Tapered ring compressor

Tapered ring compressor DEFAULT

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The right tools make the difference between a simple task and a painful ordeal. Wiseco’s piston ring compressor sleeves are an indispensable addition to any engine builder’s toolbox, and make it easy to do the job right the first time.

Before the Internet, even before mail order titans like Summit and Jegs, there was a certain catalog printed in black and white on newsprint, with hand-drawn illustrations and the full-retro feel of something straight out of the 1950’s transported to the ultra-modern eighties. Seat covers! Opera lights! Tachometers! Replacement composition gaskets for everything from a slant-six to a Model T!

And let’s not forget the infamous “re-ring kit.” Is your MG burning oil faster than it can leak it? Let your ink-stained fingers do the walking through the catalog and pick out a set of replacement rings, a cylinder hone, and of course the dreaded Universal Ring Compressor Tool. This adjustable monstrosity made it possible (if just barely) to stuff those stock pistons back into the bores, once you’d cleaned them up with some steel wool and a pocket knife and managed to get the new ‘high performance’ rings (made from an alloy that defied metallurgical science by being simultaneously soft AND brittle) into their grooves without snapping them in half.

A Better Way

Today, for anything more performance-oriented than a lawn tractor, a rebuild will require a few specialized tools, and that rusty adjustable ring compressor your dad used to stuff slugs back in their bores should stay in the water-stained cardboard box it’s in now. To do the job right, you’ll need the appropriate ring compressor sleeve sized for your engine’s bore, like the ones offered by Wiseco Pistons. “With 5/64-inch rings, the effort to install the pistons was so high that a dead blow hammer was imperative,” Wiseco’s Vic Ellinger explains. “Today’s rings can be installed with the pressure of your thumbs. Honestly, any more pressure than that and I am looking to be sure something isn’t wrong.”

Ring technology has come a long way in the past half-century, and the techniques involved in engine building have changed along with it. Instead of relying on high static tension to provide a compression seal and proper oil control, today’s ring packages are optimized for low friction and dynamic sealing properties that keep cylinder pressure and lubrication where they belong without adding drag and wear. But they also require a more nuanced touch when putting it all together.

You Can Never Be Too Rich Or Too Thin?

“With today’s ultra-thin rings and proprietary plating and coatings, the install phase of the build is extremely important to not damage or break the ring,” says Ellinger. A bore-specific one-piece ring compressor sleeve is an essential tool for this critical assembly step, and Wiseco’s compressors are precision-engineered in the same way their pistons are, using some of the same manufacturing equipment. Per Ellinger, “Wiseco forges the ring, then machines it to size with a predetermined amount of taper in the sleeve to gently compress the rings as the skirt enters the bore. We hard-anodize the sleeve to prevent wear over time. They are also laser marked with our Wiseco logo and size to easily identify each one in your tool box.”

Does a ring compressor sleeve really need to be forged instead of cast? Probably not, but Wiseco uses the same processes to manufacture them that they do to create their forged high performance pistons, holding them to the same tight tolerances and quality control standards. The compressors also get some of the same surface treatments available for Wiseco pistons, in order to make them more wear-resistant and easier to use.

Ellinger explains, “Anodizing and Teflon coatings prevent wear and/or damage to the sleeve, rings, and pistons during the install phase. The coatings on the rings and pistons need to go in the cylinders undisturbed - this is especially critical if your parts have a break-in coating or lube on them.” On that topic, he adds, “Be mindful of the amount of oil used on the parts to assemble them. ‘Dipped in oil’ isn’t a good thing. Quality oil like Joe Gibbs break-in oil should be used on the skirts, and ideally a light break-in oil or powder applied to the rings from Total Seal should be used. In a pinch, WD-40 can be sprayed on the rings to prevent micro-welding on start-up. Also remember that the wrist pin will want to be lubed with an assembly lube, too.”

The Path To Success

Besides having the right tool for piston installation, Ellinger has some other tips for DIY engine builders. “The biggest thing to do when you get your block at the machine shop is to inspect the top of each cylinder with your machinist to make sure you and him are comfortable with the chamfer of the block,” he advises. “If there is little to no chamfer on the top of the bore, it will be nearly impossible to install the rings. Before you get home is the time to double-check that the shop did not miss dressing the top of the bore after boring and honing. They have specialized cone-shaped stones to put a chamfer on the bore that won’t slip and ruin a fresh block.”

Once you get your newborn block home, a little bit of patience and attention will go a long way to avoid problems as you install your fresh slugs. Ellinger adds, “The number one error is not getting a feel for what is happening as the piston is installed in the bore. Try to identify each ring making its way past the chamfer at the top of the bore and into its home in the cylinder. Even with the sleeve, you can have a ring pop out between the sleeve and deck surface if you don’t hold the sleeve square on the deck once you are pushing the piston down in its bore.”

A Lid For Every Pot

Wiseco offers high-performance pistons for everything from powersports to domestic V8 engines, so it should come as no surprise that they also produce the tools necessary to do the job right for just about any engine build, with ring compressors in practically any diameter you could want. “In metric sizes, we are nearly covered in .5mm increments from 65mm-104mm,” Ellinger says. “On the V8 ranges, currently we go from 2.579-4.6250 inches. We are always adding bore sizes as the need arises, but for the most part we have almost every popular engine size available today.”

 

RCS07250

Ring Compressor Sleeve - 72.5mm

RCS07850

Ring Compressor Sleeve - 78.5mm

RCS39220

Ring Compressor Sleeve - 3.9220

RCS40900

Ring Compressor Sleeve - 4.0900

RCS40950

Ring Compressor Sleeve - 4.0950

RCS41000

Ring Compressor Sleeve - 4.1000

RCS42500

Ring Compressor Sleeve - 4.2500

RCS42800

Ring Compressor Sleeve - 4.2800

RCS43100

Ring Compressor Sleeve - 4.3100

RCS43200

Ring Compressor Sleeve - 4.3200

RCS43500

Ring Compressor Sleeve - 4.3500

RCS43750

Ring Compressor Sleeve - 4.3750

RCS44400

Ring Compressor Sleeve - 4.4400

RCS45000

Ring Compressor Sleeve - 4.5000

RCS45300

Ring Compressor Sleeve - 4.5300

RCS45600

Ring Compressor Sleeve - 4.5600

RCS46000

Ring Compressor Sleeve - 4.6000

RCS46100

Ring Compressor Sleeve - 4.6100

RCS46250

Ring Compressor Sleeve - 4.6250

Sours: http://blog.wiseco.com/the-big-squeeze-wiseco-forged-ring-compressors

Tapered Sleeve Ring Compressors

Modern piston rings require a modern approach to piston installation. Machined from Wiseco sleeve forgings to offer the same toughness as Wiseco's forged pistons, Wiseco tapered ring compressor sleeves are hard anodized and Teflon coated for low friction and prolonged wear resistance. These sleeves have a smooth radius that tapers down to the specific bore size to make installation of any piston a breeze, gently compressing the rings as you push the piston through the compressor sleeve allowing the piston to slide into the cylinder bore with minimum of resistance.

The right tools make the difference between a simple task and a painful ordeal. Wiseco’s tapered sleeve piston ring compressor sleeves are an indispensable addition to any engine builder’s toolbox, and make it easy to do the job right the first time. Having the right ring compressor is vital for proper piston installation in any high-performance engine build. Be sure to order one for every bore size.

You will find that these sleeves compress the piston rings smoothly and evenly, greatly reducing the difficulty with installing thin high-performance oil rings. If you've ever broken or bent a ring, these high quality sleeves will be a lifesaver for your shop and come in a large range of sizes.

  1. 83.5mm Tapered Sleeve Ring Compressor

    83.5mm Tapered Sleeve Ring Compressor

    SKU: 106-13.83.5

    Wiseco RCS tapered piston ring compressor sleeves are available for many piston sizes ranging from 65.5 to 105.1 mm. Prevent damaging modern thin piston rings that can occur when using traditional band clamp style split ring compressors. This handy engine assembly tool can be used with any piston from any manufacturer to easily compress the piston rings smoothly and evenly, providing a smooth radius and taper that greatly reduces the difficulty of installing piston rings. Each sleeve machined from a forging, hard anodized for long life, and is clearly labeled with its bore size. Be sure to select the correct tapered sleeve by verifying your bore size before ordering. Each sleeve is bore size specific, so you cannot use it with bore sizes other than the one listed for each specific part number. Learn More

  2. 84mm Tapered Sleeve Ring Compressor

    84mm Tapered Sleeve Ring Compressor

    SKU: 106-13.84

    Wiseco RCS tapered piston ring compressor sleeves are available for many piston sizes ranging from 65.5 to 105.1 mm. Prevent damaging modern thin piston rings that can occur when using traditional band clamp style split ring compressors. This handy engine assembly tool can be used with any piston from any manufacturer to easily compress the piston rings smoothly and evenly, providing a smooth radius and taper that greatly reduces the difficulty of installing piston rings. Each sleeve machined from a forging, hard anodized for long life, and is clearly labeled with its bore size. Be sure to select the correct tapered sleeve by verifying your bore size before ordering. Each sleeve is bore size specific, so you cannot use it with bore sizes other than the one listed for each specific part number. Learn More

  3. 85mm Tapered Sleeve Ring Compressor

    85mm Tapered Sleeve Ring Compressor

    SKU: 106-13.85

    Wiseco RCS tapered piston ring compressor sleeves are available for many piston sizes ranging from 65.5 to 105.1 mm. Prevent damaging modern thin piston rings that can occur when using traditional band clamp style split ring compressors. This handy engine assembly tool can be used with any piston from any manufacturer to easily compress the piston rings smoothly and evenly, providing a smooth radius and taper that greatly reduces the difficulty of installing piston rings. Each sleeve machined from a forging, hard anodized for long life, and is clearly labeled with its bore size. Be sure to select the correct tapered sleeve by verifying your bore size before ordering. Each sleeve is bore size specific, so you cannot use it with bore sizes other than the one listed for each specific part number. Learn More

  4. 85.5mm Tapered Sleeve Ring Compressor

    85.5mm Tapered Sleeve Ring Compressor

    SKU: 106-13.85.5

    Wiseco RCS tapered piston ring compressor sleeves are available for many piston sizes ranging from 65.5 to 105.1 mm. Prevent damaging modern thin piston rings that can occur when using traditional band clamp style split ring compressors. This handy engine assembly tool can be used with any piston from any manufacturer to easily compress the piston rings smoothly and evenly, providing a smooth radius and taper that greatly reduces the difficulty of installing piston rings. Each sleeve machined from a forging, hard anodized for long life, and is clearly labeled with its bore size. Be sure to select the correct tapered sleeve by verifying your bore size before ordering. Each sleeve is bore size specific, so you cannot use it with bore sizes other than the one listed for each specific part number. Learn More

  5. 86mm Tapered Sleeve Ring Compressor

    86mm Tapered Sleeve Ring Compressor

    SKU: 106-13.86

    Wiseco RCS tapered piston ring compressor sleeves are available for many piston sizes ranging from 65.5 to 105.1 mm. Prevent damaging modern thin piston rings that can occur when using traditional band clamp style split ring compressors. This handy engine assembly tool can be used with any piston from any manufacturer to easily compress the piston rings smoothly and evenly, providing a smooth radius and taper that greatly reduces the difficulty of installing piston rings. Each sleeve machined from a forging, hard anodized for long life, and is clearly labeled with its bore size. Be sure to select the correct tapered sleeve by verifying your bore size before ordering. Each sleeve is bore size specific, so you cannot use it with bore sizes other than the one listed for each specific part number. Learn More

Sours: https://lnengineering.com/products/wiseco-rcs-tapered-sleeve-ring-compressors.html?limit=5&mode=list&p=3
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Piston Ring Compressors: Different Strokes for Different Folks

When installing pistons, the first step is to wipe the cylinder bores with a clean, lint-free towel, and apply a small amount of conventional (non-synthetic) oil to the walls.

It’s a good idea to oil the wrist pins and piston rings as well. There’s a caveat here though: You don’t need to drench the piston in oil. You only need sufficient oil to lubricate the rings as they pass through the piston ring compressor.

Generally speaking, there are two common types of ring compressorformats on the market: Expander types where the tool is clamped over the piston and you tighten it in place or a tapered job where the rings are progressively tightened as the piston is pushed through it into the bore. In either case, the idea is to coat the compressor with oil (again, it doesn’t have to be dripping wet).

Rotate the crankshaft so that the crank rod journal is at Top Dead Center for the piston you’re installing. Place the piston/ring compressor combination over the cylinder bore. You have to be positive the piston is correctly oriented.

For example, if the piston is domed, the dome is on the outside of the block or the valve notches are at the top (nearest the lifter valley). Additionally, be sure you’ve assembled the piston-rod combination correctly so that the chamfer on the connecting rod (and rod bearing) faces the fillet radius on the crankshaft. Finally (and as mentioned previously) double check the oil ring(s) to ensure the expander ring end gaps haven’t overlapped.

If the connecting rod is equipped with press-in bolts cover them with protectors (the inexpensive plastic jobs work fine) or use a length of rubber tubing over the studs. The idea here is to prevent the rod bolts from damaging the crank during installation. We also coat the connecting rod bearing with assembly lube.

At this point, you should be able to push the piston and rod assembly into the bore, simultaneously guiding the rod so that it falls in place over the crankshaft rod journal.

In most cases, you can hand push the piston in. In others, a very light tap with the handle end of a dedicated piston hammer works well (more on this later). The need for excessive force means the oil ring isn’t installed correctly.

But let’s rewind to the ring compressor part of the equation. What’s hot and what’s not?

At the bottom end of the scale are the band-style adjustable ring compressors. Here, the assemblies are designed to expand to fit most common automotive and commercial engine bore sizes (the Lisle example shown in the accompanying photos expands from 3.5-inches all the way out to 8.00-inches).

There are other examples available that range from 2.125-inches in diameter to 5.00-inches in diameter. This style of ring compressor is inexpensive (under $15), but they can be slightly “shaky” to use. The walls of the band clamp are sharp and can slice your fingers if you’re not careful.

There are ring compressors that work with a dedicated band clamp for each cylinder bore. They’re designed for a set of pliers to attach to the band clamp. This allows you to grip the compressor as you tap the piston into the bore. The jury is out when it comes to performance of this type of compressor, but the design has been available for a long time. There are OTC kits and other kits available that cover a wide range of bore sizes.

Use a Tapered Ring Compressor to Make Piston Installation Easier

An easier way to install pistons is with a tapered ring compressor.

Here, the ring compressor is machined from aluminum with a tapered internal shape. This allows the rings to compress gently as the piston is pressed (or tapped) into the cylinder bore. Some of the better quality examples have a positive grip on the outer surfaces that allows you to hold the compressor solidly as you work the piston into the bore.

Internally, many tapered designs are honed to size. Some designs are hard-anodized for longevity.

The downside to a tapered ring compressor is that you need a different compressor for each bore size you work with.

Finally, Summit Racing offers a series of adjustable tapered ring compressors. These are essentially split tapered ring compressors with a large band clamp on the outside. In use, you insert the piston and ring combination, tighten the clamp to fit and then drive the piston into the bore. The format doesn’t allow for huge dimensional changes, but they will typically have an adjustment range of 0.100 to 0.150-inch or so. That means if you go up in bore size on a build, you won’t need to buy a new ring compressor.

Even the most expensive tools prove priceless when you’re getting a new engine done right. See the accompanying photos for more info:

Tags: piston ring compressors, piston ring tech, ring compressors

Author: Wayne Scraba Wayne Scraba is a diehard car guy and regular contributor to OnAllCylinders. He’s owned his own speed shop, built race cars, street rods, and custom motorcycles, and restored muscle cars. He’s authored five how-to books and written over 4,500 tech articles that have appeared in sixty different high performance automotive, motorcycle and aviation magazines worldwide.

Sours: https://www.onallcylinders.com/2019/07/25/piston-ring-compressors-different-strokes-for-different-folks/

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HOW TO COMPRESS PISTON RINGS. PISTON RING COMPRESSOR TOOL

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