Outland hatch covers

Outland hatch covers DEFAULT
September 2016

After nearly a year in service, 2-thumbs up and nothing I would suggest they do differently. A great product that is both durable and sharp looking.

Measure carefully (they are all custom cut), clean the hatch, and install on a warmish day.


Press the buttons on firmly.


 This one is located near the base of the mast, and thus, I've stepped on it many times.


Kind of pricey, but they do a nice job of keeping the sun out (the cabin is significantly cooler and the AC works less) and they can be left in place sailing. Although I would try not to step on hatches on principle, this hatch is at the mast, I stand near there every time I hoist or reef. As a result, they've been stepped on roughly a good many times in rough weather. Not at all slippery and evidently durable. One owner (Boat Galley.com) reported dropping a wrench from the masthead, saving the lens from a certain crack. The only evidence was a tiny dent.

March, 2018

After 5 years on the PDQ, I liked them so much (they are still like new), I added one to my F-24. The forward hatch gets stepped on a good bit and the cover offer some insulation, keeping the cabin warmer in the winter and much cooler in the summer. The the hatch lens will last longer (no UV), making it worthwhile for that reason alone.





Sours: http://sail-delmarva.blogspot.com/2018/03/outland-hatch-covers.html?m=1
September 2016

After nearly a year in service, 2-thumbs up and nothing I would suggest they do differently. A great product that is both durable and sharp looking.

Measure carefully (they are all custom cut), clean the hatch, and install on a warmish day.


Press the buttons on firmly.


 This one is located near the base of the mast, and thus, I've stepped on it many times.


Kind of pricey, but they do a nice job of keeping the sun out (the cabin is significantly cooler and the AC works less) and they can be left in place sailing. Although I would try not to step on hatches on principle, this hatch is at the mast, I stand near there every time I hoist or reef. As a result, they've been stepped on roughly a good many times in rough weather. Not at all slippery and evidently durable. One owner (Boat Galley.com) reported dropping a wrench from the masthead, saving the lens from a certain crack. The only evidence was a tiny dent.

March, 2018

After 5 years on the PDQ, I liked them so much (they are still like new), I added one to my F-24. The forward hatch gets stepped on a good bit and the cover offer some insulation, keeping the cabin warmer in the winter and much cooler in the summer. The the hatch lens will last longer (no UV), making it worthwhile for that reason alone.





Sours: http://sail-delmarva.blogspot.com/2018/03/outland-hatch-covers.html?utm_source=feedburner&utm_medium=feed&utm_campaign=Feed%3A+SailDelmarva+%28Sail+Delmarva%29
  1. Huskemaw scope review
  2. Central hudson outage
  3. 8 sofa legs
  4. Judaica crown heights
  5. Watercolor postcards ideas

Outland Hatch Covers, Part 2

We’ve had our Outland Hatch Covers for about a year and a half now, and we love the way that they keep the inside of the boat cool and don’t have to be removed to go sailing or if a squall threatens. They protect the hatches from crazing and clouding, and only took about 5 minutes to install.

A few days ago, a friend here in the harbor right now called us and thanked us profusely for recommending the hatch covers, which they bought about 6 months ago. And yes, they liked how cool they kept the boat. But there was another reason . . .

It seems that another friend was helping them do some work on a wind instrument at the top of the mast. And despite taking numerous precautions, the guy at the top of the mast dropped a hammer to the deck.

Well, actually not to the deck . . . but smack dab onto a hatch.

38 feet. Full-size hammer.

The only damage? A gouge in the hatch cover. Well, that and a lost hammer.  It bounced on the hatch cover and over the lifeline into the water.

But the hatch didn’t break . . . or even get a scratch on it.

(Note: this story also illustrates why you never, ever stand near the mast when someone is working at the top of the mast — even a dropped screw is going to hurt if it hits you!)

Okay, you’re not going to buy hatch covers “just in case” someone drops a tool from the top of the mast. And Outland Hatch Covers isn’t going to guarantee that their covers will always protect in situations like that. But I have to say that I like the idea that these covers provide more protection than a fabric hatch cover does.

We’ve left the hatch covers in place during at least five squalls where it blew 40 knots or more. They stayed perfectly in place, tight against the hatch. The fasteners didn’t budge.

The Outland brothers told me that someone else had them hold through a hurricane (they were accidentally left on), although they recommend that you remove the covers when winds are expected to be over 50 knots — or when crossing oceans.

Also, when I told the Outland brothers — James, Steve and Bob — about the hammer hit, they gave me a little bit of info. Should you ever need to replace a cover that they already have the measurements for, you can do so very quickly and at a reduced price: $15 for the smallest up to $30 for the largest. Two other benefits: since they are all white and don’t change color in the sun, the replacement will match the originals perfectly; and since it’s made from the same pattern, the fasteners will line up perfectly with the new one!

Read my first post about our Outland Hatch Covers here or just go straight to their website here. They have some of the best customer service of any company I’ve ever dealt with, too!

Find this helpful? Share and save:

Some links above (including all Amazon links) are affiliate links, meaning that I earn from qualifying purchases. Learn more.

Filed Under: Buying a Boat & GearTagged With: Boat Gear

Sours: https://theboatgalley.com/outland-hatch-covers-part-2/

Ultra-violet light is a relentless villain that destroys vinyl, gelcoat, paint, and lines, bit by bit. The best we can do is delay the inevitable for a season or two with regular maintenance chores like waxing and preventative measures like covering eisenglass or Lexan. Windows, both soft vinyl and the rigid polycarbonate or acrylic sort, are particularly vulnerable and expensive. To protect them, we use light-proof hatch covers, which reduce heat in the summer and provide insulation in the winter.

Hatch covers should be quick and easy to remove, easy to clean, and durable; and its a big plus if they remain in place underway and while the hatches are open. We recently came across an interesting product from Outland Hatch Covers (OHC) that looked like it would fit all of the criteria, so we decided to put a few samples through their paces on cabintop hatches aboard a PDQ 32.

The North Carolina-based company manufactures low-profile PVC covers that fit directly to the Lexan glass. The white PVC reflects ultraviolet light (UV) and is UV resistant. The cover even floats, if its dropped overboard.

Outland Hatch Covers
Fitting and installation

Outland covers promise easy removal, a custom fit for even low-profile hatches, and ease of installation. While OHC can produce many covers from manufacturer data sheets, the maker recommends taking your own measurements using their guide and taking a few pictures to avoid any ambiguity. We did as they suggested, and the fit was spot-on; both covers fit well, right side up (there is no top) and inverted.

Fabricated from expanded PVC, they are attached with two or four patented, twist-locking, self-adhesive circles, or buttons; the number depends on size and whether external handles must be incorporated. (The covers can slide under external handles.)

Installation takes just a few minutes and is made easier by watching Outland Hatch Covers simple installation video on the OHC website. First, clean the lenses: Simply wash them with a solution of 1 tablespoon of dishwashing liquid in 5 cups of water; rinse and dry well. Press the buttons firmly into place using the cover as a guide. It takes three days for the buttons to reach peak strength, and warm, dry weather is recommended for those three days. Testers found the process-which was carried out at anchor-completely painless.

 Outland covers
What We Found

OHC recommends that the hatches be removed for offshore sailing, but said that they can remain in place for coastal passages. We left ours in place for two years of sailing on Chesapeake Bay, through numerous squalls and some rough weather. Located near the foot of the mast, the covers we tested got stepped on a lot while we were handling sails. Occasionally, a cover lock was accidentally opened with the twisting motion of a shoe, but the covers were never damaged, never came off, and never even lifted a corner. We never caught a hatch covers corner with sheets or halyards, nor did we ever snag a line.

Testers noted that with the covers, the cabin was significantly cooler in the summer and warmer in the winter. We are very satisfied with the convenience they offered on hatches that had resisted all previous efforts with canvas covers.

The fixed windows on the test boat are fitted with snap-on canvas covers and the vinyl hardtop windows are covered either with snap-on covers or non-contact awnings; these offered a good comparison to the OHC covers. For the fixed windows-our wraparound view from the salon-we like our snap-on canvas covers because the attachment fittings are on the frame and do not obstruct the view. OHC covers cannot be applied to flexible vinyl windows, so canvas remains the standby, either snap-on for skylights or awnings for the front and side curtains. While the awnings must be removed underway, they do have the added advantage of deflecting rain. On the other hand, the OHC covers look slick and custom, shed dirt far better than canvas, add more insulation, and do not affect hatch operation. Thats a lot for us to like.

Bottom line

For appropriate hatches-and the range is wide-the Outland Hatch Covers offer a durable, attractive, easy, and trouble-free solution. We Recommend Outland Hatch Covers. Considering the cost of Lexan lens replacement due to UV damage, the covers (about $40 to $80 each) seem like smart money.

Sours: https://www.practical-sailor.com/belowdecks-amenities/outland-hatch-covers-impress

Hatch covers outland

Outland Hatch Covers

Dave and I both really like our new Outland Hatch Covers. They look great, were simple to install and even easier to use. [UPDATE: After over a year of use, they still look as good as when we installed them. No problems whatsoever!]

Our previous boat, Que Tal, had fabric covers and were much harder to use. Over time, the fabric shrunk and the covers became progressively harder to put on and get snapped — in fact, we often had to leave one or more snaps unfastened. And we couldn’t leave them in place and open the hatches. That meant that there was no way to block the light but still get air in the boat.

Getting ready to cruise? Prepare to Cruise (a FREE mini-course) gives you lots of free resources along with affordable recommended courses and coaching for more in-depth needs.

Outland Hatch Covers take care of all those problems. Full disclosure: OHC is a sponsor of The Boat Galley and provided two of our covers free for review purposes. We purchased the other two and we are delighted with them. Yes, we’d buy them again.

The covers are a flat piece of a special type of PVC, custom cut to fit your hatches exactly. While all four of our Bomar hatches are the same model, OHC knew that these Bomar hatches tend to vary some in the handle placement — so they had me take a couple of measurements on each hatch, then cut each one slightly differently to match up. WOW!

They attach with a neat proprietary twist fastener that is permanently attached to your hatch.

So why do we like them so much?

  • We can leave the hatches open yet block the sun coming in through the glass (Lexan). Even though the hatches are tinted, it heats up the boat — and puts a nasty glare on computer screens. No more!
  • On cool days, if we want the sun to warm up the boat, it takes just a couple of minutes to remove all four covers. Much faster than the cloth covers.
  • The covers can stay in place for normal coastal cruising, although not for ocean passages. No taking them off every time we go out and putting them back on when we anchor up again. Not only is it one less chore, but the boat stays much cooler underway.
  • They are going to be great when we store our boat this summer. Last year we used Reflectix on the inside of all the windows and hatches. Later we learned from other Gemini owners that this can lead to warping of the Lexan in the hatches and then to leaking hatches — the sun passes through the Lexan, then is reflected off the Reflectix and back through the hatch. It’s much better for the hatch to have sunproof covers on the outside — and they keep the boat cooler, too. Since the OHC covers are on the outside, we won’t have to make anything different for the summer. Not only will they be better, it’ll be a big time saver, too.
  • They’re not going to come off accidentally. Outland says they’ll stay on in a 50-knot blow. We haven’t tested this (and I hope not to).

These are solid covers that don’t let any light in when the hatches are closed. Well, actually, there is a tiny bit of light around the fasteners and the handles, but it is tiny.

A few photos of our covers — inside and out — a few photos with tips on installing them and then a video from OHC on installing the covers. It took me maybe 15 minutes to install all four of ours, including cleaning the hatches.

The outside appearance:

Outland Boat Hatch Covers: Hatch covers that are easy to install and use, don't shrink over time and can stay on even underway? YES!

Inside, almost no light enters when the hatch is closed (there’s a weird reflection in the photo, but the only light that comes in is around the circular cut outs for the handles).

Outland Boat Hatch Covers: Hatch covers that are easy to install and use, don't shrink over time and can stay on even underway? YES!

I marked the covers so we’d know which one went on which hatch when we took them off and on. Mark in the little tabs that’ll go under the fasteners and no one will ever see the markings (I used P for port, S for starboard; F for forward and A for aft).

Outland Boat Hatch Covers: Hatch covers that are easy to install and use, don't shrink over time and can stay on even underway? YES!

I used blue tape to hold the covers exactly in place while I installed the fasteners. I found they slid just a bit otherwise.

Outland Boat Hatch Covers: Hatch covers that are easy to install and use, don't shrink over time and can stay on even underway? YES!

Here’s the company video showing how to install them. I was surprised at how easy it was!

To see more about the hatch covers, visit Outland Hatch Covers. Pricing and ordering information is here.

Pin it now! Save it for later!

Boat hatch covers that are easy to install and use, don't shrink over time and can stay on even underway? YES!

Are you preparing to cruise? Check out my free mini-course for help with all you need to learn:

Find this helpful? Share and save:

Some links above (including all Amazon links) are affiliate links, meaning that I earn from qualifying purchases. Learn more.

Filed Under: Buying a Boat & GearTagged With: Boat Gear, Prepare

Sours: https://theboatgalley.com/outland-hatch-covers/
Hatch Covers for boats by Outland Hatch Covers

The guy nodded. So why don't you marry me. - she finished. Then you can fuck me as much as you want, and everyone will be happy. Wait, but what about Olya.

Now discussing:

I went to the shower, unsatisfied. What selfish men you are, everything to yourself and yourself, - she stopped at the door of the shower and stuck her tongue out. At him.



351 352 353 354 355