Shipping urban dictionary

Shipping urban dictionary DEFAULT

The act of taking two fictional or non-fictional characters, and personally wishing for them to either be in love, or for them to have sex.

The term has many background terms.

If you are a person who wants to characters/people shipped, you are a shipper.

The term is changed to "Sailing Ship" whenever the ship that was made becomes successful. For example: two fictional characters falling in love after multiple ships of said characters were made.

"Jesus Christ, my hormones are shipping Cait and Frodo so fucking hard right now."

"Never knew that Rick and Michonne's ship would sail."

by Squirrel_Live May 25, 2019

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A verb used to describe the action of wishing for two people to enter a relationship (whether romantic or occasionally platonic) in books, movies, tv shows or real life. Shipping can often happen involuntarily, and it is the majority of what happens on the website, Tumblr. There are some very popular ships, some unpopular, as well as often lots of controversy between ships from the same fandom.

"Do you ship Klaroline, or Steroline?"

"Omigod. I am definitely shipping Olicity."

by S.C.Moffatt October 18, 2014

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Sours: https://www.urbandictionary.com/define.php?term=shipped

shipping

This shows grade level based on the word's complexity.

1


noun

the act or business of a person or thing that ships.

a number of ships, especially merchant ships, taken as a whole; tonnage.

Obsolete. a voyage.

QUIZ

ARE YOU A TRUE BLUE CHAMPION OF THESE "BLUE" SYNONYMS?

We could talk until we're blue in the face about this quiz on words for the color "blue," but we think you should take the quiz and find out if you're a whiz at these colorful terms.

Question 1 of 8

Which of the following words describes “sky blue”?

Origin of shipping

1

Middle English word dating back to 1250–1300; see origin at ship1, -ing1

OTHER WORDS FROM shipping

non·ship·ping,adjective

Words nearby shipping

ship out, shipowner, shippable, shipper, shippie, shipping, shipping agent, shipping articles, shipping clerk, shipping fever, shipping lane

Other definitions for shipping (2 of 2)

shipping2


nounSlang.

the act or practice of discussing, writing about, or hoping for a romantic relationship between fictional characters, as in fan fiction, or between famous people, whether or not the romance actually exists in the book, show, etc., or in real life:the shipping of TV characters;shipping in webcomics.

Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2021

ABOUT THIS WORD

What else does shipping mean?

Shipping is the act of wanting two or more fictional characters or celebrities to end up in a relationship, usually romantic.

Where does shipping come from?

Though the term didn’t come around until later, the concept of shipping itself predated any label. The first widely-known ship, appearing around the mid-1970s, was the romantic pairing of Kirk and Spock or Kirk/Spock from Star Trek. (The slash between the names is why fan fiction about two men is now called slash. It has since extended to women with femslash.)

The actual term ship apparently came from the X-Files fandom. Fans who wanted Mulder and Scully to get together were called relationshippers starting in the 1990s. These people were known as r’shippers or shippers for short by as early as 1996. 1996 was a big year for shipping, as ‘ship as a noun appeared in discussions about the canonization of a romantic relationship between the two characters. By 1998, ship was a full-on verb.

By 1999, the terms shipper and ship appeared in Star Trek fandom, possibly indicating a cross-pollination of fandoms, perhaps because both shows involve extraterrestrials. A shipper is a person who engages in shipping. They might write fan fiction or draw art of characters involved, often with the characters ending up in a relationship or already being in a relationship. They might also discuss their ship with fellow fans, sometimes presenting evidence as to the characters’ chemistry.

Not too soon after these words entered the Star Trek fandom, they spread to other fandoms like Harry Potter, which was growing its own fanbase following the popularity of the books. The term exploded by 2002, and by 2003, it was finally added to Urban Dictionary, signaling that its presence online had been secured.

Even decades since Kirk/Spock, shipping thrives. It also continues to evolve, with fans shipping real-life personalities and celebrities (Larry Stylinson, a shipping of One Direction’s Harry Styles and Louis Tomlinson) as well as developing increasing subgenres and increasingly large fandoms. However, this type of shipping can be somewhat controversial, and people doing it are sometimes warned to be careful to not cross boundaries.

How is shipping used in real life?

As a verb, people usually declare their affinity for a certain pairing by saying something like “I ship Character X and Character Y!” Alternatively, when faced with a situation that makes characters seem cute together, they may say “I ship it.” Someone who so ships a character is a shipper (e.g., a Ron Weasley/Hermione Granger shipper in Harry Potter fandom).

Many fans have strong opinions about shipping, which may result in shippingwars within a fandom, where each side wants a different ship to become canon, or part of the actual story or narrative.

Ships, which are the pairings themselves, have a variety of ways they can be named. Blending character names together is a popular choice. Though many are funny, many are more straightforward and aren’t as laughter-inducing. Ships may also be known under another name entirely. For example the ship name for Finn and Poe from Star Wars is Stormpilot because Finn was formerly a stormtrooper and Poe is a rebel pilot. And, the ship for the characters in the 17th season of Pokémon:XY are called AmourShipping.

While making up new names is fun, the most unambiguous way to name a ship is to place character names next to each other, separated by an x or a /. For example, Ash/Misty or AshxMisty. This more easily accommodates polyamorousships as well, like Ron/Harry/Hermione in Harry Potter.

Note

This content is not meant to be a formal definition of this term. Rather, it is an informal summary that seeks to provide supplemental information and context important to know or keep in mind about the term’s history, meaning, and usage.

How to use shipping in a sentence

  • The deal also includes free shipping for Amazon Prime members.

    Today’s best tech deals: AirPods Pro, Fitbit trackers, Lenovo ThinkPads, and more|Ars Staff|February 2, 2021|Ars Technica

  • This very rapid ecommerce growth did come with some hiccups, including a crushing number of packages leading to shipping delays at public and private carriers, including the USPS and UPS.

    Leveraging customer data and AI to drive ecommerce growth in 2021|Tracey Ryan O’Connor|February 1, 2021|Search Engine Watch

  • A 23-year-old who works for a shipping company, and who declined to give his name for safety fears, said he was disgusted by the military.

    In Myanmar coup, Suu Kyi’s ouster heralds return to military rule|Shibani Mahtani, Timothy McLaughlin|February 1, 2021|Washington Post

  • Along with the anticipated delayed shipping and production times, unfortunately our onboarding process with Neiman Marcus was initially put on hold.

    The future of maternity workwear is all in the details|Rachel King|January 31, 2021|Fortune

  • Araujo says they’re also looking into making the sauce available for national and international shipping.

    Why Caracas Arepa Bar’s House Salsa Is a Condiment All-Star|Tanay Warerkar|January 29, 2021|Eater

  • Manufacturing merchandise, publicity (a radio ad in SF, Facebook ads, venue specific advertising), supplies, shipping.

    How Much Money Does a Band Really Make on Tour?|Jack Conte|December 8, 2014|DAILY BEAST

  • A plastic factory, a hardware supplier, and shipping–and-receiving giants like Fed-Ex and DHL are neighboring businesses.

    House of the Witch: The Renegade Craft Brewers of Panama|Jeff Campagna|November 30, 2014|DAILY BEAST

  • Higher shipping costs mean additional friction for companies working in the Canadian oil sands.

    Why the Keystone XL Pipeline May Not Be Built|Robert Bryce|November 19, 2014|DAILY BEAST

  • Although new to the shipping industry, Kaiser proved a success in turning out the ships America needed.

    Does Ebola Need An Organization Man?|Nicolaus Mills|October 26, 2014|DAILY BEAST

  • By Abby Haglage The shipping company heads to court Tuesday to face $1.6 billion in charges of conspiring to traffic illegal meds.

    The Best of the Beast, Aug 3-4||August 2, 2014|DAILY BEAST

  • She was only having a look; flying around the shipping and Headquarters camp at a great height, but dropping no bombs.

    Gallipoli Diary, Volume I|Ian Hamilton

  • That curious, almost ridiculous-looking craft, was among the aristocracy of shipping.

    The Floating Light of the Goodwin Sands|R.M. Ballantyne

  • After curing, it is removed to the packing house and baled in packages, and then transported on mules to the coast for shipping.

    Tobacco; Its History, Varieties, Culture, Manufacture and Commerce|E. R. Billings.

  • The long cavalcade is seen disappearing down the hill, while away in the distance is Portsmouth Harbour with its crowded shipping.

    The Portsmouth Road and Its Tributaries|Charles G. Harper

  • The Pryor makes the heaviest, richest shipping, and can only be grown to perfection on alluvial or heavily manured lands.

    Tobacco; Its History, Varieties, Culture, Manufacture and Commerce|E. R. Billings.

British Dictionary definitions for shipping


noun

  1. the business of transporting freight, esp by ship
  2. (as modifier)a shipping magnate; shipping line
  1. ships collectivelythere is a lot of shipping in the Channel
  2. the tonnage of a number of shipsshipping for this year exceeded that of last

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012

Sours: https://www.dictionary.com/browse/shipping
  1. Pensacola beach suites
  2. Heartbeat turkish drama
  3. Walgreens liquid laxative
  4. Craftsman industrial ratchet

'I ship them' — the strange concept that's changing the way people talk about relationships

If you see someone on Twitter or Tumblr discussing “shipping,” don’t assume they’re talking about mailing a package. The term has taken on new life thanks to people, predominantly teens, using the word to discuss ideal relationships between fictional characters, celebrities, and even their own friends.

Shipping originated in the world of fandoms, which are groups of hardcore fans of movies, books, and television shows. According to the ridiculousy comprehensive fandom slang guides of the internet, the word derives from "relationshipper," typically shortened to just "shipper." Relationshippers are people who care deeply about the romantic relationships between their favorite characters — and sometimes, celebrities or even the people in their own lives.

So instead of saying, "Romeo and Juliet are a perfect couple," a Shakespeare-loving shipper would say, "I ship Romeo and Juliet."

"To say, ‘I ship that couple,’ is a short way for someone to say that they believe in a couple, that they’re rooting for them to succeed,” Michael, my friend's 15-year-old brother who is a high school sophomore from New Jersey, told Tech Insider. “The term has evolved in teenage slang to become a widespread part of our vocabulary."

A quick Twitter search for the phrase “I ship them” will show you just how widespread the term has become, with thousands of people all over the world tweeting about their favorite couples.

“Kids often use the word when talking about [characters from] TV shows and movies, but it’s also become a slang term for describing any two people that you want to get together,” Michael explained.

In a sense, some people were shipping over 100 years ago, according to Know Your Meme. They just weren't calling it that. In 1913, the book “Old Friends, New Fancies” featured characters from Jane Austen’s “Pride and Prejudice” re-imagined in new relationships.

Today, ships have gone digital. Since the mid-aughts, shipping has become common in the world of online fan fiction, where people create stories based on beloved characters from TV shows, movies, and books. A definition for shipping was added to Urban Dictionary in 2005.

Here’s the definition.

shipping urban dictionary
Urban Dictionary

If you were a fan of the Harry Potter series, for example, "you could say, ‘I ship Hermione Granger and Harry Potter,'” Michael explained.

In case you’re not a Potter fan, Harry and Hermione don’t wind up together at the end of the series. Shippers of the pair believe that the two wizards should have ended up together. There’s even an entire Tumblr community devoted listing reasons why Harry and Hermione are meant for each other.

harry hermione ship
Tumblr

“Ships are all about your imagination, so they could be impossible or completely realistic,” Gabby, a childhood friend and high school senior from Massachusetts, told TI.

For example, celebrity couple Kim Kardashian West and Kanye West are one of the hottest “real-life ships” around right now, she says.

As for an “impossible ship,” Gabby says one of the most popular at her school is “Larry Stylinson,” a fictional coupling of One Direction band members Louis Tomlinson and Harry Styles. 

Shipping isn’t limited to fictional characters and celebrities. Teenagers are also starting to use the verb to talk about each other.

“Fans will still ship more than other teens, but lately I've seen it [shipping] leaking more into normal teenage conversation,” Michael told TI.

For Gabby and her classmates, saying "I ship you two" is the teenage equivalent of saying two people would make a great couple. 

“My friend used to have a huge crush on a this boy,” explained Gabby. “When she said she liked him, I told her, ‘OMG I totally ship you two!'”

As for older generations, it doesn't look like moms will be shipping their favorite couples anytime soon. 

 

Sours: https://www.businessinsider.com/what-shipping-means-to-teens-2015-8

What does ship mean in relationship?

Shipping, initially derived from the word relationship, is the desire by fans for two or more people, either real-life people or fictional characters (in film, literature, television etc.) to be in a romantic relationship.

Click to see full answer.

Thereof, what does to ship someone mean?

Shipping is the act of wanting two or more fictional characters or celebrities to end up in a relationship, usually romantic.

One may also ask, what is a ship date slang? In those days, one could not go far without running into the internet slang term “ship.” Ship, a term so ubiquitous in fandom it has its own Wikipedia page , was immortalized on Urban Dictionary in 2003, in noun and verb form. Noun, short for relationship. Verb, to endorse a romantic relationship.

Likewise, people ask, what does it mean the couple everyone ships?

A ship (noun) is a romantic relationship that hasn't yet been established but is desired among a fandom. So, if you 'ship them', it's two people that you want to be in a romantic relationship (who aren't yet in a relationship).

What does I ship mean on Instagram?

Romantic relationship

Sours: https://askinglot.com/what-does-ship-mean-in-relationship

Dictionary shipping urban

Shipping (fandom)

Desire by fans for fictional characters or real-life people to be in a relationship

Shipping (derived from the word relationship) is the desire by followers of a fandom for two or more people, either real-life people or fictional characters (in film, literature, television series, etc.) to be in a romantic or sexual relationship. It is considered a general term for fans' involvement with the ongoing character development of two people's character arcs in a work of fiction. Shipping often takes the form of unofficial creative works, including fanfiction stories and fan art, most often published on the internet.

Etymology[edit]

The actual usage of the term "ship" saw its origin around 1995 by internet fans of the TV show The X-Files, who believed the two main characters, Fox Mulder and Dana Scully, should be engaged in a romantic relationship.[1][2] They called themselves "relationshippers," at first;[1][3][4] then R'shipper, 'shipper, and finally just shipper.[4][5][6]

The oldest uses of the noun ship and the noun shipper, as recorded by the Oxford English Dictionary,[7][8][9][10] date back to 1996 postings on the Usenet group alt.tv.x-files;[11]shipping is first attested slightly later, in 1997 and the verb to ship in 1998.[12]

Notation and terminology[edit]

"Ship" and its derivatives in this context have since come to be in wide and versatile use. "Shipping" refers to the phenomenon; a "ship" is the concept of a fictional couple; to "ship" a couple means to have an affinity for it in one way or another; a "shipper" or a "fangirl/boy" is somebody significantly involved with such an affinity; a "shipping war" is when two ships contradict each other, causing fans of each ship to argue.[13][14] A ship that a particular fan prefers over all others is called an OTP, which stands for one true pairing.[15][14]

When discussing shipping, a ship that has been confirmed by its series is called a canon ship or sailed ship, whereas a sunk ship is a ship that has been proven unable to exist in canon.[13][16][17][18]

Naming conventions[edit]

Various naming conventions have developed in different online communities to refer to prospective couples, likely due to the ambiguity and cumbersomeness of the "Character 1 and Character 2" format. The first method deployed was using a slash,[14] first used for Kirk/Spock.[19] This is today mainly used for same-sex ships; fanfiction with these pairings is known as slash fiction.[20][19]Name blending is often used to refer to a couple, like 'Reylo' for Kylo Ren and Rey in Star Wars franchise, 'Destiel' for Dean Winchester and Castiel in the Supernatural TV series, and 'Bubbline' referring to Princess Bubblegum and Marceline the Vampire Queen in Adventure Time.[21][22][23]Portmanteaus and clipped compounds are used not only to abbreviate character pairings but also to create a name for the ship itself. For example, 'Klance' forms a clipped compound, and an abbreviated form of the complete names Keith and Lance in Voltron: Legendary Defender.[24] 'Sculder' in this case Dana Scully and Fox Mulder in The X-Files, is an example of surnames being blended, although most X-Files fans use the term "MSR" (Mulder-Scully Relationship), as is "MoonBoon" to stand for Zarya Moonwolf and Kitty Boon in Mysticons.[25][26] These combinations of names often follow systematic phonological principles.[27]

Many fandom-specific variants exist and often use fandom-specific terminology.[28][14][29] These often employ words that describe the relationship between characters in the context of the fictional universe and simply add the word "Shipping" to the end. Other terminology include using a combination of the characters' names and codes as a ship name. For instance, ship names for characters in RWBY include "Bumbleby" (Blake Belladonna and Yang Xiao Long) and "White Rose" (Weiss Schnee and Ruby Rose).[30][31]

Types of ships[edit]

Same-sex[edit]

Main article: Slash fiction

Within shipping, same-sex pairings are popular; they are sometimes known as "slash and femslash".[19][32][33] Within the anime/manga fandom, borrowed Japanese terms such as yaoi and yuri may be used.[34][35] A person who supports same-sex pairings and reads or writes slash fiction may be referred to as a "slasher",[36] although the Japanese term "fujoshi" for women who like same-sex stories,[37] and "fudanshi" as the male equivalent of that,[38][39] are also commonly used within the community, especially by fans of yaoi (boy on boy) and fans of Yuri (girl on girl).

The term "slash" predates the use of "shipping" by at least some 20 years. It was originally coined as a term to describe a pairing of Kirk and Spock of Star Trek, Kirk/Spock (or "K/S"; sometimes spoken "Kirk-slash-Spock", whence "slash") homosexual fan fiction.[40][41] Other early slash pairings came from characters in Starsky & Hutch and Dirty Harry."[42] For a time in the late 1970s and early 1980s, "K/S" was used to describe such fan fiction,[43] regardless of whether or not they were related to Star Trek, and eventually "slash" became a universal term to describe all homosexual-themed fan works.[44][45] It now refers to a genre of fan fiction that focuses on romantic or sexual relationships between fictional characters of the same sex,[46][47][48] Even so, the slash mark itself is a shorthand label for a romantic relationship, regardless of whether the pairing is heterosexual or homosexual, romantic or erotic.[49]

The first K/S stories were not immediately accepted by all Star Trek fans.[50] Early slash fans in England feared that they would be arrested, because slash violated the obscenity laws there at the time.[51] Many early slash stories were based on a pairing of two close friends, a "hero dyad", or "One True Pairing", such as Kirk/Spock or Starsky/Hutch; conversely, a classic pairing between foils was that of Blake/Avon from Blake's 7.[49] With the advent of the Internet, slash fiction writers created mailing lists (which gradually took the place of amateur press associations (APA), and websites such as FanFiction.Net[52] (which gradually started taking the place of zines). With the Internet, the number of fandoms represented increased dramatically, especially those devoted to science fiction, fantasy, and police dramas.[53] The Internet also increased the level of reader interaction, making it easier for fans to comment on stories, give episode reviews, and discuss comment on trends in slash fandom itself. Websites and fanzines dedicated to fans of The X-Files, Stargate, Harry Potter, and Buffy the Vampire Slayer became common, with tens of thousands of slash stories available.[52]

Due to the lack of canonical homosexual relationships in source media at the time that slash fiction began to emerge, some came to see slash fiction stories as being exclusively outside their respective canons and held that the term "slash fiction" applies only when the characters' same-sex romantic or erotic relationship about which an author writes is not part of the source's canon and that fan fiction about canonical same-sex relationships is therefore not slash.[49] Femslash, a subgenre of slash fiction which focuses on romantic and/or sexual relationships between female fictional characters,[54] on the other hand, are typically heterosexual in the canon universe, but when fictions focus on lesbian characters, the stories are often labeled as femslash for convenience.[55] Original slash stories are those that contain male/male content, based on perceived homoerotic subtext between fictitious characters.[56] This can be sourced from a variety of media content, such as manga, TV shows, movies and books amongst others. These works are now generally published online[57] and use the same forms of rating, warnings and terminology that is commonly used by slash writers.

In May 2020, She-Ra and the Princesses of Power showrunner Noelle Stevenson said that while shipping has been a great tool for fans, she does not want films or shows with just occasional glances, or for all same-sex relationships to be portrayed as shipping.[58] She argued that the Catra/Adora relationship in She-Ra and the Princesses of Power is not an example of shipping, since it is "central to the plot" of the story.

Polyamory[edit]

Love triangles are commonly used as a plot device to cause conflict in the story. The easy way around this is to pair all three together, or one member with both potential romantic partners.[59][60][61] This is not to be confused with a harem, which is usually just a single character being sought out by many others. Situations such as that may be the one to cause a polyamorous relationship or characters may be in such a relationship.[62][63] Polyamory is not always caused by love triangles,[64][65] but those that don't tend to be less accepted by the fandom.[14] In some fan fictions, characters are given a polyamorous identity, including warning "poly readers that the central characters are monogamous."[66]

Interspecies[edit]

Interspecies shipping, which is usually displayed in fandoms of media consisting of animals of various species,[67] is usually not problematic until a human is paired with a non-humanoid, sapient character.[68] Shipping a human character with an animal or furry character can be controversial as it treads a contentious line with bestiality.[69][70]

Age difference[edit]

Controversial age differences have a wide range. An elderly adult with a young adult, anyone with an immortal or slowly aging being, teenagers with young adults, or even ships involving fictional children are all part of this category.[5][71][72][73] Connected to this are continued arguments about which ships are "best" and "right," with inevitable shipping wars.[74][75][76]

Love-hate[edit]

Romances between two characters who canonically hate each other also occur.[77][78][79] It is often interpreted that the characters share sexual tension between each other, having a love–hate relationship. An example would be pairing Daniel LaRusso and his bully and rival Johnny from The Karate Kid and Cobra Kai.[80] This is one of the most popular types of shipping.[81][82]

Notable fandoms[edit]

Daria fandom[edit]

Daria was marked throughout its run by shipper debate, primarily over whether the title character should have a relationship with Trent Lane.[83] A common argument was that it would signal a turning away from the more subversive aspects of Daria's character, such as bitter criticism of romantic relationships.

In a later episode, Tom Sloane, who became Jane's boyfriend, is introduced, drawing a wedge between Jane and Daria, for instance.[84] Daria and Tom warmed up to each other throughout the fourth season, leading up to its finale.[85] With Jane and Tom's relationship in crisis, a heated argument between Daria and Tom led up to a kiss in Tom's car. In the TV movie Is it Fall Yet?, Daria decided to begin a relationship with Tom, and Daria and Jane patched up their friendship. This caused an uproar, and conversation turned to whether Tom was more appropriate than Trent had been. The debate was satirized by the show's writers in a piece on MTV's website.[86]

In interviews done after the series' run, series co-creator Glenn Eichler revealed that "any viewer who really thought that Daria and Trent could [have] a relationship was just not watching the show we were making,"[87] Tom came about because "going into our fourth year... I thought it was really pushing credibility for Daria to have only had one or two dates during her whole high school career," and "teaser" episodes like "Pierce Me" were "intended to provide some fun for that portion of the audience that was so invested in the romance angle. The fact that those moments were few and far between should have given some indication that the series was not about Daria's love life."[88]

Harry Potter fandom[edit]

The Harry Potter series' most contentious ship debates came from supporters of various potential pairings:

Author J.K. Rowling appeared to tamp down the first possibility even before the debates got truly started following the release of Goblet of Fire in July 2000, when she stated in October 1999 that Harry and Hermione "are very platonic friends" after the release of Prisoner of Azkaban in July 1999.[98] An interview with J.K. Rowling shortly after the release of Harry Potter and the Half-Blood Prince, in 2005 caused significant controversy within the fandom. An interviewer stated that Harry/Hermione fans were delusional, to which Rowling responded that they were "still valued members of her readership", but that there had been "anvil-sized hints" for future Ron/Hermione and Harry/Ginny relationships, incorporated in the book itself,[99] and that Harry/Hermione shippers needed to re-read the books. This caused an uproar among Harry/Hermione shippers, some of whom claimed they would return their copies of Harry Potter and the Half-Blood Prince and boycott future Harry Potter books.[100]

Rowling's attitude towards the shipping phenomenon has varied between amused and bewildered to frustrated. In that same interview, she stated that she was a "relative newcomer to the world of shipping" and that it was "extraordinary" to meet the shippers, calling it a "huge underworld" seething beneath her.[101] Rowling stated in an interview in February 2014 in Wonderland Magazine, however, that she thought that realistically Hermione and Ron had "too much fundamental incompatibility," that they were written together "as a form of wish fulfillment" to reconcile a relationship she herself was once in. She went on to say that perhaps with marriage counseling Ron and Hermione would have been all right.[102]

Xena: Warrior Princess fandom[edit]

The 1995–2001 action/fantasy TV series Xena: Warrior Princess produced "shipping wars," with spillover from real-world debates about homosexuality and gay rights.[35] The show spawned various websites, online discussion forums, works of Xena fan fiction and several unofficial fan-made productions, with members of the fandom writing numerous fanfiction stories of the series, numbering in the thousands, and popularized the term altfic to refer to fanfiction about loving relationships between women.[103][104][105]

Shortly after the series' debut, fans started discussing the possibility of a relationship between Xena and her sidekick and best friend Gabrielle.[106][107] According to journalist Cathy Young, the quarrel between fans about a relationship between Xena and Gabrielle had a sociopolitical angle, in which some on the anti-relationship side were "undoubtedly driven by bona fide bigotry", while some on the pro-relationship side were lesbians who "approached the argument as a real-life gay rights struggle" in which "denying a sexual relationship between Xena and Gabrielle was tantamount to denying the reality of their own lives".[106] She argued that the fact that staff paid attention to fan opinions may have led to problems, with an "incentive for the rival groups to out-shout one another to make themselves heard," leading to shipping wars.

In 2000, during the airing of the fifth season, the intensity of the "shipping wars" was chronicled (from a non-subtexter's point of view) in an article titled "The Discrimination in the Xenaverse" in the online Xena fan magazine Whoosh!,[108] and numerous letters in response.[109] The wars did not abate after the 2001 series finale. With no new material from the show itself, the debates were fueled by various statements from the cast and crew. In January 2003, Xena star Lucy Lawless told Lesbian News magazine that after watching the finale, she had come to believe that Xena and Gabrielle's relationship was "definitely gay".[110] In March 2005, one-time Xena screenwriter Katherine Fugate, an outspoken supporter of the Xena/Gabrielle pairing, posted a statement on her website appealing for tolerance in the fandom, telling people to "allow everyone the grace to take what they need from the show and make it theirs," whether they see Xena with Gabrielle, or Xena with Ares.[111] She also called for fans to "stop the arguing and name-calling."

References[edit]

  1. ^ abOwen, Maggie (June 29, 2018). "The Sweet Science of Shipping". Fandom. Archived from the original on January 15, 2021. Retrieved May 31, 2021.
  2. ^"How The X-Files helped shape modern fandom — including shipping". SYFY. March 20, 2018. Archived from the original on March 6, 2021.
  3. ^ abKircher, Madison Malone (August 3, 2015). "'I ship them' — the strange concept that's changing the way people talk about relationships". Business Insider. Archived from the original on January 12, 2021. Retrieved May 30, 2021.
  4. ^ abWax, Alyse (May 21, 2020). "The potency of Fox Mulder's sportswear, from the red Speedo to Georgetown sweats". SYFY. Archived from the original on February 23, 2021. Retrieved May 31, 2021.
  5. ^ abEtman, Colleen (June 28, 2018). "Why We Need to End Toxic Shipping As A Fandom Community". ComicsVerse. Archived from the original on January 25, 2021. Retrieved May 31, 2021.
  6. ^Iovine, Anna (November 20, 2019). "It's time to add internet slang 'ship' to the dictionary". Mashable. Archived from the original on December 3, 2020. Retrieved May 31, 2021.
  7. ^"ship, n.3". Oxford English Dictionary (Online ed.). Oxford University Press. (Subscription or participating institution membership required.)
  8. ^"shipper, n.2". Oxford English Dictionary (Online ed.). Oxford University Press. (Subscription or participating institution membership required.)
  9. ^"shipping, n.2". Oxford English Dictionary (Online ed.). Oxford University Press. (Subscription or participating institution membership required.)
  10. ^"ship, v.2". Oxford English Dictionary (Online ed.). Oxford University Press. (Subscription or participating institution membership required.)
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Sours: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Shipping_(fandom)
FUNNIEST URBAN DICTIONARY TERMS

The act of taking two fictional or non-fictional characters, and personally wishing for them to either be in love, or for them to have sex.

The term has many background terms.

If you are a person who wants to characters/people shipped, you are a shipper.

The term is changed to "Sailing Ship" whenever the ship that was made becomes successful. For example: two fictional characters falling in love after multiple ships of said characters were made.

"Jesus Christ, my hormones are shipping Cait and Frodo so fucking hard right now."

"Never knew that Rick and Michonne's ship would sail."

by Squirrel_Live May 25, 2019

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A romantic relationSHIP between two people or characters. You shouldn't ship to people that are already in a relationship, because they really don't need it.

Lu : Hey , Lilly, I really ship Error and Ink!
Lilly : ok
Lu : I also ship Dust and Blueberry!
Lilly : ok, I get it...
Lu and I also ship Geno and reaper!
Lilly : I FUCKING GET IT!!!
Lu : and-
Lilly : FOR THE LOVE OF GOD, SHUT THE FUCK UP!!!!!
Lu : why you weren't adopted by anyone
Lilly : what about our parents- wait... I'm adopted!?!?!
Lu : yeah, my parents weren't that smart.

by Lu the look-a-like June 03, 2018

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A couple. Two people one thinks should date, or likes that they do/did. Usually combines the two names to make a ship name, i.e.:John+Karen=Jaren. Usually the boy's name goes first, however it is used. It can combine the last names to such as peazer+payne=payzer. A rare form of a ship name is one name inside another, such as louis+eleanor=elounor(i don't ship it). A ship is the couple. To ship something is to suppourt the ship. Shipping is when you create ships. Ships are most commonly used in fandoms or with celebrities, but are also used for people you know. Also commonly used for fictional characters.

"Do you ship Joe and Stacey?"
"Yes! Their ship name should be Stoe. Or Jacey!"
"Oh, they are such a cute couple."

by swift_direction February 19, 2014

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• © 1999-2021 Urban Dictionary ® • advertise • terms of service • privacy • dmca • bug report • help • blog • data subject request

Sours: https://www.urbandictionary.com/define.php?term=Ship

Now discussing:

The act of taking two fictional or non-fictional characters, and personally wishing for them to either be in love, or for them to have sex.

The term has many background terms.

If you are a person who wants to characters/people shipped, you are a shipper.

The term is changed to "Sailing Ship" whenever the ship that was made becomes successful. For example: two fictional characters falling in love after multiple ships of said characters were made.

"Jesus Christ, my hormones are shipping Cait and Frodo so fucking hard right now."

"Never knew that Rick and Michonne's ship would sail."

by Squirrel_Live May 25, 2019

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usually two people who you ship. meaning that you either want them to become an item, kiss or enter into a romantic/sexual relationship or all of the above. usually when you ship someone, you smile when they interact somehow or become extremely giddy when they do something together.

person: i totally ship dean and castiel!
person 2: no way, me too!
person 3: i don't ship them that much. i ship castiel and meg more, to be honest.

by poroporo May 25, 2016

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A verb used to describe the action of wishing for two people to enter a relationship (whether romantic or occasionally platonic) in books, movies, tv shows or real life. Shipping can often happen involuntarily, and it is the majority of what happens on the website, Tumblr. There are some very popular ships, some unpopular, as well as often lots of controversy between ships from the same fandom.

"Do you ship Klaroline, or Steroline?"

"Omigod. I am definitely shipping Olicity."

by S.C.Moffatt October 18, 2014

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A romantic relationSHIP between two people or characters. You shouldn't ship to people that are already in a relationship, because they really don't need it.

Lu : Hey , Lilly, I really ship Error and Ink!
Lilly : ok
Lu : I also ship Dust and Blueberry!
Lilly : ok, I get it...
Lu and I also ship Geno and reaper!
Lilly : I FUCKING GET IT!!!
Lu : and-
Lilly : FOR THE LOVE OF GOD, SHUT THE FUCK UP!!!!!
Lu : why you weren't adopted by anyone
Lilly : what about our parents- wait... I'm adopted!?!?!
Lu : yeah, my parents weren't that smart.

by Lu the look-a-like June 03, 2018

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Get a Ship mug for your dad José.

A term used to describe fan fictions that take previously created characters and put them as a pair. It usually refers to romantic relationships, but it can refer platonic ones as well. (Just think of "shipping" as short for "relationSHIP".)

It generally uses the initials of the characters shipped or a combination of the names, though this is not a rule.

AMshipping
AM-shipping
AM shipping
Ash & Misty shipping
Ashistyshipping

by Aiya March 06, 2005

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• © 1999-2021 Urban Dictionary ® • advertise • terms of service • privacy • dmca • bug report • help • blog • data subject request

Sours: https://www.urbandictionary.com/define.php?term=to%20ship


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