Steel vengeance trains

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Steel Vengeance

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Steel Vengeance (Cedar Point) 2018 01.jpg
Statistics
Manufacturer Rocky Mountain Construction
Designer / calculations Alan Schilke
Type Steel - Hyper - Hybrid
Product I-Box Track
Riders per train 24
Hourly capacity 1200
Propulsion Chain lift hill
Height 205 feet
Drop 200 feet
Top speed 74 mph
Length 5740 feet
Inversions 4
Drop angle 90°
Duration 2:30
Airtime points: 28 - HELP
Steel Vengeance logo.png

Steel Vengeance is a steelroller coaster located at Cedar Point in Sandusky, Ohio, USA. It was built by Rocky Mountain Construction and uses much of the wooden support structure of the former Mean Streak roller coaster.

History

Track for Steel Vengeance prior to installation

Mean Streak closed on September 16, 2016. In July 2017, some additional details were revealed about the ride at a media preview day. Cedar Point stated that they were aiming for a May 2018 opening and the ride's first drop would be larger than 200 feet. The roller coaster was officially unveiled at noon on August 16, 2017.[1]

The ride officially opened on May 5, 2018. On opening day, an incoming train collided with another in the station. No guests were hospitalized and Steel Vengeance was closed for investigation.[2] It reopened the next day on May 6, albeit on one train operation. On June 1, a second train returned to operation.

For the 2019 season, a metal detector was installed in the queue line.

Design

According to Cedar Point, Steel Vengeance broke 15 different records when it opened in 2018. These include the record for world's tallest hybrid roller coaster at 205 feet, the world's fastest hybrid roller coaster at 74 mph, the longest hybrid roller coaster at 5,740 feet and the most airtime on any roller coaster in the world, with a total 27.2 s of airtime. While the records for tallest and fastest hybrid now belong to Zadra and Iron Gwazi, Steel Vengeance is still the longest.

Trains

3 trains with 6 cars per train. In each car, riders are arranged 2 across in 2 rows, for a total of 24 riders per train.

Ride Experience

Directly after the ride leaves the station the ride makes a 180 degree turn, passes over 2 bunny hills, then goes up the chain lift. After the chain lift, the ride drops 200 feet at 90 degrees which is where it reaches it's top speed at 74 mph. The ride then goes up a small airtime hill at full speed. This is then followed by a much larger airtime hill. Next, riders experience an outer banked hill and dip to the right. After that, there is another airtime hill before going into the first inversion, which is a zero-g roll (variant). Then the train dips right under the lift hill and goes through an over-banked turn. This leads into the second inversion, a zero-g stall. This is the second time riders pass through the lift hill structure. After a small airtime hill, the ride goes up a larger hill. This leads to a block brake. The train then navigates a smaller over-banked turn, goes up an airtime hill, then upward into a slightly over-banked turn. This is followed by a small drop which leads into the third inversion, another zero-g roll. The ride goes through a double up, an over-banked turn, and a final zero-g roll. The ride ends with an over-banked turn and four more airtime hills.

Records

Steel Vengeance broke ten records:

  • World's tallest hybrid roller coaster at 205 feet tall.
  • World's fastest hybrid roller coaster at 74 mph.
  • World's steepest drop on a hybrid roller coaster at 90 degrees.
  • World's longest drop on a hybrid roller coaster 200 feet.
  • World's longest hybrid roller coaster at 5,740 feet.
  • Most inversions on a hybrid roller coaster at four.
  • Fastest airtime hill on a hybrid roller coaster at 74 mph.
  • Most airtime on a hybrid roller coaster at 27.2 s.
  • Most airtime on any roller coaster at 27.2 s.
  • World's first hybrid hyper roller coaster

Trivia

Cedar Point paired up with gaming developer Frontier to release a replica of Steel Vengeance on their groundbreaking theme park game Planet Coaster. The only other Cedar Fair coaster to do this is Copperhead Strike at Carowinds.

Images

References

External links

Sours: https://coasterpedia.net/wiki/Steel_Vengeance

SANDUSKY, Ohio - Crews at Cedar Point continue to work on Steel Vengeance, the park's new record-breaking new roller coaster, which has been running with just one train since two trains bumped in the loading station on opening day.

Lines for the ride have been long - up to three hours on some days - and are likely to get longer Memorial Day weekend and as schools let out for the summer.

Park spokesman Tony Clark declined to speculate about how long work would continue on Steel Vengeance, which is a higher, faster, smoother version of the coaster formerly known as Mean Streak. The new ride breaks numerous records for hybrid roller coasters, which are made of wood and steel.

He said visitors could stay updated on any developments by following the park on Twitter.

Clark also wouldn't say what part of the ride was being worked on, though observers at the park have noted crews working overnight on the coaster's braking system.

On May 5, the park's opening day, two trains were operating when one ran into the other at the loading station. No one was seriously hurt.

The ride has operated with only one train since then. The coaster was designed to operate with three trains, holding 24 riders each, for a total capacity of 1,200 riders per hour.

Because of the decreased capacity, Cedar Point temporarily pulled the ride from its Fast Lane Plus system, the park's go-to-the-front-of-the-line program, for which visitors pay extra.

It's not unusual for new rides, especially those that test boundaries in speed and height, to face early-season problems.

Walt Schmidt, co-founder of Pointbuzz.com, a Cedar Point fan site, pointed out that numerous other Cedar Point ride debuts have been troubled by mechanical or other problems over the years, including popular rides Top Thrill Dragster, Maverick and WindSeeker.

Rocky Mountain Construction, the Idaho company that engineered the transformation of Mean Streak to Steel Vengeance, has had its share of delays, too. Two years ago, the highly anticipated debut of Lightning Rod at Dollywood in Tennessee was delayed by several months because of concerns about its launch system.

Jeff Putz, co-founder of Pointbuzz.com, said history suggests Cedar Point will get Steel Vengeance fully functioning soon. "One thing I can say is that the park eventually figures it out every year, and I'm sure they will this time as well," he said.

Water Park opens: Cedar Point Shores, the park's 18-acre outdoor waterpark, opens on Saturday with special giveaways, live entertainment and construction of a massive sand sculpture. Admission to the waterpark is $39.

Veterans free admission: Also this weekend, Cedar Point is offering free admission to the main park and water park to active, retired and honorably discharged members of the U.S. armed forces. Identification is required.

Sours: https://www.cleveland.com/travel/2018/05/cedar_points_steel_vengeance_r_1.html
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Steel Vengeance
Steel-Vengeance-lift-hill-with-skyline-in-the-background.jpg
General
[[File:|link=|center]]
ParkCedar Point
LocationUSA.pngSandusky, Ohio, USA
StatusOperating
Operated
OperatedMay 5, 2018 -
OpenedMay 5, 2018
Opening
Costawaiting verification
Height restriction52 inches (132 cm)
Statistics
ManufacturerRocky Mountain Construction
Builder
DesignerAlan Schilke
Type
Type
Model
Riders per train24
Riders per hour
Lift/launch systemChain lift
Height205 feet feet
Drop200 feet feet
Top speed74 mph mph
Length5,740 feet feet
Dimensions

feet x feet

Duration2:30
Inversions4
Steepest drop90 degrees
Maximum g-force

Steel Vengeance, formerly known as Mean Streak, is a Rocky Mountain Construction hyper-hybrid roller coaster located at Cedar Point in Sandusky, Ohio, USA. It was the park's eighteenth roller coaster when it opened on May 5, 2018. Steel Vengeance is the first and only hyper-hybrid roller coaster, meaning that it is the only coaster made of both wood and steel that exceeds 200 feet. It is the fourth tallest roller coaster at Cedar Point, having a height that is equal with Magnum XL-200. When it opened, Steel Vengeance broke 10 world records.

Design

Mean Streak offered its final rides to the public on September 16, 2016. The ride was officially confirmed in August 2017. Steel Vengeance was opened at Cedar Point in 2018. The coaster broke 10 records when it opened. The coaster was Cedar Point's 18th. Steel Vengeance features 3 trains. Each train carries 6 cars, allowing for a capacity 24 people in 12 rows of 2.

Trains:3 trains with 6 cars. Riders are arranged 2 across in 2 rows for a total of 24 riders per train

Error: Missing train type

Sours: https://rollercoaster.fandom.com/wiki/Steel_Vengeance

Cedar Point begins running two trains on Steel Vengeance after opening day incident

SANDUSKY, Ohio -- Good news for roller coaster fans.

Cedar Point's Tony Clark confirms with WKYC that Steel Vengeance is operating two roller coaster trains as of Friday morning.

This news comes after the ride had been closed all day Thursday.

Cedar Point was running just one train since the Steel Vengeance had a minor collision on opening day May 5.

Steel Vengeance debuted to rave reviews from thrill seekers, many declaring it’s the best roller coaster on earth for its smooth-as-butter attitude and relentless air time.

The ride, which breaks a total of 10 world records, was designed to carry 1,200 riders per hour using three trains.

PHOTOS | Steel Vengeance media day at Cedar Point

Sours: https://www.wkyc.com/article/features/cedar-point-begins-running-two-trains-on-steel-vengeance/95-560623843

Vengeance trains steel

Steel Vengeance

Roller coaster at Cedar Point

For the comic book character, see Ghost Rider.

Steel Vengeance, formerly known as Mean Streak, is a steel roller coaster at Cedar Point in Sandusky, Ohio. The roller coaster was rebuilt by Rocky Mountain Construction (RMC) and opened to the public on May 5, 2018. It features RMC's patented I-Box Track technology utilizing a significant portion of Mean Streak's former support structure. Upon completion, Steel Vengeance set 10 world records.

Originally constructed by Dinn Corporation, Mean Streak opened to the public on May 11, 1991, as the tallest wooden coaster in the world with the longest drop height. After more than 25 years of operation, Cedar Point closed Mean Streak on September 16, 2016, casting doubt and uncertainty regarding the ride's future. Over time, the park dropped subtle hints about a possible track conversion, which was officially confirmed in August 2017. It was marketed as the world's first hybrid hypercoaster – a wooden and steel roller coaster at least 200 feet (61 m) in height – and reemerged as Steel Vengeance. A minor collision on opening day led to a temporary closure and later modifications from RMC.

History[edit]

Cedar Point revealed in 1990 that a new roller coaster would be built for the 1991 season. It was officially named Mean Streak on October 24, 1990.[2] Construction commenced later that year and continued through spring of the following year.[3][4] Mean Streak opened with the park's seasonal debut on May 11, 1991,[5] in the Frontiertown section of the park behind one of Cedar Point & Lake Erie Railroad's stations.[6] The ride's media day press conference was held on May 22, 1991.[7]

Mean Streak was one of eleven roller coasters designed and manufactured by Ohio-based Dinn Corporation before the company went out of business in 1992.[8] It was a twister coaster model designed by Curtis D. Summers, and the ride cost $7.5 million to construct.[5][9][10] In September 2010, a small 5-foot (1.5 m) section caught fire, which was quickly contained by firefighters to a small portion of the ride.[11]

On August 1, 2016, Cedar Point announced that Mean Streak would offer its last rides to the public on September 16, 2016.[12][13] Park officials, however, declined to confirm that the ride was being torn down.[14] Following its closure, unconfirmed rumors emerged that the roller coaster was being refurbished by Rocky Mountain Construction (RMC), a manufacturing company well known for its restoration work on existing wooden roller coasters.[15] The company has refurbished, and in many cases completely transformed, other wooden roller coasters with applications of either of its two patented technologies: I-Box and Topper track.[16]

Cedar Point began teasing the public on the ride's future with the release of an 18-second teaser video entitled "They're Coming" on April 1, 2017.[17] Cedar Point showed video shots briefly panning several elements of the rumored conversion.[17] Another similar video showing snippets of the new ride was released a few months later in June.[18] Three more videos were released over the summer of 2017, with catchphrases “They‘re rollin’ in like thunder," "There's a score to settle," and "They stake their claim."[19] On August 16, 2017, Cedar Point held an official announcement for Steel Vengeance.[20] It was also announced that a virtual recreation of the ride would be made available in the PC video game, Planet Coaster.[21] Steel Vengeance opened to the public on May 5, 2018.[22]

Following an incident on Twisted Timbers at Kings Dominion, where a phone hit a rider in the face during the ride, Cedar Point issued a temporary ban on cell phones when entering the ride's queue beginning in August 2018. The ban was lifted the following season after zipper pouches were installed on the trains to safely secure loose items.[23] Metal detectors were installed in the queue, ensuring that all loose articles were placed in these pouches.[24] The pouches were removed in 2020 following the COVID-19 pandemic, and the previous ban was reinstated.[25]

Characteristics[edit]

Mean Streak's first turnaround

Mean Streak's wooden track was approximately 5,427 feet (1,654 m) in length and the height of the lift hill was approximately 161 feet (49 m).[5] It was constructed from 1.7 million board feet (4,000 m³) of treated southern yellow pine.[9] In 1994, a trim brake was installed on the first drop reducing its overall speed in an attempt to prevent abnormal track wear and increase ride comfort.[7] Over the years, Mean Streak had been re-tracked several times. Some re-tracking was completed by Martin & Vleminckx.[26] Prior to the 2012 operating season, many sections of track after the first drop were replaced. This was the most significant work done on the ride since it opened.[27] Also, in 2012, a portion of the queue was removed to make room for a new building. The building is located in the infield of Mean Streak and is used for the HalloWeekends haunted house, Eden Musee. It is also used for storage during the off-season and summer.[28]

Mean Streak operated with three trains manufactured by Philadelphia Toboggan Coasters (PTC) that were colored red, gold, and green.[10][29] Each train had seven cars with riders arranged two across in two rows for a total of 28 riders per train. The minimum height required to ride was 48 inches (120 cm), and guests were secured by an individual ratcheting lap bar and seat belt.[5] During the 2011–2012 off-season, all three trains were sent to PTC's headquarters for maintenance and refurbishment.[29]

After the conversion to Steel Vengeance, the coaster's track length was extended to 5,740 feet (1,750 m) and the ride's peak height was increased to 205 feet (62 m). Its three new trains are each based on a character from the themed backstory of the ride: Jackson "Blackjack" Chamberlain, Chess "Wild One" Watkins, and Wyatt "Digger" Dempsey."[30]

Ride experience[edit]

Mean Streak with Maverickin the foreground

Mean Streak[edit]

After leaving the station, the Mean Streak train passed through the storage tracks and made a 180-degree turn to the right, before ascending the 161-foot-tall (49 m) lift hill. After cresting the top of the hill, the train dropped 155 feet (47 m) at a 52-degree-angle, reaching a top speed of 65 miles per hour (105 km/h). While dropping, riders went through a set of trim brakes on the first drop. Riders then went through a 123-foot-tall (37 m) twisted turnaround followed by a small airtime hill, and then another twisted turnaround. The train maneuvered over the lift hill and dipped down to the right. After that, the train traveled through the ride's structure and down another hill, turning to the left into the mid-course brake run. The train then dipped down to the left into another airtime hill. Riders then went through several small airtime hills and turned through the ride's structure followed by the final brake run.[31] One cycle of the ride lasted 3 minutes and 13 seconds, making it the former longest duration of any roller coaster at Cedar Point.[5][32]

When Mean Streak opened in 1991, it was the tallest wooden roller coaster in the world and featured the longest drop.[9] Upon closure in 2016, Mean Streak had the seventh tallest lift, the tenth fastest speed, the fourth longest track-length and the seventh longest drop.[33][34][35][36]

Steel Vengeance[edit]

After leaving the station, the train makes a 180 degree right turn, passes over two small bunny hills, and begins its ascent up the 205-foot-tall (62 m) lift hill. After cresting the top of the lift hill, the train drops 200 feet (61 m) at a 90-degree angle, reaching its maximum speed of 74 miles per hour (119 km/h). After this drop, the train traverses a small airtime hill, followed by a climb into a larger airtime hill, which drops riders slightly to the right. Next, the train climbs up a 116-foot (35 m) left outward banked hill,[37] dips slightly right, and passes over another small airtime hill, which leads to the first inversion, a zero-g roll. After this, the train dips right, passes underneath the lift hill, and traverses an overbanked right turn, which leads into the second inversion, a half stall, that sees the train pass through the lift hill structure for a second time. Then, the train dips straight, passes over a small airtime hill, and climbs up a hill. The train then makes an upward left-hand turn, which leads to the mid-course brake run. Following this, the train makes another sharp left turn into a short, steep drop slightly to the left. Next, the train navigates an upward, slightly overbanked turn to the left, traverses another airtime hill, then upward into a slightly overbanked left turn. This is followed by a small drop into a high-speed overbanked left turn, which leads into the third inversion, a zero-g roll. Next is a double-up into another high-speed overbanked left turn, which leads into the fourth inversion, a final zero-g roll. Next, another overbanked left turn into an airtime hill, followed by four more airtime hills, which lead to the final brake run back into the station. One cycle of the ride lasts 2 minutes and 30 seconds.[38]

World records[edit]

Steel Vengeance broke 10 world records when it opened:[39]

  • World's tallest hybrid roller coaster at 205 feet (62 m)
  • World's fastest hybrid roller coaster at 74 miles per hour (119 km/h)
  • World's steepest drop on a hybrid roller coaster at 90 degrees
  • World's longest drop on a hybrid roller coaster at 200 feet (61 m)
  • World's longest hybrid roller coaster at 5,740 feet (1,750 m)
  • Most inversions on a hybrid roller coaster at 4
  • Fastest airtime hill on a hybrid roller coaster at 74 miles per hour (119 km/h)
  • Most airtime on a hybrid roller coaster at 27.2 seconds
  • Most airtime on any roller coaster at 27.2 seconds
  • World's first "hyper-hybrid" roller coaster

Comparison[edit]

StatisticMean StreakSteel Vengeance
Operating yearsMay 11, 1991–September 16, 2016May 5, 2018–present
ManufacturerDinn CorporationRocky Mountain Construction
DesignerCurtis D. SummersAlan Schilke
Track TypeWoodSteel
Height161 ft or 49 m205 ft or 62 m
Drop155 ft or 47 m200 ft or 61 m
Length5,427 ft or 1,654 m5,740 ft or 1,750 m
Speed65 mph or 105 km/h74 mph or 119 km/h
Duration3:132:30
Inversions04
Height Requirement48 inches52 inches

Reception[edit]

Writers from The Pantagraph stated that Mean Streak was "the best-kept-secret at Cedar Point," as it was located at the very back of the park.[40] The ride was also featured on the Today show in 1992 in connection with the 100th anniversary of roller coasters.[41]

Mean Streak had been ranked as one of the most popular wooden roller coasters in the world. It has ranked in the top 50 nine times since the Golden Ticket Awards were introduced in 1998. The ride was not ranked in the other seasons.

In 2018, Steel Vengeance was awarded "Best New Ride" by Amusement Today as part of the annual Golden Ticket Awards.[42]

Incidents[edit]

See also: Incidents at Cedar Fair parks

During opening day on May 5, 2018, Steel Vengeance was temporarily closed following a minor collision between two trains.[61][62] As a train was reentering the station, it "lightly bumped" another parked train.[62] Four riders were treated for minor injuries and later returned to the park.[62][63] The coaster resumed operation with only a single train, while the manufacturer investigated the issue and made modifications.[64][65] The park temporarily removed the ride from its Fast Lane Plus lineup and considered timed boarding passes as a result of its limited capacity.[64] Normal, two train operation resumed on June 1, 2018.[66] The ride was added back to the Fast Lane Plus lineup on June 2.

On July 21, 2018, a 17-year-old boy was arrested and charged with a misdemeanor for throwing a hot sauce packet at a moving train. Seven people were treated by the park's EMS after the packet exploded and hit them in the face and eyes.[67]

On August 10, 2018, a tire from the drive system located near the brake run became detached and landed near the queue. The ride was then evacuated and reopened later that same evening.[68]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^"A Steel Vengeance Update – Cedar Point". www.cedarpoint.com. Retrieved 2018-04-21.
  2. ^"'Mean Streak' named". Portsmouth Daily Times. October 24, 1990. Retrieved February 23, 2013.
  3. ^"Cedar Point adds waterfront restaurant and pool complex". The Daily Sentinel. December 7, 1990. Retrieved February 23, 2013.
  4. ^"Stacked Wood". The Vindicator. April 4, 1991. Retrieved February 23, 2013.
  5. ^ abcdeMarden, Duane. "Mean Streak  (Cedar Point)". Roller Coaster DataBase. Retrieved October 16, 2012.
  6. ^Urbanowicz, Steve (2004). The Cheapskate's Guide to Them. New York, New York: Kensington Publishing. p. 85. ISBN .
  7. ^ ab"Cedar Point Timeline". PointBuzz. Retrieved October 16, 2012.
  8. ^Marden, Duane. "Dinn Corporation". Roller Coaster DataBase. Retrieved February 23, 2013.
  9. ^ abc"Cedar Point Park develops Mean Streak". The Vindicator. May 6, 1991. Retrieved February 23, 2013.
  10. ^ ab"Mean Streak". Ultimate Rollercoaster. Retrieved October 16, 2012.
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  12. ^"Goodbye Mean Streak". Cedar Point. Archived from the original on August 1, 2016. Retrieved August 1, 2016.
  13. ^Pevos, Edward (August 1, 2016). "'Mean Streak' coaster at Cedar Point will close for good next month". MLive. Retrieved August 1, 2016.
  14. ^Glaser, Susan (August 1, 2016). "Cedar Point says massive wooden coaster Mean Streak will close; fans hope for steel-track remake". The Plain Dealer. Retrieved August 1, 2016.
  15. ^Haidet, Ryan (February 2, 2017). "Cedar Point changes its long-used logo: See the new design". WKYC. Retrieved February 12, 2017.
  16. ^James, Daniel (January 23, 2017). "What Type Of Roller Coaster Can We Expect From Cedar Fair In 2018?". INSCMagazine. Retrieved February 12, 2017.
  17. ^ abBybee, Taylor (April 3, 2017). "One of the Worst Roller Coasters in the World is About to Become the Best". Huffington Post. Retrieved April 13, 2017.
  18. ^Eccentric Gamer (2017-06-02), Cedar Point 2017/2018: RMC Mean Streak Teaser 2: "They're Wild and Unruly." (#TheyreComing), retrieved 2017-06-19
  19. ^Point, Cedar (2017-07-05). "#TheyreComingpic.twitter.com/eOZq6bks3C". @cedarpoint. Retrieved 2017-07-05.
  20. ^TEGNA. "Cedar Point announces 'Steel Vengeance' RMC coaster for 2018 to replace Mean Streak". WKYC. Retrieved 2017-09-21.
  21. ^Minotti, Mike (August 16, 2017). "Cedar Point's next thrill ride debuts in Planet Coaster". Venture Beat. Retrieved August 16, 2017.
  22. ^Marden, Duane. "Raptor  (Cedar Point)". Roller Coaster DataBase. Retrieved July 29, 2018.
  23. ^Glaser, Susan (2019-02-24). "Cedar Point reverses policy, will allow cellphones in Steel Vengeance line". cleveland.com. Retrieved 2019-03-20.
  24. ^"Cedar Point adds metal detectors at Steel Vengeance roller coaster to enforce loose article policy".
  25. ^Glaser, Susan (2020-07-08). "Cedar Point opening day preview: Face masks, social distancing, HalloWeekends and more". cleveland.com. Retrieved 2020-07-20.
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  27. ^Clark, Tony (May 23, 2012). "Mean Streak isn't so mean". Cedar Point. Archived from the original on July 2, 2012. Retrieved October 16, 2012.
  28. ^Stoddart, S.L. (October 12, 2012). "Inside Cedar Point's Newest Haunted House 'Eden Musee'". CBS Detroit. CBS Corporation. Retrieved October 16, 2012.
  29. ^ ab"Services — Projects Around the Shop — Mean Streak". Philadelphia Toboggan Coasters. Retrieved October 17, 2012.
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  31. ^Cedar Point (May 23, 2012). "Official Mean Streak POV". YouTube. Retrieved October 17, 2012.
  32. ^"Cedar Point considers plan to shorten lines for popular rides". Toledo Blade. May 27, 2000. Retrieved February 23, 2013.
  33. ^Marden, Duane. "Record Holders  (Statistic: Height, Type: Wood)". Roller Coaster DataBase. Retrieved July 14, 2015.
  34. ^Marden, Duane. "Record Holders  (Statistic: Speed, Type: Wood)". Roller Coaster DataBase. Retrieved July 14, 2015.
  35. ^Marden, Duane. "Record Holders  (Statistic: Length, Type: Woodl)". Roller Coaster DataBase. Retrieved July 14, 2015.
  36. ^Marden, Duane. "Record Holders  (Statistic: Drop, Type: Wood)". Roller Coaster DataBase. Retrieved July 14, 2015.
  37. ^"Cedar Point back with a 'Vengeance'".
  38. ^Cedar Point (April 25, 2018). "Steel Vengeance – Official POV". Retrieved August 12, 2019 – via YouTube.
  39. ^"Steel Vengeance | Hyper-Hybrid Roller Coaster | Cedar Point".
  40. ^"Cedar Point rolls out scream after scream". The Pantagraph. June 30, 1996.
  41. ^"'Today' at Cedar Point". Toledo Blade. June 25, 1992. Retrieved February 23, 2013.
  42. ^"Amusement Today – Golden Ticket Awards 2018"(PDF). Amusement Today. 22 (6.2): 10. September 2018. Retrieved September 9, 2018.
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  44. ^"Top 25 wood Roller Coasters"(PDF). Amusement Today: 6B. August 1999. Retrieved September 14, 2013.
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  53. ^"Top 50 wood Roller Coasters"(PDF). Amusement Today. 12 (6.2): 42–43. September 2008. Archived from the original(PDF) on October 19, 2013. Retrieved September 14, 2013.
  54. ^"Top 50 wood Roller Coasters"(PDF). Amusement Today. 13 (6.2): 38–39. September 2009. Archived from the original(PDF) on October 19, 2013. Retrieved September 14, 2013.
  55. ^"Top 50 wood Roller Coasters"(PDF). Amusement Today. 14 (6.2): 38–39. September 2010. Archived from the original(PDF) on October 19, 2013. Retrieved September 14, 2013.
  56. ^"Top 50 wood Roller Coasters"(PDF). Amusement Today. 15 (6.2): 46–47. September 2011. Archived from the original(PDF) on October 19, 2013. Retrieved September 14, 2013.
  57. ^"Top 50 wood Roller Coasters"(PDF). Amusement Today. 16 (6.2): 46–47. September 2012. Retrieved September 14, 2013.
  58. ^"2013 Top 50 wood Roller Coasters"(PDF). Amusement Today. 17 (6.2): 40–41. September 2013. Archived from the original(PDF) on October 19, 2013. Retrieved September 14, 2013.
  59. ^"2018 Top 50 Steel Coasters". Golden Ticket Awards. Amusement Today. September 2018. Retrieved September 11, 2018.
  60. ^"2019 Top Steel". Golden Ticket Awards. Amusement Today. September 2019. Retrieved September 11, 2018.
  61. ^"Minor collision temporarily shuts Cedar Point's new Steel Vengeance roller coaster". The Columbus Dispatch. May 7, 2018. Retrieved May 11, 2018.
  62. ^ abcKoziol, Brandon. "Cedar Point's new 'Steel Vengeance' roller coaster closed after two trains collide". WFMJ. Frankly Media and WFMJ. Retrieved 5 May 2018.
  63. ^Pevos, Edward (May 5, 2018). "Steel Vengeance back open after accident closed it on opening day at Cedar Point". mlive.com. Retrieved May 11, 2018.
  64. ^ abJackson, Tom. "Steel Vengeance will return, but with one train". Sandusky Register. Retrieved May 10, 2018.
  65. ^Dietz, Justin (June 1, 2018). "Steel Vengeance returns to multi-train operation". Sandusky Register. Retrieved June 20, 2018.
  66. ^Glaser, Susan (June 1, 2018). "Cedar Point adds second train to Steel Vengeance, Fast Lane Plus coming Saturday". The Plain Dealer. Retrieved June 20, 2018.
  67. ^Addeo, Brandon (July 23, 2018). "Report: Boy threw hot sauce at Steel Vengeance train, injures riders". Sandusky Register. Retrieved July 29, 2018.
  68. ^Dietz, Justin (August 12, 2018). "Update: Steel Vengeance reopens after shutting down Friday". Sandusky Register. Retrieved September 2, 2018.

External links[edit]

Preceded by

Texas Giant

World's Tallest Wooden Roller Coaster
May 1991 – March 1992
Succeeded by

Rattler

Sours: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Steel_Vengeance
Coaster Idiots Ride Steel Vengeance (Before the Collision)

There was a lot of it, it was thick and hot. When he finished, I sucked his head with sperm in my mouth, and then I swallowed everything. The finish was not disgusting, but tart. Probably the guy hasn't had sex for a long time.

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Of this town. With such an appearance, it was not difficult for her to get to know a wealthy person. One evening she went to the most expensive restaurant, put on a formal suit, put on a daring make-up, sat down at a table. And ordered red wine and fruit.



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