Blender render video

Blender render video DEFAULT

Rendering Animations

Hints¶

Your computer accidentally turns off in the middle of rendering your movie!

Unless your animation renders in a few minutes, it is best to render the animation as separate image files. Instead of rendering directly to a compressed movie file, use a lossless format (e.g. ).

This allows you an easy recovery if there is a problem and you have to re-start the rendering, since the frames you have already rendered will still be in the output directory.

Just disable the Overwrite option to start rendering where you left off.

You can then make a movie out of the separate frames with Blender’s Sequence editor or use 3rd party encoding software.

Animation Preview

It can be useful to render a subset of the animated sequence, since only part of an animation may have an error.

Using an image format for output, you can use the Frame Step option to render every N’th frame. Then disable Overwrite and re-render with Frame Step set to 1.

Sours: https://docs.blender.org/manual/en/latest/render/output/animation.html

Sound Strips¶

As well as images and movies the VSE can also edit audio tracks. You can add Waveform Audio format , and other audio formats files from your drive, or from sound encoded within a movie, and mix them using an F-Curve as a volume control.

../../../../_images/editors_sequencer_audio_editing.png

Example of Sound Editing.

Options¶

Pack
This allows you to save the audio file into the blend-file.
Caching
Caching loads a file into RAM and plays it from there, apposed to reading it for the hard drive.
Draw Waveform
Draws either the waveform or the strip name, file name, duration. This can be useful for syncing two or more audio strips.
Volume
Changes the loudness of the audio.
Pitch
Transposes the frequency of the audio.
Pan
Used to pan the audio from left and right channels -2 being hard left, 2 being hard right.
Trim Duration
Offset the start and end of a sound strip.

Working with Audio Tracks¶

An audio track (strip) is just like any other strip in the VSE. You can grab and move it, adjust its starting offset using over the arrow end handles, and cut it into pieces. A useful example is cutting out the “um’s” and dead voice time.

You can have as many Audio strips as you wish and the result will be the mixing of all of them. You can give each strip its own name and volume via the properties region.

Overlapping strips are automatically mixed down during the rendering process. For example, you can have the announcer on channel 5, background music on channel 6, and Foley sound effects on channel 7.

See also

In the Playback Menu menu of the Timeline you will find some options concerning audio playback behavior.

Animating Audio Track Properties¶

To animate audio strips simply hit over any of its values. Examples of animating an audio strip are to fade in/out background music or to adjust volume levels. Layered/crossed audio strips are added together; the lower channel does not override and cut out higher channels (unlike image and video strips). This makes Blender an audio mixer. By adding audio tracks and using the curves to adjust each tracks’ sound level, you have an automated dynamic multi-track audio mixer!

Output¶

There are two ways to render out your audio. You can either have it encoded with a video file or in its own audio file. To render your audio in an video file make sure to use a video format as the output with an audio codec and hit the render Animation button in the properties editor. Read more on how to do this here. To render as an audio file simple use the Audio button. Read more on how to do this here.

Known Limitations¶

Hiss, Crackle and Pop¶

In some cases when Caching is disabled, playback noise/hiss is introduced.

If you hear pops and crackles, usually that is a sign that your hardware cannot keep up in real-time playback. They will not be present in your final rendered animation output.

Also, static hiss can occur whenever two or more audio strips are overlapping in the timeline.


© Copyright : This page is licensed under a CC-BY-SA 4.0 Int. License.

Sours: http://builder.openhmd.net/blender-hmd-viewport-temp/editors/vse/sequencer/strips/audio.html
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How to Render Blender Animations: Movie & Image Sequencing

Whether using the video sequencing editor or the compositor, the following guide explains how to properly render and complete an animation in Blender 2.8 onward, as well as the differences between rendering as a movie file and as an image sequence (rendering each frame as a still image).

Contents

Preparing to Render an Animation in Blender

When you’re finished with your project and ready to render, switch to the Render Properties subsection and select your rendering engine (Cycles, Eevee, or third-party engine). Tip: Pay close attention to the engine you choose when setting up the lighting in your project. Switching engines can drastically alter the lighting setup of your scene.

Changing the settings in the Performance subsection will help you with the rendering process. There, you will find the Threads Mode setting. It detects the number of CPU threads (virtual CPU cores) your workstation has and how many to use for rendering. By default, it’s set to auto-detect but can be changed to a fixed number, which allows you to manually select how many threads Blender will employ during rendering.

In the Output Properties panel, you can set the following:

  • Resolution of the animation
  • Start and end frames for the animation
  • Frame rate
  • Directory where the rendered animation will be saved

The File Format dropdown menu allows you to choose a movie format or an image format. As it suggests, your animation will be rendered as a single movie file when choosing a movie format, while each frame will be rendered as an individual image when choosing an image format. If your animation has 150 frames, for example, you would end up with 150 images rendered individually.

Each method has its own share of advantages and disadvantages but image sequencing carries the most versatility when comparing the two. With image sequencing, you can stop and restart the rendering process wherever you have left off. After rendering the individual images, you can then use the internal video sequencer to convert the images into a single movie file. Because this conversion is quick, it’s an effective and convenient way to convert the images into more than one movie file format.

Also, by rendering frames as individual images, you can augment them further by post-processing the images in the compositor before converting them. That said, one disadvantage with rendering individual images is that it takes a little extra work to convert them.

If you’re confident in your scene and your machine, you can of course render it directly as a movie file. If it seems to take longer than initially anticipated to render as a movie file, then consider rendering it as an image sequence instead.

Rendering an Animation as a Movie File

If you select the FFmpeg video format in the Output Properties sub-tab, an encoding section will become available that lets you select more options. You can select a video codec and a container for your video. If your project has audio, you can also select an audio codec.

  • Video Codec: The video codec encodes and also compresses the project’s rendered images into a format that can be stored or transmitted to another computer.
  • Audio Codec: If your project has audio, the audio codec should be used to encode and compress the audio as well.
  • Container: A container is what contains your video and audio. Container files have file extensions that will play with your video player, such as AVI, MP4, and MKV.

Once you have selected the codecs and container, you’re ready to render your animation. Open the Render menu in the toolbar and select Render Animation (F12). Once complete, the file will be available in the output directory you have selected.

Rendering an Animation as an Image Sequence

Alternatively, using an image file format such as BMP, JPG, or PNG will allow you to render out your scene as an image sequence. In terms of production, it’s much better to do this instead of rendering out as a movie file. Because rendering as a movie file can’t be stopped or paused during the render, and there’s a chance that your file can become corrupted, you may have to restart the entire render from the beginning.

Rendering as an image sequence allows you to experiment with different formats and settings before encoding to video. You can also restart the rendering process from your last successful frame in the event of a crash.

Once you have set your parameters, start the rendering process from the Render menu in the toolbar and select Render Animation (F12). To play the animation, go back to the main Blender window, and select View Render Animation from the Render menu.

Converting Rendered Images into a Movie File

By using the video sequencer, you can convert your rendered images into a playable movie file. Once inside the sequencer, go to Add (Shift+A) and select the Image Sequence option. Navigate to the directory where your files are stored and click “Add.”

Click the Strip tab to set the length of your animation. The file format of your output can also be set there.

As mentioned earlier, if you select the FFmpeg video format, then an encoding section will become available where you can select more options, including the video codec, audio codec, and container.

In the post-processing section, make sure that the sequencer option has been selected. If you plan to render the animation again, and you have a scene strip set up and the sequencer is activated, Blender will convert the strip into the specified file format when you render the animation.

Sours: https://renderpool.net/blog/how-to-render-blender-animations/

How to render an animation as video in Blender?

You have created an animation and want to make it into a final video format. Here are the steps -

  1. Choose an output location for your animation under the Output Settings tab by clicking on "Output".

  2. Set the Path to the folder where you want your output files to be saved, whether it is rendered as image files or a video file.

enter image description here

Before you make a video file of your animation, it is a good idea to render it as an Image Sequence first. If you render it directly to a video file, you can't stop/pause the render or there is a chance that you will get a corrupted file and have to render all of the frames all over again. Having an image sequence will allow you to experiment with different formats for and settings for encoding to video.

(If you want to render directly to video without saving as images, skip to step 8)

  1. When you have chosen an output directory for your Image Sequence, choose an Image Format.

enter image description here

  1. On the main menu Select Render > Render Animation (or press the shortcut + )

enter image description here

Blender will now start rendering the scene frames one by one.

  1. When the rendering is finished you will have a lot of numbered images. To encode them as a single video file, start a new project and choose New > Video Editing.

enter image description here

  1. On the Sequencer window, click on Add > Image Sequence

enter image description here

  1. Select all of the image files of your animation with and click on "Add image strip".

  2. In the Properties Window now select FFmpeg video as File format.

enter image description here

A new tab will appear with Encoding options.

There you can select the Container and the Codec for the output video file.

Container is the file format for the file, (Mov, Avi, Ogg, MP4, to name a few) sometimes is referred as a "wrapper".

Codec (short for Compression-Decompression) Is how the image is compressed. The picture quality, file size and processing power needed to view the file are largely determined by the kind of codec used and the settings used for it.

  1. On the main menu Select Render > Render Animation (or press the shortcut + )

enter image description here

The result of this will be a video file.

----------

For older versions of blender (previous to 2.79)

The options to choose formats are like this:

enter image description here

Choose a video format for your animation here:

enter image description here

The Render Animation" is located in "Render" tab.

To open the video editor click on "Choose screen layout" and then "Video Editing".

enter image description here

enter image description here

$\endgroup$Sours: https://blender.stackexchange.com/questions/15142/how-to-render-an-animation-as-video-in-blender

Render video blender

Video Output¶

Preparing your Work for Video¶

Once you master the art of 3D animation, you will probably want to share your work with others; either on the Internet (YouTube, Vimeo, etc.) or with family and friends (DVD/Blu-ray) or even possibly for television broadcast.

To spare you some disappointment, here are some tips specifically targeted at video preparation.

Safe Areas and Overscan¶

For anyone creating motion graphics or simple text overlays, overscan is an important consideration. Although its origins are rooted in historic analog TV systems, unfortunately even in 2017, for various reasons it can still be an issue with modern digital flat screen TVs.

Note

Due to various limitations in analog TV equipment, the displayed image could sometimes end up shifted horizontally or vary in size, which could lead to the area beyond the intended visible picture being shown. This hidden area sometimes contained junk noise, timing signals or closed-caption/subtitle data. To avoid this being visible to the viewer, the standard approach for TV manufacturers was to ‘overscan’ (zoom in) the displayed picture by a small amount (between 5-10% edge crop) to ensure that at no time would the hidden areas be visible.

Although modern digital electronics have eliminated the issue of shifting image position, unfortunately, some TV manufacturers have included overscan on their flat screen TVs. Why? Because for many years it was given that the edge of the visible image would rarely be seen, so broadcasters would sometimes overlay ‘hidden’ data to the very edge of the image (e.g. some types of closed captions). Also, legacy analog recordings might still contain unwanted noise around the edge. To avoid consumer complaints, overscan is quite often enabled by default. For some flat screen TVs, it is not possible to disable it.

Enabling Safe Areas¶

Blender has configurable safe-area markings which can be made visible by selecting the scene camera, then in the camera settings by enabling Safe Areas. Several presets are available. If you are producing work for a television network or indeed any client, they may have their own rules and requirements on safe area dimensions – so consult with them.

Color Reproduction¶

When exporting to many of the common video formats, the rendered RGB(A) images go through a conversion process whereby they are translated to the YCbCr color model. Y corresponds to a gray-scale representation of the image, Cb and Cr contain data for the blue and red channels respectively. Green is encoded into the Y and Cb, Cr channels with some clever math.

Importantly, the color components are often stored at a lower resolution to the Y (grayscale) channel. This can cause blurring/smearing which can be a problem with small text and some saturated color combinations – so it is well worth doing test encodes to make sure that text remains legible. As with safe areas, a TV network or client might have their own rules on minimum text size and positioning, so always seek clarification when unsure.

Encoding Panel¶

../../_images/render_output_video_encoding-panel.png

Encoding panel.

Here you choose which video container, codec, and compression settings you want to use. With all of these compression choices, there is a trade-off between file size, compatibility across platforms, and playback quality.

Tip

When you view the System Console, you can see some of the output of the encoding process. You will see even more output if you execute Blender as .

Presets
You can use the presets, which choose optimum settings for you for that type of output.
Container
Video container or file type. For a list of all available options, see video formats.
Autosplit Output
If your video is huge and exceeds 2GiB, enable Autosplit Output. This will automatically split the output into multiple files after the first file is 2Gig.
Codec
Chooses the method of compression and encoding. For a list of all available options see video formats.

Note

Standards

Some containers and codecs are not compatible with each other, so if you are getting errors check that your container and codec are compatible. Like containers and codecs are sometimes not compatible with each other, some codecs do not work with arbitrary dimensions. So, try to stick with common dimensions or research the limitations of the codec you are trying to use.

Output Quality
These are preset Rates.
Encoding Speed
Presets to change between a fast encode (bigger file size) and more compression (smaller file size).
Keyframe Interval
The number of pictures per Group of Pictures. Set to 0 for “intra_only”, which disables inter-frame video. A higher number generally leads to a smaller file but needs a higher-powered device to replay it.
Max B-frames

Enables the use of B‑frames.

Interval
The maximum number of B‑frames between non-B-frames.

Rate¶

Bitrate
Sets the average bit rate (quality), which is the count of binary digits per frame. See also: FFmpeg -b:v.
Rate
Video files can use what is called variable bit rate (VBR). This is used to give some segments of the video less compressing to frames that need more data and less to frames with less data. This can be controlled by the Minimum and Maximum values.
Buffer
The decoder bitstream buffer size.

Mux¶

Multiplexing is the process of combining separate video and audio streams into a single file, similar to packing a video file and .mp3 audio file in a zip-file.

Rate
Maximum bit rate of the multiplexed stream.
Packet Size
Reduces data fragmentation or muxer overhead depending on the source.

Audio¶

Audio Codec
Audio format to use. For a list of all available options, see video formats.
Bitrate
For each codec, you can control the bit rate (quality) of the sound in the movie. Higher bit rates are bigger files that stream worse but sound better. Use powers of 2 for compatibility.
Volume
Sets the output volume of the audio.

Tips¶

Tip

The choice of video format depends on what you are planning to do.

It’s not recommended to render directly to a video format in the first instance. If a problem occurs while rendering, the file might become unplayable and you will have to re-render all frames from the beginning. If you first render out a set of static images such as the default PNG format or the higher-quality OpenEXR (which can retain HDR pixel data), you can combine them as an Image Strip in the Video Sequence Editor (VSE). This way, you can easily:

  • Restart the rendering from the place (the frame) where any problem occurred.
  • Try out different video encoding options in seconds, rather than minutes or hours as encoding is usually much faster than rendering the 3d scene.
  • Enjoy the rest of the features of the VSE, such as adding Image Strips from previous renders, audio, video clips, etc.

Tip

You shouldn’t post-process a lossy-compressed file as the compression artifacts may become visible. Lossy compression should be reserved as a final ‘delivery format’.

If you are planning on doing significant post-processing and color correction, it is best to output a frameset rendered in OpenEXR format. If you plan to do only minimal changes after rendering and would prefer a single file, choose lossless H.264 for high quality, or regular H.264 for lower quality.


© Copyright : This page is licensed under a CC-BY-SA 4.0 Int. License.

Sours: https://docs.blender.org/manual/en/2.79/render/output/video.html
Export to Video Format in Blender

Video Output¶

Preparing your work for video¶

Once you have mastered the trick of animation you will surely start to produce wonderful animations, encoded with your favorite codecs, and possibly you will share them on the Internet with the rest of the community.

Sooner or later you will be struck with the desire to build an animation for television, or maybe burn your own DVDs. To spare you some disappointment, here are some tips specifically targeted at Video preparation. The first and principal one is to remember the double-dashed white lines in the camera view!

If you render for PC then the whole rendered image which lies within the outer dashed rectangle will be shown. For television, some lines and some part of the lines will be lost due to the mechanics of the electron beam scanning in your TV’s cathode ray tube. You are guaranteed that what is within the inner dashed rectangle in camera view will be visible on the screen. Everything within the two rectangles may or may not be visible, depending on the given TV set that your audience watches the video on.

Color Saturation¶

Most video tapes and video signals are not based on the RGB model but on the YCrCb model: more precisely, the YUV in Europe (PAL), and the YIQ in the USA (NTSC), the latter being quite similar to the former. Hence some knowledge of this is necessary too.

The YCrCb model sends information as ‘Luminance’, or intensity (Y) and two ‘Crominance’ signals, red and blue (Cr and Cb). Actually a Black and White TV set shows only luminance, while color TV sets reconstruct color from Crominances (and from luminance). Construction of the YCrCb values from the RGB ones takes two steps (the constants in italics depend on the system: PAL or NTSC):

First, the Gamma correction (g varies: 2.2 for NTSC, 2.8 for PAL):

  • R’ = R1/g
  • G’ = G1/g
  • B’ = B1/g

Then, the conversion itself:

  • Y = 0.299R’ + 0.587G’ + 0.114B’
  • Cr = a1 (R’ - Y) + b1 (B’ - Y)
  • Cb = a2 (R’ - Y) + b2 (B’ - Y)

Whereas a standard 24 bit RGB picture has 8 bits for each channel, to keep bandwidth down, and considering that the human eye is more sensitive to luminance than to chrominance, the luminance signal is sent with more bits than the two chrominance signals. This bit expansion results in a smaller dynamic of colors in video, than what you are used to on monitors. You hence have to keep in mind that not all colors can be correctly displayed.

A rule of thumb is to keep the colors as ‘grayish’ or ‘unsaturated’ as possible; this roughly means keeping the dynamics of your colors within 80% of one another. In other words, the difference between the highest RGB value and the lowest RGB value should not exceed 0.8 (0 - 1 range) or 200 (0 - 255 range).

This is not strict, something more than 0.8 is acceptable, but an RGB display with color contrast that ranges from 0.0 to 1.0 will appear to be very ugly (over-saturated) on video, while appearing bright and dynamic on a computer monitor.

Encoding Panel¶

../../_images/render_output_encoding-panel.png

Encoding panel.

Here you choose which video codec you want to use, and compression settings. With all of these compression choices, there is a tradeoff between file size, compatibility across platforms, and playback quality.

When you view the System Console, you can see some of the output of the encoding process. You will see even more output if you execute Blender as .

Presets
You can use the presets, which choose optimum settings for you for that type of output.
Format

Video container or file type. For a list of all available options see video formats.

Codec
Chooses the method of compression and encoding. For a list of all available options see video formats.
Lossless Output
Allows the ability to perfectly reconstruct compressed data from compressed data.
Bitrate
Set the average bitrate (quality), which is the count of binary digits per frame. See also: FFmpeg -b:v.
GOP Size
The number of pictures per Group of Pictures. Set to 0 for “intra_only”, which disables inter-frame video. From FFmpeg docs: “For streaming at very low bitrate application, use a low frame rate and a small GOP size. This is especially true for RealVideo where the Linux player does not seem to be very fast, so it can miss frames”.
Autosplit Output
If your video is HUGE and exceeds 2Gig, enable Autosplit Output. The main control over output filesize is the GOP or keyframe interlace. A higher number generally leads to a smaller file but needs a higher-powered device to replay it.
Mux

Multiplexing settings.

Rate
Maximum bit rate of the multiplexed stream.
Packet Size
Reduces data fragmentation or muxer overhead depending on the source.

Note

Standards

Some codecs cannot encode off-the-wall video sizes, so stick to the XY sizes used in the presets for standard TV sizes.

Rate

The bitrate control also includes a Minimum and a Maximum.

Buffer
The decoder bitstream buffer size.
Audio Codec
Audio conainer used, For a list of all available options see video formats.
Bitrate
For each codec, you can control the bitrate (quality) of the sound in the movie. Higher bitrates are bigger files that stream worse but sound better. Use powers of 2 for compatibility.
Volume
Sets the output volume of the audio.

Tips¶

Choosing which format to use depends on what you are going to do with the image.

If you are animating a movie and are not going to do any post-processing or special effects on it, use either or and choose the XviD open codec. If you want to output your movie with sound that you have loaded into the VSE, use M-PEG.

If you are going to do post-processing on your movie, it is best to use a frameset rendered as “OpenEXR” images; if you only want one file, then choose “AVI Raw”. While AVI Raw is huge, it preserves the exact quality of output for post-processing. After post-processing (compositing and/or sequencing), you should compress the video.

Tip

You do not want to post-process a compressed file because the compression artifacts might throw off what you are trying to accomplish with the post-processing.

Note that you might not want to render directly to a video format. If a problem occurs while rendering, you have to re-render all frames from the beginning. If you first render out a set of static images (such as the default PNG, or the higher-quality OpenEXR), you can stitch them together with an Image Strip in the Video Sequence Editor. This way, you can easily:

  • Restart the rendering from the place (the frame) where the problem occurred.
  • Try out different video options in seconds, rather than minutes or hours.
  • Enjoy the rest of the features of the VSE, such as adding Image Strips from previous renders, audio, video clips, etc.

© Copyright : This page is licensed under a CC-BY-SA 4.0 Int. License.

Sours: http://builder.openhmd.net/blender-hmd-viewport-temp/render/output/video.html

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