Fsu bachelor degrees

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Academics

There are many factors to consider when choosing a college, but none is more important than academics. If you haven't decided upon a major, be sure to explore the variety of majors we offer. If you have decided upon a major, check out the types of courses we teach, and the opportunities for study abroad and undergraduate research.


Students listening to professor's lecture.

Choosing a Major at Florida State University

Choosing a major is one of the most important decisions you will make and should be given the time and attention it deserves. Once you decide, whether it is at the onset of your college career or after spending a semester or two exploring your options, FSU provides you with an academic map to earn your degree in four years.

We believe that opportunities for success are found within every degree program that is offered at Florida State University. As a student here, you will be able to choose and pursue experiences that reflect and define your unique focus. Thorough exploration involves reflection in three distinct areas: self, major, and career.

Students wishing to complete studies in more than one field while at Florida State University have multiple degree program options to choose from.

  • Degree in Three: a program designed for students who wish to graduate in three years or fewer.
  • Double Major: Students complete the standard degree hours while studying two majors, for which they receive one bachelor's degree. If the student's primary major requires a minor, their second major instead fulfills this requirement.
  • Dual Degree: Students complete degree hours while studying two majors, for which they receive two bachelor's degrees. Minor requirements are not waived.
  • Combined Degree: Students take some graduate-level courses during their undergraduate career. Their graduate courses are double-counted towards both degrees, thus allowing students to earn both a bachelor's and master's degree in less time than it would normally take to complete both programs back-to-back. For more details, refer to The Graduate School.

Major Exploration

Before committing to a major, it is important that you understand all of the coursework required to complete the major and ways the degree is structured. Some majors at the University are limited access or limited enrollment which means that you must fulfill necessary prerequisite courses, earn specific grades, and/or complete a specialized application prior to gaining admission into the major. Each major at Florida State has a corresponding academic map listing sample courses and required milestones for every term. To gain a better understanding of the academic majors offered:

Self-Exploration

This phase involves an understanding of your values, interests, abilities, and personality characteristics. When selecting a major, it is important that you are genuinely interested in the subject matter within your major and that the coursework aligns with your strengths and talents. To clarify your values, interests, and skills, please review the following:

  • The Choosing a Major or Occupation Guide is a workbook, co-created with advisors from the FSU Career Center and Advising First. Contained within the book are reflective activities, lists of majors and careers, and decision-making exercises that assist you with sorting and prioritizing your options.
  • My Majors is an online assessment that matches interests and strengths, and suggests majors that may be a good fit for you.
  • The FSU Career Center offers assistance with exploring majors and careers to help find the right fit for your goals

Career Exploration

When you finish your four-year degree, you will either be seeking employment, or looking at graduate or professional school and then employment. It naturally follows that you should connect your academic studies at Florida State with career opportunities beyond college. Career exploration involves the exciting process of researching and testing the countless possibilities associated with your field of study and selecting the area that corresponds with your respective goals. Career exploration is an ongoing process and should begin when you enroll at FSU. It involves conducting occupational research, as well as seeking out part-time jobs, internships, volunteer work, and any other experiential learning that will help define your focus. To learn more about career exploration:

  • Visit the Career Center website and investigate the many resources and services available to better understand career options.
  • Review the Occupational Outlook Handbook for the latest career information, including training and educational requirements, earnings, working conditions, and projected job openings for literally hundreds of occupations.
  • View O*NET Online, the nation's primary source of occupational information, providing comprehensive information on key attributes and characteristics of workers and occupations.

Frequently Asked Questions About Majors

For more academic information, we invite you to visit the following websites.

Sours: https://admissions.fsu.edu/first-year/academics/

Degree Offerings and Academic Programs

Florida State University is a comprehensive degree granting university, offering baccalaureate degrees in programs, master's degrees in programs, advanced master's/specialist degrees in 14 programs, doctorates in 70 programs, and three professional degrees. The university offers fully accredited professional programs in law (J.D.), medicine (M.D.) and nursing.

Degree programs are available at branch campuses in Panama City, Florida, and the Republic of Panama and off-campus instructional sites in Sarasota, New York, and the St. Petersburg College University Partnership Center in Seminole. In addition, the university offers several undergraduate and graduate degree programs that may be completed entirely online.

The College of Medicine has regional campuses in Daytona Beach, Ft. Pierce, Orlando, Pensacola, Sarasota and Tallahassee. Students complete their required clinical rotations at one of these locations. In these urban centers and the surrounding rural areas, the clinical training program extends into hospitals, skilled nursing facilities, managed care organizations, private clinics and other outpatient settings. Targeted rural clinical training sites are located in Marianna and Immokalee.

The Ringling Museum in Sarasota, affiliated with Florida State University, is the largest museum/university complex in the U.S. and houses one of the most significant collections of fine art in North America.

Florida State University also offers a variety of study abroad opportunities for students during the regular academic year, as well as in special summer programs in Florence, Italy; Panama City, Republic of Panama; Valencia, Spain; and London, England.

Sours: https://www.fsu.edu/academics/degrees.html
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Actuarial Science [B]
Anthropology [B, M]
Biochemistry [B]
Biological Sciences
  Biological Science [B, M, D]
    Cell and Molecular Biology [T]
    Ecology, Evolution, and Environmental Science [T]
    Marine Biology [T]
    Physiology and Neuroscience [T]
    Plant Sciences [T]
    Pre-Professional Health Sciences* [T]
    Zoology [T]
  Biology/FSU-Teach [B]
Biostatistics [M, D]
Chemical Science
  Chemical Science [B]
  Chemical Sciences/FSU-Teach [B]
Chemistry
  Chemistry [B, M, D]
  Environmental Chemistry [B]
  Materials Chemistry [D]
  Nuclear Chemistry [M, D]
Classics
  Ancient History [B, M]
  Classical Archaeology [B, M]
  Classical Civilizations [B, M]
  Classics [D]
  Classics and Religion [B]
  Greek and Latin [B, M]
Computational Biology
  Computational Biology - Biology [B]
  Computational Biology - Computer Science [B]
Computational Science
  Computational Science [B, M, D]
  Computational Science (Atmospheric Science) [D]
  Computational Science (Biochemistry) [D]
  Computational Science (Biological Science) [D]
  Computational Science (Geological Sciences) [D]
  Computational Science (Material Science) [D]
  Computational Science (Physics) [D]
  PSM in Computational Science [M]
  PSM in Computational Science (Computational Molecular Biology/Bioinformatics) [M]
Computer Criminology
  Computer Criminology - Computer Science [B, M]
Computer Programing and Applications [B]
Computer Science
  Computer Science [B, M, D]
  Computer Science BA [D]
  CS Math/FSU-Teach [B]
  Computer and Network Systems Administration [M]
  Cyber Security [M]
Creative Writing
  Creative Writing (MFA) [M]
East Asian Languages and Cultures
  Chinese/Business [B]
  Chinese and Japanese [B]
  Chinese Language and Culture [B]
  Japanese/Business [B]
  Japanese Language and Culture [B]
English
  Creative Writing [B, D]
  Editing, Writing, and Media [B]
  English [M, D]
  Literature [B, M, D]
Environmental Science
  Environmental Science [B]
  Environmental Science and Policy [B]
  Environmental Science/FSU-Teach [B]
French
  French [B, M, D]
  French/Business [B]
  French and German [B]
  French and Italian [B]
  French and Russian [B]
  French and Spanish [B]
Geology [B, M, D]
Geophysical Fluid Dynamics [D]
German
  German [B, M]
  German/Business [B]
  German and Italian [B]
  German and Russian [B]
  German and Spanish [B]
  German Studies [M]
Greek [B, M]
History
  History [B, M, D]
  Public History [M]
History and Philosophy of Science [M]
Interdisciplinary Humanities
  Digital Humanities [M]
  Humanities [B]
  Women's Studies [B]
Italian
  Italian [B]
  Italian/Business [B]
  Italian and Russian [B]
  Italian and Spanish [B]
Italian Studies [M]
Latin [B, M]
Mathematics
  Applied and Computational Mathematics [B, M, D]
  Biomathematics [B, M, D]
  Financial Mathematics [M, D]
  Mathematics [B, M, D]
  Mathematics/FSU-Teach [B]
Meteorology
  Applied Geosciences/FSU-Teach [B]
  Meteorology [B, M, D]
Middle Eastern Studies [B]
Molecular Biophysics
  Computational Structural Biology [D]
  Molecular Biophysics [D]
Neuroscience [D]
  Behavioral Neuroscience [B]
  Cell/Molecular Neuroscience [B]
Oceanography
  Aquatic Environmental Sciences [M]
  Biological Oceanography [M, D]
  Chemical Oceanography [M, D]
  Geological Oceanography [M, D]
  Oceanography [M, D]
  Physical Oceanography [M, D]
  PSM in Aquatic Environmental Science [M]
Philosophy [B, M, D]
Physical Science
  Physical Science [B]
Physics
  Physics [B, D]
  Physics and Astrophysics [B]
  Physics and Materials [B]
Psychology
  Clinical Psychology [D]
  Cognitive Psychology [D]
  Developmental Psychology [D]
  Psychology [B, M]
  Social Psychology [D]
Religion
  Religion [B, M, D]
  Religion and Classics [B]
Russian
  Russian [B]
  Russian/Business [B]
  Russian and Spanish [B]
Secondary Science and/or Mathematics Teaching
  College STEM Teaching [M]
Slavic [M]
Spanish
  Spanish [B, M, D]
  Spanish/Business [B]
Statistics [B, M, D]
  Statistical Data Science [M]

* Includes Medicine, Veterinary Medicine, Optometry, Dentistry, Pharmacy, Physical Therapy, and Physician's Assistant.

Sours: https://admissions.fsu.edu/majors/

All Available Programs

* Majors also offered at Panama City campus

Accounting *

Actuarial Science

Advertising (Communication)

African American Studies

Ancient History

Anthropology

Applied Mathematics

Art, Studio BA

Art, Studio BFA

Art History

Asian Studies

Asian Studies with Emphasis in Business

Athletic Training

Behavioral Neuroscience

Biochemistry

Biology (FSU-Teach)

Biological Science

Biomathematics

Business Administration - Panama City Campus only

Cell and Molecular Neuroscience

Chemical Science

Chemical Science (FSU-Teach)

Chemistry

Child Development (Family and Child Science)

Chinese

Chinese and Japanese

Classical Archeology

Classical Civilization

Classics and Religion

Communication (Digital Media Production)

Communication (Media and Communication Studies)

Communication (Professional Communication) - Panama City campus only

Communication Science & Disorders (Audiology & Speech Pathology)

Computational Biology (Biology)

Computational Biology (Computer Science)

Computational Science

Computer Programming and Applications BA*

Computer Science, BA *

Computer Science, BS *

Crime Scene Investigation : Public Safety and Security

Criminology/Criminal Justice

Cyber Criminology (Computer Science)

Cyber Criminology (Criminology)

Dance

Dietetics

Economics

Elementary Education *

Elementary Education - Panama City Campus

Engineering (Biomedical)

Engineering (Chemical)

Engineering (Civil) *

Engineering (Computer) *

Engineering (Electrical) *

Engineering (Industrial)

Engineering (Mechanical) *

English (Creative Writing)

English (Editing, Writing, & Media)

English (Literature, Media, and Culture)

English Education

Entrepreneurship (Commercial)*

Entrepreneurship (Commercial - Automotive)

Entrepreneurship (Retail Merchandising)

Entrepreneurship (Product Development)

Entrepreneurship (STEM)

Environmental Chemistry

Environmental Science

Environmental Science/Policy

Environment and Society

Exercise Physiology

Exploratory

Family and Child Science

Finance

Food and Nutrition Science

French

FSU-Teach (Applied Geosciences)

FSU-Teach (Biology)

FSU-Teach (Chemical Science)

FSU-Teach (Environmental Sciences)

FSU-Teach (Mathematics)

FSU-Teach (Physical Sciences)

FSU-Teach (Computer Science - Math)

General Linguistics

Geography

Geology

Geosciences, Applied (FSU-Teach)

German

Global Club Management and Leadership

Greek

History

Hospitality and Tourism Management*

Human Resources Management

Humanities

Information, Communication & Technology

Information Technology

Interdisciplinary Medical Sciences: Clinical Professions

Interdisciplinary Medical Sciences: Health Management, Policy and Information

Interdisciplinary Medical Sciences: Community Patient Care

Interior Architecture and Design

International Affairs

Italian

Japanese

Latin

Latin American and Caribbean Studies

Latin American and Caribbean Studies with Emphasis in Business

Latin and Greek

Law Enforcement Operations : Public Safety and Security

Law Enforcement Intelligence : Public Safety and Security

Management (General)

Management (Human Resources)

Management Information Systems

Marketing

Mathematics

Mathematics (FSU-Teach)

Meteorology

Middle Eastern Studies

Motion Picture Arts (Animation/Digital Arts)

Motion Picture Arts (Production)

Music (General)

Music (Commercial)

Music (Jazz)

Music (Sacred)

Music Composition

Music Education (Choral)

Music Education (General)

Music Education (Instrumental)

Music Performance (Guitar)

Music Performance (Harp)

Music Performance (Jazz)

Music Performance (Organ)

Music Performance (Piano)

Music Performance (String)

Music Performance (Voice)

Music Performance (Woodwind, Brass, Percussion)

Music Theatre (College of Music)

Music Theatre (School of Theatre)

Music Theory

Music Therapy

(Neuroscience) Behavioral Neuroscience

(Neuroscience) Cell and Molecular Neuroscience

Nursing

Nutrition Science, Food and

Philosophy

Physical Science

Physics

Physics & Astrophysics

Physics & Materials

Political Science

Professional Communication - Panama City campus only

Professional Sales

Psychology *

Public Health

Public Relations (Communication)

Real Estate

Recreation and Tourism Management

Religion

Retail Entrepreneurship (Product Development)

Retail Entrepreneurship (Retail Merchandising)

Retail Management

Risk Management and Insurance

Russian

Russian and East European Studies

Social Science, Interdisciplinary **

Social Science Education

Social Work *

Sociology

Spanish

Special Education Teaching

Sport Management

Statistics

Theatre, BA

Theatre, BFA (Acting)

Theatre BFA, (Music Theatre)

Visual Disabilities (Special Education)

Women’s Gender and Sexuality Studies

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Sours: https://www.academic-guide.fsu.edu/z-list

Bachelor degrees fsu

Undergraduate Bulletin

Degrees Offered

Florida State University confers at the bachelor’s level the Bachelor of Arts, Bachelor of Fine Arts, Bachelor of Science in Nursing, Bachelor of Music, Bachelor of Music Education, Bachelor of Social Work, and the Bachelor of Science degrees, the requirements for which are described in detail below. Students may find requirements for all graduate degrees (master’s, specialist, professional, and doctoral) in the Graduate Bulletin.

Students pursuing a baccalaureate degree at Florida State University must meet numerous state- and University-wide degree requirements as they progress through their course of studies. In general, freshman and sophomore students in most majors emphasize work in a broad-based liberal arts curriculum, described below as Liberal Studies for the 21st Century, and in consultation with their advisors select a major concentration. By the end of the sophomore year, all students should have completed at least half of the General Education portion of the Liberal Studies for the 21st Century program, including the English Composition and Quantitative and Logical Thinking requirements.

Around the end of the sophomore year (fifty-two degree hours), students formally select a major and request acceptance by the college in which the major is taught. Students transferring into the University with an Associate of Arts (AA) degree from a Florida public community college or university, or transferring fifty-two or more semester hours of credit, are eligible to be admitted directly into the college of their choice provided they meet minimum requirements for the major selected.

Students at the junior and senior level complete the requirements of their chosen major and often of a minor field. They may also have to fulfill additional requirements specific to their college and/or certification requirements to engage in a particular profession for which their undergraduate major is preparatory.

Understanding these degree requirements is crucial to the smooth progression to graduation. Students are encouraged to consult with their academic advisors regularly throughout their undergraduate years to ensure that they are making appropriate progress toward their degree and to consult their academic deans’ offices, Advising First, and the Office of the University Registrar for assistance and clarification of degree requirements.

Baccalaureate Degree Requirements

Florida State University will confer the bachelor’s degree when the following conditions have been met. Restrictions may be found under ‘Transfer Credit’ in the “Academic Regulations and Procedures” chapter of this General Bulletin.

Satisfactory completion of Florida State University’s Liberal Studies requirements with a minimum overall adjusted grade point average of The Liberal Studies Program Requirements are divided into two curriculum segments: General Education and University-Wide Graduation Requirements, which encompass all state requirements. A full discussion of these requirements can be found in this chapter below, under the “Liberal Studies for the 21st Century Program”.

  1. Satisfactory completion of major requirements in a chosen degree program, including additional requirements set by the college offering the degree. The student’s degree program will appear on the baccalaureate diploma. A list of degree programs is available in the “Academic Degree and Certificate Programs” chapter of this General Bulletin. Major names are not printed on university diplomas.
  2. A minimum adjusted grade point average (GPA) of on all coursework taken at Florida State University is required for a degree. In addition, the overall GPA on all college-level work attempted (high school dual enrollment, transfer and FSU coursework) is used as part of the determination of degrees of distinction. See the “Degrees of Distinction” section of this chapter for more information.
  3. Successful completion of a minimum of one hundred twenty unduplicated semester hours. Physical education activity courses may count as elective credit except in cases where an individual degree program places a specific limit.
  4. Completion of at least forty-five semester hours in courses numbered and above, thirty of which need to be taken at Florida State University.
  5. Completion of the last thirty semester hours and half of the major course semester hours, in residence at this University. In cases of emergency, a maximum of six hours of the final thirty semester hours may be completed by correspondence or residence at another accredited institution with the approval of the academic dean. College-Level Examination Program (CLEP) credit earned may be applied to the final thirty-hour requirement provided that the student has earned at least thirty semester hours credit at Florida State University.
  6. Students who have entered a university in the State of Florida, Division of Colleges and Universities, with fewer than sixty hours of credit in the fall of or any time thereafter are required to earn at least nine hours prior to graduation by attendance in one or more Summer terms at one of the State University System institutions. The University President may waive the application of this rule in cases of unusual hardship to the individual. Students may request waivers of this requirement by giving the details of their hardships through their academic deans to the Vice President for Faculty Development and Advancement. Prior to , students who had earned nine semester hours of credit through approved acceleration methods (AP, IB, CLEP, and approved dual enrollment courses) were exempt from the summer residency requirement. Effective , this exemption is no longer available.
  7. Satisfaction of the foreign-language admissions requirement by having two sequential units of the same foreign language in high school, or eight semester hours of the same foreign language in college, or documented equivalent proficiency.
  8. Successful completion of the Civic Literacy requirement.
  9. Successful completion of coursework constituting the student’s program of studies, minor, honors thesis, or certification examination does not guarantee the awarding of the baccalaureate degree. Faculty judgment of the academic performance of the student is inherent in the educational process in determining whether the awarding of the baccalaureate degree or admission into a higher level degree program is warranted.

Note: For the purpose of establishing residency, the various Summer sessions are considered one semester.

Following is a full discussion of state- and University-wide degree requirements at the undergraduate level. Requirements specific to a particular college may be found in the section of this General Bulletin describing that college. Major and minor requirements may be found under the appropriate department in the departmental listings.

State Mandated Academic Learning Compacts (SMALCs)

The State Board of Governors has directed each university to develop Academic Learning Compacts for every baccalaureate degree program. A State University System Academic Learning Compact (SMALC) identifies for each academic bachelor’s program what students will learn by the end of a program and how knowledge is measured above and beyond course grades.

A SMALC must pinpoint the core learning expectations in the areas of communication, critical thinking skills, and content/discipline knowledge and skills. Additionally, it must identify the corresponding assessments used to determine how well the student has assimilated the articulated expectations.

Successful performance related to the State Mandated Academic Learning Compacts specific to your degree is a requirement for graduation.

Visit https://provost.fsu.edu/outcomes/smalcs-report/ to view the current version of the SMALCs for your degree. Simply select your major and detailed information is provided. You may also obtain information pertaining to SMALCs by contacting the academic departments.

Division of Undergraduate Studies

Dean: Joseph O’Shea

Associate Deans: Craig Filar, Sara Hamon, Lynn Hogan, Nikki Raimondi, Annette Schwabe; Assistant Deans: Heather Bishop, DeOnte Brown, Kacy King, Allison Peters

The Division of Undergraduate Studies is responsible for the supervision and monitoring of state- and University-wide degree requirements as well as University-wide academic support offices. Overseen by the Dean of Undergraduate Studies, the division includes the Office of Undergraduate Studies (the academic home of most freshmen and sophomores), Advising First, the Center for Academic Retention and Enhancement (CARE), the University Honors Program, Transfer and Information Services, the Academic Center for Excellence (ACE), the Office of National Fellowships, and the Center for Undergraduate Research and Academic Engagement. For further information on these academic support offices see ‘Honors Program’ in the “University Honors Program and Honor Societies” chapter and ‘Advising First’, the ‘Center for Academic Retention and Enhancement’, ‘Center for Undergraduate Research and Academic Engagement’, and ‘Transfer and Information Services’ in the “Academic Advising and Support Services” chapter of this General Bulletin.

Freshmen and sophomores have their programs and coursework supervised by the Office of Undergraduate Studies. Exceptions to this placement are students accepted into the College of Music, College of Motion Picture Arts, or into the Bachelor of Fine Arts (BFA) program in theatre or dance. Students in these majors are advised and supervised directly within their own schools or departments. The Office of Undergraduate Studies is the dean’s office that administers the academic and advisement program, regardless of intended major, for all other freshman and sophomore students.

Liberal Studies for the 21st Century Program

The Liberal Studies for the 21st Century program provides an educational foundation that enables FSU students to thrive in and beyond the classroom. Across the program, students build the knowledge and skills needed to be successful in the major and life after college. Liberal Studies courses help FSU students become:

  • Critical analysts of quantitative and logical claims
  • Critical readers and clear, creative, and convincing communicators
  • Critical analysts of theories and evidence about social forces and social experience
  • Critical analysts of theories and evidence about historical events and forces
  • Thoughtful patrons of and participants in cultural practices
  • Ethically engaged citizens and logical thinkers
  • Effective interpreters of scientific results and critical analysts of claims about the natural world
  • Analytical and flexible thinkers and life-long learners)
  • Clear, creative, and convincing communicators
  • Critical thinkers, creative users of knowledge, and independent learners
  • Culturally conscious participants in a global community
  • Culturally literate members of a society
  • Skilled users of discipline-appropriate technologies
  • Flexible and proficient oral communicators
  • Flexible and proficient writers for professional purposes

Statewide Requirements

College-Level Communication and Computation Requirement

The State of Florida mandates minimum communication and computation skills for all students in Florida public institutions of higher education. The Statewide General Education Core and the University-wide requirements are designed to meet these requirements. The statewide graduation requirements of these rules follow.

Students will satisfy the requirements of this rule by completing, with a grade of “C–” or higher in each course, the General Education requirements in Quantitative and Logical Thinking, English Composition, and two other approved courses that require college-level writing for a total of six additional writing credits. The six additional writing credits may be fulfilled through successful completion of approved “W” (State-Mandated Writing) or E-Series courses. These requirements must be completed prior to receipt of an Associate of Arts degree from Florida State University.

Credit by Examination. A student shall be allowed to partially satisfy the State mandates for communication and computation by earning academic credit for approved Quantitative and Logical Thinking, English Composition, or “W” (State-Mandated Writing) coursework with a passing score on an appropriate AP, IB, AICE or CLEP examination. Refer to the AP, IB, AICE, and CLEP Tables in the “Academic Regulations and Procedures” chapter of this General Bulletin for college course equivalents and credits earned. Students will still be required to take ENC (or an approved level ENC composition course) to meet FSU requirements for English Composition and General Education.

Transfer Credits or Correspondence Credits. Students transferring to Florida State University who have been certified by Florida State University as having completed the AA degree from a Florida public university, state college, community college, or other college with which Florida State University maintains an official articulation agreement are deemed to have satisfied the State mandates for communication and computation and Florida State University’s General Education requirements.

Students transferring from other institutions that come under the provision of these State mandates, but who have not received the AA degree will be deemed to have satisfied the State mandates for General Education if the previous institution indicates, by notation on the transcript or by some other form of written certification, that the student has satisfied these State mandates before leaving that institution.

Transferring students who do not fall into either of the above categories will be required to satisfy Florida State University’s plan for State mandates.

Statewide General Education Core

The State of Florida Statute regarding General Education was revised in and again in to “improve articulation and reduce excess hours” for students entering the State University System (SUS) and Florida College System (FCS). Information on the statute, the implementation process, and the decisions made is posted on the official Website at http://www.fldoe.org/policy/articulation/general-edu-core-course-options.stml.

The Statewide General Education Core requirements apply to students initially entering the SUS or FCS in the academic year and thereafter. Fifteen (three credit hours from each category) of the thirty-six General Education credits must be earned from the five Statewide General Education Core requirement categories (at FSU, these are: English Composition, Quantitative and Logical Thinking, Social Sciences/History, Humanities and Cultural Practice/Ethics, and Natural Sciences). All SUS and FCS institutions must accept these courses for transfer credit, but no institution must offer all courses.

Civic Literacy

Students first entering any Florida College System institution or State University System institution as degree-seeking undergraduates in the school year and thereafter must demonstrate competency in civic literacy prior to receipt of the baccalaureate degree. This includes transfer students and students seeking a second bachelor’s degree who began as degree-seeking undergraduates at any FCS or SUS institution in the school year or thereafter.

Students may satisfy the state of Florida’s Civic Literacy requirement by: (1) completing either POS , American Government: National, or AMH , History of the United States Since , with a grade of “C–” or higher; (2) receiving credit for either POS or AMH through completion of one or more of the following: Advanced Placement Government and Politics: United States exam with a score of 3 or more, Advanced Placement United States History exam with a score of 4 or more, or CLEP American Government exam with a score of 50 or more; or (3) obtaining a score of 60 out of on the U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services Naturalization Test administered by a Florida College or University. This exam is administered at no cost at the Testing Center at Florida State University. Visit https://liberalstudies.fsu.edu/civic-literacy.html for the most recent guidance on meeting the Civic Literacy requirement.

Liberal Studies for the 21st Century General Education Requirements

Satisfactory completion (a minimum adjusted grade point average of on all courses used for General Education) of thirty-six semester hours of Florida State University’s General Education courses within the Liberal Studies for the 21st Century program, as follows:

  • Quantitative and Logical Thinking: Students must complete a total of six semester hours in this area, of which at least three semester hours must be chosen from the Statewide Core list. At least three of the six hours in this area must be in the Department of Mathematics. Students must earn a “C–” or higher in these courses.
  • English Composition: Students must complete a total of six semester hours in this area, three of which must be chosen from the Statewide Core list (ENC ). The additional hours must be earned through ENC Research, Genre, and Context (or an approved level composition course with an ENC prefix). Students must earn a “C–” or higher in these courses.
  • Social Sciences/History: Students must complete at least six semester hours in the combined area of Social Sciences and History, of which three semester hours must be chosen from the Statewide Core list. Students must complete at least one Social Sciences course and one History course.
  • Humanities and Cultural Practice/Ethics: Students must complete at least six semester hours in the combined area of Humanities and Cultural Practice and Ethics, of which at least three semester hours must be chosen from the combined Statewide Core requirement list. Students must complete at least one Humanities and Cultural Practice course and one Ethics course.
  • Natural Sciences: Students must complete six semester hours in this area, of which at least three semester hours must be chosen from the Statewide Core requirement list. Note: All students must complete at least one semester hour in a Natural Sciences laboratory course as a graduation requirement (see below).
  • Additional Liberal Studies General Education Hours: Students must complete a minimum of six additional hours of Liberal Studies courses. These six additional hours may be selected from the lists of approved General Education courses.

Liberal Studies for the 21st Century University-Wide Requirements

Satisfactory completion of University-wide Graduation Requirements as follows:

  • “W” (State-Mandated Writing) and E-Series: In addition to the six credits required for English Composition, students must complete two three-credit courses that meet state mandates for college-level writing. These six additional writing credits may be fulfilled through successful completion of approved “W” (State-Mandated Writing) or E-Series courses. Courses must be completed with a grade of “C–” or higher to satisfy the State-Mandated Writing requirement.
  • Scholarly and Formative Experiences: Students must complete one Scholarship in Practice course and one approved Formative Experience prior to the awarding of a bachelor’s degree with the following exceptions: (1) students who have completed an AA degree from an articulated institution (including those who have completed a high school AA degree from an articulated institution) and (2) transfer students who enter the University with sixty or more credit hours will only be required to complete either one Scholarship in Practice course or one approved Formative Experience. A second Scholarship in Practice course may substitute for the Formative Experience.
  • Diversity Requirement: Students must complete at least one Cross-Cultural Studies (x) course and one Diversity in Western Experience (y) course. Both Diversity courses must be completed with a grade of “C–” or higher.
  • Natural Sciences Laboratory Requirement: Students must complete at least one credit hour in a Natural Sciences laboratory course with a grade of “C–” or higher.
  • Oral Communication Competency Requirement: Students must complete at least one course designated as meeting the Oral Communication Competency Requirement with a grade of “C–” or higher.
  • Computer Competency Requirement: Students must complete at least one course designated as meeting the Computer Competency Requirement with a grade of “C–” or higher.
  • Upper-Division Writing Requirement: Students must complete at least one course designated as meeting the Upper-Division Writing Requirement with a grade of “C–” or higher.
  • For more information, please see the Liberal Studies Advising Sheet: http://liberalstudies.fsu.edu/documents/LSRequirements.pdf.

Liberal Studies for the 21st Century

Academic Policies

The General Education requirements must be met by completion of appropriate coursework or by combination of coursework and credit by examination within the limits set below:

  1. Credit by Examination. A maximum of thirty semester hours of credit earned through examination may be applied to the General Education requirements.
  2. Coursework. An overall average or higher is required for coursework used to satisfy the General Education requirements.
  3. To satisfy state mandates and University-wide requirements, students must also earn a grade of “C–” or higher in each of the courses used to fulfill the General Education requirements in Quantitative and Logical Thinking, English Composition, and two approved courses that require college-level writing. These two additional college-level writing courses may be fulfilled through successful completion of approved “W” (State-Mandated Writing) or E-Series courses. Students with an AA degree or General Education Statement from a Florida public university, state college, community college, or other colleges with which Florida State University maintains an official articulation agreement are exempt from the state mandates for college-level writing.
  4. Courses listed as “directed individual study” (DIS), “senior honors thesis,” or “senior seminar” cannot apply to the General Education requirements.
  5. No courses taken on a satisfactory/unsatisfactory (S/U) basis may apply to the Liberal Studies requirement, with the exception that a single course that counts as a designated Formative Experience may be awarded an S/U grade.
  6. A student who transfers to Florida State University from a Florida public community/state college or other articulated institution will be deemed to have satisfied the University’s General Education requirement if all General Education requirements stipulated by the community/state college or other articulated institution have been met and the student’s transcript has been so marked.
  7. If a course taken at FSU was approved for Liberal Studies credit at the time a course is completed, it will count for Liberal Studies credit, even if the course was not listed as a Liberal Studies course in the General Bulletin under which the student entered.

Students should check departmental curriculum listings to determine prerequisites and potential course duplications prior to taking courses. In addition, students may search for current Liberal Studies listings here: http://liberalstudiescourses.fsu.edu/care/LS-courses/course-display.php. Finally, it is important to note that designations and approved courses may change periodically. An up-to-date listing of designations can be found on the Liberal Studies website and all appropriate designations are indicated in the course syllabus for individual courses.

Note: Some students will be required to take preparatory coursework prior to enrollment in Quantitative and Logical Thinking and/or English Composition courses. See ‘Required Preparatory Courses’ in the “Academic Regulations and Procedures” chapter of this General Bulletin.

Liberal Studies for the 21st Century Curriculum

Courses within the Liberal Studies curriculum are listed below by area. These lists are subject to change. For the most recent list of courses, see the Liberal Studies Website at: https://liberalstudies.fsu.edu/.

Symbol Legend

  • C Stands for combined lecture and laboratory
  • L Stands for laboratory
  • r Stands for “repeatable” and indicates that the course may be taken more than once
  • x Denotes a course that meets the Cross-Cultural Studies requirements
  • y Denotes a course that meets the Diversity in Western Experience requirements
  • # Indicates that the course has a credit limit and only one of these courses will earn credit towards meeting the Liberal Studies requirements
  • s Denotes a course that meets the Scholarship in Practice requirements
  • w Denotes a course that meets the State-Mandated Writing requirement

General Education Curriculum

Quantitative and Logical Thinking

Students must complete (or be exempted from with credit) a total of at least six semester hours in Quantitative and Logical Thinking, of which at least three semester hours must be chosen from the Statewide Core requirement list for mathematics (see Statewide Core requirement list). Of those six required hours, three of those credit hours must be in the Department of Mathematics and three additional credit hours must be from a list approved by the Liberal Studies Coordinating and Policy Committee and maintained by the Office of Undergraduate Studies. Students must complete their first Quantitative and Logical Thinking course by the time they have attempted thirty hours, which includes any credit hours earned through acceleration (i.e., AP, IB, Dual Enrollment, etc.). Students must complete or be registered for their second Quantitative and Logical Thinking course by the time they have attempted forty hours. All six semester hours of the Quantitative and Logical Thinking General Education requirement should be completed by the time the student earns fifty-two hours. All courses used to satisfy this requirement must be completed with a grade of “C–” or higher.

All incoming freshman students who intend to register for College Algebra (MAC ), Analytic Trigonometry (MAC ), Pre-Calculus Algebra (MAC ), Calculus with Analytical Geometry I (MAC ), Calculus with Analytical Geometry II (MAC ), or Calculus for Business (MAC ) as their first mathematics course at FSU (in their first semester or subsequent semesters) will be required to take the ALEKS placement exam, regardless of SAT/ACT or AP/IB/AICE/CLEP test scores. Students who bring in dual enrollment credit of a “C-” or better in a prerequisite course for one of the courses listed above are not required to take the ALEKS exam. Detailed information about taking the ALEKS placement exam can be found on the Department of Mathematics Website: https://www.math.fsu.edu/Undergraduate/ALEKS.

Statewide Core Courses:

MAC College Algebra (3)

MAC Calculus with Analytic Geometry I (4)

MGF Mathematics for Liberal Arts I (3)

MGF Topics in Practical Finite Mathematics (3)

STA Fundamental Business Statistics (3)

Note: Any student who successfully completes a mathematics course for which one of the General Education Core course options in mathematics is a direct prerequisite shall be considered to have completed the Statewide Core mathematics requirement.

Additional Quantitative and Logical Thinking Coursework

IDS w Understanding Uncertainty: Games of Skill and Chance (3)

IDS w Personally Relevant Mathematics (3)

IDS w Mathematics for Civic Engagement (3)

IDS w Making the Argument: Symbolic Logic and the Forms of Good Reasoning (3)

ISC Computational Thinking (3)

MAC Analytic Trigonometry (2)

MAC Precalculus Algebra (3)

MAC Precalculus Algebra/Trigonometry (5)

MAC Calculus for Business (3)

MAC Calculus with Analytic Geometry II (4)

MAC Calculus with Analytic Geometry III (5)

PHI Reasoning and Critical Thinking (3)

STA Statistics through Example (3)

STA s In My Opinion: Introduction to Designing, Conducting and Analyzing Surveys (3)

STA Introduction to Applied Statistics (3)

STA Statistics for Biology (4)

English Composition

Students must complete (or be exempted from with credit) a total of at least six semester hours in English Composition, which shall include ENC (which meets the Statewide Core requirement) and ENC All students shall complete the required English Composition courses by the time they have attempted thirty credit hours, which includes any credit hours earned through acceleration (i.e., AP, IB, Dual Enrollment, etc.) or must show an appropriate exemption, as approved by the Faculty Senate, from six semester hours of English Composition courses. The second required course in the English Composition sequence, ENC , provides students a foundation for upper-division writing in the major as well as essential competencies for careers in all fields. Both courses used to satisfy this requirement must be completed with a grade of “C–” or higher.

Statewide Core Course:

ENC Freshman Composition and Rhetoric (3)

Note: Any student who successfully completes a course with an ENC prefix for which ENC is a direct prerequisite shall be considered to have completed the Statewide Core communication requirement.

Additional English Composition Coursework

ENC Research, Genre, and Context (3)

Social Sciences/History

Students must complete six semester hours in the combined area of Social Sciences and History, of which at least three semester hours will be chosen from the combined Statewide Core requirement list. Students must complete at least one Social Sciences course and one History course.

Statewide Core Courses in Social Sciences:

ANT x Introduction to Anthropology (3)

ECO Principles of Macroeconomics (3)

POS American Government: National (3)

PSY General Psychology (3)

SYG Introductory Sociology (3)

Statewide Core Course in History:

AMH A History of the United States Since (3)

Social Sciences

ANT x Introduction to Cultural Anthropology (3)

ANT x Childhood Around the World (3)

ANT x Peoples of the World (3)

ANT x Anthropology of Religion (3)

CCJ Introduction to Criminal Justice (3)

CCJ Criminology (3)

CCJ Minorities, Crime, and Social Policy (3)

CPO Introduction to Comparative Government and Politics (3)

ECO Introduction to Economics (3)

ECO Principles of Microeconomics (3)

FAD Family Relationships: A Life Span Development Approach (3)

GEA x World Geography (3)

GEA y Latin America (3)

GEO Environmental Science (3)

GEO x Human Geography (3)

GEO x Cultural Geography (3)

IDH yw Social (In)Equalities: Social Construction of Difference and Inequalities (3)

IDH xw Feminist Perspectives on Globalization (3)

IDH Everyday Life: Time/Space/Power (3)

IDH w Becoming and Being Leaders: Motivating Self and Others (3)

IDS w Making Good Decisions: How to Get the Most Out of Your Money and Life (3)

IDS sw Dead Cities (3)

IDS w Sustainable Society (3)

IDS w Communication and Dance (3)

IDS rw Sexual Health in the Modern World (3)

IDS yw Gendered Bodies Over the Life Course (3)

IDS w The Boundaries Between Us: Exploring Racial Inequality in the U.S. (3)

IDS w Relationship Status: It’s Complicated–Understanding and Influencing Intimate Relationships (3)

IDS xw Festivals: Artisanship, Satire, and Fire (3)

IDS w Public Opinion and American Democracy (3)

IDS w Why is Good Politics Not Good Economics? (3)

IDS w The Hunger Games Trilogy: Collective Action and Social Movements (3)

IDS xw Thinking Beyond Ourselves: Global Perspectives (3)

IDS w Political Participation in the 21st Century: From Indigenous Communities to On-line Democracy (3)

IDS w Glaciers, Geysers, and Glades: Exploring U.S. National Parks (3)

IDS w Freshman Seminar (3)

IDS w 21st Century Literacies (3)

IDS sw Language, Body, Mind and World (3)

IDS w Is Google Making Us Stupid? The Unintended Consequences of Information Technology (3)

IDS w Politics of Reproduction (3)

IDS yw Great Britain? Geography, Imperialism, Industry, and Culture (3)

IDS w Boomers and Millennials: Changing Generations (3)

IDS xw Global Conflicts: Analysis and Resolution (3)

IDS w Sociology of Hip Hop Culture (3)

IDS w Modern Death (3)

IDS w “Please Please Me”: Anglo-American Youth Culture from the ’s to the Present (3)

IDS yw Examining the Educational Achievement Gap (3)

INS sw Developing Global Citizens: Global Issues in Theory and Practice (3)

LIS Information and Society (3)

PAD Social Entrepreneurship and Innovation (3)

SYD sy Sociology of Law and Hispanics (3)

SYD y Sociology of Sex and Gender (3)

SYD y Race and Minority Group Relations (3)

SYG y Social Problems (3)

SYP Aging and the Life Course (3)

SYO Families and Social Change (3)

SYO y Sociology of Religion (3)

URP x Green Global Health (3)

URS x World Cities: Quality of Life (3)

History

AMH w The History of the United States to (3)

AMH yw The African-American Experience in the United States (3)

AMH yw American Indians in the United States (3)

AMH yw Black Women in America (3)

AMH yw Nationality, Race, and Ethnicity in the United States (3)

AMH y The Seminoles and the Southeastern Indians (3)

ANT Introduction to Underwater Archaeology (3)

ANT x World Prehistory (3)

ASH xw Middle Eastern History and Civilization (3)

ASH xw History of Asia (3)

ASH rs Middle East Research: An Interdisciplinary Seminar (3–6)

CLA sxw Peoples of the Roman World (3)

CLA sw Debates about the Past: Greek Civilization, History and Culture (3)

CLA sw Debates about the Past: Roman Civilization, History and Culture (3)

CLA w History of Ancient Greece (3)

CLT Medical Terminology (3)

EUH w Ancient and Medieval Civilizations (3)

EUH xw 19th-Century Europe (3)

EUH w England, the Empire and the Commonwealth (3)

HIS sw The Historian’s Craft (3)

HIS s Interpreting Native America (3)

HIS yw Pandemics and People (3)

HIS yw LGBTQ History (3)

HIS xw Pirates and Patriots in the Atlantic World (3)

HIS yw History of Science (3)

HIS yw Medicine and Society (3)

HIS Perspectives on Science and Mathematics (3)

IDH yw America Abroad (3)

IDS w Environment and Society (3)

IDS w History of American Popular Culture, Present (3)

IDS w The American GI in War and Peace in World War II (3)

IDS w Who Do the British Think They Are? (3)

IDS w Citizenship and Debate: Models from the Ancient World (3)

IDS w The Italian Mafia from Corleone to the Globalized World (3)

IDS w (Re)Imagining Florida: From Spanish Colonialism to Today (3)

IDS w Fight the Power: Protesting with Song in America: 20th Century versus 21st Century (3)

IDS w Making Chief Osceola (3)

IDS w Defining Moments and Identities: From the Persian Wars to September 11th (3)

IDS w Empire and Revolution in Cold War Latin America (3)

IDS xw Heretics, Rebels, and Militants in the Islamic World (3)

IDS sw Digital Microhistory Lab (3)

IDS yw Ancient Sexualities and Modern Sexual Politics (3)

IDS w Terrorism in Historical Perspective (3)

IDS w Guns, Drugs, and Slaves: The History of Trafficking in the Modern World (3)

IDS w Ethics and Empire in the Roman World (3)

LAH xw Latin America: A Cross-Cultural History (3)

MUH w Survey of Music History–Antiquity to (3)

MUH Survey of Music History– to Present (3)

REL yw Religion in the United States (3)

REL r Topics in Religion in the Americas (3)

REL Psychology in American Religious History (3)

REL Religion and Science (3)

WOH xw The Modern World to (3)

WOH xw The Modern World Since (3)

WOH Mortal Combat: Eurasian Worlds of War Since (3)

Humanities and Cultural Practice/Ethics

Students must complete six semester hours in the combined area of Humanities and Cultural Practices and Ethics, of which at least three semester hours must be chosen from the combined Statewide Core requirement list. Students must complete at least one Humanities and Cultural Practice course and one Ethics course.

Statewide Core Courses in the Humanities and Cultural Practice:

ARH Art, Architecture, and Artistic Vision (3)

HUM The Art of Being Human: Examining the Human Condition Through Literature, Art and Film (3)

LIT Introduction to Literature (3)

MUL Music Literature, Listening, and Understanding (3)

THE y Introduction to Theatre (3)

Statewide Core Courses in Ethics:

PHI Introduction to Philosophy (3)

Humanities and Cultural Practice:

AML w Major Figures in American Literature (3)

ARH w History and Criticism of Art I (3)

ARH w History and Criticism of Art II (3)

ARH sxw Great Discoveries in World Archaeology (3)

ARH x History of Islamic Art (3)

ART Csw Contemporary Art Scholarship and Practice (3)

ASN x Traditions of East Asian Humanities (3)

CHT rx Pre-Modern Chinese Literature and Culture (3)

CHT rx Modern Chinese Literature (3)

CHT rx Chinese Cinema and Culture (3)

CHT rx Writing Women in Pre-Modern China (3)

CLA s Sports in Antiquity: Olympians, Gladiators, and Superstars (3)

CLA yw Gender and Society in Ancient Greece (3)

CLT Medical Terminology (3)

CLT sw Classical Mythology (3)

CLT sxw Ancient Mythology, East and West (3)

CLT syw The Ancient World in Film (3)

DAN sw Dance Appreciation (3)

DAN xw Cultural Perspectives on Dance (3)

Or

DAN Classical Perspectives on Dance (3)

DAN yw African-American Perspectives on Dance (3)

ENG The Graphic Novel (3)

ENG The Documentary Film (3)

FIL s Introduction to Cinema Studies: Analysis and Practice (3)

FOW yw Literature and Sexuality (3)

FRT rx French and Francophone Cinema (3)

FRT yw French Women Writers (3)

FRW s Survey of French Literature I: Early-Modern France (3)

FRW s Survey of French Literature: Modern France (3)

GET yw Masterpieces of German Literature in Translation: 19th and 20th Centuries (3)

GET ry German Cinema (3)

HUM sw Humanities: Pre-History to Late Antiquity (3)

HUM sw Humanities: From the Renaissance to the Enlightenment (3)

HUM sw Humanities: 18th-Century Romanticism to Postmodernism (3)

HUM Walking in London (3)

HUM x Irish Culture: An Introduction (3)

HUM syw Multicultural Dimensions of Film and 20th-Century Culture (3)

IDH sy Radical Visions of Freedom (3)

IDH sw Utopias/Dystopias: An Homage to ‘Social Dreaming’ (3)

IDH syw Child and Youth Media Cultures in the U.S. (3)

IDH sy Staging Identity and Difference in the American Musical Theatre (3)

IDH yw Musical Theatre in the Weimar Republic: Identities and Creative Freedom (3)

IDS xw The Tourist Trap: The Good, the Bad, and the Ugly (3)

IDS sw Art as Propaganda: The Impact of Visual and Performing Arts on Western Society (3)

IDS xw Music in the World (3)

IDS w Visualizing Music: Representing Music Through Images (3)

IDS yw A Social History of America’s Popular Music (3)

IDS w The Immigrant Experience in Contemporary America (3)

IDS sw Language Birth, Language Death (3)

IDS w Dangerous Liaisons: Rape Myths and Violence in Literature, the Arts and Music (3)

IDS xw Central American Cinema (3)

IDS w Music and Culture in London (3)

IDS w Art Music in Contemporary Society (3)

IDS w From Ballet to Beyonce: Gender and the Body in Dance and Pop Culture (3)

IDS w Theory and Practice of the Encounter (3)

IDS xw Third World Cinema (3)

IDS w Making Babies, Making Families: Adoption and Surrogacy in Literature, Film, and Public Debate (3)

IDS w Creative Inquiry (3)

IDS w From Page to Screen: The Arts and Politics of Adaptation (3)

IDS w Documentary Film, History, Theory, and Practice (3)

IDS sxw Reality and Illusion in World Cinema (3)

IDS yw Fantasy Girls: Philosophical Examinations of Women and Girls in Fantasy and Science Fiction (3)

IDS w The Role of the Public Intellectual (3)

IDS xw Who is Human? Culture, Gender and Human Rights (3)

IDS xw Global Perspectives: Communication (3)

IDS xw Music and International Human Rights (3)

IDS w Human Nature: Modern and Contemporary Perspectives (3)

IDS w Writing/s about Music (3)

IDS w Crossing the Atlantic: Lorca in America, Hemingway in Spain (3)

IDS w To Work, Learn, or Play? The Role of the Child in British Fiction (3)

IDS rs Interdisciplinary Explorations in German Culture (3)

IDS w Seeing Sound, Hearing Pictures: The Interaction of Music and Photography (3)

IDS syw Music and Film (3)

IDS yw Popular Music in Literature (3)

IDS sw Animation and Identity (3)

IDS w Philosophy and Film (3)

IDS w Understanding America: Hemingway in a World of Discredited Values and Traditions (3)

IDS yw Female Friendship Alliances in Shakespeare (3)

IDS w Apocalypse: The End of the World in the Arts (3)

IDS w Reading, Writing, and Speaking in the Digital Age (3)

IDS w Technologies of Memory from Ancient Greece to Today (3)

IDS w Contemporary Art as a Mirror (3)

IDS sw Walt Disney’s America (3)

IDS sw Art and the Environment (3)

IDS xw German Society Through Film: The Legacy of Nazi Crimes Against Humanity (3)

IDS w Vistas on Florence: From Dante to the Big Flood of (3)

IDS w Responses to the Holocaust (3)

IDS w Music and Literature (3)

IDS w Robots, Monsters, Avatars: Technology and the (Post-)Human Condition (3)

IDS w Demons, the Antichrist, and Satan (3)

IDS w Human Nature: The War Within (3)

IDS xw The Culture in the Cuisine: The Food of Italy (3)

IDS w How Houses Build People: Ancient and Modern Domestic Life (3)

IDS xw Through an Arabic Lens: The Intersection of Film and Culture (3)

IDS w The Reel Middle Ages: Medieval Literature and Film (3)

IDS syw Lions and Tiger and Bears, Oh My! Multicultural Dimensions of American Cinema (3)

IDS xw Cinema Gone Global (3)

IDS xw India Through Bollywood Film (3)

IDS w Beethoven in America (3)

IDS w Science Fiction, Dystopia, Fate, and the Problem of Evil (3)

IDS w Promoting Art Ethically in Social Media: Screening Truth from Fiction (3)

IND Design and the Human Experience (3)

ITT yw Masterpieces of Italian Literature and Culture in Translation (3)

ITT yw Italian Culture and Civilization: From Origins to the Age of Romanticism (3)

ITT yw Modern Italian Culture: From the Unification to the Present (3)

ITT yw The Italian-American Experience in Literature and Film (3)

ITT yw Italian Cinema (3)

LIT x Perspectives on the Short Story (3)

LIT yw Women in Literature (3)

LIT rw Literature and Medicine (3)

LIT Eco-Literature and Ecocriticism (3)

MUH y Modern Popular Music (3)

MUH x Music in World Cultures (3)

MUH x Music in World Cultures (2). (For music majors.)

MUH yw American Roots Music (3)

MUL Survey of Music Literature (2)

MUT s The Art of Songwriting (3)

MUT s Music Theory III (3)

MUT Music Theory IV (3)

REL xw Introduction to World Religions (3)

REL yw Introduction to the Old Testament (3)

REL yw Introduction to the New Testament (3)

REL x Religions of South Asia (3)

REL x Religions of East Asia (3)

REL w Religion and 20th Century Fantasy Literature (3)

REL Religion, the Self, and Society (3)

REL xw Gender and Religion (3)

REL s The Dead Sea Scrolls (3)

REL The Hebrew Prophets (3)

REL r Topics in Biblical Studies (3)

REL x Ramayana in Indian Culture and Beyond (3)

REL x Goddesses, Women, and Power in Hinduism (3)

REL x The Buddhist Tradition (3)

REL x Chan/Zen Buddhism (3)

REL x Japanese Religions (3)

REL x Tibetan and Himalayan Religions (3)

REL y Islamic Traditions (3)

REL y Islamic Traditions II: Islam up to the Modern World (3)

REL x Religion in Africa (3)

REL y New Religious Movements (3)

REL w The Christian Tradition (3)

REL s American Protestant Thought in Historical Context (3)

REL yw The Jewish Tradition (3)

REL rx Topics in Buddhism (3)

REL r Special Topics in Religion (3)

REL Seminar on Shi’ite Islam (3)

REL Islam in North America (3)

RUT yw Russian Literature in English Translation (3)

RUT y Russian Folklore and Fairy Tales (3)

RUT ry Russian Cinema (3)

SLL x The Slavic Vampire (3)

SPT xw Latin American Literature in Translation (3)

SPT x Hispanic Cinema (3)

SPT x Introduction to Hispanic Culture Analysis (3)

THE s World Theatre History II (3)

Ethics:

CIS Ethics and Computer Science (3)

FRT yw Masterworks of French Literature in Translation; French (3)

HPS yw Screening the Scientific Life: Cinema and the Cultural Image of Science (3)

IDH sy Ethics, Art, and Freedom (3)

IDH xw Freedom and Religion: Liberal, Christian, and Muslim Perspectives (3)

IDH xw Feminist Perspectives on Globalization (3)

IDH sy Race and Religion in America Today: The Legacies of the Civil Rights and Black Power Movements (3)

IDS w Know Thyself: A Philosophical Investigation of Self-Knowledge (3)

IDS xw When Culture and Business Collide: Communication in an International Context (3)

IDS w Information Ethics for the 21st Century (3)

IDS xw Intercultural Communication, Business, and Sustainability: Writing for “Green” Everywhere (3)

IDS w Dangerous Liaisons: Rape Myths and Violence in Literature, the Arts, and Music (3)

IDS w World Without God? (3)

IDS xw Third World Cinema (3)

IDS x Music and Human International Rights (3)

IDS w Social Responsibility (Rhetorically Speaking) (3)

IDS w Communication Matters: Personal Responsibility in Public Speaking (3)

IDS w Sport: Place, Competition, and Fairness (3)

IDS w Questioning What We Know: Teaching and Learning Mathematics and Science in the 21st Century (3)

IDS w Classical Philosophy of India (3)

IDS w Made in Italy: Cultural Capital and Global Exchanges (3)

IDS w Need and Greed (Is Money the Root of All Evil?) (3)

IDS sw Media, Culture, and the Environment (3)

IDS w Ethics Through Art (3)

IDS xw German Society through Film: The Legacy of Nazi Crimes Against Humanity (3)

IDS w The Animal in Ancient and Modern Thought (3)

IDS w Robots, Monsters, Avatars: Technology and the (Post-) Human Condition (3)

IDS w Understanding Religion, Understanding People (3)

IDS w Who Owns the Past: Perspectives on Ethics in Anthropology (3)

IDS w Yesses and Noes: The Ethics of Consent (3)

IDS w Just Torture (3)

IDS w Ethics and Empire in the Roman World (3)

IDS w Modern Death (3)

IDS w Sport: Conscience Meets Commerce (3)

IDS w Promoting Art Ethically in Social Media: Separating Truth from Fiction (3)

ITT Dante’s Inferno (3)

LEI Events: Love Them, Then Leave Them, What’s My Footprint? (3)

LIT rw Literature and Medicine (3)

PAD Public Administration in American Society (3)

PHI Environmental Ethics (3)

PHI Ethical Issues and Life Choices (3)

PHI yw Bioethics (3)

PHM y Philosophy of Race, Class and Gender (3)

PHM x Introduction to Political Philosophy (3)

REL x Religion, Race and Ethnicity (3)

REL xw Religious Ethics and Moral Problems (3)

REL r Topics in Ethics (3)

REL s Religion and Bioethics (3)

REL Critics of Religion (3)

SOW Seminar in Global Social Work Ethics (3)

Natural Sciences

Students must complete a minimum of six semester hours, of which at least three semester hours must be chosen from the Statewide Core requirement list.

Note: All students must complete at least one credit hour in a Natural Sciences laboratory course as a graduation requirement.

Statewide Core Courses in the Natural Sciences:

AST Planets, Stars, and Galaxies (3)

BSC General Biology for Nonmajors (3)

BSC Biological Science I (3). (For science majors.)

BSC Anatomy and Physiology I (3)

CHM C Chemistry for Liberal Studies (4)

CHM General Chemistry I (3). (For science majors.)

ESC Introductory Earth Science (3)

EVR Introduction to Environmental Science (3)

PHY Physics and Technology for Future Presidents (3)

PHY C General Physics A (5). (For science majors.)

PHY C College Physics A (4). (For science majors.)

Note: Any student who successfully completes a Natural Science course for which one of the General Education core course options in Natural Sciences is a direct prerequisite shall be considered to have completed the Natural Sciences Core requirement. The direct prerequisite must be in the same subject area for the course to count and the subject area is determined according to the institution or SCNS catalog.

Natural Sciences

ANT Introduction to Archaeology (3)

ANT L Introduction to Archaeology Laboratory (1)

ANT Evolution of Human Sexuality (3)

ANT Introduction to Physical Anthropology and Prehistory (3)

ANT L Introduction to Physical Anthropology and Prehistory Laboratory (1)

ANT Bones, Bodies and Disease (3)

AST L Planets, Stars, and Galaxies Laboratory (1)

BSC L General Biology Laboratory for Nonmajors (1)

BSC Natural History, Biodiversity, and the Growth of Evolutionary Thought (3)

BSC L Biological Science I Laboratory (1). (For science majors.)

BSC Biological Science II (3). (For science majors.)

BSC Ls Biological Science II Laboratory (1). (For science majors.) [Note: Only Scholarship in Practice if taken with BSC ]

BSC L Anatomy and Physiology I Laboratory (1). (For science majors.)

CHM L General Chemistry Laboratory (1). (For science majors.)

CHM General Chemistry II (3)

CHM L General Chemistry II Laboratory (1). (For science majors.)

CHM Honors General Chemistry I (3). (For science majors.)

CHM L Honors General Chemistry I Laboratory (1). (For science majors.)

CHM Honors General Chemistry II (3). (For science majors.)

CHM L Honors General Chemistry II Laboratory (2). (For science majors.)

CHM One-Semester General Chemistry (3)

CHM L One-Semester General Chemistry Laboratory (1)

CHM L One-Semester Organic Chemistry Laboratory (1)

CJE Forensic Science in Investigation (3)

CJE L Forensic Science in Investigations Laboratory (1)

CLA sxw Ancient Science for Non-Science Majors (3)

ESC L Introductory Earth Science Laboratory (1)

EVR L Introduction to Environmental Science Laboratory (1)

GLY Dynamic Earth (3)

GLY L Dynamic Earth Laboratory (1)

GLY Environmental Issues in Geology (3)

GLY Dinosaurs and Disasters on an Evolving Earth (3)

GLY C Physical Geology (4). (For science majors.)

HUN The Science of Nutrition (3)

IDH w An Apple a Day: Natural Science Honors Seminar (3)

IDS Busting Common Biological Myths (3)

IDS w Trilobites to T. Rex: History of Life on Earth (3)

IDS w Evolution, Medicine and Evidence (3)

IDS w Genetics in Society (3)

IDS w Biotechnology: Impact of Life and Science on Society (3)

IDS w Sustainable Food and Water: Soil, Animals, Vegetables, and Grain (3)

IDS w Green Chemistry in a Changing World (3)

IDS w Chemistry in Art: From Pottery to Forgery (3)

IDS w The Ecology of Food (3)

IDS w Putting Science into Action: Field Methods in Plant Ecology (3)

IDS w Thinking about Language: How Cognition and Language Interact (3)

IDS w Living Green, Theory to Action (3)

IDS w Broken Clocks and Disrupted Sleep: Impacts of Technology (3)

ISC Global Change: Its Scientific and Human Dimensions (3)

ISC Scientific Underwater Investigation (3)

ISC L Scientific Underwater Investigation Laboratory (1)

ISC C Research Methods (3)

MET Introduction to the Atmosphere (3)

MET Natural Hazards and Disasters: From Hurricanes to Meteorites (3)

OCE Elementary Oceanography (3)

PHY L Physics and Technology for Future Presidents Laboratory (1)

PHY C General Physics B (5)

PSB Introduction to Brain and Behavior (3)

SPA Introduction to Communication Sciences and Disorders (3)

Note: Certain restrictions exist regarding the allotment of course credit for the chemistry and geology courses listed above. Students should refer to the course descriptions of each department for specific credit information before registering for these courses.

University-Wide Curriculum

“W” (State-Mandated Writing) and E-Series Courses

To satisfy the state writing mandates, students must complete two approved three-credit college-level writing courses beyond the six hours required for English Composition. These two additional college-level writing courses may be fulfilled through successful completion of “W” (State-Mandated Writing) or E-Series courses. Transfer students who entered the University without having completed the General Education requirements elsewhere or who have not completed an articulated AA degree must complete two approved courses that meet the State-Mandated Writing requirement. To fulfill the college-level writing requirement, students must earn a grade of at least a “C–” in the course, and also earn at least a “C–” average on the required writing assignments. If a student does not earn a “C–” average or higher on the required writing assignments, the student will not earn an overall grade of “C–” or higher in the course, no matter how well the student performs in the remaining portion of the course. Students with an AA degree or General Education Statement from a Florida public university, state college, community college, or other colleges with which Florida State University maintains an official articulation agreement are exempt from the state mandates for college-level writing.

Florida State University has developed E-Series courses that focus on broad questions that are relevant to humanity and our natural world and can be explored, examined, and experimented upon (thus, E-Series). E-Series courses are designed to foster critical thinking by allowing students to analyze persistent issues from multiple perspectives. All E-Series courses count toward the “W” (State-Mandated Writing) requirement. To fulfill the college-level writing requirement, students must earn a grade of at least a “C-” in the course and also earn at least a “C-” average on the required writing assignments. If the student does not earn a “C-” average or higher on the required writing assignments, the students will not earn an overall grade of “C-” or higher in the course, no matter how well the student performs in the remaining portion of the course. This course may also fall into one of the core General Education and/or Scholarship in Practice areas. Check the Liberal Studies website for the most recent information and to find an approved list of E-Series courses: https://liberalstudies.fsu.edu/.

“W” Courses

AFA w Introduction to the African-American Experience (3)

AFA yw Theories of African American Studies (3)

AMH w The History of the United States to (3)

AMH yw The African-American Experience in the United States (3)

AMH yw American Indians in the United States (3)

AMH yw Black Women in America (3)

AMH yw Nationality, Race, and Ethnicity in the United States (3)

AML yw Introduction to African-American Literature (3)

AML w American Authors Since (3)

AML w Major Figures in American Literature (3)

AML w Latino/a Literature in English (3)

AML xw American Multi-Ethnic Literature (3)

ARH w History and Criticism of Art I (3)

ARH w History and Criticism of Art II (3)

ARH sxw Great Discoveries in World Archaeology (3)

ARH xw Survey of Greek Art and Archaeology (3)

ARH w Art and Archaeology of Ancient Italy (3)

ART Csw Contemporary Art Scholarship and Practice (3)

ASH xw Middle Eastern History and Civilization (3)

ASH w History of Asia (3)

CLA sxw Peoples of the Roman World (3)

CLA sw Debates about the Past: Greek Civilization, History, and Culture (3)

CLA sw Debates about the Past: Roman Civilization, History, and Culture (3)

CLA sxw Ancient Science for Non-Science Majors (3)

CLA w History of Ancient Greece (3)

CLA yw Gender and Society in Ancient Greece (3)

CLA w Women, Children, and Slaves in Ancient Rome: The Roman Family (3)

CLT sw Classical Mythology (3)

CLT sxw Ancient Mythology, East and West (3)

CLT syw The Ancient World in Film (3)

DAN sw Dance Appreciation (3)

DAN xw Cultural Perspectives on Dance (3)

DAN w Classical Perspectives on Dance (3)

ENL w British Authors: Early Romantics to the Present (3)

ENL w Introduction to Shakespeare (3)

EUH w Ancient and Medieval Civilizations (3)

EUH xw 19th-Century Europe (3)

EUH w England, the Empire and Commonwealth (3)

FOW yw Literature and Sexuality (3)

FRT yw Masterworks of French Literature in Translation; French (3)

FRT yw French Women Writers (3)

GET yw Masterpieces of German Literature in Translation: 19th and 20th Centuries (3)

HIS sw The Historian’s Craft (3)

HIS yw Pandemics and People (3)

HIS yw LGBTQ History (3)

HIS xw Pirates and Patriots in the Atlantic World (3)

HIS yw History of Science (3)

HIS yw Medicine and Society (3)

HPS yw Screening the Scientific Life: Cinema and the Cultural Image of Science (3)

HUM sw Humanities: Pre-History to Late Antiquity (3)

HUM sw Humanities: From the Renaissance to the Enlightenment (3)

HUM sw Humanities: 18th-Century Romanticism to Postmodernism (3)

HUM syw Multicultural Dimensions of Film and 20th-Century Culture (3)

INS sw Developing Global Citizens: Global Issues in Theory and Practice (3)

ITT yw Masterpieces of Italian Literature and Culture in Translation (3)

ITT yw Italian Culture and Civilization: From Origins to the Age of Romanticism (3)

ITT yw Modern Italian Culture: From the Unification to the Present (3)

ITT yw The Italian-American Experience in Literature and Film (3)

ITT yw Italian Cinema (3)

JPT rxw Japanese Film and Culture (3)

LAH xw Latin America: A Cross-Cultural History (3)

LIT w Introduction to Fiction (3)

LIT w Introduction to Poetry (3)

LIT w Contemporary Literature (3)

LIT w Introduction to Global Literature in English (3)

LIT w Modern Drama (3)

LIT yw Women in Literature (3)

LIT rw Literature and Medicine (3)

MUH yw American Roots Music (3)

MUH w Survey of Music History-Antiquity to (3)

PHH w Plato and His Predecessors (3)

PHH w Aristotle to Augustine (3)

PHH w Modern Philosophy (3)

PHI yw Bioethics (3)

PHM w Philosophy of Sex (3)

REL xw Introduction to World Religions (3)

REL yw Religion in the United States (3)

REL yw Introduction to the Old Testament (3)

REL yw Introduction to the New Testament (3)

REL w Religion and 20th Century Fantasy Literature (3)

REL xw Gender and Religion (3)

REL xw Religious Ethics and Moral Problems (3)

REL w Critics of Religion (3)

REL w The Christian Tradition (3)

REL yw The Jewish Tradition (3)

RUT yw Russian Literature in English Translation (3)

SPT xw Latin American Literature in Translation (3)

THE sw World Theatre History II (3)

WOH xw The Modern World to (3)

WOH xw The Modern World Since (3)

WST yw Women in Western Culture: Images and Realities (3)

Scholarly and Formative Experiences

To satisfy this requirement, students will be required to take one course from each of the two categories described below. All students are required to complete at least one Scholarship in Practice course and one approved Formative Experience, with the following exceptions: students who have completed an AA degree from an articulated institution (including those who have completed a high school AA degree from an articulated institution) and transfer students who enter the University with sixty or more credit hours are only required to complete either one Scholarship in Practice or one Formative Experience course.

The Scholarly and Formative Experiences requirement must be completed prior to the receipt of the baccalaureate degree.

Scholarship in Practice courses are classroom-based experiences that allow students to apply relevant areas of scholarship to an original project. A Scholarship in Practice course must be completed with a grade of “C–” or higher prior to the receipt of the baccalaureate degree. A Scholarship in Practice course at any level will count towards the graduation requirement.

Formative Experiences are a type of hands-on, high impact practice through which students engage in independent, immersive learning settings outside the classroom that are relevant to their educational, professional, and life goals. Student participation in Formative Experiences must be evaluated by an instructor of record (faculty or qualified staff). Formative Experiences must be completed with a grade of “C–” or higher (or an “S” if taken on an S/U basis) in an approved course or through successful completion of the Experience Recognition Program through the FSU Career Center prior to the receipt of the baccalaureate degree. Students may satisfy the Formative Experience requirement by completing a second Scholarship in Practice course. In order for a Scholarship in Practice course to fulfill the Formative Experience requirement, the student must earn a “C–” or higher.

Scholarship in Practice Courses

ADV rs Advertising Team II (3)

ANT s Human Osteology (3)

ARE rs Introduction to Arts Administration (3)

ARH sxw Great Discoveries in World Archaeology (3)

ARH rs Methods of Art History and Criticism (3)

ART Csw Contemporary Art Scholarship and Practice (3)

ART s BA: Exploring Opportunities in the Arts (3)

ART s BFA Thesis Project and Exhibition (3)

ASH rs Middle East Research: An Interdisciplinary Seminar ()

AST Ls Astrophysics Laboratory (2)

BCH Ls General Biochemistry I Laboratory (3)

BSC Ls Biological Science II Lab (1) (For science majors.) [Note: Only Scholarship in Practice if taken with BSC ]

CEN Ls Software Engineering Capstone (1)

CGN s Senior Design Project (3)

CJE s Cold Case Investigations (3)

CLA sxw Peoples of the Roman World (3)

CLA sw Debates About Past: Greek Civilization, History and Culture (3)

CLA sw Debates About Past: Roman Civilization, History and Culture (3)

CLA sxw Ancient Science for Non-Science Majors (3)

CLA s Sports in Antiquity: Olympians, Gladiators, and Superstars (3)

CLA rs Seminar in Classical Civilization (3)

CLT sw Classical Mythology (3)

CLT sxw Ancient Mythology, East and West (3)

CLT syw The Ancient World in Film (3)

COM s Contemporary Issues in Communication (3)

COM rs Directed Individual Study (1–3)

CRW s Writing Florida (3)

CRW rs Fiction Workshop (3)

CRW rs Poetry Workshop (3)

DAN sw Dance Appreciation (3)

DAN s Senior Capstone Experience (3)

ECH s Chemical Engineering Process Design I (4)

EEL Cs Senior Design Project I (3)

EIN s Industrial Engineering Senior Design Project (3)

EML Cs Senior Design Project I (3)

ENC rs Advanced Article and Essay Workshop (3)

ENG s Research in Renaissance Literature (3)

ENG s Senior Seminar in Literature (3)

ENT s The Themed Experience (3)

ENT s Innovation by Design (3)

FIL s Introduction to Cinema Studies: Analysis and Practice (3)

FIL rs History of Visual Effects and Animation ()

FRW s Survey of French Literature I: Early-Modern (3)

FRW s Survey of French Literature II: Modern France (3)

HIS sw The Historian’s Craft (3)

HIS s Interpreting Native America (3)

HIS s Digital History (3)

HIS s Senior Seminar (3)

HUM sw Humanities: Pre-History to Late Antiquity (3)

HUM sw Humanities: From the Renaissance to the Enlightenment (3)

HUM sw Humanities: 18th–Century Romanticism to Postmodernism (3)

HUM s Digital Literacy in the Humanities (3)

HUM syw Multicultural Dimensions of Film and 20th–Century Culture (3)

IDH sy Radical Visions of Freedom (3)

IDH sw Utopias/Dystopias: An Homage to “Social Dreaming” (3)

IDH sy Ethics, Art, and Freedom (3)

IDH syw Child and Youth Media Cultures in the U.S. (3)

IDH sy Staging Identity and Difference in the American Musical Theatre (3)

IDH sy Race and Religion in America Today: The Legacies of the Civil Rights and Black Power Movements (3)

IDS sw Foundations of Research and Inquiry (3)

IDS sw The Lean Machine: The 21st Century Entrepreneur (3)

IDS s Innovation and Emerging Technologies (3)

IDS sw Art as Propaganda: The Impact of Visual and Performing Arts on Western Society (3)

IDS sw Dead Cities (3)

IDS sw Language Birth, Language Death (3)

IDS syw The Blindness Experience (3)

IDS sxw Reality and Illusion in World Cinema (3)

IDS rs Interdisciplinary Explorations in German Culture (3)

IDS sw Creating Experiences (3)

IDS sw Language, Body, Mind, and World (3)

IDS syw Music and Film (3)

IDS sw Animation and Identity (3)

IDS sw Digital Microhistory Lab (3)

IDS sw Business Case Analysis and Solution Development (3)

IDS sw Media, Culture, and the Environment (3)

IDS sw Walt Disney’s America (3)

IDS sw Art and the Environment (3)

IDS syw Lions and Tigers and Bears, Oh My! Multicultural Dimensions of American Cinema (3)

IDS sw Empowering Health Consumers in the eHealth Era (3)

IDS sw Exploring the World of Sports (3)

IDS sw Technical Communication in the Information Age (3)

IHS s Interdisciplinary Medical Sciences Capstone Course (3)

IND Cs Interior Design Studio IV (4)

INS sw Developing Global Citizens: Global Issues in Theory and Practice (3)

ISM s Data Analytics and Mining for Business (3)

LDR s Leadership Theory and Practice (3)

LDR s Peer Leadership (3)

LDR s Leadership in Groups and Communities (3)

LDR s Emerging Leaders (3)

LDR sx Leadership for Social Justice (3)

LDR s Leadership and Sustainability in Action (3)

LDR s Leadership in Film (3)

LDR s Leadership and Change (3)

LDR s Leadership and Complexity (3)

LDR s Student Affairs Leadership (3)

LIS s Information Architecture (3)

MAN sy Disability Inclusion in the Workforce (3)

MMC s Media Legalities (3)

MMC s Comparative and International Media Studies (3)

MUO rs Music Theatre Workshop (2)

MUT s The Art of Songwriting (3)

MUT s Music Theory III (3)

MUT s Popular Music Analysis (3)

PHC Public Health: Honors in the Major (3)

PHY Ls Intermediate Laboratory (2)

PHY Lrs Advanced Laboratory (2)

PSY Cs Research Methods in Psychology with Laboratory (4)

REL s Religion and Bioethics (3)

REL s The Dead Sea Scrolls (3)

REL s American Protestant Thought in Historical Context (3)

REL s What is Religion? What is Religious Studies? (3)

REL s Modern Hinduism (3)

SOW s Integrative Field Seminar (2)

SPA s Clinical Methods (3)

SPW sx Readings from Spanish America (3)

SPW sx Cuba: Diaspora, Race, and Cultural Identity (3)

STA s In My Opinion: Introduction to Designing, Conducting and Analyzing Surveys (3)

STA s Introduction to Statistical Modeling with SAS (3)

SYD sy Sociology of Law and Hispanics (3)

THE s World Theatre History II (3)

TPA s Theatre Management (3)

Formative Experience Courses

ACG Accounting Internship (3)

ACG r Honors Thesis ()

AFA r African American Studies Internship ()

ANT r Honors Work ()

ARA r Honors Thesis ()

ARH r Honors Work in Art History ()

ARH r Internship in Museum Studies ()

ART Internship in Creative Art ()

ART r Honors Work (3)

ASN r Honors Thesis ()

ATR r Sports Medicine Practicum ()

ATR Athletic Training Clinical IV (1)

BME Biomedical Engineering Process Design II (3)

BME r Honors URP in Biomedical Engineering ()

BSC r Honors Work in Biological Sciences ()

CCJ r Honors in Criminology (3)

CCJ Internship in Criminology (15)

CCJ Part Time Internship in Criminology (8)

CLP Abnormal Psychology Field Experience (1)

CGN Senior Design II (3)

CGN r Honors Work in Civil and Environmental Engineering ()

CHI r Internship in Applied Chinese ()

CHM r Honors Work (Chemistry) ()

CIS r Internship in Computer Science ()

CIS r Honors Work (3)

CJE r Public Safety and Security Capstone (3)

CLA r Classical Archaeology: Fieldwork ()

CLA r Honors Work ()

CLP Abnormal Psychology Field Experience (1)

COM r Application of Communication Skills ()

COM Global Exchange Formative Experience (0)

COM r Honors Work ()

COM r Application of Instructional Methods ()

COM r Communication Internship ()

DAN r Dance Internship ()

ECH Chemical Engineering Process Design II (3)

ECH r Honors URP in Chemical Engineering ()

ECH Chemical Engineering Process Design II (3)

ECH r Honors URP in Chemical Engineering ()

ECO r Honors Work ()

ECO Economics Internship ()

EDE r Honors Work (3)

EEL r Honors Work in Electrical Engineering ()

EEL C Computer Engineering Senior Design Project II (3)

EEL C Electrical Engineering Senior Design Project II (3)

EEX Practicum in High Incidence Disabilities (1)

EIN Industrial Engineering Senior Design Project II (3)

EIN r Honors Thesis (3)

EML C Senior Design Project II (3)

EML r Honors Work (3)

ENC r Internship in Editing ()

ENG r Kudzu Review Undergraduate Magazine ()

ENG r Honors Thesis ()

ENT Entrepreneurship Internship (3)

ENT r Honors Thesis (3)

EUS r Honors Thesis ()

EVR Environmental Science Capstone (4)

FAD Practicum in Family and Child Sciences (6)

FAD r Honors Work ()

FIL r BFA Thesis Production ()

FIL r Undergraduate Honors Thesis ()

FIN Finance Internship (3)

FIN r Honors Thesis ()

FRE r Honors Thesis ()

FRE r Internship in Applied French ()

GEB Learning Experientially in Business ()

GEB r Business Internship ()

GEO r Honors Work (Geography) ()

GEO r Internship ()

GER r Honors Thesis ()

GER r Internship in Applied German ()

GLY Field Course (6)

GLY r Undergrad Research ()

GLY Senior Thesis (1)

GLY r Honors Work ()

HEE r Honors Work (3)

HFT r Management Internship ()

HFT r Honors Thesis ()

HIS r Honors Work ()

HIS r Undergraduate History Internship (3)

Sours: https://registrar.fsu.edu/bulletin/undergraduate/information/undergraduate_degree/
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2

boy looking at art in a gallery

Art Education, MS

Majors: Art Education

female basketball coach in huddle with team

Athletic Coaching, MS

Majors: Athletic Coaching

confident businesswoman in conference room

Business Administration, MBA

Majors: Business Administration

pair of engineers testing sophisticated technology

Civil Engineering, MEng

Majors: Civil Engineering-MEng

speech therapist working with young child

Communication Science & Disorders, MS

College of

Communication & Information

Majors: Communication Science & Disorders

programmer at computer writing code

Computer Science, BA

College of

Arts & Sciences

Majors: Computer Programming & Applications, Computer Science

programming code on laptop screen

Computer Science, BS

College of

Arts & Sciences

Majors: Computer Science

school counselor talking to students in school library

Counseling & Human Systems, MS/Specialist

Majors: School Counseling

gavel with scales of justice in background

Criminology, BS

College of

Criminology & Criminal Justice

Majors: Criminology

scales of justice with bookshelf in background

Criminology, MS

College of

Criminology & Criminal Justice

Majors: Criminal Justice Studies

teacher and student interacting at desk

Curriculum & Instruction, MS

Majors: Autism Spectrum Disorders, Elementary Education, English Education, Foreign & Second Language Education, Mathematics Education, Science Education, Social Science Education, Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages (TESOL), Visual Disabilities Studies

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Educational Leadership & Policy, EdD

Majors: Educational Leadership/Administration

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Educational Leadership & Policy, EdS

Majors: Educational Leadership/Administration

educator with book in library

Educational Leadership & Policy, MS

Majors: Educational Leadership/Administration

students in classroom listening to instructor

Educational Psychology, MS

Majors: Learning & Cognition

manager looking over the shoulder of colleague in situation room

Emergency Management, Graduate Certificate

College of

Social Sciences & Public Policy

Graphic with environmental icons.

Entrepreneurship, MSE

College of

Entrepreneurship

Majors: Social & Sustainable Enterprises

Graphic of trees and buildings in a city center.

Entrepreneurship, MSE

Majors: Hospitality Entrepreneurship

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Health Informatics, Graduate Certificate

College of

Communication & Information

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Information Technology, MSIT

College of

Communication & Information

Majors: Information Technology

professionals brainstorming at conference table

Information, MSI

College of

Communication & Information

Majors: Information

professionals working together at whiteboard

Information, Specialist

College of

Communication & Information

Majors: Information

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Instructional Systems & Learning Technologies, EdD

Majors: Instructional Systems & Learning Technologies, Learning Design & Performance Technology

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Instructional Systems & Learning Technologies, MS

Majors: Instructional Systems & Learning Technologies

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Interdisciplinary Social Science, BS

College of

Social Sciences & Public Policy

Majors: Interdisciplinary Social Science

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Juris Master, JM

Majors: Cybersecurity, Privacy & Technology Risk Management, Employment Law & HR Risk Management, Financial Regulation & Compliance, Health Care Regulation, Legal Risk Management, Contracting & Compliance

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Law Enforcement Intelligence, MS

College of

Applied Studies

Majors: Law Enforcement Intelligence

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Management Information Systems, MS

Majors: Management Information Systems

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Nursing Practice, DNP

Majors: Acute Care Nurse Practitioner, Nursing Practice-Family Nurse Practitioner, Psychiatric Mental Health Nurse Practitioner

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Project Management, Graduate Certificate

College of

Communication & Information

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Public Administration, MPA

College of

Social Sciences & Public Policy

Majors: Public Administration

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Public Safety & Security, BS

College of

Applied Studies

Majors: Crime Scene Investigations, Law Enforcement Intelligence, Law Enforcement Operations

charts and files on conference table

Risk Management & Insurance, MS

Majors: Risk Management & Insurance

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Social Work, MSW

Majors: Social Work

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Systems Engineering, MS

Majors: Systems Engineering

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User Services, Graduate Certificate

College of

Communication & Information

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Youth Services, Graduate Certificate

College of

Communication & Information

Sours: https://distance.fsu.edu/programs

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And here is the entertainment exclaimed one of the fighters getting out of the pool. Katerina stood naked in front of them. The soldiers quickly surrounded her, she felt the tips of their members touch her thighs.



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