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Cucumber Testing Tutorial

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Cucumber Testing Tutorial

Cucumber is a widely used tool for Behaviour Driven Development because it provides an easily understandable testing script for system acceptance and automation testing.

Our Cucumber testing tutorial provides basic and advanced concepts of Cucumber testing. This Cucumber testing tutorial is designed for beginners and professionals.

In this tutorial, you will find all crucial terminologies such as Behaviour Driven Development, Feature File, Scenario, Step Definition, Tag, etc of cucumber testing.

Prerequisite

Before learning software testing, you should have basic knowledge software testing, System behaviour, and hand-on experience of some testing tools.

Audience

This tutorial is designed for testing professionals such as developers, analysts, and testers who are intending to learn the fundamentals of Cucumber and want to put it into practice.

Problems

We assure you that you will not find any problem with this Cucumber Testing Tutorial. But if there is any problem or misunderstanding, please post the problem in the contact form.


Next TopicCucumber Testing Introduction



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Sours: https://www.javatpoint.com/cucumber-testing

Cucumber Testing Tutorial Summary


Behavior Driven Development (BDD) is a rising methodology to test and check your code. Cucumber framework is a flagship BDD tool. This online guide will help you learn Cucumber Basics.

What should I know?

Nothing! This is an absolute beginner training for Cucumber automation. Ruby and Java is used for code.

Cucumber Testing Syllabus

👉 TutorialWhat is Cucumber Testing Tool? Complete Introduction
👉 TutorialHow to Download & Install CUCUMBER in Windows
👉 TutorialWhat is Cucumber Feature File & Step Definition? (with Example)
👉 TutorialWhat is Gherkin? Write Gherkin Test in Cucumber
👉 TutorialCreate your First Cucumber Script (2 Examples)
👉 TutorialTop 20 Cucumber Interview Questions & Answers
Sours: https://www.guru99.com/cucumber-tutorials.html
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Cucumber Tutorial

Cucumber Tutorial

Cucumber is a testing tool that supports Behavior Driven Development (BDD) framework. It defines application behavior using simple English text, defined by a language called Gherkin.

Cucumber allows automation functional validation that is easily read and understood. Cucumber was initially implemented in Ruby and then extended to Java framework. Both the tools support native JUnit.

This tutorial is fairly comprehensive and covers all the necessary aspects on Cucumber using examples for easy understanding.

This tutorial is designed for software professionals such as analysts, developers, and testers who are keen on learning the fundamentals of Cucumber and want to put it into practice.

Before proceeding with this tutorial, you need to have a basic knowledge on testing as well as some hands-on experience of some testing tools. You should have a commanding knowledge on Java, and some familiarity with JUnit and Ruby.

Sours: https://www.tutorialspoint.com/cucumber/index.htm

Cucumber Java Tutorial

In this tutorial, you will learn what is a Cucumber Framework, the advantages of Cucumber and how to get started with this Cucumber Java Tutorial.

What is Cucumber?

Cucumber is a testing framework which supports Behavior Driven Development (BDD). It lets us define application behavior in plain meaningful English text using a simple grammar defined by a language called Gherkin. Cucumber itself is written in Ruby, but it can be used to “test” code written in Ruby or other languages including but not limited to Java, C# and Python.

TDD vs BDD

  • TDD is an iterative development process. Each iteration starts with a set of tests written for a new piece of functionality. These tests are supposed to fail during the start of iteration as there will be no application code corresponding to the tests. In the next phase of the iteration Application code is written with an intention to pass all the tests written earlier in the iteration. Once the application code is ready tests are run.
  • Behavior Driven testing is an extension of TDD. Like in TDD in BDD also we write tests first and the add application code. The major difference that we get to see here are
    • Tests are written in plain descriptive English type grammar
    • Tests are explained as behavior of application and are more user focused
    • Using examples to clarify requirements

What is Gherkin?

Gherkin is a simple, lightweight and structured language which uses regular spoken language to describe requirements and scenarios. By regular spoken language we mean English, French and around 30 more languages.

​Common Problems solved by Gherkin language:

  1. Different teams in the project need a common language to express requirements. This language should be simple enough to be understood by Business team members and should be explicit enough to remove most of the ambiguities for developers and testers.
  2. This language should open up the thinking of team members to come up with more scenarios. As you express more details you try to visualize the system more and hence you end up making more user scenarios.
  3. This language should be good enough to be used as project documentation.

Example of Gherkin:

Feature: Search tutorials in JavaPointers Scenario: A user search for a tutorial, the user related content results should be displayed in UI Given User is on the main page of www.javapointers.com When User search for Cucumber Java Tutorial Then search page should be displayed with related contents

Getting Started with Cucumber in Java

Here’s an example of a simple cucumber java tutorial. Create a Maven Project. You can read our guide here if you don’t know how to create one.

In your pom.xml, add the cucumber dependencies:

<dependency>     <groupId>io.cucumber</groupId>     <artifactId>cucumber-java</artifactId>      <version>4.4.0</version>     <scope>test</scope> </dependency> <dependency>     <groupId>io.cucumber</groupId>     <artifactId>cucumber-junit</artifactId>      <version>4.4.0</version>     <scope>test</scope> </dependency>

Then create the test resources folder in the src > test location.

Next, set up your Project Structure. Go to File > Project Structure > Modules. Expand the tree and select the created resources folder and click Test Resources icon.

Install the necessary plugins in IntelliJ. Go to File > Settings and select the Plugins section.

  • Cucumber for Java
  • Cucumber for Groovy (Optional)
  • Gherkin

Now we can create our feature file. Right-click the test resources folder, select New > File. You can name it anything but set the extension as .feature. For example, here is my string-palindrome.feature file:

Feature: Determine if String is Palindrome or not. A string is a palindrome if it reads the same backwards as forwards. Scenario: Valid Palindrome Given I entered string "Refer" When I test it for Palindrome Then the result should be "true" Scenario: Invalid Palindrome Given I entered string "Coin" When I test it for Palindrome Then the result should be "false"

Create a new package or folder under src/main/test/java by right-clicking the java folder and select New > Package. Add any folder name and hit the OK button. This will be the package where all your step definitions will be saved.

Next, we will add the Step Definitions. You can quickly add it by placing the cursor on the yellow highlighted string and press ALT + ENTER in keyboard (This might be different if you’re using other key mappings in IntelliJ).

This will show a popup on where you want to add the step definitions. Browse or enter the package that we have created earlier, and select if you want to use Java or Groovy. Repeat this until you created all the needed step definitions or until there is no warning (yellow) mark in your feature file.

Add your logic for each step definition that was created. For example, here’s the logic that we have added:

package cucumber; import cucumber.api.java.en.Given; import cucumber.api.java.en.Then; import cucumber.api.java.en.When; import org.junit.Assert; public class PalindromeStepDef { private String testPalindrome; private boolean isPalindrome; @Given("I entered string {string}") public void iEnteredString(String toTest) { testPalindrome = toTest; } @When("I test it for Palindrome") public void iTestItForPalindrome() { isPalindrome = testPalindrome.equalsIgnoreCase(new StringBuilder(testPalindrome).reverse().toString()); } @Then("the result should be {string}") public void theResultShouldBe(String result) { boolean expectedResult = Boolean.parseBoolean(result); if (expectedResult) { Assert.assertTrue(isPalindrome); } else { Assert.assertFalse(isPalindrome); } } }

Finally, we can now run our feature file. Go to your feature file and right-click > Run Feature. This should start Cucumber and run your test.

You can download the source we used in our example using this link.

That’s it for this simple Cucumber Java Tutorial. In our next post, we will learn how to use Scenario Outline in Cucumber. Let us know in the comments if this helps you to get started in the cucumber framework!

Share this tutorial!

Sours: https://javapointers.com/automation/cucumber/cucumber-java-tutorial/

Java tutorial cucumber

Hello everyone. Welcome to an all new course on Cucumber with Java.

I'm Giridhar Rajkumar and I will be your course instructor. I'm very excited about publishing this course and I would like to thank Angie Jones for giving me this opportunity to teach you via Test Automation University once again.

Now let's get straight to the course overview.

This course is designed for people who are new to Cucumber and are eager to implement the Cucumber fashion test automation for their application.



# Behavior Driven Development

As always, first we will get some basic knowledge on the behavior driven development concept.

Then we will learn about the Three Amigos process which is one of the main activities performed during the Sprints.


# Cucumber Basics

Following that, we will start learning about Cucumber, which I'm personally using for years now.

We will get to know what Cucumber is, and a specialized language called Gherkin, which will help us to achieve effective requirements mapping, along with examples.

We will also be learning about what a Feature File is and the structure in which it has to be written.

Also, we are going to see Scenarios, Scenario Outlines, and then we will get into Step Definitions. We will also be learning about Cucumber Hooks.


Gherkin Scenarios play an important role in understanding the requirements between the developers, testers and business analysts and hence, it is very important for us to know how to write the Gherkin Scenario.

We will learn about some good practices to write the Gherkins that are highly effective.


# Cucumber Test Automation Using Selenium and JUnit

Now, the most exciting part — Cucumber with Selenium.



Yes, we will learn how we can automate a demo banking application with various features in it.

We will learn how to write a Gherkin scenario for a Feature and make it reusable. When I say reusable, I mean that we will start learning how we can use the concepts of Scenario Outline, Data Tables, and Data Lists.

Following that, we will start focusing on the advanced level concepts like sharing states and dependency injection.

We will also be looking at how to execute the Scenarios in parallel so that we can save a lot of time and effort.

Lastly, we will see the reporting. Pretty reporting is a common kind of reporting and we will see how to generate and analyze it.


# Tools and Versions



Next, the tools part.

If you are new to Java or Selenium, I would highly recommend you go through the courses, Selenium WebDriver with Java and Java Programming by Angie Jones in Test Automation University.

Throughout the scores, we will be using Eclipse IDE as the editor.

We will use Cucumber JVM 5.0.0 RC 2 version, Selenium WebDriver version 3.141.59, and JUnit as our testing framework.

So, with these topics, I hope you will enjoy this course.

Now without any ado, let's get started.

Resources

Sours: https://testautomationu.applitools.com/cucumber-java-tutorial/
BDD for Beginners 1 - What is BDD with Examples - How BDD works - What is Cucumber

Create an empty Cucumber project

In this quick tutorial you will learn how to:

  • Install Cucumber
  • Write your first Scenario using the Gherkin syntax
  • Write your first step definition in JavaJavaScriptKotlinRuby
  • Run Cucumber
  • Learn the basic workflow of Behaviour-Driven Development (BDD)

We’ll use Cucumber to develop a small library that can figure out whether it’s Friday yet.

Please be aware that this tutorial assumes that you have a:

  • Basic understanding of the Java programming language
  • Basic understanding of the Gradle file
  • Basic understanding of the Kotlin programming language
  • Basic understanding of the Gradle file
  • Basic understanding of the Javascript programming language
  • Basic understanding of the Ruby programming language
  • Basic understanding of the Bundler tool and
  • Some experience using a terminal
  • Some experience using a text editor

Before we begin, you will need the following:

Open a terminal to verify that Node.js is installed properly:

Both of these commands should print a version number.

Open a terminal to verify that Ruby is installed properly:

Both of these commands should print a version number.

Decide whether you’d prefer to use Gradle or Maven.

With Maven

For Maven, we’ll start by creating a new project directory with the Maven plugin. Open a terminal, go to the directory where you want to create your project, and run the following command:

You should get something like the following result:

Change into the directory that was just created by running the following command:

Open the project in IntelliJ IDEA:

  • File -> Open… -> (Select the pom.xml)
  • Select Open as Project

With Gradle

One way to create this sample Cucumber project using Gradle is to convert the above generated Maven archetype into a Gradle project.

Run the following command from the directory:

Add following dependency configuration to your build.gradle file:

Add the following Task to your file:

Note that you also need to add the necessary dependencies/configurations to depending on which version of Gradle you are using. See the Build Tools section. If you follow this guide be sure to set your path to for this tutorial.

If you have not already, open the project in IntelliJ IDEA:

  • File -> Open… -> (Select build.gradle)
  • Select Open as Project

Decide whether you’d prefer to use Gradle or Maven.

With Maven

For Maven, we’ll start by creating a new project directory with the Maven plugin. Open a terminal, go to the directory where you want to create your project, and run the following command:

You should get something like the following result:

Change into the directory that was just created by running the following command:

Open the project in IntelliJ IDEA:

  • File -> Open… -> (Select the pom.xml)
  • Select Open as Project

With Gradle

One way to create this sample Cucumber project using Gradle is to convert the above generated Maven archetype into a Gradle project.

Run the following command from the directory:

Add following dependency configuration to your build.gradle file:

Add the following Task to your file:

Note that you also need to add the necessary dependencies/configurations to depending on which version of Gradle you are using. See the Build Tools section. If you follow this guide be sure to set your path to for this tutorial.

If you have not already, open the project in IntelliJ IDEA:

  • File -> Open… -> (Select build.gradle)
  • Select Open as Project

To use Kotlin, we need to add it to our project:

  • Add a directory named in your directory and mark it as . In IntelliJ, you can do so by right-clicking on the directory and selecting “Mark Directory as” > “Test Sources Root”.
  • Create the package inside the directory.
  • Create a Kotlin class called inside the package. IntelliJ might tell you that Kotlin is not configured; click “Configure”. Your should now look like this:
  • Copy the annotations from the class to the class. If you are using IntelliJ, it will offer to translate the Java code to Kotlin code. Otherwise you’ll have to write your own.

Your class should now look like this:

  • Now you can delete the class.
  • Create a Kotlin class called inside the package.
  • Copy the import statements from to ; you’ll need them later.
  • Finally, delete the class (or even the directory).

To use Kotlin in our project, we need to take some extra steps:

  • Add a directory named in your directory and mark it as . In IntelliJ, you can do so by right-clicking on the directory and selecting “Mark Directory as” > “Test Sources Root”.
  • Create the package inside the directory.
  • Create a Kotlin class called inside the package and copy the annotations from the class to the class. If you are using IntelliJ, it will offer to translate the Java code to Kotlin code. Otherwise you’ll have to write your own.

Your class should now look like this:

We’ll start by creating a new directory and an empty Node.js project.

Add Cucumber as a development dependency:

Open in a text editor and change the section so it looks like this:

Prepare the file structure:

Create a file called at the root of your project and add the following content:

Also, create a file called with the following content:

We’ll start by creating a new directory and an empty Ruby project.

Create a with the following content:

Install Cucumber and prepare the file structure:

You now have a small project with Cucumber installed.

To make sure everything works together correctly, let’s run Cucumber.

Maven:

Gradle:

Maven:

Gradle:

You should see something like the following:

Cucumber’s output is telling us that it didn’t find anything to run.

When we do Behaviour-Driven Development with Cucumber we use concrete examples to specify what we want the software to do. Scenarios are written before production code. They start their life as an executable specification. As the production code emerges, scenarios take on a role as living documentation and automated tests.

Try running an Example Mapping workshop in your team to design examples together.

In Cucumber, an example is called a scenario. Scenarios are defined in files, which are stored in the directory (or a subdirectory).

One concrete example would be that Sunday isn’t Friday.

Create an empty file called with the following content:

The first line of this file starts with the keyword followed by a name. It’s a good idea to use a name similar to the file name.

The second line is a brief description of the feature. Cucumber does not execute this line because it’s documentation.

The fourth line, is a scenario, which is a concrete example illustrating how the software should behave.

The last three lines starting with , and are the steps of our scenario. This is what Cucumber will execute.

Now that we have a scenario, we can ask Cucumber to execute it.

Maven:

Gradle:

Maven:

Gradle:

Cucumber is telling us we have one scenario and three steps. It’s also suggesting some snippets of code that we can use to define these steps:

Copy each of the three snippets for the undefined steps and paste them into .

Unfortunately, Cucumber does not generate snippets in Kotlin. But fortunately IntelliJ can convert the Java code to Kotlin code for you. You might need to improve the translated code, to make it more idiomatic. You might also need to add the following import statements (if you hadn’t already).

Your file should now look like this:

Run Cucumber again. This time the output is a little different:

Cucumber found our step definitions and executed them. They are currently marked as pending, which means we need to make them do something useful.

The next step is to do what the comments in the step definitions is telling us to do:

Write code here that turns the phrase above into concrete actions

Try to use the same words in the code as in the steps.

If the words in your steps originated from conversations during an Example Mapping session, you’re building a Ubiquitous Language, which we believe is a great way to make your production code and tests more understandable and easier to maintain.

Change your step definition code to this:

Run Cucumber again:

That’s progress! The first two steps are passing, but the last one is failing.

Let’s do the minimum we need to make the scenario pass. In this case, that means making our methodfunctionblockfunctionfunction return :

Run Cucumber again:

Congratulations! You’ve got your first green Cucumber scenario.

The next thing to test for would be that we also get the correct result when it is Friday.

Update the file:

We’ll need to add a step definition to set to “Friday”:

When we run this test, it will fail.

That is because we haven’t implemented the logic yet! Let’s do that next.

We should update our statement to actually evaluate whether or not is equal to .

Run Cucumber again:

So, we all know that there are more days in the week than just Sunday and Friday. Let’s update our scenario to use variables and evaluate more possibilities. We’ll use variables and examples to evaluate Friday, Sunday, and anything else!

Update the file. Notice how we go from to when we start using multiple .

We need to replace the step definitions for and with one step definition that takes the value of as a String. Update the file as follows:

Run Cucumber again:

Now that we have working code, we should do some refactoring:

  • We should move the methodfunctionblockfunctionfunction out from the test code into production code.

  • We could at some point extract helper methods from our step definition, for methodsfunctionsfunctionsblocks we use in several places.

In this brief tutorial you’ve seen how to install Cucumber, how to follow the BDD process to develop a methodfunctionblockfunctionfunction, and how to use that methodfunctionblockfunctionfunction to evaluate multiple scenarios!

Sours: https://cucumber.io/docs/guides/10-minute-tutorial/

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