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Using the USB ports on your Xbox console

Xbox consoles have three USB 3.0 ports: two on the rear of the console and one that’s either on the front (Xbox Series X|S, Xbox One S, or Xbox One X) or the left side (original Xbox One).

Supported accessories for these ports include:
  • Xbox Wireless Headset (for headset charging)
  • Xbox One Play & Charge Kit
  • Mad Catz Arcade FightStick Tournament Edition 2 for Xbox One
  • Thrustmaster TX Racing Wheel, Ferrari 458 Italia Edition
  • Wired USB keyboards

For info on the latest accessories, see:

If you have a USB 3.0 external storage with a capacity of 128 GB or greater, you can use it to hold Xbox games and apps. Alternatively, you can use the drive to store and play music, videos, and pictures on Xbox using the Media Player app.

Note Make sure your drive is using a USB 3.0-compliant cable that’s in good condition. The cable, believe it or not, can affect the performance of your drive or your Xbox.

If you have a USB drive that doesn’t meet these requirements for speed and size, you can still use it to play media.


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Contact times

Phone support

Monday to Friday: 6:00am-5:00pm PTSaturday to Sunday: 6:00am-5:00pm PT

Web chat

Monday to Sunday: 24 hours a day

Sours: https://support.xbox.com/en-US/help/hardware-network/accessories/usb-port-use

The best Xbox One external hard drives for 2021

If you get the best Xbox One external hard drive for your setup now, in the year 2021, you are still making an excellent purchase. Extra storage is always a worthwhile, though not sexy, acquisition but even more so on the last generation of consoles. And that is particularly because the Xbox game library is just massive. Stretching across multiple console generations, there's more choice than ever, and it's highly likely that Xbox One players will have a burgeoning, bursting at the seams game collection that needs to be stored somewhere, somehow.

And you're not just backing yourself up and strengthening your last-gen position: these drives on the new Xbox consoles to store the next-gen titles to shift them over to the internal SSD when you want to play them. This is way quicker than having to re-download them if you fill up the console's own SSD and have to shift things around. 

Plus, you can move over your existing Xbox One content when you upgrade too. We've already tested a bunch on the new Xbox, so if you'd like to see what works best on those, head on over to our best Xbox Series X external hard drive guide.

Making a decision on the best Xbox One external hard drive is ultimately driven by what you want from a portable HDD. As we've heard from the recent conversations about the new consoles, speed is a massive factor, with HDDs being almost wholesale replaced by SSDs whenever the opportunity presents itself. External SSDs are more expensive, however, but the faster read and write speeds they bring to the party can massively reduce load times and any time spent copying files from your console. 

Elsewhere, and probably for most users still, capacity is king. The larger the better. Many Xbox gamers will look for at least 4TB to get the best value option that'll keep them covered for the larger game collections, while some just need an extra 1TB to keep a few more games within arms reach that they play regularly. Reliability is a key factor, especially if you're going to be carrying your HDD with you regularly. You don't want something made of cheap materials that will damage easily and potentially lose all your game saves and installs with the slightest of bumps. And finally, very importantly, price is key, too and we consider all these criteria before putting something in our guide. All in, one of the best Xbox One external hard drives really is one of the most essential Xbox One accessories.

And remember, the winter seals madness is nearly here, which means there's going to be money to be saved on storage solutions. It might well pay to wait for the Black Friday external hard drive deals, but definitely think about perusing the Black Friday SSD offerings, and the Black Friday PS5 SSD deals as there's very likely to be something in those that'll be perfect for Xbox One players too.

Best Xbox One external hard drives

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1. WD 4TB My Passport Portable

The best Xbox One external hard drive

Specifications

Capacity: 4TB

Storage Type: HDD

Reasons to buy

+Huge storage capacity+Trusted brand at a great price+Good speeds

Reasons to avoid

-Slightly short connector cord

Our top pick for best Xbox One external hard drive belongs to the Western Digital 4TB My Passport series. We used to recommend a 2TB drive (which is still more than large enough for most people), but with Xbox One X ownership rising and the increased size of 4K games, this is the best way to future proof yourself. In terms of features, this USB 3.0 (and USB 2.0) compatible hard drive offers 256-AES encryption and cloud storage, along with WD's own backup software. In reality, all you really need to know is that this hits the sweet spot of size, speed and affordability. This 4TB external hard drive will store up to 40 Xbox One X games (or more), and up to 100 or so regular Xbox One games. Basically, it's a monster, and with a three-year limited warranty, there's every reason to buy with utmost confidence. It's available in a 2TB option, too, but 4TB feels like maximum value. What's more, the new design is excellent, stylish and keeps all that is good in a sleek new aesthetic.

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2. Toshiba 1TB Canvio Advance

Best budget Xbox One external hard drive

Specifications

Capacity: 1TB

Storage Type: HDD

Reasons to buy

+Great price+Small and slick+Different colors available

Reasons to avoid

-Standard HDD speed

We have a new budget pick for the best Xbox One external hard drive. The Toshiba Canvio Advance is a lovely piece of kit: it comes with a glossy shell, a simple design, and a neat, blue power-light on the top. It doesn't require an additional power source, and simply plugs into the USB port on your Xbox One console and... just works. It has read and write speeds to match all other drives on this list, and comes with a two year warranty as standard. If you want to use it for PC too, it has password protection and automatic file back-up, which are both useful features that elevate this model above our previous budget pick, the Canvio Basics. The only real drawback of the Advance is that it doesn't come in a green color, which means it won't complement your console. However, you can get white which does look slick next to most Xbox consoles. You should be able to grab the 1TB version for around $50 / £50, which makes it a genuine bargain too.

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3. WD Black P10 1-5TB Game Drive

A bit pricey, but reliable and built to last

Specifications

Capacity: 1-5TB

Storage type: : HDD

Reasons to buy

+Super portable size+Runs cool and quietly at all times+3-year warranty

Reasons to avoid

-Quite expensive-Standard speeds

The WD Black P10 hard drive is a superb portable option for expandable storage. And while not listed as an armored or 'rugged' hard drive, we found it to have a really sturdy build-quality with the metal topside giving it a bit of a shipping container aesthetic. We also noticed the hard drive runs cool (and quietly too), even with back to back-to-back 16-hour days for a couple of weeks.

Why would you have it running that long? Well, we decided to test the 5TB version and download every single Xbox Game Pass game (took a while with our home connection speed). And we managed it too, that's over 280 games, with a bit of space leftover. 

The write speed is nothing special at 'up to 130 MB/s' but we found it matched that of the Xbox One console itself, so we were perfectly happy running our entire game collection from this external hard drive rather than the console's storage system. 

An Xbox branded version has a white trim instead of the cheaper all-black model, but that's the only real difference and we found the plain one to be cheaper. Although some of the branded ones come with a code for two months of Game Pass, so worth checking the product description for confirmation there. 

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4. Seagate 2TB/4TB Xbox One Game Drive

The official Xbox One external hard drive (and it's a good one too!)

Specifications

Capacity: 2TB/4TB

Storage Type: HDD

Reasons to buy

+All the space you'll ever need+Looks great

Reasons to avoid

-A little on the expensive side

This officially branded external hard drive on Xbox One comes in 2 or 4GB options giving you a choice depending on if you want to go for media storage, or games. It's basically a regular Seagate drive in a flashier case, and you're paying about $15-20 extra for having the (admittedly quite nice) embossed Xbox logo and official green case colour. If your budget allows, and aesthetics are important to you, it's functionally still a great choice, and you can often find it on sale. The Seagate 2TB Game Drive in official Xbox green often drops in price around big retail events, so while now is a great time to buy, we'll surely see reductions in the new year sales.

If you're not worried about official branding, this Seagate 4TB drive at Walmart is currently $40 off at $89.

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5. Seagate Expansion 8TB

The biggest Xbox One external hard drive

Specifications

Capacity: 8TB

Storage Type: HDD

Reasons to buy

+Gargantuan storage space+Great price

Reasons to avoid

-Needs plugging into the mains-Not exactly small

The Seagate Expansion 8TB is USB 3.0 compatible and offers more storage than you'll likely ever need. It's the ideal choice for the prolific Xbox One user who wants to buy one hard drive and never have to think about storage again. The huge storage capacity raises the price, obviously, and the 8TB drive requires an external power adapter (supplied in the box), but is surprisingly elegant for such a large device. At 2.09 lbs with dimensions of 4.75 x 6.93 x 1.44 in, the Seagate Expansion 8TB is also considerably lighter than rival large capacity external hard drives, such as the WD 8TB My Book drive at 3.0 lbs with dimensions of 1.9 x 5.5 x 6.7 in.

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6. Silicon Power Armor A62

A great value hardy drive

Specifications

Capacity: up to 5TB

Storage Type: HDD

Reasons to buy

+Robust and solid design+Easy to set up and use+Good speeds

Reasons to avoid

-You'll probably still want an external case to take it out and about to be sure

This is a great value option for those looking for a tough as nails hard drive with decent and reliable transfer rates and speeds, robust design, and a do-it-all feel to their external hard drive. 

It's a solid unit that has a fair bit of weight to it, which makes it really feel like it could survive a drop or two, or bump around the house. There's a big emphasis on robustness here with the drive being shockproof, water-resistant, and is anti-scratch protected, plus there is a rubber bumper around the outside which helps with grip when on the go and adds a bit more protection to the drive. The rubber actually pulls away at some parts (safely) to act as a holder for the USB cable when on the go, and there's a little USB port cover which is a nice touch for storage.

As well as using it solely as an Xbox One external hard drive, we used this to back up a load of files onto via PC and it was very easy to set up and use, and the transfer speeds were very quick - even 'by eye'; transferring more than 1.5GB of things didn't take any time at all. This represents an all-round solid acquisition in the hard drive department.

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7. WD_Black P50 Game Drive

The best external SSD for Xbox One right now

Specifications

Capacity: up to 4TB

Storage type: SSD

Reasons to buy

+Excellent speeds+Great design+Robust build+Purpose-built for gaming

Reasons to avoid

-A little pricey

The WD BLACK P50 SSD is pretty much the complete package. And what a robust package it is. Starting from the top, the P50 is a rectangular-shaped drive that is about the size of a small-ish (nowadays, anyway) smartphone. It's still handheld size though so it's extremely portable while also staying firmly away from the 'so small I might lose it' territory. The case is a very cool-looking military style with molded metal and the traditional sleek WD_Black aesthetic and marking.

Its USB-C port can be used on your devices as either a USB-A or USB-C connection and in our testing, we got the same speeds through either port so it shouldn't matter which you have free or available, or if you change the device it's used with during its lifetime. There's a small but clear LED indicator on one of the short ends which is always a help, but one small downside is that it does get a little warm when in use so it'll pay to keep that in mind when positioning it.

When it comes to speeds, what you're told you're getting and what happens is pretty much bang on. It's incredible performance for an external SSD and the stated speeds of 'up to 2000MB/s' were on the money in our testing. Real-world performance-wise, the P50 gives you everything a high-quality external SSD should do: games were loaded incredibly quickly, files were retrieved in the snap of a finger, and the performance levels were incredibly consistent. It's a surefire SSD that will rapidly improve your gaming experience by far reducing the time looking at loading screens and increasing the time when you're actually playing. 

While you will pay a bit more for the P50, it's definitely worth it. It's hard to look past this as the top SSD contender in the world of the best Xbox One external hard drives.

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8. OWC Envoy Pro EX SSD

A stylish and solid SSD

Specifications

Capacity: up to 2TB

Storage type: SSD

Reasons to buy

+Excellent portable design+Small and solid+Decent speeds

Reasons to avoid

-A bit expensive

The OWC Envoy Pro EX SSD is a neat little SSD that has excellent form and function. With that, and it being an SSD, it does demand a high-ish price tag but the quality you get for your money is undeniable.

As a unit of tech, it's simply a great bit of kit: it's a sleek, stylish, silver wedge-shaped drive with one connection port and one LED that is pocket-sized and very robust. Despite being small, it has a good weight to it and really feels like it could survive the odd bump or drop. It's small enough to keep out of the way behind a console, but also stylish enough - for a hard drive - to be left open to see. 

If you do want to turn it into a PC external drive then the software on board will get you going well. This is also how we revealed the speeds, using Crystal Disk Mark, of 411mb/s read speed, and 248mb/s write speed. Solid enough and certainly reliable for it to be among the best Xbox One external hard drives.

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Sours: https://www.gamesradar.com/the-best-xbox-one-external-hard-drive/
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READ THIS BEFORE GIVING UP                  (QUALIFIED TECHNICIAN)

All USB 3.0 Ext HDD including SATAII are formatted to NTFS unless specified by manufacturer.

This is windows standard format for use on PC. If you buy an external drive even one that is formatted for Mac you plug this new external HDD into either a PC or Mac as formatted for, then go to the formatting features in that device to reformat this external HDD to Xbox parameters.

Select the formatting code Fat32 (only) and quick format the new external without partitions. Choosing to check every block in long formatting is not necessary as this drive is new.

Once the drive is formatted to Fat32 remove it from PC/Mac and then connect it to your Xbox (whatever version) and turn on that device.

A window will appear before login, asking you to select the type of use for this external drive.

Select the games option for storage of game content and do not make it the preferred storage of new content. It is a library backup not a main drive for game play. If you intend to use this new storage for music and videos it requires different formatting to the games option. You cannot have both on the same drive.

Let your Xbox do its thing and then check the drive by going into 'settings' and selecting 'storage' to see the drive in your system settings.

You will notice that your formatted external drive loses a lot of Gb, as in 4Tb will be 3.6Tb. This is because the formatted drive is in large blocks probably 128Kb shrinking the drive space to Fat32 128Kb not NTFS.

Don't use a program to change this external to Xbox format (AOMEI Partition Pro allows multi layer HDD formatting for technicians). Changing the format parameters in Fat32 will render your format to no longer work on Xbox and you will need to redo the entire format procedure.

On partitioning, you can have a single external drive with 2 partitions connected to your Xbox but these partitions cannot serve different purpose. E.g., you cannot have 1 partition for games and the 2nd for music and photos. You can have 2 partitions for game storage on one device but why bother. Separate partitions on the same external must have the same formatting. Hence, don't partition, just add another external drive.

You can have up to 2 external drives on an Xbox One upwards. But note, the external should be used for storage of games, not a drive for play. It is necessary to extend one specific option here- if you intend to play from an external drive, buy a powered SATAII external drive as it will not break easily. This is far more reliable than an SSD of similar and these USB 3.2 SATAII drives start at 4Tb storage size and get very large at 20Tb of saved data on one drive. SATAII is not cheap but it will outlast all other external options.

A faster drive does not transfer at a faster speed than the set parameters of the Operating System settings. Most people don't read the technical information on how their device functions as a stable unit, especially Xbox users. Xbox One upwards runs 5400rpm and no higher. It is why you can buy very good external HDDs at a fraction of price to extend your units onboard storage and not be at a loss for exaggerated hype that serves only to confuse the real terminology herein. Learn from an expert.

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Get to know your Xbox One console

This page will help you get to know your Xbox One console. The following illustrations show you the important buttons and ports that you'll be using.

Get to know your Xbox One X console

The front of the Xbox One X console with the features numbered to correspond with the accompanying text.
  1. Eject button: Used to eject a disc from the console. Discs will insert automatically.
  2. Infrared receiver and blaster: Used to receive signals from the Xbox One Media Remote.
  3. Pair button: Used to connect wireless accessories such as the Xbox Wireless Controller.
  4. USB 3.0 port: Used to connect wired accessories, such as the Xbox One Play & Charge Kit.
  5. Power button: The console's power button and LED indicator.
The back of the Xbox One X console with the features numbered to correspond with the accompanying text.
  1. Power port:Power supply connects here.
  2. HDMI out: HDMI cable connects here and then to your TV.
  3. HDMI in: HDMI cable connects here and then to your HDMI-compatible cable/satellite receiver.
  4. USB 3.0 port: Used to connect wired accessories. If connecting a Kinect Adapter, use this USB port on the left as you view the back of the console.
  5. USB 3.0 port: Used to connect wired accessories.
  6. IR out: Infrared output port for IR blaster (optional; IR blaster not included).
  7. S/PDIF: Optical audio output (optional; optical cable not included).
  8. Networking port: Ethernet cable connects here from your modem or router (Ethernet cable not included).

Get to know your Xbox One S console

The front of the Xbox One S console with the features numbered to correspond with the accompanying text.
  1. USB 3.0 port: Used to connect wired accessories, such as the Xbox One Play & Charge Kit.
  2. Eject button: Used to eject a disc from the console. Discs will insert automatically.
  3. Power button: The console's power button and LED indicator.
  4. Pair button: Used to connect wireless accessories, such as the Xbox Wireless Controller.
  5. Infrared receiver and blaster: Used to receive signals from the Xbox One Media Remote.
The back of the Xbox One S console with the features numbered to correspond with the accompanying text.
  1. Power port:Power supply connects here.
  2. HDMI out: HDMI cable connects here and then to your TV.
  3. HDMI in:HDMI cable connects here and then to your HDMI-compatible cable/satellite receiver.
  4. USB 3.0 port: Used to connect wired accessories. If connecting a Kinect Adapter, use this USB port on the left as you view the back of the console.
  5. USB 3.0 port: Used to connect wired accessories.
  6. IR out: Infrared output port for IR blaster (optional; IR blaster not included).
  7. S/PDIF: Optical audio output (optional; optical cable not included).
  8. Networking port: Ethernet cable connects here from your modem or router (Ethernet cable not included).
  9. Lock port: Allows you to connect a laptop lock to your console to secure it (optional; lock not included).

Get to know your Xbox One S All-Digital Edition console

The front of the Xbox One S All-Digital Edition console with the features numbered to correspond with the accompanying text.
  1. USB 3.0 port: Used to connect wired accessories, such as the Xbox One Play & Charge Kit.
  2. Pair button: Used to connect wireless accessories, such as the Xbox Wireless Controller.
  3. Infrared receiver and blaster: Used to receive signals from the Xbox One Media Remote.
  4. Power button: The console's power button and LED indicator.
The back of the Xbox One S All-Digital Edition console with the features numbered to correspond with the accompanying text.
  1. Power port:Power supply connects here.
  2. HDMI out: HDMI cable connects here and then to your TV.
  3. HDMI in: HDMI cable connects here and then to your HDMI-compatible cable/satellite receiver.
  4. USB 3.0 port: Used to connect wired accessories. If connecting a Kinect Adapter, use this USB port on the left as you view the back of the console.
  5. USB 3.0 port: Used to connect wired accessories.
  6. IR out:Infrared output port for IR blaster (optional; IR blaster not included).
  7. S/PDIF: Optical audio output (optional; optical cable not included).
  8. Networking port: Ethernet cable connects here from your modem or router (Ethernet cable not included).
  9. Lock port: Allows you to connect a laptop lock to your console to secure it (optional; lock not included).

Get to know your original Xbox One console

The front of the original Xbox One console with the features numbered to correspond with the accompanying text.
  1. Eject button: Used to eject a disc from the console. Discs will insert automatically.
  2. Power button:The console power button and LED indicator.
The side of the original Xbox One console with the features numbered to correspond with the accompanying text.
  1. USB 3.0 port: Used to connect wired accessories, such as the Xbox One Play & Charge Kit.
  2. Pair button: Used to connect wireless accessories such as the Xbox Wireless Controller.
The back of the original Xbox One console with the features numbered to correspond with the accompanying text.
  1. Power supply port: Power supply connects here.
  2. HDMI out: HDMI cable connects here and then to your TV.
  3. S/PDIF: Optical audio output (optional; optical cable not included).
  4. HDMI in: HDMI cable connects here and then to your HDMI-compatible cable/satellite receiver.
  5. USB 3.0 ports: Two ports used to connect wired accessories, such as the Xbox One Play & Charge Kit and gaming accessories.
  6. Kinect port: Proprietary USB port, to be used only for Kinect.
  7. IR out: Infrared output port for IR blasters (optional; IR blaster not included).
  8. Networking port: Ethernet cable connects here from your modem or router (Ethernet cable not included).
  9. Lock port: Allows you to connect a laptop lock to your console to secure it (optional; lock not included).

Did this resolve the issue?

Still need help?

Request a call, chat online, and more.


Contact times

Phone support

Monday to Friday: 6:00am-5:00pm PTSaturday to Sunday: 6:00am-5:00pm PT

Web chat

Monday to Sunday: 24 hours a day

Sours: https://support.xbox.com/en-US/help/hardware-network/console/get-to-know-xbox-console

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USB Killer vs PS4 Pro \u0026 Xbox One S - Instant Death?

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