Tennessee hunting seasons

Tennessee hunting seasons DEFAULT

KNOXVILLE, Tenn. (WVLT) - The Tennessee Wildlife Resources Agency released 2020-2021 hunting and fishing guides.

TWRA says there are several new and important changes to the guides to be aware of. According to the Tennessee Hunting and Fishing Guide website, the following new rules and regulations are in place:

  • Tag Before You Drag: A new requirement says hunters must check-in their big game on their smartphone or physically tag the animal before moving it. Physically tagged animals must be checked in before midnight.
  • The statewide bag limit for spring turkey has been reduced from four to three.
  • Five counties adjacent to the Mississippi River form a new spring turkey unit (Mississippi Alluvial Valley or MAV) with a two-week delayed spring turkey season opener and a reduced, unit-wide bag limit of 2.
  • Southern Middle Tennessee counties of Giles, Lawrence, Lincoln and Wayne Counties have a two-week delayed spring turkey season opener.
  • The fall turkey season has been closed in Lincoln County.
  • Hunting dates have changed in Bear Hunt Zones 1, 2, and 3.
  • Incidental take of one either-sex elk by licensed deer hunters in non-elk restoration counties is allowed. This is only allowed outside of Anderson, Campbell, Claiborne, Morgan and Scott Counties.
  • The definition for legal trapping devices has changed.
  • Due to COVID-19 restrictions, hand-held drawing procedures for issuing season-long waterfowl blind permits and sandhill crane tags may differ than described in this guide. Go to www.tnwildlife.org for updated information.
  • Crow season has changed.
  • New Veterans and Active Military personnel waterfowl hunting days have been added.
  • The deer hunting unit “Unit CWD” has expanded to include Lauderdale, Gibson and Crockett Counties.
  • Unit CWD hunters will be able to use archery, muzzleloader or guns during three-day August hunt.
  • Unit CWD hunters can now earn an unlimited number of antlered deer. See “Earn-A-Buck Program”.
  • In Unit CWD, gun season (G/M/A) will begin Saturday, Nov. 7 when the rest of the state begins muzzleloader season (M/A).
  • New regulations for the Mississippi River Flood Closure Zone for big game hunts. Only the Caruthersville gauge is used, and the zone has been reduced in Lake and Dyer counties to include only those lands east of Hwy.

For more information about the new rules, click here. To view the full Tennessee Hunting and Fishing Guides, click here.

Copyright 2020 WVLT. All rights reserved.

Sours: https://www.wvlt.tv/2020/07/09/new-rules-and-regulations-in-place-for-2020-2021-hunting-and-fishing-seasons/

One of the most traditional states in the country also offers some truly exciting hunting seasons. Tennessee offers one of the longest deer hunting seasons in the country.

For Tennessee deer hunting, the statewide bag limit for antlered bucks is two per season, and one per day. Legal bucks must have antlers a minimum of three inches in length; anything less than three inches is considered antlerless under Tennessee hunting regulations. It is unlawful to hunt or trap any albino deer in Tennessee.

In addition to deer hunts, Tennessee also offers a wide variety of small game and turkey hunting with a lot of year round hunting options.

In addition to hunting, Tennessee also has a trapping season for many small game animals. License information can be obtained online or at any authorized seller within the state.

Tennessee Deer Seasons

August SeasonAug. 27-29
ArcherySept. 25-Oct. 29 and Nov. 1-5
Young SportsmanOct. 30-31
Muzzleloader/ArcheryNov. 6-19
General SeasonNov. 20-Jan. 2
Private Lands OnlyJan. 3-7

Tennessee deer seasons are managed by hunting units. Specific season dates may vary by your particular region. For more information, visit the Tennessee Wildlife Resources Agency website.

Tennessee Elk Seasons

ArcherySept. 25-Oct. 1
Young SportsmanOct. 2-8
General SeasonOct. 9-15

Tennessee elk hunts are quota hunts requiring specific permits, with limited permits awarded. For more information on obtaining an elk hunt permit, visit the Tennessee Wildlife Resources Agency website.

Tennessee Turkey Seasons

Fall ArcherySept. 25-Oct. 29 and Nov. 1-5
Fall Shotgun SeasonOct. 16-29
Spring Young SportsmanMarch 26-27
Spring General SeasonApr. 2-May 15

Fall turkey hunting may be limited to specific counties in Tennessee. Spring seasons may have reduced bag limits or shortened seasons. To see if your part of the state is available for legal hunts, visit the Tennessee Wildlife Resources Agency website.

Tennessee Small Game Seasons

SquirrelAug. 28-Feb. 28 and May 8-June 13
RabbitNov. 6-Feb. 28
BullfrogOpen season
RaccoonSept. 17-Feb. 28
GrouseOct. 9-Feb. 28
QuailNov. 6-Feb. 28
CoyoteOpen Season
GroundhogOpen Season
Striped SkunkOpen Season

Bag limits, special seasons and hunting regulations for Tennessee hunting seasons do vary based on animal and seasons. For more information on obtaining licenses, permits and regulations, visit the Tennessee Wildlife Resources Agency website.

 

Sours: http://www.huntingseasonhq.com/tennessee-hunting-seasons/
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Wildlife Management Areas

AGE REQUIREMENTS FOR TENNESSEE HUNTERS

Any person born on or after January 1st, 1969 must complete a state-approved hunter education course and obtain a Hunter Education Card to hunt legally within the state of Tennessee. 

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WHAT IS A TENNESSEE HUNTER EDUCATION CARD

A Tennessee Hunter Education Card proves that you’ve obtained the knowledge needed to hunt safely, responsibly, and ethically, within the state of Tennessee. Any person born on or after January 1st, 1969 must obtain the card, in order to hunt legally within the state. 

WHERE CAN I GET MY TENNESSEE HUNTER EDUCATION CERTIFICATE?

You can obtain your Tennessee Hunter Education Card by completing a Tennessee Wildlife Resources Agency (TWRA) approved course. Courses can be taken either online or in-person, depending on your preference. Hunters who are less than 21 years of age will also be required to complete an in-person field day to be certified.  

Traditional Classroom Course Option

Hunters may choose to complete an in-person classroom course and field day to obtain a Hunter Education Card. The classroom course includes a minimum of 10 hours of in-class study and a 100 question final exam.

Online Course – 21 years of age or older:

Hunters who are 21 years of age or older can obtain their Hunter Education Card entirely online if they choose. Online courses typically take about 4-6 hours to complete. Students are issued a temporary Hunter Education Card upon completion. 

Hunters who complete the online hunter education course, and are 21 years of age or older, must also apply for a TWRA Field Day Course Exemption. Exemption application forms must be completed and mail to the TWRA with requirements payment. Once the application has been processed, the TWRA will mail the permanent Hunter Education Card within 3-5 days. 

Online Course – Under 21 Years of Age 

Hunters who are less than 21 years of age may choose to complete the online Hunter Education Course. Upon completion of the online portion, the student will be required to complete an in-person field day. Once both the online course and field day have been successfully completed, the hunter will receive a permanent Hunter Education Card 

HOW OLD DO I HAVE TO BE TO GET A HUNTER EDUCATION CERTIFICATE IN TENNESSEE?

You must be 9 years of age or older to obtain a Hunter Education Card within the state of Tennessee. While hunters who are less than 9 years of age are not required to get certified, they are still permitted to hunt so long as they are supervised by a certified hunter who is 21 years of age or older. The supervisor must be in a position to take immediate control of the youth’s hunting device. 

AGE AND SUPERVISION REQUIREMENTS

Hunters who are less than 10 years of age are not required to obtain a Hunter Education Card however, they must be supervised by a certified hunter who is 21 years of age or older. The supervisor must be in a position to take immediate control of the youth’s hunting device.

Apprentice Hunting Programs

Hunters who are 10 years of age or older who have not completed a Hunter Education Course may choose to obtain an Apprentice Hunting License. The apprentice license allows the hunter to participate in hunting, without a hunter education card, so long as they are under the direct supervision of a certified hunter who is 21 years of age or older. 

The Apprentice Hunting license exempts the hunter from the hunter education requirement for a period of one year from the date of purchase. The license type may only be purchased for a maximum of 3 consecutive years. 

HOW LONG DOES IT TAKE TO GET MY HUNTER EDUCATION CARD?

It typically takes about 4-6  hours to get your Tennessee Hunter Education Card online. 

Who is exempt from having to obtain a Tennessee Hunter Education Card?

  • Hunters born prior to January 1st, 1969
  • Hunters who are less than 10 years of age
  • Hunters who are 10 years of age or older who possess an Apprentice Hunting License, and are supervised by an adult hunter who is 21 years of age or older

Is my Tennessee Hunter Education Certificate valid in other states?

Yes. The Tennessee Hunter Education Card will be accepted in any US state, province, or country which also requires mandatory hunter education, meaning hunters who have obtained their Tennessee Hunter Education Certificate may use it to hunt in other states. This is known as “reciprocity”.  

What's the difference between a Hunter Education Certificate and a Hunting License?

A Hunter Education Card proves that you’ve obtained the knowledge you need to hunt safely and ethically in Tennessee, and is different from a Hunting License. A Hunting Licence is similar to a permit and is required to hunt any game animal within the state. Different licenses and permits may be required depending on which game animal is being hunted.

HUNTING LICENSES

A Hunting License is required in the state of Tennessee to hunt any game animal. There are a variety of license types available depending on your age, residency status, and what type of game you plan to hunt. 

Hunting License Exemptions:

  • Residents of the state who were born before March 1, 1926 
  • Military personnel on leave who possess leave papers
  • Landowners and their immediate family (spouses and children), who hunt on their own farmland
  • Resident grandchildren or great-grandchildren who are under the age of 16, and are hunting on land owned by their grandparents or great grandparents

Additional exemptions may apply – for more information on hunting license exemptions in Tennessee, visit the TWRA website. 

HUNTING LICENSE TYPES

Tennessee Resident Hunting License

There are a variety of resident license types available. Resident licenses only may be obtained by legitimate residents of the state. For information on who may obtain a resident hunting license type visit the TWRA Website

Types of resident hunting licenses include:

  • Hunting and fishing combination license
  • Junior hunt/trap/fish license
  • Annual Sportsman License

Non-resident Hunting License

Non-resident hunting license types are available to residents of states other than Tennessee, including:

  • Annual junior hunt (all game)
  • Annual hunting license (all game)
  • Trapping License
  • Small Game and Waterfowl License

HUNTING PERMITS

Hunters may be required to purchase a permit, in addition to required licenses, to hunt in specific areas or for specific game animals. Special permits are required for any hunter to take game within a Wildlife Management Area (WMA). Migratory Game Bird permits are also required to hunt any waterfowl or other migratory game bird. 

UNDER 10 YEARS OF AGE

Hunters who are less than 10 years of age are not required to obtain a Hunter Education Card however, they must be supervised by a certified hunter who is 21 years of age or older. The supervisor must be in a position to take immediate control of the youths hunting device.

10 YEARS OF AGE OR OLDER

Hunters who are 10 years of age or older, who were born on or after January 1st, 1969, are required to complete a hunter education course, in order to hunt within the state of Tennessee. 

Hunters who are 10 years of age or older who have not completed a Hunter Education Course may choose to obtain an Apprentice Hunting License. The apprentice license allows the hunter to participate in hunting, without a hunter education card, so long as they are under the direct supervision of a certified hunter who is 21 years of age or older. 

The Apprentice Hunting license exempts the hunter from the hunter education requirement for a period of one year from the date or purchased. The license type may only be purchased for a maximum of 3 consecutive years. 

EXEMPTIONS

  • Hunters born prior to January 1st, 1969
  • Hunters who are less than 10 years of age
  • Hunters who are 10 years of age or older who possess an Apprentice Hunting License, and are supervised by an adult hunter who is 21 years of age or older

 

Failure to carry Hunter Education Certificate

Up to $25

Hunting without proper license or permit

Up to $25

Spotlighting deer

Up to $500

Illegal hunting or possession of deer, bear, elk, boar, or turkey

Up to $2,500

Hunting big game during closed season

Up to $500

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DO I NEED A HUNTING LICENSE TO HUNT WITHIN THE STATE OF TENNESSEE?

Yes. A Hunting License is different from a Hunter Education Card and is required for any person, of any age who hunts within the State of Tennessee. This includes both residents and non-residents. There are a variety of license types available depending on your age, residency status, and what type of game you plan to hunt. Certain exceptions may apply depending on the game animal being hunted. For more information on hunting licenses in Tennesse, visit the TWRA website.

WHAT ARE THE TENNESSEE TAGGING REQUIREMENTS?

Big game animals taken in Tennessee must be tagged and reported at “check-in” stations after they’re killed. Big game animals include deer, elk, bear, and turkey. It’s important for hunters to understand the tagging and/or check-in requirements for the game animal they’re hunting, and to ensure that the animal is tagged and reported properly. 

Once you’ve taken a big game animal, it must be checked-in before it can be moved from the area. Hunters may choose to use the TWRA mobile app to electronically tag and check-in their harvest, or may physically tag the animal and check it in before midnight. Tagging and check-in requirements apply to all hunters including hunters who have taken game on their own land and those who are exempt from hunting license requirements. 

The following requirements apply when reporting and tagging big game animals:

  • Big game must be checked-in by no later than midnight on the day the animal was harvested (the same applies if the animal is being gifted or transported out of state)
  • If the animal is being transported before being checked-in a Temporary Transport Tag must be affixed to the animal. The tag can be removed once the animal has been checked-in. 

Additional regulations may apply depending on the type of game animal. For more information on check-in requirements visit the Tennessee Hunting and Trapping eRegulations Guide. 

WHAT ARE THE HUNTER ORANGE REQUIREMENTS IN TENNESSEE?

Hunter orange must be worn by big game hunters in Tennessee. Anyone hunting big game within the state is required to wear a minimum of 500 square inches of hunter orange on both their head and an outer garment worn above the waist. The outer garment must have orange visible on both the back and front. Turkey hunters participating in hunts proclaimed by the commission, and hunters taking game on their own property are exempt from these regulations. 

WHAT ARE THE BAG LIMITS IN TENNESSEE?

Bag limits are imposed on hunters to restrict the number of a particular game animal that can be taken. Bag limits may be daily or seasonal depending on the type of animal. Daily bag limits restrict the number of a specific game animal that may be taken within a day, whereas seasonal bag limits restrict the number of a particular game animal that may be taken by a hunter within the hunting season. 

Bag limits may vary annually depending on game species populations. Hunters must understand and follow bag limit restrictions. Violations may result in fines. For more information on bag limits visit the Tennessee Hunting and Trapping eRegulations Guide.

GAME SPECIES

Anyone hunting in Tennessee will have a variety of game animals to choose from, and hunting opportunities for all ages, skills levels and hunting interests. The state’s landscape offers a variety of natural habitats and ecosystems for plenty of game animals, including big and small game species, furbearers, upland game and waterfowl. 

Game species in Tennessee include:

  • Big game including white-tailed deer, bear, elk and turkey.
  • Small game including woodcock, rails, coot, snipe and crow.
  • Waterfowl and other migratory game birds including ducks, geese, dove and sandhill cranes.
  • Furbearers including beaver, bobcat, fox, minc, and coyote among others. 

NON-GAME SPECIES

The TWRA defines a nongame species as “any wild mammal, bird, amphibian, reptile, fish, mollusk, crustacean or other wildlife not ordinarily taken for sport, fur, food or other commercial use”. Unless otherwise specified no person is permitted to take, attempt to take, possess or transport any nongame species within the state. 

Additionally, some wildlife species in Tennessee may be designated as endangered, protected, or threatened. It is unlawful to hunt any endangered, protected or threatened species within the state. Some examples of these species include various types of bat, the piping plover, and the least tern, in addition various plants, fish, and mussels. 

INVASIVE SPECIES

Invasive animals and other pests have been introduced to the United States, including the State of Tennessee, and have become a threat to native wildlife. These animals, plants, fish, and invertebrates typically have no natural predators which can result in rapid spread and population growth. This in turn can seriously harm the state’s lands and waters, and can be detrimental to the health and population numbers of a variety of the state’s native plants and animals. Some common invasive species in Tennessee include Asian Carp, Asian longhorn tick, brown marmorated stink bug, and gypsy moths, in addition to a long list of other plants, animals, fish, insects, and invertebrates. 

In order to protect Tennessee’s native plants and animals, invasive species must be controlled and eradicated. Anyone who encounters or suspects that they have encountered an invasive species within the state is encouraged to report the sighting so that it can be monitored and controlled. For information on how to report various types of invasive species in Tennessee visit the US Department of Agriculture, National Invasive Species Information Center. 

White-tailed Deer

Deer seasons in Tennessee are organized by firearm type, hunt units, hunter and age land type. Seasons typically begin as late August and continue through to early January, depending on the seasons. Seasons may be as short as 2 days or may be as long as 3 weeks depending on the season type. Bag limits for deer may vary depending on the type of deer (antlered vs antlerless). 
Learn more about hunting deer in Tennessee.

Bear

Bear seasons are limited in Tennessee. The season typically only lasts for a few days in the fall and ends once the quota for the season has been reached. Bear hunting season is only permitted in a small number of counties, and license availability may be limited. 
Learn more about hunting bear in Tennessee.

Elk

Elk seasons in Tennessee typically begin in late September and end in early-mid October. Elk hunts are organized within a small number of Elk Hunt Zones, and permits are limited. 
Learn more about hunting elk in Tennessee.

Small Game

Small game seasons in Tennessee include grouse, rabbit, quail, and various types of squirrel. Seasons date vary depending on the type of small game, with the earliest season (for squirrel) beginning in August and ending in February. 
Learn more about hunting small game in Tennessee.

Ducks

Duck seasons dates in Tennessee vary depending on a variety of factors including the species and the license type (ex. Youth vs. vet seasons). Duck season typically begins in September, with additional season dates in November and February. 
Learn more about hunting ducks in Tennessee.

PRIVATE LAND

Much of the land in Tennessee is privately owned. Hunters can typically freely take game animals hunted on their own private property, or may seek permission from a landowner to hunt on private property. Hunters who wish to take game on privately owned land must follow state hunting regulations as well as any regulations specified by the landowner. Hunters must ensure they respect the rights and property of the landowner at all times. 

SPECIAL REGULATIONS AREAS

Certain lands within the state of Tennessee may have additional regulations that apply to hunters or other recreational land users – this may include wildlife refuges and federally owned lands. 

Regulations may be imposed on vehicle use, firearm types, use of dogs to hunt certain game animals, campsite regulations, and baiting just to name a few. It is critical that hunters understand and follow any additional regulations that may apply in these areas in order to ensure that they continue to be open to hunting. 

PUBLIC LAND

The state of Tennessee offers over 7000 acres of public lands which are open to hunters including lands managed by the TWRA, designated Wildlife Management Areas, State Natural Areas and Wildlife Refuges. Hunters should note that public hunting lands may be restricted – this may include firearms restrictions and bag limits. Not all game animals may be hunted within public hunting areas, and regular seasons dates still apply. Hunters should learn about the rules and regulations the apply within the region they plan to hunt prior to heading to the area. 

Some of the land within the state is only available for hunters as a result of cooperative agreements between the TWRA and private landowners. Hunters who plan to hunt these areas must abide by any regulations stipulated by the landowner.

For additional information on public hunting areas within the state, including contact information and public land regulations, visit the Tennessee Hunting and Trapping eRegulations Guide. 

WMA Regulations

Specific rules and regulations apply to hunters, trappers and other recreational users within WMAs. It’s important for hunters to understand the regulations that apply within various WMAs, as they may vary by county.  Some example of additional regulations that apply in WMA’s include: 

  • Bag limit regulations
  • Alcohol restrictions
  • Firearm type and transportation restrictions, within certain areas
  • Motorized vehicle restrictions
  • Varying designated hunting hours

With plenty of game animals to choose from, and hundreds of thousands of acres open to hunting, you’re sure  to find plenty of hunting and trapping opportunities in Tennessee. Some of the most popular game animals to hunt within the state include deer, turkey, squirrel and bear. Deer, particularly bucks, within the state have been known to be over hunted within the state, however stricter bag limits have since been imposed. While the state isn’t necessarily known for trophy 10-point bucks, the overall deer population is still plentiful. Hunters looking for top deer spots should head towards central Tennessee, and counties bordering the Mississippi River. 

Hunters looking for larger game will find excellent bear hunting opportunities – with the state permitting large bear quotas annually. Hunters can find excellent bear hunting opportunities in the eastern portion of the state. While hunting is typically strictly prohibited within the boundaries of national parks,  there are a few open to hunting including South Fork National Forest, Great Smoky Mountains National Park, and Cherokee National Forest. 

If you’re up for the additional challenge of hunting small stealthy game, squirrel hunting is another great option in Tennessee. The species is plentiful within the state, allowing for long seasons and large bag limits. Successful squirrel hunting can be accomplished in most of the state’s designated hunting zones and WMA’s, with most hunters having a lot of success in the fall season.  

Helpful resources for Hunting in Tennessee

Tennessee's Popular Hunting Destinations

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Sours: https://www.huntingsmart.com/tennessee/hunting-regulations/

Summary of Tennessee Hunting and Trapping Seasons Dates

MIGRATORY BIRDS

Sandhill Crane

Statewide Zone              December 4, 2021 – January 30, 2022

Southeast Zone             December 4, 2021 - January 13, 2022 & January 17 – 30, 2022 

Mourning Dove                Sep. 1-28, 2021: Daily bag 15 | Oct. 9 - 31, 2021: Daily bag 15 | Dec. 8, 2021 - Jan. 15, 2022: Daily bag 15

Woodcock                          Nov. 13 - Dec. 5, 2021: Daily bag 3 | Jan. 10 - Jan. 31, 2022: Daily bag 3

Snipe                                    Nov. 14, 2021- Feb. 28, 2022: Daily bag 8

Canada Goose                  Sep. 1-19, 2021: Daily bag 5

Wood Duck/Teal              Sep. 11-15, 2021: Daily bag 6, not to exceed 2 wood ducks/day

Teal-only                            Sep. 16-19, 2021: Daily bag 6

Ducks, Coots, and Mergansers - Bag limit is 6 ducks per day.

Reelfoot Zone                  Nov. 13 - 14, 2021  & Dec 4, 2021 - Jan 30, 2022

Statewide Zone               Nov 27 - 28, 2021 & Dec 4, 2021 - Jan 30, 2022

Veterans and Active Military   Feb 6 and 13, 2022: All zones

Young Sportsman          Feb. 5, 2022, and Feb. 12, 2022: All zones, ages 16 and under

See the Tennessee Hunting and Trapping Guide for more information on these seasons, as well as sandhill crane and other goose seasons.

Sours: https://www.tn.gov/twra/hunting/tennessee-hunting-seasons-summary.html

Hunting seasons tennessee

Tennessee Deer Season Information

General Deer Hunting Regulations

Fluorescent Orange

Hunters must wear on the upper portion of their body and head a minimum of 500 square inches of daylight fluorescent-orange (blaze orange), visible front and back while hunting big game except on archery-only and turkey hunts.  A hat and vest fulfill requirements.

Blaze orange camo is legal if it contains 500 square inches of fluorescent orange. In those areas where the archery-only deer season dates overlap with another big game gun season (i.e., bear) archers are required to wear 500 square inches of daylight fluorescent orange.

Fluorescent orange is required during the August Hunt in Unit CWD.

Field Dressing

Evidence of species and sex and antlered status (if applicable) must not be destroyed and must remain with the animal while afield.

Normal field dressing, quartering, and icing down of the meat are permitted.

Carcass Transport into Tennessee

Only approved parts (i.e., deboned meat, clean skulls, skull plates and teeth, antlers, finished taxidermy, hides, and tanned products) from deer, elk, moose, and caribou may be brought back into TN.

Carcass Transport concerning CWD Affected Counties

Approved parts (i. .e., deboned meat, clean skulls, skull plates and teeth, antlers, finished taxidermy, hides, and tanned products) may be moved freely within Tennessee. 

There are restrictions on moving unapproved parts (i.e. whole or undressed carcasses) from county to county dependent on a county’s CWD status. 

Visit CWD Affected Counties – Carcass Transportations Restrictions for more details.  

Deer Harvest Check In

All harvested deer must be checked in. There is a new tag before you drag requirements this year.   Visit Big Game Check-In Procedures for details.

Antlered Deer

Male or female deer with at least one (1) antler that is a minimum of three (3) inches in length.

The statewide bag limit is two (2) antlered deer (one per day, not to exceed 2 for the license year).

The statewide bag limit of two (2) antlered deer may be exceeded if taken as a bonus deer, if taken under the Earn-A-Buck Program in Unit CWD, or if taken as a Replacement Buck.

Antlerless Deer

Male or female deer with no antlers or with antlers that are less than three (3) inches in length.

Antlerless deer hunters may harvest up to the unit antlerless bag limit in each unit. Moving to a different county within the same deer hunting unit does not increase the hunter’s bag limit.

Regular license holders (Type 001) will need to purchase a Special Season permit (Type 094) to take advantage of the antlerless opportunities. Hunters with a  Sportsman License, Lifetime Sportsman, Sr. Citizen with Type 166 & 167 licenses, and landowners hunting on their own land do not need the Special Season permit.

Albino Deer

Hunting, trapping, or possession of albino deer is prohibited as set forth in TCA 70-4-130.

An albino deer is a deer with a lack, or significant deficiency, of pigment in the skin and hair, and has pink eyes.

Mississippi River Flood Closure

When the Mississippi River at Caruthersville gauge reaches 34 ft. all big game hunting will close in the Mississippi River Floodwaters Zone (on private and public land) and will remain closed until the Mississippi River drops below 34 ft. at the Caruthersville gauge.

NOTE: Flood Closure area has changed. See the updated map. 

Sours: https://www.tn.gov/twra/hunting/big-game/deer.html
Public Land TN mountain BUCK!!!

There is so much watchable wildlife in Tennessee , including Birds and everything in between that loves snow as well. From forestry to camping to the many fun things between there is a chance at every turn to learn about the various resources that are available with wildlife, boating, hunting and even an opportunity for forestry as well as a lot of other fun topics as well.

Tennessee Hunting Season

Big Game: Deer, Elk, Black Bear

Small Game: Squirrel, Rabbit, Bullfrog

Bird: Turkey, Game Birds, Migratory Birds

Tennessee Hunting Season

Tennessee Deer Hunting 2021

SeasonOpening DateClosing DateUnitLimitNotes
Archery9/25/2110/29/21A, B , C, D4Antlerless
11/1/2111/5/21A, B, C, D4Antlerless
9/25/2110/29/21L, CWD3Antlerless
11/1/2111/5/21L, CWD3Antlerless
Young
Sportsman
10/30/2110/31/21A, B, C, D2Antlerless
1/8/221/9/22A, B, C, D2Antlerless
10/20/2110/31/21L, CWD3Antlerless
1/8/221/9/21L, CWD3Antlerless
Muzzleloader/
Archery (M/A)
11/6/2111/19/21A, B2Antlerless
11/6/2111/19/21C, D1Antlerless
11/6/2111/19/21L3Antlerless
Gun/
Muzzleloader/
Archery
11/20/211/2/22A2Antlerless
11/20/211/2/22B1Antlerless
11/20/2112/5/21C1Antlerless
11/20/2111/26/21D1Antlerless
11/6/211/2/22L, CWD3Antlerless

Antlered Bag Limits:

Antlered Deer: Male or female deer with at least one (1) antler that is a minimum of three (3) inches in length.
Antlerless Deer: Male or female deer with no antlers or with antlers that are less than three (3) inches in length.Antlerless deer hunters may harvest up to the unit antlerless bag limit in each unit. Moving to a different county within the same deer hunting unit does not increase the hunter’s bag limit.
Archery equipment is legal during muzzleloader and gun seasons, muzzleloading equipment is legal during gun season.
Statewide Bag Limit: Two (2) antlered deer (one per day, not to exceed 2 for the license year). The statewide bag limit of two (2) antlered deer may be exceeded if taken as a bonus deer, if taken under the Earn-A-Buck Program in Unit CWD (see CWD in Tennessee), or if taken as a Replacement Buck (see CWD in Tennessee).

Tennessee Hunting License

Purchase your Tennessee License at: https://gooutdoorstennessee.com/

Annual LicenseResidentNonresident
Sportsman$165N/A
Big Game
Muzzleloader
$33N/A
All GameN/A$305
Big Game Gun$33N/A
Big Game Archery$33N/A

Find a hunting guide

Tennessee hunting guides

Duck hunting guides

Deer hunting guides

Tennessee Hunting News

The statewide limit has been reduced from 4 to 3 turkeys, there are five counties adjacent to the Mississippi River form a new spring turkey unit with 2 week delayed spring turkey season opener and reduced unit bag limit of 2.

Operated by Tennessee Division of forestry, state forests are open to hunting during statewide seasons, that include bledsoe state forest, cedars of Lebanon State Forest, Franklin state first Lone Mountain State forest and Stewart State Forest.

Links to Official Sites

Sours: https://www.huntersguides.com/tennessee-hunting-season/

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At the whore !!. He fucked and talked, and I just hum and nodded my head. What was there to do.



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