Iu germanic studies

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Department of Germanic Studies

A diversified program

We offer a wide range of undergraduate majors, minors, and certificates in Germanic Studies, Dutch Studies, Norwegian Studies, and Yiddish Studies. Our top-ranked graduate program is considered one of the most distinguished in the country.

Broaden your perspective

In addition to language courses, we offer a variety of cultural courses that explore literature, film, media, philosophy, culture, and the history of ideas. We also encourage our students to take part in study abroad and offer funding opportunities to support your exploration.

Find your campus home with us

We foster a welcoming and collegial environment with plenty of opportunities to get involved in social activities, including film screenings, conversation tables, holiday parties, and more. You&#;ll make friends and find mentors to support you in your academic pursuits.

Gain global skills

As the most widely spoken native language in the EU, learning German opens doors in both your professional and personal life. Knowledge of German increases your options in nearly any profession, helping you acquire a range of skills that are likely to enhance the quality of your professional life and prepare you to live in the world.

Sours: https://germanic.indiana.edu/

CFP - Germanic Studies Graduate Student Conference, Making Meaning across Media: Orality and Literacy in Germanic Languages ().

Dear Colleagues,

The Department of Germanic Studies at Indiana University invites contributions from graduate students for the Germanic Studies Graduate Student Conference titled Making Meaning across Media: Orality and Literacy in Germanic Languages. Given the unprecedented events surrounding the global spread of COVID, this year’s conference will be held in conjunction with the Department’s Hedwig Leser Lecture, featuring plenary speaker Prof. Katerina Somers.

Orality is deeply rooted in literacy, even though it is violently suppressed through literacy. Can you read a written text without voicing it in your head? Ong writes in Orality and Literacy () that “though words are grounded in oral speech, writing tyrannically locks them into a visual field forever.” Likewise, Walter Benjamin writes in The Storyteller () that “less and less frequently do we encounter people with the ability to tell a tale properly… It is as if something that seemed inalienable to us, the securest among our possessions, were taken from us: the ability to exchange experiences.” We can ask, however, whether we can recover some of the lost orality through literacy and rediscover literacy by returning to orality. Moreover, in the age of social distancing, mediated orality has taken on both new meanings and functions. How does that complicate the dynamic between orality and literacy?

The Committee welcomes papers on any topic related to meaning-making in oral and/or literary traditions in Germanic languages. This may include:

  • Morphology: Units of Meaning
  • Semantic and Pragmatic change in Language use
  • Corpus Linguistics and Speaker Populations
  • Bilingualism and Multilingualism in a Globalized World
  • Foreign Language Education and Second Language Acquisition
  • Literature and Discourse Studies: Structuring and Developing Meaning
  • The Orality of literacy, the Literacy of Orality
  • Prosody in Written Language
  • Secondary Orality
  • Verbal Performances of the Written Word: Poetry, ASL Poetry, Cabaret, Improvisation
  • Philology and Historical Linguistics
  • Multimedia Mediums: How Media Changes Meaning
  • Computer-Mediated Discourse
  • German Media Studies
  • Storytelling, Folklore and Oral Narratives
  • Music, Song and Orality
  • History of Literature and Communication: Trajectory through the Ages
  • Coronavirus and Sociolinguistics: What Changed?
  • Lost in Translation: Orality and Literacy across Languages

Authors of accepted papers will be asked to present their work at the Biennial IU Germanic Studies Graduate Student Conference on March , , which will be held virtually via Zoom.

Abstracts: Deadline and Submission Guidelines

We ask authors to submit their abstracts by midnight on February 26, . Abstracts will be selected based on their quality and relevance. The abstracts should include a description of the topic addressed, the method of inquiry, a summary of the findings, interpretation of the results, and a statement regarding the significance of their contribution to the respective fields of research. Please also include the title of the paper (as will be printed in the program) and the full names of the authors and presenters. In regard to length, abstracts should be limited to words. Abstracts, as well as the author’s pertinent contact information (email and phone number), should be sent to Cynthia Shin at [email protected] Please put “IUGS Conference [Last Name]” in the subject line of the email.

Acceptance of Abstracts

Authors will be notified by March 5, if their paper has been selected by the Conference Committee. Please note that the number of accepted proposals may be limited. 

Conference Procedure

Although this biennial event is usually held in person, the Germanic Studies Graduate Student Conference and Hedwig Leser Lecture will be held virtually via Zoom in an effort to mitigate the spread of COVID Authors will be notified by March 8, regarding the date and time of their presentations, shortly to be followed by Zoom Conference Invitations. All Zoom sessions will be moderated by seasoned IU faculty or experienced graduate students. Presentations should not exceed 20 minutes in length. Given the screen-sharing functions available in Zoom, presenters are encouraged but not required to prepare visual aids (i.e., handouts, PowerPoints, etc.) to share with the audience.

Contact Information

The IU Department of Germanic Studies looks forward to receiving your abstracts in response to the call. Should there be any questions or concerns, please feel free to contact the Committee. Questions may be addressed to Cynthia Shin at [email protected] at [email protected] 

Thank you for your interest in this event. The papers you present will broaden the scope of Germanic Studies and encourage collaboration in and between departments and universities in the face of this time of separation and isolation.

Sours: https://networks.h-net.org/node//discussions//cfpgermanic-studies-graduate-student-conference-making
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College Schools, Departments & Programs

Germanic Studies

Course Descriptions
German
Courses Taught in German
  • GER-G&#; Beginning German I (4&#;cr.) Introduction to present-day German and to selected aspects of the cultures of German-speaking countries. Introduction to German grammatical forms and their functions. Development of listening comprehension, simple speaking proficiency, controlled reading skills and simple written compositions. Active oral participation required. I Sem., II Sem., SS. Credit given for only one of the following: G–G or G
  • GER-G&#; Accelerated First-Year German (5&#;cr.) R: Highly motivated students or those with proficiency in another foreign language. All elements of grammar, principles of word formation, phonetic and phonemic concepts, structure analysis, extensive reading, and active use of German. Offered only in the fall semester. Credit given for only one of the following: G or G–G
  • GER-G&#; Beginning German II (4&#;cr.) P:&#;G with a minimum grade of C–. Introduction to present-day German and to selected aspects of the cultures of German-speaking countries. Introduction to German grammatical forms and their functions. Development of listening comprehension, simple speaking proficiency, controlled reading skills and simple written compositions. Active oral participation required. I Sem., II Sem., SS. Credit given for only one of the following: G–G or G
  • GER-G&#; Intermediate German I (3&#;cr.) P:&#;G or G with a minimum grade of C–. Further development of oral and written command of language structures. Review of selected grammatical items. Listening comprehension. Reading of literary and non-literary texts. Discussion of selected films. Oral presentations. Writing of compositions based on the material covered. Emphasis on both speaking proficiency and structural awareness. Conducted in German. I Sem., II Sem., SS. Credit given for only one of G or G
  • GER-G&#; Intermediate German II (3&#;cr.) P:&#;G with a minimum grade of C–. Further development of oral and written command of language structures. Listening comprehension. Review of selected grammatical items. Discussion of modern German literary and non-literary texts, as well as films. Oral presentations. Writing of compositions based on the material covered. Emphasis on both speaking proficiency and structural awareness. Conducted in German. I Sem., II Sem., SS. Credit given for only one of G or G
  • GER-G&#; Fifth-Semester College German (3&#;cr.) P:&#;G or G or equivalent. Comprehensive review of grammatical points introduced in G through G Reading proficiency, systematic vocabulary building, composition, and discussion through the assignment of short literary texts and one novel or play. Conducted in German.
  • GER-G&#; Introduction to German Literature: Types (3&#;cr.) P:&#;G or equivalent. Study of literary types (narrative, dramatic, lyric), with examples of each selected from two or more periods. Conducted in German.
  • GER-G&#; Introduction to German Literature: Themes (3&#;cr.) P:&#;G or equivalent. Study of a single literary theme (such as music, generational conflict, love, revolution) as represented in two or more periods. Conducted in German.
  • GER-G&#; Sixth-Semester College German (3&#;cr.) P:&#;G or equivalent. Advanced oral and written communication. Study of selected advanced grammatical topics. Reading of primarily non-literary texts. Required for teacher certification. Conducted in German.
  • GER-G&#; Introduction to German Literature and Media (3&#;cr.) P:&#;G or equivalent proficiency. Gateway course to the study of German literature and media. Provides the basic tools of the analysis of literature, film and media. Content varies and may focus on either literature or film/media. Conducted in German.
  • GER-G&#; Introduction to German Thought and Culture (3&#;cr.) P:&#;G or equivalent proficiency. General introduction to German philosophical and cultural traditions from the Middle Ages to the present. Emphasizes some of the most important events of German cultural history and provides the intellectual concepts that lend meaning to those events. Conducted in German.
  • GER-G&#; Contemporary Austria (3&#;cr.) P:&#;Participation in the Graz Summer Program. An on-site introduction to Austrian culture and its roots. Family, education, religion and the arts, music, customs and traditions; the economy and tourist industry; historical relations with Germany and the new identity of the Second Republic. Conducted in German.
  • GER-G&#; Introduction to Contemporary Germany (3&#;cr.) P:&#;G or equivalent. An overview of contemporary German civilization, with attention to the other German-speaking countries. Political, economic, and social organization. Conducted in German.
  • GER-G&#; Introduction to German Cultural History (3&#;cr.) P:&#;G or equivalent. A survey of the cultural history of German-speaking countries, with reference to its social, economic, and political context.
  • GER-G&#; Conversational German (3&#;cr.) P:&#;G Emphasis on developing oral proficiency. Students are expected to increase their vocabularies, gain more accuracy in self-expression, and develop a sensitivity to appropriate usage. Texts for the course will include examples from contemporary German media. Assignments may include dialogues, skits, and parodies. Conducted in German.
  • GER-G&#; Advanced College German (3&#;cr.) P:&#;G or equivalent. Reading, discussion, and analysis (structural and grammatical) of advanced non-literary texts (academic essays, scientific articles, journals, newspaper articles, interviews, etc.). Development of writing skills. Conducted in German.
  • GER-G&#; Medieval German Literature (3&#;cr.) P:&#;G or equivalent. Introduction to reading Middle High German and survey of Middle High German literature. Historical and cultural background on the Middle Ages in German-speaking countries. Conducted in German.
  • GER-G&#; Modern German Literature (3&#;cr.) P:&#;G or equivalent. Selection of significant German literary works since Topic announced in online Schedule of Classes. Conducted in German. May be repeated with a different topic for a maximum of 6 credit hours.
  • GER-G&#; Perspectives on German Literature (3&#;cr.) P:&#;G or equivalent. Study of one aspect of German literature: formal, historical, political, psychological, etc. Relation to wider concerns in and outside of literature. Topic announced in the online Schedule of Classes. Conducted in German. May be repeated with a different topic for a maximum of 6 credit hours.
  • GER-G&#; Studies in German Authors (3&#;cr.) P:&#;G or equivalent. Life and works of a major author or a group of authors. Topic announced in the online Schedule of Classes. Conducted in German. May be repeated with a different topic for a maximum of 6 credit hours.
  • GER-G&#; German Film and Popular Culture (3&#;cr.) P:&#;G or equivalent. Study of German film and/or other manifestations of German popular culture (television, music, cabaret, Trivialliteratur of the twentieth century).
  • GER-G&#; Contemporary Germany: Overview (3&#;cr.) P:&#;G or equivalent. Political, sociological, economic, and cultural aspects of present-day Germany. Comparison with adjacent states. Conducted in German. Credit given for only one of G or V
  • GER-G&#; Contemporary Germany: Special Topics in German Studies (3&#;cr.) P:&#;G or equivalent. Topics dealing with language, literature, and culture of any of the German-speaking countries, generally in the more recent historical periods. Conducted in German. May be repeated with different topics for a maximum of 12 credit hours in G and V
  • GER-G&#; Literature and Society since (3&#;cr.) P:&#;G or equivalent. Major public concerns as reflected in German literature since World War II. Literary art in its cultural and political context. Conducted in German. Credit given for only one of G or V
  • GER-G&#; Introduction to German Phonetics and Phonology (3&#;cr.) P:&#;G or equivalent. Phonetics of modern German, including practice in transcription, contrastive analysis of English and German, and attention to pronunciation. Brief historical sketch of principal phonological developments. Conducted in German.
  • GER-G&#; Introduction to German Syntax (3&#;cr.) P:&#;G or equivalent. The syntax of modern German, with a practical introduction to the methods of grammatical analysis. Conducted in German.
  • GER-G&#; Introduction to German Sociolinguistics (3&#;cr.) P:&#;GER-G or equivalent. Examines the relationship between language and society in the German-speaking world. Issues include early linguistic socialization, language of institutions (education, medicine, law), language and identity (age, gender, sexuality, ethnicity, region), language and multiculturalism, German as a polycentric and as a pan-European language. Conducted in German.
  • GER-G&#; Introduction to German Morphology (3&#;cr.) P:&#;G or equivalent. In-depth study of the principles underlying word formation (morphology) in German. Comparative study of inflection, derivation, and compounding in German and English. Conducted in German.
  • GER-G&#; Introduction to the History of the German Language (3&#;cr.) P:&#;G or equivalent. Introduction to the German language from its Indo-European origins to the present. Examination of the changing role of German in a changing Europe and to the structure, geo-politics, and sociolinguistics of standard and non-standard varieties of the language. Conducted in German.
  • GER-G&#; German Culture and Society (3&#;cr.) P:&#;G or equivalent. The interaction of social, intellectual, and artistic forces in German life of the past two centuries, with emphasis on important developments and figures. Conducted in German. May be repeated with a different topic for a maximum of 6 credit hours.
Reading Knowledge Courses Primarily for Graduate Students
  • GER-G&#; Elementary German for Graduate Students (&#;cr.) Introduction to structure of the language necessary for reading, followed by reading in graded texts of a general nature. Open, with consent of the instructor, to undergraduates who have already completed the language requirement for the B.A. in another language. I Sem., SS. Credit not given for G and G or G
  • GER-G&#; Readings in German for Graduate Students (&#;cr.) P:&#;G or consent of department. II Sem., SS. Credit not given for G and G, G, or G
Taught in English
  • GER-E&#; An Introduction to German Culture (3&#;cr.) Introduction to important events of German cultural history. Rather than sticking to the strict chronology of history, it introduces concepts that lend meaning to chronology in the first place. The course is built around ideas—religion, language, literature, sports, for example—that make sense of the changing flow of events and yield historical narratives.
  • GER-E&#; Fairy Tales from the Grimm Brothers to Today (3&#;cr.) Introduction to Germanic fairy tales. Some of the world's most famous fairy tales are examined in their historical and cultural contexts and read for their contemporary significance. Promotes analysis of European culture revealed in these tales.
  • GER-E&#; Marx, Nietzche, Freud, and Company (3&#;cr.) Introduces modern European intellectual history, focusing on authors who have changed how we think about the world and our place in it. Studies landmark works and interprets them in the context of various historical and contemporary challenges.
  • GER-E&#; Amsterdam (3&#;cr.) General introduction to Dutch culture, focusing mostly on Amsterdam and its influence upon societies in and around the world. Emphasizes contemporary issues based on events in the past. May include a study of liberalism, policies, World War II, Anne Frank, water management, and trends in home design and architecture. Taught in English.
  • GER-E&#; Dutch Footprints (3&#;cr.) Introduction to an important period in Dutch cultural history, with a focus on novels about that time. The course is built around ideas (religion, language, literature, colonialism) that make sense of the changing flow of events and yield historical narratives.
  • GER-E&#; Scandinavian Culture (3&#;cr.) Introduces Scandinavian cultural history from the region's unique position as an "outsider" living in the outskirts of Europe and in close proximity to nature. Studies the Viking expansion, Icelandic sagas, traditional folk culture and its transformation into modern-day individual expression, indigenous modes of expression, contemporary literature and film, and current political and social trends.
  • GER-E&#; Tradition and Innovation in German Literature (3&#;cr.) Major themes and ideas in prominent works of German literature (lyric, fiction, drama) in translation, selected from various historical periods. Conducted in English. Credit given for only one of E or G
  • GER-E&#; Gender and Sexuality in Germany (3&#;cr.) Study of the shifting definitions and social constructions of masculinity, femininity, homosexuality, and related topics, as reflected in the cultural documents (texts, films, music, etc.) of German-speaking society from the Enlightenment to the present. Conducted in English. Credit given for only one of E or G
  • GER-E&#; German Cultural History (3&#;cr.) A survey of the cultural history of German-speaking countries, with reference to its social, economic, and political context. Conducted in English. Credit given for only one of E or G
  • GER-E&#; German Film Culture (3&#;cr.) An introduction to the methods of film studies by examining the aesthetic, sociological, political, and philosophical contexts of German film, as well as its role in the development of European and American cinematic tradition. Conducted in English. Credit given for only one of E or G
  • GER-E&#; Introduction to the Structure of Germanic Languages (3&#;cr.) Introduction to the comparative linguistic structure of the modern Germanic languages. Does not require specific background in general linguistics or knowledge of a particular language other than English.
  • GER-E&#; Vikings and Sagas (3&#;cr.) Introduction to Viking culture (c. –) and its reflections in selected sagas. Readings, lectures, and discussions. Conducted in English. Credit given for only one of E or G
  • GER-E&#; Special Topics in Germanic Studies (&#;cr.) Topics dealing with Germanic languages, literatures, and cultures. Conducted in English. May be repeated with different topics for a maximum of 6 credit hours.
Workshops, Theses, and Other Courses
  • GER-X&#; College Teaching Internship (2&#;cr.) P:&#;G and consent of director of undergraduate studies. Observation of and participation in the teaching of an undergraduate German course. Recommended for teacher certification candidates. Counts toward teacher certification but not toward level concentration in German. Credit given for only one of X or G
  • GER-G&#; German Language Abroad (&#;cr.) P:&#;G or equivalent; acceptance into an Indiana University–approved overseas study program. Credit for intermediate to advanced German language study in a German-speaking country when no specific equivalent is available among departmental offerings. May be repeated for a maximum of 9 credit hours.
  • GER-G&#; Residential Workshop (&#;cr.) P:&#;Consent of chairperson and instructor. Discussion and workshop (performance, drama reading, etc.) given in residential units; conducted in German. Topic set in consultation with student group. May be repeated for a maximum of 6 credit hours.
  • GER-G&#; Honors Tutorial (&#;cr.) P:&#;Consent of departmental honors advisor. Honors course. Tutorial may be taken for 1 credit hour in conjunction with an upper-level course in which the student is concurrently enrolled, or independently for 2 credit hours under the supervision of a faculty member. May be repeated for a maximum of 4 credit hours.
  • GER-X&#; Individual Readings in Germanic Literatures (German, Scandinavian, Netherlandic) (&#;cr.) P:&#;Consent of departmental chairperson. May be repeated for a maximum of 6 credit hours in X and G
  • GER-G&#; Advanced German Language Abroad (&#;cr.) P:&#;G or equivalent; acceptance into an Indiana University–approved overseas study program. Credit for advanced German language study in a German-speaking country when no specific equivalent is available among departmental offerings. May be repeated for a maximum of 6 credit hours.
  • GER-G&#; Honors Thesis (3&#;cr.) P:&#;G and consent of departmental honors advisor. Honors course.
Dutch
  • GER-N&#; Intensive Dutch I (4&#;cr.) Development of speaking ability, with stress on pronunciation, leading to fluency on restricted topics. Introduction to grammar. Reading of annotated stories.
  • GER-N&#; Accelerated Elementary Dutch (5&#;cr.) Recommended for motivated students or those with proficiency in another foreign language. All elements of grammar, principles of word formation, phonetic, phonemic concepts, structure analysis, extensive reading, and active use of elementary Dutch. Credit given for only one of N or NN
  • GER-N&#; Intensive Dutch II (4&#;cr.) P:&#;N or consent of instructor. Completion of grammatical study begun in N; continued stress on speaking Dutch on selected topics; rapid expansion of reading ability using literary and cultural materials.
  • GER-N&#; Dutch Reading, Composition, and Conversation I (3&#;cr.) P:&#;N or consent of instructor. Development of oral fluency; attention to idiom. Further grammatical study; attention to formal writing style. Readings in Dutch literature and culture.
  • GER-N&#; Dutch Reading, Composition, and Conversation II (3&#;cr.) P:&#;N or consent of instructor. Further development of style and idiom in speaking and writing. Reading of novels. Oral and written practice on topics of contemporary Dutch life.
  • GER-N&#; Advanced Dutch I (3&#;cr.) P:&#;N with a minimum grade of C–. Comprehensive review of grammatical points introduced in N through N Reading proficiency, different levels of style and expression, and written argumentation. Discussion through short literary texts and one novel. Conducted in Dutch.
  • GER-N&#; Advanced Dutch II (3&#;cr.) P:&#;N with minimum grade of C–. Introduction to different levels of style and expression and to written argumentation in Dutch. Texts include various literary genres and form the basis for in-class discussion and for exercises designed to develop oral and written fluency. Conducted in Dutch.
  • GER-E&#; Dutch Culture: The Modern Netherlands (3&#;cr.) Development of a complex modern society of 15 million people in a physically unique area one-third the size of Indiana. The interaction of geography, social structure, political system, religion, and literature. Readings in English. Topics vary. May be repeated with a different topic for a maximum of 6 credit hours in E and N
  • GER-E&#; Topics in Dutch Culture and History (3&#;cr.) Topics in Dutch history since the Middle Ages. Analyzing, discussing, evaluating and writing about texts and articles about Dutch culture in a specific historical context. Conducted in English. May be repeated with a different topic for a maximum of 6 credit hours.
  • GER-E&#; Topics in Dutch Literature (3&#;cr.) Topics dealing with literature in Dutch. Readings in English translation of novels, plays, and poetry that reflect a specific topic chosen by the instructor. May be repeated with a different topic for a maximum of 6 credit hours.
  • GER-N&#; Topics in Dutch Culture and Literature (3&#;cr.) P:&#;N or equivalent. Dutch literature and culture since the Middle Ages. Analyzing, discussing, evaluating and writing about literary texts and articles about Dutch culture through the ages. Conducted in Dutch.
  • GER-X&#; Individual Readings in Netherlandic Studies (&#;cr.) P:&#;Permission of instructor. Individualized reading program in Netherlandic studies, generally designed to deepen foundation laid in previous coursework with the same instructor. May be repeated for a maximum of 6 credit hours in X and N
Scandinavian
  • GER-K&#; Beginning Norwegian I (4&#;cr.) Development of listening comprehension, speaking, reading and writing skills in a cultural context. Introduction to grammar. I Sem.
  • GER-K&#; Beginning Norwegian II (4&#;cr.) P:&#;K with a grade of C– or higher, or equivalent. Further development of listening comprehension, speaking, reading and writing skills. Introduction to Norwegian literature and culture. Review of grammar and study of new grammatical topics. II Sem.
  • GER-K&#; Intermediate Norwegian I (3&#;cr.) P:&#;K with a grade of C– or higher, or equivalent. Further development of oral and written command and language structures. Reading and discussion of literary and non-literary texts in a cultural context. Review of grammar and study of grammatical topics.
  • GER-K&#; Intermediate Norwegian II (3&#;cr.) P:&#;K with a grade of C– or higher, or equivalent. Advanced reading proficiency, systematic vocabulary building, composition, and discussion of literary and non-literary texts in cultural and historical contexts. Review of grammar. Conducted in Norwegian.
  • GER-K&#; Advanced Norwegian I (3&#;cr.) P:&#;GER-K with a minimum grade of C-, or equivalent. Focuses on increasing the structural and textual complexity of speaking and writing in Norwegian. Reviews complex grammar issues and uses a large number of contemporary literary and non-literary texts and visual materials to significantly expand vocabulary. Themes include health, lifestyle, communication, love, gender roles, and socialization.
  • GER-K&#; Advanced Norwegian II (3&#;cr.) P:&#;GER-K with a minimum grade of C-, or equivalent. Focuses on increasing the structural and textual complexity of speaking and writing in Norwegian. Reviews complex grammar issues and uses a large number of contemporary literary and non-literary texts and visual materials to significantly expand vocabulary. Themes include language, politics, work, environment, family and education.
  • GER-E&#; Topics in Scandinavian Culture (3&#;cr.) Topics dealing with language, literature, and culture in Norway and other Scandinavian countries in more recent historical periods. Discussions located within a comparative overview of political, economic, and social realms of the Nordic nations. Lectures in English. Topics vary. May be repeated with a different topic for a maximum of 6 credit hours in E and K
  • GER-E&#; Topics in Scandinavian Literature (3&#;cr.) Topics dealing with literature in Norway and other Scandinavian countries. Discussions incorporate literary criticism, biography, and adaptations on film and stage in the Nordic nations. Lectures in English. Topics vary. May be repeated with a different topic for a maximum of 6 credit hours in E and K
  • GER-S&#; Scandinavian Languages for Reading Knowledge (4&#;cr.) Introduction to the structure of Swedish, Norwegian, and Danish necessary for reading, followed by reading in graded texts in the area of Scandinavian studies. Open to undergraduates who have already completed the language requirement for the B.A. in another language, and to other undergraduates with the consent of the instructor.
  • GER-X&#; Individual Readings in Scandinavian Studies (&#;cr.) P:&#;Permission of instructor. Individualized reading program in Scandinavian studies, generally designed to deepen foundation laid in previous coursework with the same instructor. May be repeated for a maximum of 6 credit hours in X or K
Swedish
  • GER-S&#; Beginning Swedish I (4&#;cr.) Development of communicative skills: listening comprehension, speaking, reading, and writing in a cultural context. Introduction to grammar and vocabulary.
  • GER-S&#; Beginning Swedish II (4&#;cr.) P:&#;S with a grade of C– or higher, or equivalent proficiency. Further development of listening comprehension, speaking, reading, and writing skills in Swedish. Introduction to Swedish literature and culture. Review of grammar and introduction to new grammatical topics.
Yiddish
  • GER-Y&#; Beginning Yiddish I (4&#;cr.) No previous knowledge of Yiddish or German required for Y Introduction to the Yiddish language and selected aspects of Yiddish-language culture. Development of listening comprehension, simple speaking proficiency, controlled reading and writing skills.
  • GER-Y&#; Beginning Yiddish II (4&#;cr.) P:&#;Y Introduction to the Yiddish language and selected aspects of Yiddish-language culture. Development of listening comprehension, simple speaking proficiency, controlled reading and writing skills.
  • GER-Y&#; Intermediate Yiddish I (3&#;cr.) P:&#;Y or consent of instructor. Development of speaking, reading, writing, and listening skills. Review of basic grammar and study of new grammatical topics. Reading of short fictional texts and other writings on Jewish culture. Taught in alternate years.
  • GER-Y&#; Intermediate Yiddish II (3&#;cr.) P:&#;Y or consent of instructor. Continuing development of active and passive skills. Additional new grammar concepts. Emphasis on development of reading skills and cultural knowledge through literary and journalistic texts including texts in nonstandardized orthographies. Taught in alternate years.
  • GER-E&#; Topics in Yiddish Literature (3&#;cr.) Selected topics focusing on Yiddish fiction and drama (–) or twentieth-century Yiddish fiction, drama, and poetry. Taught in English. No prior knowledge of Yiddish required. Topics vary. May be repeated with a different topic. Students may receive a maximum of 6 credit hours for any combination of E, Y, and CMLT-C
  • GER-E&#; Topics in Yiddish Culture (3&#;cr.) Selected topics on history of Ashkenazic Jews; Old Yiddish and premodern Yiddish folklore and popular culture; history and sociology of Yiddish; modern Yiddish culture; and centers of modern Yiddish culture. Conducted in English. No prior knowledge of Yiddish required. Topics vary. May be repeated with a different topic. Students may receive a maximum of 6 credit hours for any combination of E, Y, and CMLT-C
  • GER-X&#; Individual Readings in Yiddish Studies: Language, Literature, Culture (&#;cr.) P:&#;Consent of instructor. Readings in Yiddish or English translations on a topic in Yiddish Culture. May be repeated for a maximum of 12 credit hours in X and Y
Sours: https://bulletins.iu.edu/iub/college//departments/german-studies/courses.shtml

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