First honey bandages

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Monofloral Means Pure

Running a Manuka honey farm can be a tricky business. That’s because bees will tend to harvest the nectar of every flower they find. In order to secure the potency of every tube and bandage of First Honey, every flower around here must be a Manuka flower. The bees only visit the sticky, thick, and sometimes difficult petals of this whitish pink blossom.

Small Beginnings

In the small town of Masterton, New Zealand, we have dedicated ourselves to a small and intimate family farm of Manuka trees. We are beekeepers, nature lovers, and evangelists of the healing properties of Manuka honey.

Research Based Healing

Through research and innovation, our First Honey team of chemists have uncovered the unique nourishing benefits of Methylglyoxal found within Manuka honey. From these discoveries of unparallelled antibacterial and wound healing properties, First Honey was born. Created for the moments in everyday life when you need safe and effective care for the ones you love.

Sours: https://www.amazon.com/Honey%C2%AE-Dressing-Medical-Chemical-Treatment/dp/B07G9V51D3

How I Heal Wounds Naturally With Manuka Honey

In my experience, the manuka honey wound gel draws out the pus in my wounds almost completely when covered with gauze and medical tape. This is one of the most important parts of the process for me because as my wounds drain, the amount of pain that I am in decreases substantially. Prior to using the wound gel, my pain is often around an 8 and after the gel has worked its’ magic, I am down to less than a 4. Plus, I find that my wounds don’t scar as bad as they heal which is helpful when they are located in places that may not always be hidden.

I choose products that work best for my lifestyle

After actively managing my HS over the past few years, I have noticed that I have an allergy to the adhesives used in traditional band-aid types of products. So, this meant that I was not willing to purchase the manuka honey bandages, but these could be a much easier option for those who are not sensitive to adhesives. Additionally, I found the wound healing gel to be a more economical product as I could get more uses out of this type of product because a little goes a long way. With the bandages, I would likely have to change them more often which would mean I would buy more in the long run. On the other hand, traditional bandages may be better to use in certain situations because they typically don’t move around as easily and may benefit those with a more active lifestyle.

Sours: https://hsdisease.com/living/manuka-honey
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First Honey Manuka Honey Adhesive Bandages 12 Pack | Latex Free, Antibiotic Free Wound Dressing | Medical Grade Honey Adhesive Pads | First Aid Care Burns, Cuts, Scrapes, Wounds, Lacerations

First Honey Manuka Honey Adhesive Bandages 12 Pack | Latex Free, Antibiotic Free Wound Dressing | Medical Grade Honey Adhesive Pads | First Aid Care Burns, Cuts, Scrapes, Wounds, Lacerations

FIRST HONEY

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Product Details

  • ACTIVE INGREDIENT - 100% active leptospermum scoparium. No fillers, chemical additives, or petroleum
  • A HEALING LAYER - Wound pads contain a healing layer of medical grade manuka honey. Highly antibacterial and encourages wounds, cuts, and scrapes to heal
  • FLEXIBLE, LATEX FREE - Won't irritate latex allergy, “ouchless” removal for sensitive skin types. Water resistant and keeps out the elements during wound healing
  • MEDICAL GRADE & ANTIBIOTIC FREE - The use of artificial antibiotics creates antibiotic resistant bacterial strains over time. First Honey sterile honey bandages are a natural healing alternative to antibiotic ointment like neosporin
  • FAMILY GROWN AND HARVESTED IN NEW ZEALAND - Our farms are monofloral, meaning there’s no cross pollination with other plants, resulting in the purest and highest quality rated active Manuka Honey available
Is Discontinued By Manufacturer ‏ : ‎No
Package Dimensions ‏ : ‎7.91 x 3.23 x 1.5 inches (20.1 x 8.2 x 3.8 cm); 0.63 Ounces (17.86 grams)
Manufacturer ‏ : ‎FIRST HONEY
ASIN ‏ : ‎B07G9R4KM7
BrandFIRST HONEY
Size12 Count (Pack of 1)
Item FormPads

Description

First Honey Manuka Honey Adhesive Bandages 12 Pack | Latex Free, Antibiotic Free Wound Dressing | Medical Grade Honey Adhesive Pads | First Aid Care Burns, Cuts, Scrapes, Wounds, Lacerations

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First aid bandages, First aid bandage, First Aid For Burn, First Aid Bandages, Explore pad healers for dogs, Explore healing salves for wounds

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Sours: https://www.ubuy.vn/en/product/CEQCCZ8-first-honey-manuka-honey-adhesive-bandages-12-pack-latex-free-antibiotic-free-wound-dressing-medical

How Honey Can Help Heal Wounds

A dollop of sweet, yummy goo made by bees — sounds pretty nice, and maybe a bit messy, but will it help stop an infection? Perhaps. The age-old elixir may actually be a modern-day remedy for wound healing, as antibiotics become less able to handle the infections we see.

Who Thought of Using Honey on Wounds?

Honey has been used since ancient times, from Egypt to China to Greece to the Middle East. It was used to treat sore throats, but also, at times, wounds. Today, it's used anywhere from San Francisco to Northern Nigeria. 

However, honey hasn't always been recognized as beneficial in wound care. In the past, it was seen as a natural remedy with little value. For years, it was not part of standard medical practice. Sterile honey was licensed for use as early 1999 in Australia and bandages with honey were licensed in the UK in 2004. The medical honey business is now worth millions of dollars for some companies.

Does Honey Actually Work?

There is growing evidence that honey does help with wound healing when placed on wounds. Many health practitioners use it in established medical facilities. However, given all of the different types of wounds, it is hard to gather the evidence and run the clinical trials needed to evaluate honey in all of these different settings.

The Cochrane Review, an important independent review group, reports: "Honey appears to heal partial thickness burns more quickly than conventional treatment (which included polyurethane film, paraffin gauze, soframycin-impregnated gauze, sterile linen and leaving the burns exposed) and infected post-operative wounds more quickly than antiseptics and gauze." This means that when multiple studies were analyzed, the Cochrane Review experts say that honey was helpful for some types of burns, even better than some common treatments, and that post-operative wounds improved with honey faster than with gauze and common antiseptics alone.

Types of Honey Used

There are particular types of honey that are used more often than others for wound healing. Research is still being done to determine what works best. Honey should be medical grade honey to avoid worries that it has bacteria or other additives or added allergens in it. Many use medical-grade honey that comes from Leptospermum honey like manuka and jelly bush honey.

Although honey does not support bacterial growth, it does contain spores. These spores can sprout into bacteria that can cause diseases like botulism, which we don't want. Botulism is also why parents are told not to feed their babies, honey. Medical-grade honey is treated (or irradiated) to ensure there are no spores, and also to ensure that no other disease-causing agents are present.

You also don't want sweet, uncovered honey that attracts flies or insects to a wound, so using bandages with medical-grade honey and prepared gels that include medical-grade honey is the way to go.

Is Medical Grade Honey Edible?

The honey discussed here is for placing on wounds, not for eating. Honey has sugar in it, and high levels of sugar are not helpful when treating infections, especially in those with diabetes.

How It Works

Bacteria doesn't grow well in honey. This is one of the reasons why honey can be helpful for wounds. In a way, the honey smothers bacteria. There are a lot of reasons for this.

  • Honey isn't particularly wet. It contains very little water, which the bacteria would need to grow.
  • Honey also contains hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) which helps fight bacteria. This is because the bees swallow the nectar and in their stomachs is an enzyme (glucose oxidase) that makes H2O2 (and gluconic acid) from the nectar, which the bees then regurgitate up, ending up in the honey we use. 
  • Honey is also very acidic. Its pH is about 3.9 (sometimes lower, sometimes higher, but always well below 7.0, the cut-off point for something to be basic instead of acidic).

This is also a great mixture because it's not too strong. Straight up H2O2 would be too strong for wounds, damaging healing tissue. Too acidic a substance would also damage young, growing tissue. 

How Honey Is Used on Wounds

First thing, seek professional medical help for any burns or wounds that might be serious, are getting worse, or not healing fast enough. Here's why:

  • Burns can be more serious than they seem. Burns that don't hurt so much can be the most damaging.
  • If you have an infected or very dirty wound, you may need surgery, debridement by a medical professional, and/or antibiotics. It is best not to wait and honey can't replace this.
  • Stitches may also be needed. If they are needed, the wound needs to be closed soon after injury, because of infection risk. It's important to have this done within hours and definitely within the same day.
  • A puncture wound, such as a bite from a cat's long incisors or from stepping on a nail, maybe more serious than it seems. You may need to have further treatment — antibiotics, a tetanus shot, debridement, or removal of foreign material that you can't see.
  • It's important that a wound is fully cleaned. If there is foreign material lodged in the wound, it's important to seek help in cleaning this wound. 
  • Wounds can also be more serious if you are diabetic or immunocompromised.
  • And do not forget your tetanus shot if you are not up-to-date. Check if you've had a vaccine in the last 5 years if you have a dirty or serious wound.

Keep wounds clean. Talk to a medical professional about how best to do this. It's also important that wounds do not dry out. Bandages can help keep them moist, without drying too much, and a health professional can help with this. It's also important to seek help with wounds, such as burns, that can stiffen and which may need help to keep tissue from contracting and becoming too tight as they heal.

It's important also to use precautions when handling wounds. You do not want to introduce bacteria or other germs into a wound, such as from your hands or even from gloves or bandages. You also do not want a wound to infect you. Use universal precautions when handling any open wounds, blood, or other body fluids from someone else to avoid any risk that you could be infected with any sort of infectious pathogen. This means using gloves when handling any sort of body fluid or open wound.

Wounds may need antibiotics. If the wound develops pus, new discharge, an abscess, new redness or pain around the wound edges, is slow to heal, or any other important signs or symptoms, you may need further treatment of the wound. This may mean debridement by a medical professional or antibiotics or other treatments.

Even if you seek care in a hospital, you may still be treated with honey. Many health facilities around the world do use honey as part of their wound care. You can talk to your healthcare professional about this.

All of this said simple wounds can now be treated with medical honey bandages, sold over the counter in many pharmacies and stores in the US and elsewhere. The honey may be already on the bandages or a gel containing medical-grade honey can be applied directly to the wound.

Types of Wounds Treated

Medical grade honey has been used on a lot of different types of wounds:

  • Wounds due to trauma and injury. These could be simple cuts or scrapes.
  • Wounds from burns.
  • Some wounds called pressure ulcers that can occur when someone lies in bed, not moving or being moved for a long time. This can occur when someone is very sick (such as in an intensive care unit), is paralyzed, elderly, or otherwise incapacitated (such as when under the influence).
  • Others wounds that develop when blood flow is not good, especially on the legs and especially in the elderly and, in some cases, smokers. This can include venous stasis ulcers and arterial insufficiency ulcers.
  • Wounds that occur in people with diabetes, especially on the feet. This happens especially when those with diabetes have nerve damage and don't feel a mild injury (such as from crumpled sock), which then leads to the slow healing wound.

Fighting Against Antimicrobial Resistance

The mismanagement and overuse of antibiotics have led to a looming problem — we're running out of the antibiotics needed to treat infections. Those infections that once responded to antibiotics now are their very own "honey badgers." The bacteria don't care; they keep growing in the face of antibiotics.

This happened, in part, because we often use antibiotics when we don't need them. Many took antibiotics "just in case." They may have taken antibiotics to avoid an infection that hadn't developed. They might have taken antibiotics when they thought they had an infection but didn't. With wounds, it is often hard to tell if there is an infection, so using

Honey offers the chance to treat infections, both resistant and not resistant to antibiotics. Bacteria that are resistant to antibiotics are rarely "Super Bugs." They rarely are any more powerful than any other bacteria and, in fact, sometimes are weaker. It's just that these resistant bugs do not respond to antibiotics. Honey doesn't rely on antibiotics so it can help stop bacteria in its own way.

This is like other new but old treatments we are rediscovering as we move closer to a post-antibiotic era. Phages (or viruses that infect bacteria) were used before antibiotics were discovered and are being increasingly examined as a new means of fighting bacteria when antibiotics don't work. This is also true of different antibody treatments. It may be that more types of treatments that were once considered alternative or complimentary become central and important to the fight against bacteria, as we begin to lose the ability to fight bugs with the antibiotics we have relied upon.

Thanks for your feedback!

Verywell Health uses only high-quality sources, including peer-reviewed studies, to support the facts within our articles. Read our editorial process to learn more about how we fact-check and keep our content accurate, reliable, and trustworthy.

Sours: https://www.verywellhealth.com/can-honey-help-heal-wounds-4092613

Bandages first honey

Adding to Cart...

Monofloral Means Pure

Running a Manuka honey farm can be a tricky business. That’s because bees will tend to harvest the nectar of every flower they find. In order to secure the potency of every tube and bandage of First Honey, every flower around here must be a Manuka flower. The bees only visit the sticky, thick, and sometimes difficult petals of this whitish pink blossom.

Small Beginnings

In the small town of Masterton, New Zealand, we have dedicated ourselves to a small and intimate family farm of Manuka trees. We are beekeepers, nature lovers, and evangelists of the healing properties of Manuka honey.

Research Based Healing

Through research and innovation, our First Honey team of chemists have uncovered the unique nourishing benefits of Methylglyoxal found within Manuka honey. From these discoveries of unparallelled antibacterial and wound healing properties, First Honey was born. Created for the moments in everyday life when you need safe and effective care for the ones you love.

Sours: https://www.amazon.com/Bandages-Certified-Indicated-Treatment-Antibiotic/dp/B07G9R4KM7
Manuka honey SKIN BENEFITS- Dr Dray

How, When, and Why Honey Is Used for Wound Care

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How is honey used on wounds?

People have used honey for thousands of years for wound healing. While we now have other very effective wound-healing options, honey may still be good for healing certain wounds.

Honey has antibacterial properties and a unique pH balance that promotes oxygen and healing compounds to a wound.

Before you reach into your cabinet, know that wound-care professionals use medical-grade honey for healing chronic wounds and other injuries.

Read on for more information on the right and wrong times to use honey for wound healing.

Is honey effective for healing?

Honey is a sugary, syrupy substance that has been shown to have bioactive components that can help heal wounds.

According to a literature review published in the journal Wounds, honey offers the following benefits in healing wounds:

  • Acidic pH promotes healing. Honey has an acidic pH of between 3.2 and 4.5. When applied to wounds, the acidic pH encourages the blood to release oxygen, which is important to wound healing. An acidic pH also reduces the presence of substances called proteases that impair the wound healing process.
  • Sugar has an osmotic effect. The sugar naturally present in honey has the effect of drawing water out of damaged tissues (known as an osmotic effect). This reduces swelling and encourages the flow of lymph to heal the wound. Sugar also draws water out of bacterial cells, which can help keep them from multiplying.
  • Antibacterial effect. Honey has been shown to have an antibacterial effect on bacteria commonly present in wounds, such as methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) and vancomycin-resistant Enterococci (VRE). Part of this resistance may be through its osmotic effects.
  • boils
  • burns
  • nonhealing wounds and ulcers
  • pilonidal sinus
  • venous and diabetic foot ulcers

How do you apply honey for wounds?

If you have a wound or burn that won’t heal, it’s important to check with a doctor before using honey on the wound. Ask the doctor if honey is a possibility for treatment.

For severe wounds, it’s best a doctor or wound-care nurse shows you how to apply the honey the first time. This is because the amount of honey and the way the dressing is applied can impact how effective the wound-healing will be.

Tips for applying honey on wounds

If you’re applying honey on wounds at home, here are some general tips for application.

  • Always start with clean hands and applicators, such as sterile gauze and cotton tips.
  • Apply the honey to a dressing first, then apply the dressing to the skin. This helps to cut down on the messiness of honey when applied directly to the skin. You can also purchase honey-impregnated dressings, such as MediHoney brand dressings, which have been on the market for several years. An exception is, if you have a deep wound bed, such as an abscess. The honey should fill the wound bed before a dressing is applied.
  • Place a clean, dry dressing over the honey. This can be sterile gauze pads or an adhesive bandage. An occlusive dressing is best over honey because it keeps the honey from seeping out.
  • Replace the dressing when drainage from the wound saturates the dressing. As honey starts to heal the wound, the dressing changes will likely be less frequent.
  • Wash your hands after dressing the wound.

If you have any questions about applying honey to your wound, follow up with a physician.

Types of honey used on wounds

Ideally, a person should use medical-grade honey, which is sterilized and therefore less likely to cause immune system reactions.

In addition to Manuka honey, other forms sold for healing include Gelam, Tualang, and MediHoney, which is a brandname for a product where the honey has been sterilized by gamma irradiation.

What are the possible complications of honey for wounds?

It’s always possible that honey or its container can become contaminated, or, a person could have an allergic reaction. Sometimes, this is to the bee pollen that’s naturally present in honey.

Allergic reactions

Signs you could be having an allergic reaction to the honey include:

  • dizziness
  • extreme swelling
  • nausea
  • stinging or burning after topical application
  • trouble breathing
  • vomiting

If you experience these symptoms, clean your skin of the honey and seek medical attention. Do not apply the honey again until you talk to a doctor.

Risks with raw honey

Some researchers have raised concerns regarding the use of raw honey, which is made from honeycombs and unfiltered, for wound treatment. They theorize that there’s greater risks for infection using this honey type.

While this is more of an idea than something that is proven, it’s important to be aware of the risks, according to the journal Wilderness & Environmental Medicine.

Ineffective

It’s also possible honey may not work to heal your wound. Frequent applications are required to see a benefit. This could take a week or more. If you aren’t seeing any improvement, talk to a doctor or nurse.

The takeaway

Medical grade honey on wounds has been shown to help people with chronic and non-healing wounds. Medical honey has anti-bacterial, anti-inflammatory, and even anti-odor properties that can help people with chronic wounds.

You should always check with their doctor before using this honey type to ensure it’s safe to apply to the wound.

Sours: https://www.healthline.com/health/honey-on-wounds

You will also be interested:

Sweetening wound care: honey and sugar bandages

When to use honey and sugar

Both honey and sugar are indicated in patients with wounds in the inflammatory to early repair phases. Honey and sugar dressings should be discontinued once a wound has developed healthy granulation tissue.

In humans, systematic reviews have documented the best evidence for use of honey to treat partial-thickness burns.2,3

Common indications for the use of honey are contaminated, exudative wounds in an early phase of healing, chronic nonhealing wounds and wounds with known or suspected multidrug-resistant bacterial infection (Figure 1).

Use of honey or sugar is not appropriate in patients with dry wounds, as both agents will further remove fluid from the wound bed. In patients with very large wounds, careful monitoring of fluid loss is warranted, as it can be substantial.

How to apply honey and sugar bandages

Prior to use of both honey and sugar dressings, standard preparation of the wound via clipping of hair, generous lavage and, if indicated, debridement is necessary. Although honey and sugar can facilitate autolytic debridement, sharp (surgical) debridement is still required if tissue is obviously devitalized.

Sugar dressings

Sugar dressings should be comprised of a thick layer of sugar, described as having a minimum thickness of 1 cm for equine wounds,4 applied directly to the wound bed, followed by a nonadherent dressing and thick absorptive layers to contain wound exudate.

Sugar bandages must be changed daily at a minimum, but significant exudate may necessitate bandage changes two to three times per day.

Honey dressings

Honey bandages can be changed less frequently, depending on the overall health of the wound and the degree of exudate present, but they should be changed at least every five to seven days.

The ideal honey product is unpasteurized and not heated above 37°C (98.6°F).4 Medical-grade honeys are available, and most have been irradiated to avoid the possibility of contamination. Some honey products are formulated as sheets for easier application to wounds; alternatively, honey can be applied to a nonadherent dressing that is then applied to the wound.

Both sugar and honey have been associated with discomfort in human patients, so monitoring veterinary patients for appropriate analgesia is warranted.

References

1. Girma A, Seo W, She RC. Antibacterial activity of varying UMF-graded Manuka honeys. PLoS One 2019;14(10):e0224495.

2. Jull AB, Cullum N, Dumville JC, et al. Honey as a topical treatment for wounds. Cochrane Database Syst Rev 2015;6(3):CD005083.

3. Saikaly SK, Khachemoune A. Honey and wound healing: an update. Am J Clin Dermatol 2017;18(2):237-251.

4. Dart AJ, Dowling BA, Smith CL. Topical treatments in equine wound management. Vet Clin North Am Equine Pract 2005;21(1):77-89.

Dr. Shaver, a board-certified veterinary surgeon, is an assistant professor of small animal surgery at Midwestern University in Arizona. She enjoys hiking, travel, friends and family and teaching veterinary students.

Sours: https://www.dvm360.com/view/sweetening-wound-care-honey-and-sugar-bandages


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