heart working under increased pressure causes some different heart disorders. Hypertensive heart disease can cause thickening of the heart muscle, coronary artery disease, and other conditions such as heart failure if not controlled. Follow your MD's orders for diet and medications closely

Hypertension Teaching 1970

SN instructed patient about some measures aimed to managing & controlling hypertension, such as: eating low sodium diet , increase more fruits to increase your potassium, walk daily for 30 minutes, and have regular check-ups, as directed by Physician.

Hypertension Teaching 2004

SN instructed patient and caregiver on hypertensive urgency which is a situation where the blood pressure is severely elevated and that experiencing hypertensive urgency may or may not experience one or more of these symptoms: severe headache, shortness of breath, nosebleeds, and severe anxiety, chest or back pain, numbness or severe weakness, change in vision or difficulty speaking. Patient and caregiver were advised to seek immediately medical assistance and/or call 9-1-1 if any of these signs or symptoms appear. Patient and caregiver verbalized understanding. Family is independent with hypertension process.

Hypertension Teaching 1282

Patient was instructed on hypertension . Hypertension, or high blood pressure, stems from narrow arteries and causes a build up in blood pressure within the arteries.

Hypertension Teaching 1288

Patient instructed that hypertension is treated with regular aerobic exercise, weight reduction (if overweight), salt restriction, and medication

Hypertension Teaching 1289

Patient was instructed that stress management is important because stress can contribute to high blood pressure.

Nursing Continuing Education
Sours: https://www.nurseteachings.com/tag/hypertension
What is Hypertension and how is it managed? (Nursing School Lessons)

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