Mac pro displayport

Mac pro displayport DEFAULT

Identify the ports on your Mac

If you're not sure which port to use with your external display, hard drive, camera, printer, iPhone, iPad, or other device, the port shapes and symbols in this guide should help. 

Information about these and other types of Mac ports is in the specifications for your Mac: Choose Apple menu  > About This Mac, click Support, then click Specifications. Or check your Mac user guide.

Thunderbolt / USB 4

These Mac models have Thunderbolt / USB 4 ports:

You can connect a single external display and other devices that connect using either a Thunderbolt 3  cable or USB-C cable. You can also connect a USB-C charge cable to charge your notebook, or a USB-C to Lightning cable to charge your iPhone or iPad. If you have a device that doesn't connect to this port, you might be able to use an adapter to connect it.

2021 iMac rear with ports enlarged

On iMac (24-inch, M1, 2021), the  symbol appears above each Thunderbolt / USB 4 port. To connect a display, use either of the ports with the Thunderbolt symbol .

Thunderbolt 3

These Mac models have Thunderbolt 3 ports:

  • iMac (Retina 5K, 27-inch, 2020)
  • iMac (Retina 5K, 27-inch, 2019)
  • iMac (Retina 4K, 21.5-inch, 2019)
  • iMac (Retina 5K, 27-inch, 2017)
  • iMac (Retina 4K, 21.5-inch, 2017)
  • iMac (21.5-inch, 2017)
  • iMac Pro
  • Mac Pro (2019)
  • Mac Pro (Rack, 2019)
  • Mac mini (2018)
  • MacBook Air (Retina, 13-inch, 2020)
  • MacBook Air (Retina, 13-inch, 2019)
  • MacBook Air (Retina, 13-inch, 2018)
  • MacBook Pro (13-inch, 2020, Two Thunderbolt 3 ports)
  • MacBook Pro (13-inch, 2020, Four Thunderbolt 3 ports)
  • MacBook Pro (16-inch, 2019)
  • MacBook Pro (13-inch, 2019, Two Thunderbolt 3 ports)
  • MacBook Pro (15-inch, 2019)
  • MacBook Pro (13-inch, 2019, Four Thunderbolt 3 ports)
  • MacBook Pro (15-inch, 2018)
  • MacBook Pro (13-inch, 2018, Four Thunderbolt 3 ports)
  • MacBook Pro (15-inch, 2017)
  • MacBook Pro (13-inch, 2017, Four Thunderbolt 3 ports)
  • MacBook Pro (13-inch, 2017, Two Thunderbolt 3 ports)
  • MacBook Pro (15-inch, 2016)
  • MacBook Pro (13-inch, 2016, Four Thunderbolt 3 ports)
  • MacBook Pro (13-inch, 2016, Two Thunderbolt 3 ports)

Use these ports with displays and other devices that connect using either a Thunderbolt 3  cable or USB-C cable. You can also connect a USB-C power adapter and cable to charge your notebook computer. If you have a device that doesn't connect to this port, you might be able to use an adapter to connect it.


If your Mac notebook or desktop computer has more than one port like this, each port supports Thunderbolt 3 and USB-C.
 

USB 3

These Mac models have USB 3 ports:

  • iMac (24-inch, M1, 2021) with four ports
  • MacBook (Retina, 12-inch, 2017)
  • MacBook (Retina, 12-inch, Early 2016)
  • MacBook (Retina, 12-inch, Early 2015)

On MacBook, use this port with displays and other devices that connect using a USB-C cable. You can also connect a USB-C power adapter and cable to charge your notebook computer. If you have a device that doesn't connect to this port, you might be able to use an adapter to connect it.

On iMac (four-port model only), use the USB 3 ports with external devices that connect using a USB-C cable. To connect an external display, use either of the ports with the Thunderbolt symbol .

Thunderbolt

These Mac models have Thunderbolt or Thunderbolt 2 ports:

  • MacBook Pro introduced in 2011 through 2015
  • MacBook Air introduced in 2011 through 2017
  • Mac mini introduced in 2011 through 2014
  • iMac introduced in 2011 through 2015
  • Mac Pro introduced in 2013

Use these ports with displays and other devices that connect using a Thunderbolt  cable.

Thunderbolt and Thunderbolt 2 are not the same as Mini DisplayPort. They have the same shape, but use different symbols on the cable and port. However, this port does support Mini DisplayPort for video output, so you can use a Mini DisplayPort cable to connect a Mini DisplayPort display.
   

Mini DisplayPort

These Mac models have Mini DisplayPort:

  • MacBook Pro introduced in late 2008 through 2010
  • MacBook Air introduced in late 2008 through 2010
  • Mac mini introduced in 2009 and 2010
  • iMac introduced in 2009 and 2010
  • Mac Pro introduced in 2009 through 2012

Use this port with displays that connect using a Mini DisplayPort  cable.

Mini DisplayPort is not the same as Thunderbolt or Thunderbolt 2 . They have the same shape, but use different symbols on the cable and port.
  

USB-A

Use these ports with devices that connect using a USB-A  cable. USB ports are sometimes known by the USB specification of the port, such as USB 2 or USB 3. 

  


Left to right: power, two Thunderbolt, USB-A, and Audio-Out.
 

Ethernet

Use Ethernet  with networks and devices that connect using an Ethernet (RJ45) cable.

On some iMac models, the Ethernet port is located on the computer's power adapter. If your power adapter doesn't have an Ethernet port, you can use an Ethernet adapter.

FireWire


FireWire 400

FireWire 800

Use FireWire  with devices that connect using a FireWire 400 or FireWire 800 cable.
  

SD card

Use the SD card slot with SD, SDHC, SDXC, MMC, and UHS-II media cards, such as those used by digital cameras.
  

Audio

Use Audio-Out —  or  — with headphones, speakers, and other audio-output devices that connect using an audio cable that has a 3.5 mm (1/8 inch) audio jack. 

Use Audio-In  with a microphone or other audio-input device that connects using an audio cable that has a 3.5 mm (1/8 inch) audio jack.

 

Information about products not manufactured by Apple, or independent websites not controlled or tested by Apple, is provided without recommendation or endorsement. Apple assumes no responsibility with regard to the selection, performance, or use of third-party websites or products. Apple makes no representations regarding third-party website accuracy or reliability. Contact the vendor for additional information.

Published Date: 

Sours: https://support.apple.com/en-us/HT201736

Mini DisplayPort

Not to be confused with Mini-DVI.

Mini DisplayPort on Apple MacBook.jpg

Mini DisplayPort on a MacBook Pro

Type Digital and analog (via DAC) computer video connector
DesignerApple Inc.
Designed October 2008
ManufacturerApple Inc.
Produced 2008–present
SupersededMicro-DVI, Mini-DVI, DVI
Width 7.4 mm male (8.3 mm female)[1]
Height 4.5 mm male (5.4 mm female)
Hot pluggable Yes
External Yes
Video signal Same as DisplayPort
Pins 20
Mini DisplayPort (connector).PNG
External Mini DisplayPort Connector
Pin 1 GND Ground
Pin 2 Hot Plug Detect Hot Plug Detect
Pin 3 ML_Lane 0 (p) Lane 0 (positive)
Pin 4 CONFIG1 CONFIG1
Pin 5 ML_Lane 0 (n) Lane 0 (negative)
Pin 6 CONFIG2 CONFIG2
Pin 7 GND Ground
Pin 8 GND Ground
Pin 9 ML_Lane 1 (p) Lane 1 (positive)
Pin 10 ML_Lane 3 (p) Lane 3 (positive)
Pin 11 ML_Lane 1 (n) Lane 1 (negative)
Pin 12 ML_Lane 3 (n) Lane 3 (negative)
Pin 13 GND Ground
Pin 14 GND Ground
Pin 15 ML_Lane 2 (p) Lane 2 (positive)
Pin 16 AUX_CH (p) Auxiliary Channel (positive)
Pin 17 ML_Lane 2 (n) Lane 2 (negative)
Pin 18 AUX_CH (n) Auxiliary Channel (negative)
Pin 19 GND Ground
Pin 20 DP_PWR Power for connector
This is the pinout for the source-side connector; the sink-side connector pinout will have lanes 0–3 reversed in order, i.e. lane 3 will be on pin 3(n) and 5(p) while lane 0 will be on pin 10(n) and 12(p).
Mini DisplayPort connector

The Mini DisplayPort (MiniDP or mDP) is a miniaturized and less common version of the DisplayPortaudio-visual digital interface.

It was announced by Apple in October 2008, and by early 2013 all new Apple Macintosh computers had the port,[2] as did the LED Cinema Display.[3][4] However, in 2016 Apple began phasing out the port and replacing it with the new USB-C connector. The Mini DisplayPort is also fitted to some PC motherboards, video cards, and some PC notebooks from Asus, Microsoft, MSI, Lenovo, Toshiba, HP, Dell, and other manufacturers.

Apple offers a free license for the Mini DisplayPort[5] but they reserve the right to cancel the license should the licensee "commence an action for patent infringement against Apple".[6]

Specifications[edit]

Unlike its Mini-DVI and Micro-DVI predecessors, the Mini DisplayPort can drive display devices with resolutions up to 2560×1600 (WQXGA) in its DisplayPort 1.1a implementation, and 4096×2160 (4K) in its DisplayPort 1.2 implementation. With an adapter, the Mini DisplayPort can drive display devices with VGA, DVI, or HDMI interfaces.[7][8][9]

Compatibility[edit]

Apple replaced the DVI port from the MacBook, MacBook Air, MacBook Pro, iMac, Mac Mini, and the Mac Pro with the Mini DisplayPort. Its use as the video connector for the 24-inch Cinema Display may complicate compatibility:

  • Mini DisplayPort's HDCP extension disables playback of certain DRM-encrypted content on any display not designed for it. This includes some content from the iTunes Store[10] which has no such restrictions if played on a Mac without Mini DisplayPort.[11][12]
  • Apple's Dual-Link DVI or VGA adapters are relatively large and expensive compared to past adapters, and customers have reported problems with them, such as being unable to connect to an external display. Monitors connected to a Mini DisplayPort via these adaptors may have resolution problems or not "wake up" from sleep.[13][14][15]
  • While the DisplayPort specification can support digital audio, the older 2009 line of MacBooks, MacBook Pros, and Mac Minis cannot provide an audio signal through the Mini DisplayPort, and only do so over USB, Firewire, or the audio line out port. (The April 2010 line of MacBook Pro, and July 2010 iMac and later do support this[16]). This can be a problem for users who want to connect their computers to HDTVs using a Mini DisplayPort to HDMI adapter. To work around this issue, some third-party manufacturers have created dual or triple-headed adapters that get power for the adapter from a USB port, video from the Mini DisplayPort, and audio from either the USB port or the optical-out port. Either option terminates with a single female HDMI connector, thus allowing both video and audio to be channeled over the single HDMI cable.[17]

Adoption[edit]

  • In early 2009, VESA announced that Mini DisplayPort would be included in the upcoming DisplayPort 1.2 specification.[18][19]
  • In the fourth quarter of 2009, VESA announced that the Mini DisplayPort had been adopted. All devices using the Mini DisplayPort must comply with the 1.1a standard.[20]
  • On 7 January 2010, Toshiba introduced Satellite Pro S500, Tecra M11, A11 and S11 notebooks featuring Mini DisplayPort.[21][22][23][24]
  • AMD released a special variant of its Radeon HD 5870 graphics card called the Radeon HD 5870 Eyefinity 6 Edition, which features 2GB GDDR5 memory, higher clock speeds than the original card, and six Mini DisplayPort outputs with a maximum resolution of 5760 × 2160 pixels (a 3×2 grid of 1080p displays).
  • On 13 April 2010, Apple added support for audio out using Mini DisplayPort in their MacBook Pro product line. This allows users to easily connect their Macbook Pros to their HDTVs using a cable adapting Mini DisplayPort to HDMI with full audio and video functionality.[16]
  • On 5 May 2010, HP announced Envy 14 and Envy 17 notebooks with Mini DisplayPort.[25]
  • On 20 October 2010, Dell announced XPS 14, 15, and 17 notebooks with Mini DisplayPort.[26]
  • On 24 February 2011, Apple and Intel announced Thunderbolt, a successor to Mini DisplayPort which adds support for PCI Express data connections while maintaining backwards compatibility with Mini DisplayPort-based peripherals.[27]
  • On 17 May 2011, Lenovo announced the ThinkPad X1 notebook with Mini DisplayPort.
  • In May 2011, Dell released the XPS 15z notebook with Mini DisplayPort.
  • On 15 May 2012, Lenovo announced the ThinkPad notebooks X1 Carbon, Helix, X230, L430, L530, T430s, T430, T530, W530 with Mini DisplayPort.
  • In 2012, Intel shipped the second generation Intel NUC of which the top model with an i5 had a Mini DisplayPort and the top i3 model had Thunderbolt through a Mini DisplayPort.
  • On 9 February 2013, Microsoft released the Surface Tablet, Surface Pro, equipped with Windows 8 Pro and Mini DisplayPort.
  • In June 2013, Intel shipped the third-generation Intel NUC with both Mini HDMI and Mini DisplayPort. (The i3 and i5 models, not the Celeron or Atom models)
  • On 5 July 2013, Asus announced new N Series laptops N550 and N750 with both HDMI and Mini DisplayPort.
  • On 25 July 2013, Dell announced the Precision M3800 mobile workstation with Mini DisplayPort.
  • On 8 August 2013, Dell announced the Latitude E7240 and E7440 business notebooks with Mini DisplayPort.
  • On 9 September 2013, Lenovo announced the ThinkPad X240s, L440, L540, T440, T440s, T440p, T540p and W540 with Mini DisplayPort.
  • On 22 October 2013, Microsoft released the Surface Pro 2, equipped with Windows 8.1 Pro and Mini DisplayPort.
  • On 20 June 2014, Microsoft released the Surface Pro 3 with Mini DisplayPort.
  • On 5 May 2015, Microsoft released the Surface 3 with Mini DisplayPort.
  • On 6 October 2015, Microsoft released the Surface Book, equipped with Windows 10 Pro and Mini DisplayPort.
  • On 10 October 2015, Microsoft released the Surface Pro 4, equipped with Windows 10 Pro and Mini DisplayPort.
  • On 2 June 2016, Gigabyte announced the Aero 14 with Mini DisplayPort.
  • On 11 November 2016, ECS Liva released the Liva Z Mini PC with Mini DisplayPort.
  • On 15 December 2016, Microsoft released the Surface Studio with Mini DisplayPort.
  • On 15 June 2017, Microsoft released the Surface Laptop, equipped with Windows 10 Pro, and the fifth-generation Surface Pro, equipped with Windows 10 Pro, both with Mini DisplayPort.
  • On 16 October 2018, Microsoft released the Surface Pro 6, equipped with Mini DisplayPort.[28]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^Apple Mini DisplayPort Connector Dimensions, Apple Inc., 2008
  2. ^"About Apple video adapters and cables". Apple Support. Archived from the original on 28 February 2014. Retrieved 18 March 2020.
  3. ^"New MacBook Family Redefines Notebook Design". Apple.com. 2008-10-14. Archived from the original on 2010-03-16. Retrieved 2008-10-24.
  4. ^"LED Cinema Display - Technical Specifications". support.apple.com. Retrieved 2021-03-26.
  5. ^"Mini DisplayPort Connector Licensing & Trademark Agreements". Apple Developer Connection. 2008-11-27. Retrieved 2008-11-27.
  6. ^"Apple Mini DisplayPort Connector Implementation License Checklist"(PDF). Apple. Retrieved 2008-12-04.
  7. ^"Mini DisplayPort to DVI Adapter". Apple Store. 2008-10-14. Retrieved 2008-10-24.
  8. ^"Mini DisplayPort to Dual-Link DVI Adapter". Apple Store. 2008-10-14. Retrieved 2008-10-24.
  9. ^"Mini DisplayPort to VGA Adapter". Apple Store. 2008-10-14. Retrieved 2008-10-24.
  10. ^David Chartier (November 17, 2008). "Apple brings HDCP to a new aluminum MacBook near you". Ars Technica.
  11. ^"Apple Mini DisplayPort DRM sparks controversy". November 26, 2008.
  12. ^"EFF: Apple DisplayPort DRM will lead to more piracy". November 26, 2008.
  13. ^"Mini DisplayPort to Dual-Link DVI Adapter". Apple. Retrieved 2008-12-23.
  14. ^"Mini DisplayPort to DVI Adapter". Apple. Retrieved 2009-02-18.
  15. ^"Mini DisplayPort to VGA Adapter". Apple. Retrieved 2009-02-18.
  16. ^ abChris Foresman (April 13, 2010). "New MacBook Pros support audio over Mini DisplayPort". Ars Technica. Retrieved April 13, 2010.
  17. ^Chris Foresman (July 22, 2009). "Mini DisplayPort no longer a hassle with cables and adapters". Ars Technica.
  18. ^"DisplayPort specification to add Apple's mini connector". MacWorld. 2009-01-14. Retrieved 2009-01-14.
  19. ^"Apple's mini connector set to be part of DisplayPort standard". AppleInsider. 2009-01-13. Retrieved 2009-01-14.
  20. ^"Apple's mini connector set to be part of DisplayPort standard". AppleInsider. 2009-10-13. Retrieved 2009-10-13.
  21. ^"Toshiba Introduces New Satellite, Tecra and Qosmio Laptops Equipped With 2010 Intel Core Processors". 7 January 2010. Archived from the original on 23 March 2010. Retrieved 30 April 2010.
  22. ^"Toshiba Laptop Computers, Notebooks, Netbooks and Accessories - Toshiba Laptops". toshiba.com.
  23. ^"Toshiba Tecra A11 Laptop Computers". Laptops.toshiba.com. Retrieved 2010-04-30.
  24. ^"Toshiba: Leading Innovation". Laptops.toshiba.com. Retrieved 2010-04-30.
  25. ^"HP Envy 14 and 17 officially official, Envy 13 slowly waves goodbye". Engadget. 2010-05-05. Retrieved 2010-05-06.
  26. ^"Dell XPS Series Revamped". infosync. 2010-10-22. Archived from the original on 2011-09-27. Retrieved 2010-12-05.
  27. ^"Thunderbolt Technology: The Fastest Data Connection to Your PC Just Arrived" (Press release). Intel. Feb 24, 2011. Retrieved 2011-02-24.
  28. ^"Introducing the New Surface Pro 6 – Ultra-light and Versatile – Microsoft Surface". Microsoft Store. Retrieved 2019-03-28.
Sours: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mini_DisplayPort
  1. Cigar room decor
  2. 2014 chevy stingray
  3. Idaho state journal

Connect a display to Mac Pro

The Thunderbolt 3 (USB-C) ports the Thunderbolt icon support video output when an Apple MPX Module graphics card is installed. A third-party GPU doesn’t enable video on Thunderbolt 3 (USB-C) ports the Thunderbolt icon. The HDMI 2.0 port on your Mac Pro also supports video. You can use an external display, a projector, or an HDTV with your Mac Pro.

Note: Mac Pro has at least one HDMI 2.0 port and four Thunderbolt 3 (USB-C) ports. The Thunderbolt 3 (USB-C) ports on your Mac Pro are managed by two controllers—one controls the two ports on the top of Mac Pro and one controls the two ports on the I/O card on the back. There are additional controllers and HDMI ports if Apple MPX Module graphics cards are installed. See Install MPX Modules in Mac Pro.

To connect this device to Mac Pro

Use a cable, or an adapter and cable

Apple Pro Display XDR

Thunderbolt 3 (USB-C) cable

Thunderbolt 3 (USB-C) display

Thunderbolt 3 (USB-C) cable

USB-C display

USB-C (USB 3.1) cable

HDMI display or HDTV

The HDMI cable that came with your display or HDTV

Thunderbolt 2 display

Thunderbolt 3 (USB-C) to Thunderbolt 2 adapter and the cable that came with your Thunderbolt 2 display

VGA display or projector

USB-C VGA Multiport adapter and the cable that came with your display or projector

DisplayPort or Mini DisplayPort display

USB-C to DisplayPort cable, or DisplayPort or Mini DisplayPort adapter and the cable that came with your display

DVI display or projector

USB-C to DVI adapter and the cable that came with your display or projector

Adapters and other accessories are sold separately. Visit apple.com, your local Apple Store, or other resellers for more information and availability. Review the documentation or check with the manufacturer to make sure you choose the right product. See Adapters for the ports on your Mac or iPad Pro.

Learn more. See the Apple Support article Use external monitors with your Mac for details about extending the desktop, video mirroring, and other display preferences. To troubleshoot an issue with an external display, see Get help with video issues on external displays connected to your Mac.

Sours: https://support.apple.com/guide/mac-pro/connect-a-display-apdfb31396d3/mac

A new MacBook Pro comes with either two or four external ports, depending on the model you pick. A new MacBook Air has a pair of ports. But those MacBook ports are only of one type: Thunderbolt, which is compatible with USB-C. A 24-inch iMac comes with two Thunderbolt/USB 4 ports; some models also include two USB-C ports. You probably have devices that use USB-A, Thunderbolt 1, Thunderbolt 2, DisplayPort, HDMI, or something else. How do you connect these devices? With an adapter.

If you’re planning to buy a new 24-inch iMac, MacBook Pro, or MacBook Air, make sure you set aside a considerable amount of cash for the adapters you need. Apple doesn’t include any in the box, except for a power adapter.

Your best bet is to get a combination dock, like the Satechi Slim Aluminum Type-C Multi-Port Adapter ($60 on AmazonEdit non-product linkRemove non-product link). It connects via USB-C, and includes a USB-C pass-through port, two USB 3.0 ports, and an HDMI port with 4K (30Hz) support. With this, you don’t have to carry around multiple adapters.

If you don’t want a dock, or you can’t find a dock with the mix of connections you need, Apple or another company probably has an adapter for you. We’ve come up with this guide to help you sort out what you need, and we link to the appropriate adapter in the online Apple Store or on Amazon.

Be sure to check the return policies; sometimes adapters from third-parties don’t work. Read user reviews whenever possible, and read the specifications to make sure the adapter can do what you need it to do.

If there’s a connection we missed, or you have advice on what adapters to buy, let us know on Twitter or Facebook.

How to connect USB-C devices

The Thunderbolt ports in the current 24-inch iMac, MacBook Pro, and MacBook Air work with USB-C devices, which have the same connector shape. If you want to use a USB-C device, you can just plug it into one of the Thunderbolt ports. No adapter necessary. Whew.

How to connect USB-A devices

USB-A is the USB connector with which you’re probably most familiar. It’s the USB connector that was on the previous MacBooks. (Terms like USB 4, USB 3 and USB 2 refer to the speed at which data travels through the connector.)

You can get a dock, like the before-mentioned Satechi. Or you can get Apple’s $19 USB-C to USB AdapterEdit non-product linkRemove non-product link.

Apple USB-C to USB Adapter

Apple

If you need to connect multiple USB-A devices, get a USB-C to USB-A hub. Anker sells a USB-C to 4-Port USB 3.0 HubEdit non-product linkRemove non-product link ($25 on Amazon) that provides four USB-A ports. 

How to connect micro B SuperSpeed devices

This connector is often used with external storage devices. You’ll need a new cable, like the $15 StarTech USB C to Micro USB CableEdit non-product linkRemove non-product link. 

The name of the cable is confusing, because it could be mistaken for micro USB. But if you check the product page on StarTech’s website, you can see a clear shot of the micro B SuperSpeed connector on the cable, which is quite different from micro USB.

How to connect an iPhone or iPad

For the iPhone and iPad, if you are still using the USB-A to Lightning (or 30-pin if you’re using an older device) cable that came with your device, you can get the USB-C to USB AdapterEdit non-product linkRemove non-product link mentioned above in the USB-A section.

Don’t want an adapter? Buy a $19 Lightning to USB-C CableEdit non-product linkRemove non-product link (1m). You can also get a 2-meter version for $29.

More recent iPhones and iPads include a USB-C to Lightning cable, and the iPad Pro includes a USB-C charging cable, so you don’t need the adapter for those devices.

How to connect the Lightning EarPods

There’s now a USB-C to Lightning adapter, thanks to the folks at Anker. It’s $25 on AmazonEdit non-product linkRemove non-product link.Remove non-product link This adapter has a female Lightning connector on one end, so you can plug in your Lightning earphones. The other side is a standard USB-C connector that you plug into your MacBook or 24-inch iMac.

anker usbc lightning audio

How to connect headphones with a 3.5mm headphone plug

You’re in luck. The MacBook Pro, MacBook Air, and 24-inch iMac have a 3.5mm headphone jack. Just plug it in and you’re good to go. That was easy.

macbookpro 13 tbolt3 ports

Now, say you need a second headphone jack. You can use a splitter, like the Belkin Speaker and Headphone 3.5 mm AUX Audio Cable Splitter ($5 on AmazonEdit non-product linkRemove non-product link). The $12 Belkin RockStar 5-Jack Multi Headphone Audio SplitterEdit non-product linkRemove non-product link plugs into the headphone jack and adds five jacks.

How to connect Thunderbolt 1 and Thunderbolt 2 devices

Older versions of Thunderbolt have a different connector than the Thunderbolt connector on the current MacBook Air, MacBook Pro, and 24-inch iMac. The adapter you need is Apple’s $49 Thunderbolt 3 (USB-C) to Thunderbolt 2 AdapterEdit non-product linkRemove non-product link.

Thunderbolt 3 USB-C to Thunderbolt 2 Adapter

Apple

How to connect an external display

This one can eat up a chunk of your budget, because there are so many different types of display connectors. Be prepared to buy several adapters.

DisplayPort and mini DisplayPort

To connect to a DisplayPort display, you need a USB-C to DisplayPort cable or adapter. Amazon sells the Cable Matters USB-C to DisplayPort Adapter cableEdit non-product linkRemove non-product link for $18, and it supports 4K video at 60Hz.

To connect a display with mini DisplayPort, you need an adapter like the Answin USB C to Mini DisplayPort adapter ($18 on AmazonRemove product link).

HDMI

Apple offers the USB-C Digital AV Multiport AdapterEdit non-product linkRemove non-product link, a $69 device that also provides a USB-A port and a USB-C port that’s for charging only. Be warned: Apple released a new version of this adapter (model number A2119) in August 2019 that supports HDMI 2.0. The older version (model number A1621) supports HDMI 1.4. When shopping, check the model number (at an Apple store, you likely will get the new model). Apple has a support document that details the differences between the two adapters.

apple-usb-c-digital-av-multiport-adapter

Apple

If you don’t want to spend that much, you can get an adapter that’s just a USB-C to HDMI adapter, such as Anker’s USB-C to HDMI Adapter ($17 on AmazonEdit non-product linkRemove non-product link). We really like the Nonda USB-C to HDMI Adapter ($18 on AmazonEdit non-product linkRemove non-product link). When shopping for such adapters, look out for at least 1080p support. The Nonda adapter has 4K video support.

DVI

Cable Matters has a 6-foot USB-C to DVI Adapter ($20 on AmazonEdit non-product linkRemove non-product link). They also sell 3-foot ($19) and 10-foot ($23) versions.

VGA

To connect a VGA display, Apple has a USB-C VGA Multiport Adapter ($66 on AmazonEdit non-product linkRemove non-product link). In addition to a VGA to USB-C connection, it also provides a USB-A port for connecting a USB device, and a USB-C charging port to keep your laptop battery happy.

On the more affordable side but without the USB ports is the Benfei USB-C to VGA Adapter, which is available on Amazon for $13Edit non-product linkRemove non-product link. 

How to connect to ethernet

You’ll probably use Wi-Fi most of the time, but using an ethernet connection has its advantages. To connect to an ethernet network, you need an adapter like the Belkin USB-C to Gigabit Ethernet Adapter, which is available on AmazonEdit non-product linkRemove non-product link for $27.

belkin usbc ethernet adapter

How to connect SD cards

If you use a DLSR or other type of stand-alone camera, it might have a way to transfer your files wirelessly. If not, you need an adapter to access the SD card, like the Cable Matters Dual Slot USB C Card Reader ($10 on AmazonEdit non-product linkRemove non-product link).

cable matters dual slot usb c card reader

If you have a USB-A card reader, you can try using the Apple’s $19 USB-C to USB AdapterEdit non-product linkRemove non-product link, or get a USB-C dock.

How to connect FireWire devices

If you have a FireWire to USB-A cable, you can try using Apple’s $19 USB-C to USB Adapter. If you have a device with a FireWire 1394 4-pin connector—it was commonly used on video cameras and looks like this—and you need a way to connect, you can try using a USB-A to FireWire 1394 4-pin cable ($8 on Amazon) with the Apple’s USB-C to USB Adapter.

Trying to connect FireWire 400 and 800 devices gets iffy. Apple has a Thunderbolt to FireWire AdapterEdit non-product linkRemove non-product link for $29, but it has a older Thunderbolt connector that doesn’t plug into the Thunderbolt port on a new MacBook Pro, MacBook Air, or 24-inch iMac.

apple thunderbolt to firewire adapter

Apple

You could try daisy-chaining adapters, but that’s always risky and may not work, not to mention potentially bad for the adapters. Plug the Thunderbolt to FireWire Adapter into Apple’s $49 Thunderbolt 3 (USB-C) to Thunderbolt 2 AdapterEdit non-product linkRemove non-product link and then plug that into the Mac.

How to connect a printer with USB-B

Many printers nowadays have wireless support, so there’s no need for a cable. But maybe you have an older printer, or you find wireless printing unreliable. Most consumer printers have a USB-B port. It’s a squarish connector, much different from USB-A or USB-C.

You need a cable like the Cable Matters USB C Printer Cable, which has a USB-C to USB-B connection. A 1 meter cable is $7Edit non-product linkRemove non-product link; other lengths are available.

cable matters usbc usbb cable

If you already have a USB-C to USB AdapterEdit non-product linkRemove non-product link, you can take the USB-A to USB-B cable that came with your printer and plug it into the adapter. Then you plug the adapter into the laptop.

How to add a classic MagSafe power connector to the MacBook Air or MacBook Pro

The power adapter that comes with the new MacBook Pro and MacBook Air doesn’t have a breakaway MagSafe connector. MagSafe was a laptop lifesaver in instances where someone tripped over the power cable.

But you can still add a MagSafe connector. Tesha’s USB C Magnetic Charger Charging Cable  ($20 on AmazonEdit non-product linkRemove non-product link) is a power-only cable that has an adapter that acts like a MagSafe connector. It is available in silver or black.

Sours: https://www.macworld.com/article/229045/thunderbolt-3-adapter-m1-imac-macbook-pro-mac-mini-usb-displayport-hdmi-ethernet.html

Displayport mac pro

Mac – connect a DisplayPort monitor to the Thunderbolt port on a Mac, and vice-versa

Connect a DisplayPort display to Thunderbolt port

As Apple says on their Thunderbolt product page:

And because Thunderbolt is based on DisplayPort technology, the video standard for high-resolution displays, any Mini DisplayPort display plugs right into the Thunderbolt port. To connect a DisplayPort, DVI, HDMI, or VGA display, just use an existing adapter.

To confirm this, here's what Intel says:

And Thunderbolt enabled products are compatible with existing DisplayPort devices so you don’t have to go buy a new display to take advantage of a Thunderbolt technology enabled computer.

... emphasis mine.

This means that you can attach your DisplayPort-equipped monitor to any Mac with a Thunderbolt plug. If your display has DisplayPort only (i.e. not Mini DisplayPort), you will of course need an adapter to do this.

For the other display, just use the HDMI connection. You could also daisy-chain two displays together, if these displays support it and have two DisplayPorts each.


Connect a Thunderbolt display to (Mini) DisplayPort

The opposite seems to be possible, as the physical connection is the same. However, Apple states differently. Their tech specs don't mention the Mac Pro being capable of using it. The problem will be that you can't update the display's firmware and use the data pipe.

So, all in all, it won't work.

Ars Technica has a recent article about this, which states that there might be issues:

What is really going to rub folks the wrong way, we suspect, is that the Thunderbolt Display is not configured to work with a miniDP display plugged in to its Thunderbolt port. It wouldn't be surprising if more than one user with an existing 27" Cinema Display or other miniDP display got a Thunderbolt-equipped Mac and ordered a Thunderbolt display expecting to be able to add the miniDP display at the end of the chain.

Sours: https://itectec.com/superuser/can-i-connect-a-displayport-monitor-to-the-thunderbolt-port-on-a-mac-and-vice-versa/
Two External Monitors 13\

My legs pressed me closer and closer to you. You wanted everything for me, as if you wanted to eat everything without a trace. Your moans became constant, loud, your nails dug into my back, you were overwhelmed with pleasure. I didn't stop.

Now discussing:

But he only smiled. She burst into tears, please don't. He took his panties off the floor and stuffed it into her mouth.



1629 1630 1631 1632 1633