Psalm chapter 3

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Psalm 3

Psalm 3 is the third Psalm of the Bible. It is a personal thanksgiving to God, who answered the prayer of an afflicted soul. This psalm is attributed to David and relates in particular to the time when he fled from Absalom his son. The story of Absalom is found in the 2 Samuel, chapters 13–18. David, deserted by his subjects, derided by Shimei, pursued for his crown and life by his ungracious son, turns to his God, makes his supplications, and confesses his faith.

Context[edit]

This is the first Psalm with a title in the original and it concerns a specific time of crisis in David's life. David fled Absalom because of a series of events as a result of David being under discipline for his own sins regarding Bathsheba and Uriah the Hittite as recorded in 2 Samuel 11.[1] In that light, the prayer is a model for looking to God for help even in the midst of God's chastisement. Even so, David prays "Thy blessings by upon your people".[2]

An evening and a morning are seen (verse 5) as David lays down to sleep and wakes up protected and sustained by providence. Absalom 's advisor Ahitophel is personified as the mouth who David asks God to 'break the teeth of" and in the account Ahitophel's counsel is frustrated and Ahitophel faces his demise.[3] David fleeing his son at the start of Psalm 3 is in direct contrast with taking refuge in 'the Son' at the end of Psalm 2.[4]

This is also the first Psalm which refers to a selah, which appears after verses 2, 4 and 8. The final selah possibly indicates that Psalm 3 and Psalm 4 are tied together somehow.[5]

David spent more years fleeing Saul as a young man than he spent fleeing his son Absalom. David will even write many psalms later through the book of psalms on situations where he was being chased by Saul. Here is one of the opening psalms in the book of psalms and it is about the painful experience of fleeing from his own son.

[edit]

Matthew Henry[edit]

According to Matthew Henry’s Concise Commentary written in 1706, verses 1-3 represent David complaining to God of his enemies, and confiding in God. Verses 4-8 represent his triumphs over his fears, and "give God the glory", while "taking to himself the comfort".[6]

Martin Luther[edit]

Martin Luther felt that, overall, the goal in this Psalm is to impart the confidence of those who consider themselves followers of YHWH to call on him. "But you, Yahweh, are a shield around me, my glory, and uplifts my head." (Verse 4): This is the emphatic prayer of the oppressed who turn aside to YHWH.[7]

Although written in the mouth of David (verse 1)[8] the reader is encouraged to consider how God rescues someone like David, who was at that time very in distress, saved and later raised to be king over all Israel.

[edit]

New Advent: St. Augustine, Exposition on Psalm 3

Musical settings[edit]

Psalm 3 has been scored in music by many composers, including "Thou Art A Shield For Me",[9] by Byron Cage, "Christian Karaoke Praise Song Psalm 3 worship",[10] by Andrew Bain. In 1691, Marc-Antoine Charpentier composed around 1676 one "Domine quid multiplicati sunt", for 3 voices, 2 treble instruments and continuo, H.172. Michel-Richard Delalande composed his grand motet Domine quid sunt Multiplicati (S.37) for the offices of the Chapel of Versailles, and Henry Purcell set a variant version of the Latin text, "Jehova, quam multi sunt hostes mei," for five voices and continuo.

Uses[edit]

Judaism[edit]

  • In the Old Testament, the prayer of Jonah in the "fish" starts with Psalm 3 and he also ends his prayer drawing on Psalm 3.[11] Jonah also draws on other psalms, namely Psalms 16, 18, 31, 42, 50, 88, 116, 118, 119 and 120.[12][13]
  • Verses 2-9 are part of the prayers of the Bedtime Shema[14] and occasional sunrise Shema.
  • Verse 9 is the eighth verse of V'hu Rachum in Pesukei Dezimra[15] and is also found in Havdalah.[16]

Eastern Orthodox Church[edit]

  • Psalm 3 is the first Psalm, of "The Six Psalms", which are read as part of every Orthros (Matins) service. During the reading of the Six Psalms, movement and noise are strongly discouraged, as it is regarded as one of the most holy moments of the Orthros service.[17]

Catholic Church[edit]

About 530 in the Rule of St. Benedict, Benedict of Nursia chose this Psalm for the beginning of the office of matins, namely as the first psalm in the liturgy of the Benedictine during the year.[18] In the abbeys that preserve the tradition, it is currently the first Psalm Sunday for the office of vigils.[19]

In the current Liturgy of the Hours, Psalm 3 is sung or recited the first Office of Readings on Sunday of the week, after the first two psalms.[20]

Book of Common Prayer[edit]

In the Church of England's Book of Common Prayer, Psalm 3 is appointed to be read on the morning of the first day of the month.[21]

References[edit]

  1. ^"David's Great Repentance by R.C. Sproul".
  2. ^"Psalms 3 - Spurgeon's Verse Expositions of the Bible - Bible Commentaries".
  3. ^"Free Online Bible Library | Lecture 13: Psalm 3".
  4. ^Psalm 2:12: NKJV. Other translations vary in their treatment of this verse.
  5. ^"Bible Gateway passage: Psalm 3 - English Standard Version".
  6. ^Matthew Henry’s Concise Commentary on Psalm 3
  7. ^Martin Luther: Dr. Martin Luthers Sämmtliche Schriften, (St. Louis 1880), p 1375.
  8. ^Siehe: Howard N. Wallace, Psalms. Readings. A New Biblical Commentary, (Sheffield 2009).
  9. ^Thou Art A Shield For Me Psalm 3 lyricsArchived 2009-02-26 at the Wayback Machine, by Byron Cage.
  10. ^Christian Karaoke Praise Song Psalm 3 worship, by Andrew Bain.
  11. ^"Jonah and the Art of Being Broken".
  12. ^"Jonah 2 Commentary - Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible".
  13. ^https://images-na.ssl-images-amazon.com/images/G/01/books/a-plus/OT-excerpt-book-of-jonah.pdf
  14. ^The Complete Artscroll Siddur page 291
  15. ^The Complete Artscroll Siddur page 63
  16. ^The Complete Artscroll Siddur page 619
  17. ^Dykstra, Tyler. "The Six Psalms". Saint George Antiochian Orthodox Church. Retrieved 4 July 2013.
  18. ^Prosper Guéranger, La règle de Saint Benoit, p. 37 & 38.
  19. ^D’après le Complete Artscroll Siddur, compilation des prières juives.
  20. ^The main cycle of liturgical prayers takes place over four weeks.
  21. ^Church of England, Book of Common Prayer: The Psalter as printed by John Baskerville in 1762

External links[edit]

Wikimedia Commons has media related to Psalm 3.
  • Psalm 3 in Hebrew and English - Mechon-mamre
  • Psalm 3 King James Bible - Wikisource
Sours: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Psalm_3

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1 (A Psalm of David, when he fled from Absalom his son.) LORD, how are they increased that trouble me! many are they that rise up against me.

2 Many there be which say of my soul, There is no help for him in God. Selah.

3 But thou, O LORD, art a shield for me; my glory, and the lifter up of mine head.

4 I cried unto the LORD with my voice, and he heard me out of his holy hill. Selah.

5 I laid me down and slept; I awaked; for the LORD sustained me.

6 I will not be afraid of ten thousands of people, that have set themselves against me round about.

7 Arise, O LORD; save me, O my God: for thou hast smitten all mine enemies upon the cheek bone; thou hast broken the teeth of the ungodly.

8 Salvation belongeth unto the LORD: thy blessing is upon thy people. Selah.



Do you have a Bible comment or question?


Sours: https://www.kingjamesbibleonline.org/Psalms-Chapter-3/
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Psalm 3
1
Psalm 3 A psalm of David. When he fled from his son Absalom.
1
O LORD, how many are my foes! How many rise up against me!
2
Many are saying of me, "God will not deliver him." Selah [1]
3
But you are a shield around me, O LORD; you bestow glory on me and lift [2] up my head.
4
To the LORD I cry aloud, and he answers me from his holy hill. Selah
5
I lie down and sleep; I wake again, because the LORD sustains me.
6
I will not fear the tens of thousands drawn up against me on every side.
7
Arise, O LORD! Deliver me, O my God! Strike all my enemies on the jaw; break the teeth of the wicked.
8
From the LORD comes deliverance. May your blessing be on your people. Selah
  1. [2] A word of uncertain meaning, occurring frequently in the Psalms; possibly a musical term
  2. [3] Or LORD, my Glorious One, who lifts


Sours: http://web.mit.edu/jywang/www/cef/Bible/NIV/NIV_Bible/PS+3.html

Psalm 3

A psalm of David. When he fled from his son Absalom.

1LORD, how many are my foes! How many rise up against me!

2 Many are saying of me, “God will not deliver him.”

3 But you, LORD, are a shield around me, my glory, the One who lifts my head high.

4 I call out to the LORD, and he answers me from his holy mountain.

5 I lie down and sleep; I wake again, because the LORD sustains me.

6 I will not fear though tens of thousands assail me on every side.

7 Arise, LORD! Deliver me, my God! Strike all my enemies on the jaw; break the teeth of the wicked.

8 From the LORD comes deliverance. May your blessing be on your people.

Sours: https://www.biblestudytools.com/psalms/3.html

3 psalm chapter

Psalm chapter 3

New International Version

1 A psalm of David. When he fled from his son Absalom. LORD, how many are my foes! How many rise up against me!

2 Many are saying of me, 'God will not deliver him.' 3 But you, LORD, are a shield around me, my glory, the One who lifts my head high.

4 I call out to the LORD, and he answers me from his holy mountain. 5 I lie down and sleep; I wake again, because the LORD sustains me.

6 I will not fear though tens of thousands assail me on every side.

7 Arise, LORD! Deliver me, my God! Strike all my enemies on the jaw; break the teeth of the wicked. 8 From the LORD comes deliverance. May your blessing be on your people.

English Standard Version

1 A Psalm of David, when he fled from Absalom his son. O LORD, how many are my foes! Many are rising against me; 2 many are saying of my soul, “There is no salvation for him in God.” Selah 3 But you, O LORD, are a shield about me, my glory, and the lifter of my head. 4 I cried aloud to the LORD, and he answered me from his holy hill. Selah 5 I lay down and slept; I woke again, for the LORD sustained me. 6 I will not be afraid of many thousands of people who have set themselves against me all around. 7 Arise, O LORD! Save me, O my God! For you strike all my enemies on the cheek; you break the teeth of the wicked. 8 Salvation belongs to the LORD; your blessing be on your people! Selah

King James Version

1 {A Psalm of David, when he fled from Absalom his son.} LORD, how are they increased that trouble me! many are they that rise up against me. 2 Many there be which say of my soul, There is no help for him in God. Selah. 3 But thou, O LORD, art a shield for me; my glory, and the lifter up of mine head.

4 I cried unto the LORD with my voice, and he heard me out of his holy hill. Selah. 5 I laid me down and slept; I awaked; for the LORD sustained me. 6 I will not be afraid of ten thousands of people, that have set themselves against me round about. 7 Arise, O LORD; save me, O my God: for thou hast smitten all mine enemies upon the cheek bone; thou hast broken the teeth of the ungodly. 8 Salvation belongeth unto the LORD: thy blessing is upon thy people. Selah.

New American Standard Bible

1 LORD, how my enemies have increased! Many are rising up against me. 2 Many are saying of my soul, 'There is no salvation for him in God.' Selah3 But You, LORD, are a shield around me, My glory, and the One who lifts my head. 4 I was crying out to the LORD with my voice, And He answered me from His holy mountain. Selah5 I lay down and slept; I awoke, for the LORD sustains me. 6 I will not be afraid of ten thousands of people Who have set themselves against me all around. 7 Arise, LORD; save me, my God! For You have struck all my enemies on the cheek; You have shattered the teeth of the wicked. 8 Salvation belongs to the LORD; May Your blessing be upon Your people! Selah

New Living Translation

1 A psalm of David, regarding the time David fled from his son Absalom. O LORD, I have so many enemies; so many are against me.

2 So many are saying, 'God will never rescue him!' Interlude

3 But you, O LORD, are a shield around me; you are my glory, the one who holds my head high.

4 I cried out to the LORD, and he answered me from his holy mountain. Interlude

5 I lay down and slept, yet I woke up in safety, for the LORD was watching over me. 6 I am not afraid of ten thousand enemies who surround me on every side.

7 Arise, O LORD! Rescue me, my God! Slap all my enemies in the face! Shatter the teeth of the wicked!

8 Victory comes from you, O LORD. May you bless your people. Interlude

Christian Standard Bible

1 LORD, how my foes increase! There are many who attack me.

2 Many say about me, "There is no help for him in God." Selah 3 But you, LORD, are a shield around me, my glory, and the one who lifts up my head.

4 I cry aloud to the LORD, and he answers me from his holy mountain. Selah 5 I lie down and sleep; I wake again because the LORD sustains me.

6 I will not be afraid of thousands of people who have taken their stand against me on every side. 7 Rise up, LORD! Save me, my God! You strike all my enemies on the cheek; you break the teeth of the wicked.

8 Salvation belongs to the LORD; may your blessing be on your people. Selah

Sours: https://www.bibleref.com/Psalms/3/Psalms-chapter-3.html
God can give you peace! -- Psalm 3 Devotional

Psalm 3 – Peace in the Midst of the Storm

This is the first psalm with a title: A Psalm of David when he fled from Absalom his son. James Montgomery Boice points out that since these titles are in the canonical text of the Hebrew Bible, “They are to be taken with absolute seriousness throughout.” The events are recorded in 2 Samuel 15-18, but the heart of David at that difficult time is recorded in this psalm.

A. David’s trouble and God’s help.

1. (1-2) What those who troubled David did.

LORD, how they have increased who trouble me!
Many are
they who rise up against me.
Many are
they who say of me,
“There is
no help for him in God.” Selah

a. How they have increased who trouble me: At the writing of this psalm David was in a great deal of trouble. His own son led what seemed to be a successful rebellion against him. Many of his previous friends and associates forsook him and joined the ranks of those who troubled him (2 Samuel 15:13).

b. There is no help for him in God: David’s situation was so bad that many felt he was beyond God’s help. Those who said this probably didn’t feel that God was unable to help David; they probably felt that God was unwilling to help him. They looked at David’s past sin and figured, “This is all what he deserves from God. There is no help for him in God.”

i. Shimei was an example of someone who said that God was against David, and he was just getting what he deserved (2 Samuel 16:7-8). This thought was most painful of all for David – the thought that God might be against him and that there is no help for him in God.

ii. “If all the trials which come from heaven, all the temptations which ascend from hell, and all the crosses which arise from the earth, could be mixed and pressed together, they would not make a trial so terrible as that which is contained in this verse. It is the most bitter of all afflictions to be led to fear that there is no help for us in God.” (Spurgeon)

c. Selah: The idea in the Hebrew for this word (occurring 74 times in the Old Testament) is for a pause. Most people think it speaks of a reflective pause, a pause to meditate on the words just spoken. It may also be a musical instruction, for a musical interlude of some kind.

2. (3-4) What God did for David in the midst of trouble.

But You, O LORD, are a shield for me,
My glory and the One who lifts up my head.
I cried to the LORD with my voice,
And He heard me from His holy hill. Selah

a. You, O LORD, are a shield for me: Though many said there was no help for him in God, David knew that God was his shield. Others – even many others – couldn’t shake David’s confidence in a God of love and help.

i. Under attack from a cunning and ruthless enemy, David needed a shield. He knew that God was his shield. This wasn’t a prayer asking God to fulfill this; this is a strong declaration of fact: You, O LORD, are a shield for me.

b. My glory and the One who lifts my head: God was more than David’s protection. He also was the One who put David on higher ground, lifting his head and showing him glory. There was nothing glorious or head-lifting in David’s circumstances, but there was in his God.

i. Men find glory in all sorts of things – fame, power, prestige, or possessions. David found his glory in the LORD. “Oh, my soul, hast thou made God thy glory? Others boast in their wealth, beauty, position, achievements: dost thou find in God what they find in these?” (Meyer)

c. I cried to the LORD with my voice: “Surely, silent prayers are heard. Yes, but good men often find that, even in secret, they pray better aloud than they do when they utter no vocal sound.” (Spurgeon)

d. He heard me from His holy hill: Others said that God wanted nothing to do with David, but he could gloriously say, “He heard me.” Though Absalom took over Jerusalem and forced David out of the capitol, David knew that it wasn’t Absalom enthroned on God’s holy hill. The LORD Himself still held that ground and would hear and help David from His holy hill.

B. Blessing from and to God.

1. (5-6) God blesses David.

I lay down and slept;
I awoke, for the LORD sustained me.
I will not be afraid of ten thousands of people
Who have set themselves
against me all around.

a. I lay down and slept; I awoke: David used both of these as evidence of God’s blessing. Sleep was a blessing, because David was under such intense pressure from the circumstances of Absalom’s rebellion that sleep might be impossible, but he slept. Waking was another blessing, because many wondered if David would live to see a new day.

i. “Truly it must have been a soft pillow indeed that could make him forget his danger, who then had such a disloyal army at his back hunting of him.” (Gurnall, cited in Spurgeon)

ii. God sustains us in our sleep, but we take it for granted. Think of it: you are asleep, unconscious, dead to the world – yet you breathe, your heart pumps, your organs operate. The same God who sustains us in our sleep will sustain us in our difficulties.

b. I will not be afraid of ten thousands of people: With God sustaining him, David could stand against any foe. Before it was written, David knew the truth of Romans 8:31: If God is for us, who can be against us?

2. (7-8) David blesses God.

Arise, O LORD;
Save me, O my God!
For You have struck all my enemies on the cheekbone;
You have broken the teeth of the ungodly.
Salvation belongs
to the LORD.
Your blessing is
upon Your people. Selah

a. Arise, O LORD…. For You have struck all my enemies: David’s mind was on both what he trusted God to do (Save me, O my God) and on what God had done (struck all my enemies…broken the teeth of the ungodly). Knowing what God had done gives David confidence in what the LORD would do.

b. Arise, O LORD: This recalled the words of Numbers 10:35, where Moses used this phrase as the children of Israel broke camp in the wilderness. It was a military phrase, calling on God to go forth to both defend Israel and lead them to victory.

c. Broken the teeth of the ungodly: This vivid metaphor is also used in Psalm 58:6. It speaks of the total domination and defeat of the enemy. David looked for protection in this psalm, but more than protection – he looked for victory. It wasn’t enough for David to survive the threat to the kingdom. He had to be victorious over the threat, and he would be with the blessing of God.

d. Salvation belongs to the LORD: David understood that salvation – both in the ultimate and immediate sense – was God’s property. It isn’t the property of any one nation or sect, but of the LORD God. To be saved, one must deal with the LORD Himself.

e. Your blessing is upon Your people: This showed David’s heart in a time of personal calamity. He wasn’t only concerned for God’s hand upon himself, but upon all God’s people. He didn’t pray for preservation and victory in the trial with Absalom just for his own sake, but because it was best for the nation.

(c) 2020 The Enduring Word Bible Commentary by David Guzik – ewm@enduringword.com

Sours: https://enduringword.com/bible-commentary/psalm-3/

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