Population pyramid egypt

Population pyramid egypt DEFAULT
Subscribe to our free email alert service

Egypt: Population pyramid

Egypt - Population pyramid

201933.83%60.89%5.28%
201833.80%60.97%5.23%
201733.78%61.04%5.19%
201633.65%61.21%5.15%
201533.31%61.58%5.10%
201433.16%61.79%5.05%
201332.94%62.07%4.99%
201232.71%62.37%4.92%
201132.56%62.59%4.85%
201032.56%62.65%4.79%
200932.63%62.58%4.79%
200832.80%62.39%4.81%
200733.06%62.10%4.84%
200633.40%61.72%4.88%
200533.84%61.26%4.90%
200434.37%60.71%4.92%
200334.99%60.07%4.94%
200235.67%59.39%4.94%
200136.32%58.76%4.93%
200036.86%58.23%4.92%
199937.47%57.63%4.90%
199837.99%57.12%4.89%
199738.45%56.69%4.86%
199638.91%56.26%4.83%
199539.43%55.79%4.78%
199439.81%55.44%4.75%
199340.18%55.11%4.71%
199240.49%54.83%4.67%
199140.70%54.66%4.64%
199040.76%54.64%4.60%
198940.86%54.56%4.58%
198840.87%54.56%4.57%
198740.82%54.62%4.56%
198640.76%54.69%4.56%
198540.70%54.76%4.54%
198440.70%54.77%4.53%
198340.73%54.75%4.52%
198240.77%54.72%4.51%
198140.79%54.71%4.50%
198040.78%54.73%4.49%
197940.86%54.67%4.48%
197840.91%54.63%4.46%
197740.95%54.61%4.44%
197641.01%54.58%4.42%
197541.10%54.52%4.38%
197441.30%54.35%4.34%
197341.53%54.17%4.30%
197241.73%54.01%4.26%
197141.84%53.95%4.22%
197041.81%54.02%4.17%
196941.95%53.91%4.14%
196841.97%53.93%4.11%
196741.89%54.03%4.08%
196641.82%54.14%4.04%
196541.78%54.21%4.00%
196441.96%54.08%3.96%
196342.21%53.87%3.92%
196242.45%53.67%3.88%
196142.47%53.70%3.83%
196042.11%54.09%3.80%

Egypt - Population pyramid

Egypt - Population pyramid

Sours: https://countryeconomy.com/demography/population-structure/egypt

Egypt Demographics

Population of Egypt (2020)

View live population, charts & trends: Population of Egypt

Fertility in Egypt

A Total Fertility Rate (TFR) of 2.1 represents the Replacement-Level Fertility: the average number of children per woman needed for each generation to exactly replace itself without needing international immigration. A value below 2.1 will cause the native population to decline

pregnant_woman Total Fertiliy Rate (TFR)

3.3

(Live Births per Woman, 2020)

Life Expectancy in Egypt

See also: Countries in the world ranked by Life Expectancy

Both Sexes

72.5 years

(life expectancy at birth, both sexes combined)

Females

75.0 years

(life expectancy at birth, females)

Males

70.2 years

(life expectancy at birth, males)

Infant Mortality Rate and Deaths of Children under 5 Years Old in Egypt

Infant Mortality

13.2

(infant deaths per 1,000 live births)

Deaths under age 5

16.9

(per 1,000 live births)

Egypt Urban Population

Currently, 43.1 %of the population of Egypt is urban(43,229,498 people in 2019)

Population Density

The 2019 population density in Egypt is 101 people per Km2 (261 people per mi2), calculated on a total land area of 995,450 Km2 (384,345 sq. miles).

Largest Cities in Egypt

#CITY NAMEPOPULATION
1Cairo7,734,614
2Alexandria3,811,516
3Giza2,443,203
4Port Said538,378
5Suez488,125
6Al Mahallah al Kubra431,052
7Luxor422,407
8Asyut420,585
9Al Mansurah420,195
10Tanda404,901
11Al Fayyum306,393
12Zagazig285,097
13Ismailia284,813
14Kafr ad Dawwar267,370
15Aswan241,261
16Qina235,362
17Halwan230,000
18Damanhur227,943
19Al Minya227,150
20Idku210,678
21Sohag209,419

See also

Sources

Definitions

Population Pyramid

A Population pyramid (also called "Age-Sex Pyramid") is a graphical representation of the age and sex of a population.

Types:

  • Expansive - pyramid with a wide base (larger percentage of people in younger age groups, indicating high birth rates and high fertility rates) and narrow top (high death rate and lower life expectancies). It suggests a growing population. Example: Nigera Population Pyramid
  • Constrictive - pyramid with a narrow base (lower percentage of younger people, indicating declining birth rates with each succeeding age group getting smaller than the previous one). Example: United States
  • Stationary - with a somewhat equal proportion of the population in each age group. The population is stable, neither increasing nor decreasing.

Stages:

 

Dependency Ratio

There are three types of age dependency ratio: Youth, Elderly, and Total. All three ratios are commonly multiplied by 100.

Youth Dependency Ratio
Definition: population ages 0-15 divided by the population ages 16-64.
Formula: ([Population ages 0-15] ÷ [Population ages 16-64]) × 100

Elderly dependency ratio
Definition: population ages 65-plus divided by the population ages 16-64.
Formula: ([Population ages 65-plus] ÷ [Population ages 16-64]) × 100

Total dependency ratio
Definition: sum of the youth and old-age ratios.
Formula: (([Population ages 0-15] + [Population ages 65-plus]) ÷ [Population ages 16-64]) × 100

NOTE: Dependency Ratio does not take into account labor force participation rates by age group. Some portion of the population counted as "working age" may actually be unemployed or not in the labor force whereas some portion of the "dependent" population may be employed and not necessarily economically dependent.

Sours: https://www.worldometers.info/demographics/egypt-demographics/
  1. Donald trump onesie
  2. Hebrew gematria converter
  3. Lowes indoor plants
  4. Elkhart police station
adjective: Egyptian

Ethnic groups:
Egyptian 99.7%, other 0.3% (2006 est.)
note: data represent respondents by nationality

Languages:
Arabic (official), Arabic, English, and French widely understood by educated classes

Religions:
Muslim (predominantly Sunni) 90%, Christian (majority Coptic Orthodox, other Christians include Armenian Apostolic, Catholic, Maronite, Orthodox, and Anglican) 10% (2015 est.)

Demographic profile:
Egypt is the most populous country in the Arab world and the third most populous country in Africa, behind Nigeria and Ethiopia. Most of the country is desert, so about 95% of the population is concentrated in a narrow strip of fertile land along the Nile River, which represents only about 5% of Egypt’s land area. Egypt’s rapid population growth – 46% between 1994 and 2014 – stresses limited natural resources, jobs, housing, sanitation, education, and health care.

Although the country’s total fertility rate (TFR) fell from roughly 5.5 children per woman in 1980 to just over 3 in the late 1990s, largely as a result of state-sponsored family planning programs, the population growth rate dropped more modestly because of decreased mortality rates and longer life expectancies. During the last decade, Egypt’s TFR decline stalled for several years and then reversed, reaching 3.6 in 2011, and has plateaued the last few years. Contraceptive use has held steady at about 60%, while preferences for larger families and early marriage may have strengthened in the wake of the recent 2011 revolution. The large cohort of women of or nearing childbearing age will sustain high population growth for the foreseeable future (an effect called population momentum).

Nevertheless, post-MUBARAK governments have not made curbing population growth a priority. To increase contraceptive use and to prevent further overpopulation will require greater government commitment and substantial social change, including encouraging smaller families and better educating and empowering women. Currently, literacy, educational attainment, and labor force participation rates are much lower for women than men. In addition, the prevalence of violence against women, the lack of female political representation, and the perpetuation of the nearly universal practice of female genital cutting continue to keep women from playing a more significant role in Egypt’s public sphere.

Population pressure, poverty, high unemployment, and the fragmentation of inherited land holdings have historically motivated Egyptians, primarily young men, to migrate internally from rural and smaller urban areas in the Nile Delta region and the poorer rural south to Cairo, Alexandria, and other urban centers in the north, while a much smaller number migrated to the Red Sea and Sinai areas. Waves of forced internal migration also resulted from the 1967 Arab-Israeli War and the floods caused by the completion of the Aswan High Dam in 1970. Limited numbers of students and professionals emigrated temporarily prior to the early 1970s, when economic problems and high unemployment pushed the Egyptian Government to lift restrictions on labor migration. At the same time, high oil revenues enabled Saudi Arabia, Iraq, and other Gulf states, as well as Libya and Jordan, to fund development projects, creating a demand for unskilled labor (mainly in construction), which attracted tens of thousands of young Egyptian men.

Between 1970 and 1974 alone, Egyptian migrants in the Gulf countries increased from approximately 70,000 to 370,000. Egyptian officials encouraged legal labor migration both to alleviate unemployment and to generate remittance income (remittances continue to be one of Egypt’s largest sources of foreign currency and GDP). During the mid-1980s, however, depressed oil prices resulting from the Iran-Iraq War, decreased demand for low-skilled labor, competition from less costly South Asian workers, and efforts to replace foreign workers with locals significantly reduced Egyptian migration to the Gulf States. The number of Egyptian migrants dropped from a peak of almost 3.3 million in 1983 to about 2.2 million at the start of the 1990s, but numbers gradually recovered.

In the 2000s, Egypt began facilitating more labor migration through bilateral agreements, notably with Arab countries and Italy, but illegal migration to Europe through overstayed visas or maritime human smuggling via Libya also rose. The Egyptian Government estimated there were 6.5 million Egyptian migrants in 2009, with roughly 75% being temporary migrants in other Arab countries (Libya, Saudi Arabia, Jordan, Kuwait, and the United Arab Emirates) and 25% being predominantly permanent migrants in the West (US, UK, Italy, France, and Canada).

During the 2000s, Egypt became an increasingly important transit and destination country for economic migrants and asylum seekers, including Palestinians, East Africans, and South Asians and, more recently, Iraqis and Syrians. Egypt draws many refugees because of its resettlement programs with the West; Cairo has one of the largest urban refugee populations in the world. Many East African migrants are interned or live in temporary encampments along the Egypt-Israel border, and some have been shot and killed by Egyptian border guards.

Age structure:
0-14 years: 33.62% (male 18,112,550/female 16,889,155)
[see also: Age structure - 0-14 years country ranks ]
15-24 years: 18.01% (male 9,684,437/female 9,071,163)
[see also: Age structure - 15-24 years country ranks ]
25-54 years: 37.85% (male 20,032,310/female 19,376,847)
[see also: Age structure - 25-54 years country ranks ]
55-64 years: 6.08% (male 3,160,438/female 3,172,544)
[see also: Age structure - 55-64 years country ranks ]
65 years and over: 4.44% (male 2,213,539/female 2,411,457) (2020 est.)


[see also: Age structure - 65 years and over country ranks]
population pyramid:population pyramid
This is the population pyramid for Egypt. A population pyramid illustrates the age and sex structure of a country's population and may provide insights about political and social stability, as well as economic development. The population is distributed along the horizontal axis, with males shown on the left and females on the right. The male and female populations are broken down into 5-year age groups represented as horizontal bars along the vertical axis, with the youngest age groups at the bottom and the oldest at the top. The shape of the population pyramid gradually evolves over time based on fertility, mortality, and international migration trends.

For additional information, please see the entry for Population pyramid on the Definitions and Notes page under the References tab.

Dependency ratios:
total dependency ratio: 61.8 (2015 est.)
[see also: Dependency ratios - total dependency ratio country ranks ]
youth dependency ratio: 53.6 (2015 est.)
[see also: Dependency ratios - youth dependency ratio country ranks ]
elderly dependency ratio: 8.2 (2015 est.)
[see also: Dependency ratios - elderly dependency ratio country ranks ]
potential support ratio: 12.2 (2015 est.)
[see also: Dependency ratios - potential support ratio country ranks ]

Median age:
total: 24.1 years
[see also: Median age - total country ranks ]
male: 23.8 years
[see also: Median age - male country ranks ]
female: 24.5 years (2020 est.)
[see also: Median age - female country ranks ]
country comparison to the world (CIA rank, may be based on non-current data): 166

Population growth rate:
2.28% (2020 est.)
country comparison to the world (CIA rank, may be based on non-current data): 31
[see also: Population growth rate country ranks ]

Birth rate:
27.2 births/1,000 population (2020 est.)
country comparison to the world (CIA rank, may be based on non-current data): 42
[see also: Birth rate country ranks ]

Death rate:
4.4 deaths/1,000 population (2020 est.)
country comparison to the world (CIA rank, may be based on non-current data): 209
[see also: Death rate country ranks ]

Net migration rate:
-0.3 migrant(s)/1,000 population (2020 est.)
country comparison to the world (CIA rank, may be based on non-current data): 117
[see also: Net migration rate country ranks ]

Population distribution:
approximately 95% of the population lives within 20 km of the Nile River and its delta; vast areas of the country remain sparsely populated or uninhabited

Urbanization:
urban population: 42.7% of total population (2019)
[see also: Urbanization - urban population country ranks ]
rate of urbanization: 1.86% annual rate of change (2015-20 est.)
[see also: Urbanization - rate of urbanization country ranks ]

Major urban areas - population:
20.485 million CAIRO (capital), 5.182 million Alexandria (2019)

Sex ratio:
at birth: 1.06 male(s)/female (2020 est.)
[see also: Sex ratio - at birth country ranks ]
0-14 years: 1.07 male(s)/female (2020 est.)
[see also: Sex ratio - 0-14 years country ranks ]
15-24 years: 1.07 male(s)/female (2020 est.)
[see also: Sex ratio - 15-24 years country ranks ]
25-54 years: 1.03 male(s)/female (2020 est.)
[see also: Sex ratio - 25-54 years country ranks ]
55-64 years: 1 male(s)/female (2020 est.)
[see also: Sex ratio - 55-64 years country ranks ]
65 years and over: 0.92 male(s)/female (2020 est.)
[see also: Sex ratio - 65 years and over country ranks ]
total population: 104.5 male(s)/female (2020 est.)
[see also: Sex ratio country ranks ]

Mother's mean age at first birth:
22.7 years (2014 est.)
note: median age at first birth among women 25-29
[see also: Mother's mean age at first birth country ranks ]

Maternal mortality rate:
37 deaths/100,000 live births (2017 est.)
country comparison to the world (CIA rank, may be based on non-current data): 102
[see also: Maternal mortality rate country ranks ]

Infant mortality rate:
total: 17.1 deaths/1,000 live births
[see also: Infant mortality rate - total country ranks ]
male: 18.2 deaths/1,000 live births
[see also: Infant mortality rate - male country ranks ]
female: 15.8 deaths/1,000 live births (2020 est.)
[see also: Infant mortality rate - female country ranks ]
country comparison to the world (CIA rank, may be based on non-current data): 87

Life expectancy at birth:
total population: 73.7 years
[see also: Life expectancy at birth - total population country ranks ]
male: 72.3 years
[see also: Life expectancy at birth - male country ranks ]
female: 75.3 years (2020 est.)
[see also: Life expectancy at birth - female country ranks ]
country comparison to the world (CIA rank, may be based on non-current data): 140
[See also: Healthy Life Expectancy ]
[See also: Health Performance ]

Total fertility rate:
3.29 children born/woman (2020 est.)
country comparison to the world (CIA rank, may be based on non-current data): 45
[see also: Total fertility rate country ranks ]

Contraceptive prevalence rate:
58.5% (2014)
[see also: Contraceptive prevalence rate country ranks ]

Drinking water source:
improved:
urban: 100% of population
[see also: Drinking water source - improved - urban country ranks ]
rural: 99% of population
[see also: Drinking water source - improved - rural country ranks ]
total: 99.4% of population
unimproved:
urban: 0% of population
rural: 1% of population
total: 0.6% of population (2015 est.)

Current Health Expenditure:
4.6% (2016)
[see also: Current Health Expenditure country ranks ]

Physicians density:
0.79 physicians/1,000 population (2017)
[see also: Physicians density country ranks ]

Hospital bed density:
1.6 beds/1,000 population (2014)
[see also: Hospital bed density country ranks ]

Sanitation facility access:
improved:
urban: 96.8% of population (2015 est.)
[see also: Sanitation facility access - improved - urban country ranks ]
rural: 93.1% of population (2015 est.)
[see also: Sanitation facility access - improved - rural country ranks ]
total: 94.7% of population (2015 est.)
unimproved:
urban: 3.2% of population (2015 est.)
rural: 6.9% of population (2015 est.)
total: 5.3% of population (2015 est.)

HIV/AIDS - adult prevalence rate:
<.1% (2018 est.)
[see also: HIV/AIDS - adult prevalence rate country ranks ]

HIV/AIDS - people living with HIV/AIDS:
22,000 (2018 est.)
country comparison to the world (CIA rank, may be based on non-current data): 83
[see also: HIV/AIDS - people living with HIV/AIDS country ranks ]

HIV/AIDS - deaths:
<500 (2018 est.)
[see also: HIV/AIDS - deaths country ranks ]

Major infectious diseases:
degree of risk: intermediate (2016)
food or waterborne diseases: bacterial diarrhea, hepatitis A, and typhoid fever (2016)
water contact diseases: schistosomiasis (2016)

Obesity - adult prevalence rate:
32% (2016)
country comparison to the world (CIA rank, may be based on non-current data): 18
[see also: Obesity - adult prevalence rate country ranks ]

Children under the age of 5 years underweight:
7% (2014)
country comparison to the world (CIA rank, may be based on non-current data): 74
[see also: Children under the age of 5 years underweight country ranks ]

Education expenditures:
NA
[see also: Education expenditures country ranks ]

Literacy:
definition: age 15 and over can read and write
total population: 80.8%
[see also: Literacy - total population country ranks ]
male: 86.5%
[see also: Literacy - male country ranks ]
female: 75% (2017)
[see also: Literacy - female country ranks ]

School life expectancy (primary to tertiary education):
total: 13 years
[see also: School life expectancy (primary to tertiary education) - total country ranks ]
male: 13 years
[see also: School life expectancy (primary to tertiary education) - male country ranks ]
female: 13 years
[see also: School life expectancy (primary to tertiary education) - male country ranks ] (2016)

Unemployment, youth ages 15-24
total: 29.6%
[see also: Unemployment, youth ages 15-24 - total country ranks ]
male: 25.7%
[see also: Unemployment, youth ages 15-24 - male country ranks ]
female: 38.3% (2017 est.)
[see also: Unemployment, youth ages 15-24 - female country ranks ]
country comparison to the world (CIA rank, may be based on non-current data): 33

Sours: https://theodora.com/wfbcurrent/egypt/egypt_people.html

Egypt Age structure

Age structure: 0-14 years: 33.62% (male 18,112,550/female 16,889,155)

15-24 years: 18.01% (male 9,684,437/female 9,071,163)

25-54 years: 37.85% (male 20,032,310/female 19,376,847)

55-64 years: 6.08% (male 3,160,438/female 3,172,544)

65 years and over: 4.44% (male 2,213,539/female 2,411,457) (2020 est.)

Definition: This entry provides the distribution of the population according to age. Information is included by sex and age group as follows: 0-14 years (children), 15-24 years (early working age), 25-54 years (prime working age), 55-64 years (mature working age), 65 years and over (elderly). The age structure of a population affects a nation's key socioeconomic issues. Countries with young populations (high percentage under age 15) need to invest more in schools, while countries with older populations (high percentage ages 65 and over) need to invest more in the health sector. The age structure can also be used to help predict potential political issues. For example, the rapid growth of a young adult population unable to find employment can lead to unrest.

Population Pyramid

A population pyramid illustrates the age and sex structure of a country's population and may provide insights about political and social stability, as well as economic development. The population is distributed along the horizontal axis, with males shown on the left and females on the right. The male and female populations are broken down into 5-year age groups represented as horizontal bars along the vertical axis, with the youngest age groups at the bottom and the oldest at the top. The shape of the population pyramid gradually evolves over time based on fertility, mortality, and international migration trends.

Population pyramid of Egypt

Source:CIA World Factbook - This page was last updated on Saturday, September 18, 2021

Sours: https://www.indexmundi.com/egypt/age_structure.html

Egypt population pyramid

Recently, some Egyptian scholars have questioned the continuing need for government support of family planning programs. High fertility and population growth, they contend, are no longer serious concerns in Egypt.[1] Notwithstanding President Hosni Mubarak's public expressions of support for family planning policies[2] and recent increases in the government spending for family planning programs, there is evidence of complacency among some policymakers and scholars regarding the need to reduce fertility and population growth rates. For instance, it is widely believed that current engineering projects designed to increase the amount of arable land will relieve the consequences of high population density in the Nile Valley,[3] further reducing the need to reduce birth rates.

One statistic commonly cited as evidence that population growth is no longer a pressing policy concern is the declining fertility rate. Egypt's total fertility rate (TFR) has fallen from 7.2 children per woman in the early 1960s to 3.4 in 1998. United Nations population projections suggest that the TFR in Egypt will decrease to three children in the 2000–2005 period and to two children by 2020–2025.[4]

However, deeper examination of current trends suggests that population growth should still concern Egyptian policymakers. If the fertility declines of recent decades are to be sustained and the government of Egypt is to achieve its goal of reducing fertility to replacement level by 2016,[5] it must support a strong family planning program that can continue to provide high-quality services and reach more potential users. Financing this program will increasingly depend on the Egyptian government's resources.

Using existing demographic research, this paper examines demographic trends and their implications for Egypt. It addresses three questions:

  • What are current population challenges in Egypt?
  • How will addressing these challenges benefit Egypt?
  • What are the future challenges?

The Population of Egypt Will Continue to Grow for Most of the Twenty-First Century

Egypt's population still grows each year by approximately 1.5 million (see Figure 1) people, or the equivalent of the population of a country the size of Kuwait. United Nations projections indicate that the population will grow from 62.3 million in 1995 to 95.6 million by 2026 and will reach 114.8 million before it stabilizes in the year 2065—an increase of approximately 84.4 percent over the current total. This increase will occur for two reasons: fertility rates are still high in many parts of Egypt, and momentum will cause the population to continue to increase even after fertility rates reach replacement level.

SOURCE: United Nations (Population Division, Department of Economic and Social Affairs of the United Nations Secretariat, World Population Prospects: the 1998 Revision).

Fertility Rates Are Still High

According to the total fertility rate in 1998, the average Egyptian woman would give birth to 3.4 children in her lifetime—well above the rate needed to reach population stabilization. Fertility rates are especially high in the poor rural areas of Upper Egypt, which are least able to support rapid population growth. A third of Egypt's population and nearly half of the Egyptian poor reside in Upper Egypt.[6] Rural Upper Egypt has the lowest annual GDP per capita in the country (£E 2,353 in 1994–1995, compared to £E 3,461 for the country as a whole[7]) and the highest infant mortality rate (68.5 infant deaths per 1,000 live births, compared to 50.4 for the country as a whole[8]), and the average woman will give birth to 4.5 children in her lifetime.[9] This region is especially likely to have its socioeconomic development hampered by high fertility rates.

High fertility can impose costly burdens on Egypt: As discussed in more detail below, it can hinder economic development, increase health risks for women and children, and erode the quality of life by reducing access to education, nutrition, employment, and scarce resources, such as potable water.

Population Momentum Will Also Contribute to Population Growth

Even after the country reaches replacement-level fertility—just over two children per woman—the population of Egypt will continue to grow for a number of years. This is because of population momentum. Momentum occurs when a large proportion of women are in the childbearing years. When this is the case, the total number of births can increase even though the rate of childbearing per woman falls. Momentum is a powerful demographic force; it is predicted to account for about half of Egypt's population growth over the next 100 years. The sooner fertility rates are reduced, the smaller will be the number of people added to the population through momentum.

The share of reproductive-age women (15–49) was 23.1 percent of the total population of Egypt in 1986 and increased to 25.7 percent in 1996. This number is expected to rise to 26.5 percent of the total by 2025. This large proportion of women in the reproductive ages means that the number of annual births is likely to increase, to 1.8 million, by 2010.

Figure 2 shows two population projections to demonstrate the effect of population momentum over a period of 40 years (1996–2036). The top line shows the size of the population if the total fertility rate of 3.6 in 1995 continued. In this case the total population would reach 113 million in 2036. The second line shows the result of achieving the target of the Egyptian government—i.e., reducing the total fertility rate to replacement level by 2016. In this case the population will continue to grow to 88 million. The increase from 60 million to 88 million is due to population momentum, while the rest of the increase to 113 million is due to a fertility rate exceeding replacement level.

Many Egyptian Women Want Greater Control over Reproductive Decisions

Around eight in ten married women in Egypt want no additional children or want to delay the next birth for at least two years.[10] Yet a sizable percentage of these women do not use contraception. Data from the Egypt Demographic and Health Survey (DHS) in 1998 suggest that the percentage of Egyptian women of reproductive age who want to limit family size or have no more children but are not using contraception is 16 percent. This is a sizable number of women and represents the target group that family planning programs are trying to reach. The gap between stated preference and actual behavior is a measure of what demographers label the "unmet need for contraception," which refers to the behavior of women who want no more children or want to delay their next pregnancy but do not use contraception. Demographers categorize unmet need in two types: a need for birth spacing and for limiting family size. As shown in Figure 3, the unmet need for contraception is especially high in rural Upper Egypt, where nearly a quarter of women of reproductive age say they want no additional children or want to delay the next birth for at least two years but are nonetheless not using contraception.

Furthermore, a number of Egyptian women are having more children than they consider optimal. The 1995 DHS reports for the period 1990–1995 a total fertility rate of 3.65 children per woman and a rate of wanted fertility of 2.6.[11] That is, in 1990–1995 each woman aged 15–49 on average had one unintended child.[12] More than a third of the children born in 1990–1995 in rural Lower Egypt resulted from unintended pregnancies.

Enabling Women to Achieve Reproductive Preferences Will Benefit Egypt

Enabling women to achieve their reproductive preferences will increase their age at the first birth, increase the spacing between their births, reduce the number of unintended pregnancies, reduce fertility rates, and decrease the rate of population growth. These changes in turn will yield benefits for individual women and their families and for the country as a whole.

Reduced Risk of Maternal Mortality and Morbidity and Fewer Abortions

Reductions in fertility can reduce the risk of mortality and morbidity associated with childbirth, a risk magnified by many successive pregnancies. Maternal mortality in Egypt is high. In 1992 a national survey reported a maternal mortality rate of 174 maternal deaths per 100,000 live births (compared to rates of 6 per 100,000 in Canada and 12 per 100,000 in the United States).[13] The large number of births occurring annually (over 1.5 million) means that more than 200 maternal deaths occur each month, or about seven per day.

Maternal mortality and morbidity can also be reduced by enabling women to delay first births until age 20 or later and to space births at least two years apart. Women are more likely to die or suffer serious injury during pregnancy or childbirth when pregnancies occur before age 20 or occur very close together.

Reducing the incidence of unintended pregnancy will reduce the number of unsafe abortions, which may follow such pregnancies, and in so doing reduce the maternal morbidity and mortality associated with these abortions. Abortion in Egypt is illegal except when medically necessary. A recent study by the Population Council has shown that approximately one out of five patients of the obstetrics/gynecology department of public-sector hospitals were admitted for treatment of postabortion complications. The findings suggest that approximately 28,000 women seek postabortion treatment in Egypt in public-sector hospitals each month.[14]

Improved Health for Children

Lower fertility produces healthier children. Closely spaced children (less than two years apart), children with many siblings, and children born either to younger or older mothers are all more common at higher levels of fertility and all face higher mortality risks.[15]

The majority of married women in Egypt (77 percent) have the potential of giving birth to a child at elevated risk of mortality. Children born less than two years apart are twice as likely to die in the first year of life as those born after an interval of at least two years (Figure 4). Furthermore, closely spaced pregnancies are more likely to result in low-birthweight (LBW) babies. Such babies have a substantially greater likelihood of dying in the first year of life; those who survive are more likely to suffer developmental impairments later. Furthermore, treating LBW babies is expensive. A pilot study in Qalyoubia (a governorate in Lower Egypt) revealed that birth interval from the last pregnancy was the most striking risk factor for low birthweight. Infants born with a birth interval of less than one year from the previous pregnancy had a LBW incidence of 31.4 percent, compared to only 15.4 percent for those with a longer interval.[16] Finally, close spacing also interferes with breastfeeding, which plays a vital role in child nutrition and in building the child's resistance against infectious disease.

Improved Life Options for Women

Allowing women more control over their fertility can enhance their choices in settings where educational and economic opportunities are expanding. For example, the major reason behind the high dropout rate among Egyptian schoolgirls is economic.[17] Families with inadequate incomes and large numbers of children are more likely to withdraw their children from school. Moreover, if the family's economic circumstances are so difficult that only some children can be educated, girls—older girls in particular—are likely to be withdrawn from school first so that they can help care for younger siblings.[18] Girls from larger families and from less educated families are especially likely to be caring for younger siblings. A recent study in Alexandria examined the relationship between family size, the level of education of the father, and gender equity in child care. It showed that 52 percent of girls from large, less literate families spent time caring for younger siblings, compared with only 15 percent for girls from smaller, low-literacy families (and only 5 percent for girls from smaller, more literate families).

Recent efforts have aimed to provide basic education to deprived groups through establishing Single Class Schools. The focus is on primary school dropouts to enable them to achieve literacy. Women who have many children are less able to take advantage of these educational opportunities.

Reduced Burdens on Schools

Reducing the proportion of school-age children in the population reduces the burden on schools. Reducing child dependency also allows families and nations to invest more in education, improving the quality of the future labor force. A recent projection estimated that there would be 3.8 million fewer primary students in 2026 if current fertility trends continue than there would be if the fertility rate were to remain at its current level.[19] This change could reduce the primary class size, which was 44 per class in 1994–1995, and combined with increases in public expenditure should lead to improvements in the quality of education.

Reduced Pressures on the Environment and Public Services

Achieving the fertility-reduction goal of the Egyptian government, i.e., reaching replacement-level fertility in 2016, will reduce pressures on the environment and provide a grace period for dealing with other kinds of pressures. The projections comparing continued fertility decline with the situation if such decline does not take place estimate that by 2026 per capita income would be 18 percent higher than it would be if fertility remained at its current level.[20] As a result of a lower population growth rate, 2.4 million fewer new jobs would have to be created for the new entrants into the labor force over the entire period.

A reduced rate of population growth would provide the opportunity to provide such public services as piped water and sanitation to a greater number of households. In 1995, 17 percent of households in the country (and 44 percent in rural Upper Egypt) did not have access to piped water.[21]

Population trends will also have a significant impact on the amount of water available per person in the future. The aforementioned projections show that, at the current level of fertility, the annual amount of water available per person would be reduced to nearly half of today's levels by 2026—falling from 980 cubic meters per person per year today to 570 by 2026. However, the available amount would drop only to 670 cubic meters if reduced fertility is achieved, which would allow each person to consume 100 extra cubic meters, or 18 percent more water per year. The standard yearly requirement for water consumption per person is 1,000 cubic meters.[22] Given that more than 90 percent of Egypt's water supply originates outside its borders, reducing water consumption could also reduce the harmful effects of disruptions in supply.[23]

The results of efforts in the past two decades to increase the amount of cultivated land lagged behind population growth.[24] The average individual's share of cultivated land fell from 3.1 carats in 1981 to 2.7 carats in 1994.[25] Agricultural projects in Egypt aim to increase the area of cultivated land by about 50 percent during the next 20 years. If fertility remains at its current level, however, the per capita share of cultivated land will also remain at today's level. The projects designed to increase the area of land on which the Egyptian population lives from 5.5 percent of the total area to 25 percent in the next 25 years are expected to relieve high population density in the Nile Valley. However, this relief will not be available in the short term.

Economic Benefits

Another way in which lower fertility can promote socioeconomic development is by reducing the proportion of dependent children in the population. At present, children under age 15 constitute 24 percent of the total population of Egypt. Reducing fertility to replacement level by 2016 will reduce this percentage to 21 percent. On the other hand, continuing at the present fertility level will raise the proportion of children to 30 percent of the total population in 2016. A lower ratio of children to adults will reduce the current dependency ratio (that is, the proportion of children under 15 and older people over 60 compared with the number of population in the age group 15–60) from 0.71 to 0.40.

With fewer children, families will have more disposable income to save or invest. This constitutes a "demographic bonus," which may help to spur economic growth, create jobs, and in turn reduce unemployment. In 1995, the unemployment rates were 31.5 and 11.8 percent among secondary school and university graduates respectively.[26] However, some caution is in order when drawing connections between lower fertility and socioeconomic development. The "demographic bonus" is not automatic but depends on appropriate policy in other areas. Savings must be spent wisely.

Facing the Future

The decreases in fertility that have occurred in Egypt since 1965 attest to the success of family planning and related efforts to improve the education of women.[27] The reduction in fertility from 7.0 children per woman in 1965 to 3.4 in 1998 was accompanied by an increase in the contraceptive prevalence rate (the percentage of married women of reproductive age who use contraception) from 7 percent to 51.7 percent. Egypt's family planning program has led to sharp increases in the use of a variety of contraceptive methods, including intrauterine devices, birth control pills, and condoms. A major contributor to this achievement has been the comprehensive support from the U.S. Agency for International Development (USAID) since the early 1970s. Operations research and other studies sponsored by USAID have played a major role in shaping program operations and interventions.

To achieve the government's goal of reducing fertility to replacement level by 2016, it will be necessary to increase contraceptive prevalence to 70 percent.[28] Most of this increase can be achieved by meeting current unmet need, estimated in 1998 to be 14.5 percent of all women. However, meeting current total demand for contraception (which equals the 51.7 percent current users plus the 14.5 percent who have an unmet need for contraception—see Figure 5) would only increase contraceptive prevalence to 66.2 percent. Program efforts will face a challenge in reaching an additional 3.8 percent of women who do not currently express a desire to space or limit their births.

Strategies to Reach Couples with Unmet Contraceptive Needs Have Not Been Fully Implemented

Operations research and data such as those collected by the DHS have shed light on the reasons why, in spite of not wanting to have another child (soon), a number of Egyptian couples are not practicing contraception. This research has shown that the three main barriers that Egyptian women most commonly cite as reasons for not using contraception are concerns about side effects/health problems, concerns about having to have a vaginal examination, and difficulty in getting the money to pay for contraception.[29]

SOURCE: DHS, 1998.

The government has begun addressing these barriers by introducing a wider variety of methods as well as promoting wider knowledge about proper contraceptive use and low health risks, improving the quality of counseling services, encouraging employment of female physicians in family planning clinics, and increasing access to contraception and subsidizing contraceptives. Furthermore, efforts are under way to integrate family planning and counseling into postpartum care, design information/education/communication (IEC) programs emphasizing the health benefits of family planning, educate women about the sources of family planning services available in their community, and address misperceptions about contraceptive methods.[30]

A Sizable Cohort Is Now Reaching Childbearing Age

Egypt has an extremely young population. According to the 1996 census, 46 percent of the population was 20 years of age or younger, up from 42.7 percent in 1960. Nearly 13.3 million females were under age 20, and about one-third of them were in Upper Egypt. By 2020, 14.3 million women will be in the prime childbearing ages of 20–40, compared with 9.2 million in 1999. It also means that population growth will be highest in the poorest regions of Egypt. The number of women of childbearing age will continue to increase before it gets smaller. This means that the family planning program will need to serve a larger number of people. (Even if contraceptive prevalence rates and fertility preferences don't change, a greater number of women will be wanting to practice contraception, and the number with unmet need will be larger as well.)

Access to Contraception Is Also Important for Reducing Unintended Pregnancies and Unsafe Abortions

Even in regions where fertility is relatively low, access to contraception is still important because it can help reduce unwanted pregnancies and the unsafe abortions that sometimes follow them. As noted above, unintended pregnancy is still prevalent in many parts of Egypt (especially those where fertility rates are relatively low), and there are many unsafe abortions.

The Population Council study mentioned above found that less than 3 percent of the postabortion patients in public-sector hospitals were counseled about family planning.[31] As those women leave the hospital, they become once more subject to the risk of an unwanted pregnancy and another abortion. It is clear that repeated abortion causes a heavy burden on the health and well-being of Egyptian women. This finding also suggests that scarce medical resources are being used to treat a condition that could be avoided through provision of family planning services.

Current Projections Assume Continued Success of Family Planning

Current population projections assume that fertility will drop—that is, that family planning programs will continue to increase the use of contraception. Therefore, if family planning programs do not continue their success, the projections will not be met and the actual population size in the future will be greater than expected.

The Challenges Ahead

Family planning programs have enjoyed widespread success and popularity in Egypt. However, the continued levels of unmet need for contraception in several areas of Egypt and the increase in the number of women reaching childbearing age indicate that the work of family planning is not finished. Current trends suggest that Egyptian family planning programs need to strengthen efforts to meet unmet need and to provide more explicit links between contraceptive services and postabortion counseling to reduce unintended pregnancies and the need for abortion.

However, the current policy climate raises concerns about the future of family planning in Egypt. The Ministry of Health and Population is shifting to a more integrated approach to women's health.[32] This shift may be misinterpreted by some scholars and by the public as a shift away from family planning. There is a need to emphasize among health care providers that effective family planning contributes to women's health. Effective use of contraception can reduce the need for some kinds of maternal health care, including postabortion care after unsafe termination of unintended pregnancies, which would allow focusing of scarce medical resources on other medical needs.

Program funding and management may also be at a crossroads. USAID has been the largest contributor to Egypt's population-assistance programs since 1975. USAID's population assistance to Egypt, including family planning, will face gradual reduction during the next ten-year period. The United Nations Population Fund (UNFPA), which has also been an important supporter of the Egyptian program, recently faced sharp reductions in support from the United States and as a consequence is unlikely to maintain its past levels of support. Given the uncertainty of future donor funding levels, Egypt must be prepared to assume a greater share of the burden and anticipate playing a larger role in program operations. The Egyptian government needs to intensify its efforts to make this transition happen smoothly. These efforts, with cooperation from the private sector and nongovernmental organizations as partners, will be required to build upon the prior success of family planning programs.

Notes

This report is part of the RAND Corporation Issue paper series. The issue paper was a product of the RAND Corporation from 1993 to 2003 that contained early data analysis, an informed perspective on a topic, or a discussion of research directions, not necessarily based on published research. The issue paper was meant to be a vehicle for quick dissemination intended to stimulate discussion in a policy community.

Permission is given to duplicate this electronic document for personal use only, as long as it is unaltered and complete. Copies may not be duplicated for commercial purposes. Unauthorized posting of RAND PDFs to a non-RAND Web site is prohibited. RAND PDFs are protected under copyright law. For information on reprint and linking permissions, please visit the RAND Permissions page.

The RAND Corporation is a nonprofit institution that helps improve policy and decisionmaking through research and analysis. RAND's publications do not necessarily reflect the opinions of its research clients and sponsors.

Sours: https://www.rand.org/pubs/issue_papers/IP183.html
World - Changing of Population Pyramid \u0026 Demographics (1950-2100)

Demographics of Egypt

Overview of the demographics of Egypt

Egypt is the most populous country in North Africa and the third-most populous on the African continent, after Nigeria and Ethiopia.[1] About 95%[2] of the country's 102 million people (July 2021)[3] live along the banks of the Nile and in the Nile Delta, which fans out north of Cairo; and along the Suez Canal. These regions are among the world's most densely populated, containing an average of over 1,540 per km², as compared to 96 persons per km² for the country as a whole.

Small communities spread throughout the desert regions of Egypt are clustered around historic trade and transportation routes. The government has tried with mixed success to encourage migration to newly irrigated land reclaimed from the desert. However, the proportion of the population living in rural areas has continued to decrease as people move to the megacities in search of employment and a higher standard of living.

According to the Peterson Institute for International Economics and other proponents of demographic structural approach (cliodynamics), the basic problem Egypt has is an unemployment rate driven by a demographic youth bulge: with the number of new people entering the job force at about 4% a year, unemployment in Egypt is almost 10 times as high for college graduates as it is for people who have gone through elementary school, particularly educated urban youth, who comprised most of the people that were seen out in the streets during the Egyptian revolution of 2011. An estimated 51.2% of Egyptians are under the age of 25, with just 4.3% over the age of 65, making it one of the most youthful populations in the world.[4][5]

Population[edit]

Egypt has a population of 92,000,000 (2016).[6][7] According to the OECD/World Bank statistics population growth in Egypt from 1990 to 2008 was 23.7 million and 41%.[8]

Age distribution[edit]

Data taken from Central Agency for Public Mobilization and Statistics.[9]

Percentage Distribution of Population in Censuses (1976,1986,1996,2006) by Age Group

Percentage Distribution of Population in Censuses by Age Group

Age group 2006 1996 1986 1976
0–4 10.6 11.6 15.3 13.9
5–9 10.5 12.9 13.2 12.8
10–14 10.6 13.3 11.6 13.4
15–19 11.8 11.6 10.6 10.9
20–24 10.8 8.6 8.9 8.4
25–29 8.8 7.4 7.7 7.3
30–34 6.5 6.7 6.4 5.8
35–39 6.4 6.5 6.1 5.6
40–44 5.6 5.3 4.4 5.1
45–49 5.1 4.5 4.0 4.2
50–54 4.2 3.4 3.5 4.0
55–59 3.1 2.5 2.6 2.4
60–64 2.3 2.4 2.4 2.7
65–69 1.6 1.6 1.4 1.4
70–74 1.1 1.0 1.1 1.2
75+ 1.0 0.8 0.8 1.0

Population Estimates by Sex and Age Group (1 July 2010)

Population Estimates by Sex and Age Group (1 July 2010) :

Age group Male Female % Total
0–4 4,282 4,072 10.6 8,354
5–9 4,265 4,007 10.5 8,272
10–14 4,330 4,023 10.6 8,353
15–19 4,738 4,501 11.7 9,239
20–24 4,358 4,155 10.8 8,513
25–29 3,412 3,498 8.8 6,910
30–34 2,614 2,503 6.5 5,117
35–39 2,498 2,536 6.4 5,034
40–44 2,237 2,186 5.6 4,423
45–49 2,029 1,942 5.0 3,971
50–54 1,668 1,640 4.2 3,308
55–59 1,312 1,136 3.1 2,448
60–64 971 871 2.3 1 842
65–69 693 597 1.6 1 290
70–74 435 419 1.1 854
75+ 408 392 1.0 800
Total40,25038,47810078,728

Population Estimates by Sex and Age Group (1 July 2012)

Population Estimates by Sex and Age Group (1 July 2012) :

Age group Male Female % Total
0–4 4,780 4,410 11.17 9,190
5–9 4,534 4,192 10.60 8,726
10–14 3,970 3,706 9.33 7,676
15–19 3,970 3,746 9.37 7,710
20–24 4,236 4,024 10.04 8,260
25–29 4,084 3,924 9.73 8,008
30–34 3,346 3,249 8.01 6,595
35–39 2,589 2,524 6.21 5,113
40–44 2,262 2,206 5.43 4,468
45–49 2,077 2,037 5.00 4,114
50–54 1,821 1,798 4.40 3,619
55–59 1,494 1,480 3.61 2,974
60–64 1,105 1,113 2.69 2,218
65–69 767 785 1.89 1,552
70–74 501 517 1.24 1,018
75+ 522 536 1.29 1,058
Total42,05840,24710082,305

Population Estimates by Sex and Age Group (1 January 2013)

Population Estimates by Sex and Age Group (1 January 2013) :

Age group Male Female % Total
0–4 4,861 4,481 11.17 9,342
5–9 4,610 4,259 10.60 8,869
10–14 4,038 3,765 9.33 7,803
15–19 4,038 3,805 9.37 7,843
20–24 4,309 4,089 10.04 8,398
25–29 4,152 3,987 9.73 8,139
30–34 3,403 3,300 8.01 6,703
35–39 2,633 2,564 6.21 5,197
40–44 2,300 2,241 5.43 4,541
45–49 2,113 2,069 5.00 4,182
50–54 1,852 1,827 4.40 3,679
55–59 1,519 1,504 3.61 3,023
60–64 1,124 1,130 2.69 2,254
65–69 781 797 1.89 1,578
70–74 510 525 1.24 1,035
75–79 291 303 0.71 594
80+ 239 242 0.57 481
Total42,77340,88810083,661

Population Estimates by Sex and Age Group (1 July 2013)

Population Estimates by Sex and Age Group (1 July 2013):

Age Group Male Female Total %
0–4 4 910 594 4 538 740 9 449 334 11,17
5–9 4 657 900 4 313 848 8 971 748 10,60
10–14 4 079 894 3 812 951 7 892 845 9,33
15–19 4 079 894 3 853 840 7 933 634 9,37
20–24 4 353 289 4 140 279 8 493 568 10,04
25–29 4 195 561 4 037 843 8 233 404 9,73
30–34 3 438 467 3 342 721 6 781 188 8,01
35–39 2 660 343 2 596 487 5 256 830 6,21
40–44 2 323 857 2 269 370 4 593 227 5,43
45–49 2 134 584 2 095 590 4 230 173 5,00
50–54 1 871 704 1 850 252 3 721 956 4,40
55–59 1 535 218 1 523 136 3 058 354 3,61
60–64 1 135 641 1 144 907 2 280 548 2,69
65–69 788 639 807 569 1 596 208 1,89
70–74 515 244 531 564 1 046 809 1,24
75–79 294 425 306 672 601 097 0,71
80+ 241 849 246 108 487 957 0,58
Total43 217 10541 411 87784 628 982100
Age group Male Female Total Percent
0–14 13 648 388 12 665 539 26 313 927 31,09
15–64 27 728 560 26 854 425 54 582 985 64,50
65+ 1 840 157 1 891 913 3 732 070 4,41

Population Estimates by Sex and Age Group (1 July 2014)

Population Estimates by Sex and Age Group (1 July 2014) in thousands:

Age Group Male Female Total %
0–4 5 102 4 728 9 830 11,3
5–9 4 729 4 398 9 127 10,5
10–14 4 225 3 959 8 184 9,4
15–19 4 312 4 077 8 389 9,7
20–24 4 565 4 365 8 930 10,4
25–29 4 280 4 119 8 399 9,7
30–34 3 413 3 319 6 732 7,8
35–39 2 678 2 604 5 282 6,1
40–44 2 391 2 349 4 740 5,5
45–49 2 194 2 156 4 350 5,0
50–54 1 898 1 877 3 775 4,3
55–59 1 547 1 536 3 083 3,6
60–64 1 130 1 131 2 261 2,6
65–69 789 801 1 590 1,8
70–74 515 535 1 050 1,2
75+ 537 555 1 092 1,3
Total44 30542 50986 814100
Age group Sex ratio Male Female Total Percent
0–14 107.4 14 056 13 085 27 141 31,26
15–39 104.1 19 248 18 484 37 732 43,46
40–64 101.2 9 160 9 049 18 209 20,97
65+ 97.4 1 841 1 891 3 732 4,30

Household population by age and sex (DHS 2014)

Household population by age and sex (DHS 2014).[10]

Total Population in thousands: 114 428 (Males 56 926, Females 57 501)

Age Group Male (%) Female (%) Total (%)
0–4 14,1 12,6 13,4
5–9 12,1 11,1 11,6
10–14 10,7 9,9 10,3
15–19 9,1 9,0 9,1
20–24 7,8 8,6 8,2
25–29 8,2 9,4 8,8
30–34 7,0 7,7 7,3
35–39 5,9 6,2 6,0
40–44 4,8 5,1 4,9
45–49 4,7 4,7 4,7
50–54 4,2 4,5 4,4
55–59 3,4 3,7 3,5
60–64 3,4 3,3 3,4
65–69 2,0 1,9 1,9
70–74 1,4 1,3 1,3
75–79 0,6 0,5 0,5
80+ 0,5 0,6 0,6
Age group Male (%) Female (%) Total (%)
0–14 36,9 33,6 35,3
15–64 58,6 62,1 60,4
65+ 4,5 4,3 4,3
Recent population growth in Egypt, Data of FAO, year 2005; number of inhabitants in thousands.
YearPop.±% p.a.
14,000,000—    
1000 8,000,000+0.07%
1500 7,300,000−0.02%
1805 4,000,000−0.20%
1882 6,712,000+0.67%
1897 9,669,000+2.46%
1907 11,190,000+1.47%
1917 12,718,000+1.29%
1927 14,178,000+1.09%
1937 15,921,000+1.17%
1947 18,967,000+1.77%
1960 26,085,000+2.48%
1966 30,076,000+2.40%
1976 36,626,000+1.99%
1986 48,254,000+2.80%
1996 59,312,000+2.08%
2006 72,798,000+2.07%
2017 93,287,000+2.28%
Source: Population in Egypt[11]

Population Estimates by Sex and Age Group (1 January 2015):

Age Group Male Female Total %
0–4 5 168 230 4 791 812 9 960 042 11,3
5–9 4 790 338 4 456 493 9 246 831 10,5
10–14 4 279 072 4 013 008 8 292 080 9,4
15–19 4 367 988 4 131 991 8 499 979 9,7
20–24 4 623 621 4 424 043 9 047 664 10,3
25–29 4 334 645 4 175 258 8 509 903 9,7
30–34 3 456 601 3 364 004 6 820 605 7,8
35–39 2 711 932 2 639 282 5 351 214 6,1
40–44 2 422 954 2 379 682 4 802 636 5,5
45–49 2 222 893 2 184 980 4 407 873 5,0
50–54 1 922 803 1 903 745 3 826 548 4,4
55–59 1 567 139 1 557 610 3 124 749 3,6
60–64 1 144 789 1 146 574 2 291 363 2,6
65–69 800 241 811 254 1 611 495 1,8
70–74 522 379 540 837 1 063 216 1,2
75+ 544 608 562 470 1 107 078 1,3
Total44 880 23343 083 043 87 963 276100
Age group Male Female Total Percent
0–14 14 237 640 13 261 313 27 498 953 31,26
15–64 28 775 365 27 907 169 56 682 534 64,44
65+ 1 867 228 1 914 561 3 781 789 4,30

Historical and Present Population Distribution:

Age group 2015/01/01 2013/07/01 2013/01/01 2012/07/01 2010/07/01 2006 1996 1986 1976
0–14 31.26 (27,498,953) 31.09 (26,313,927) 31.1 (26,014,000) 31.1 (25,592,000) 31.7 (24,979,000) 31.7 37.8 40.1 40
15–64 64.44 (56,682,534) 64.50 (54,582,985) 64.49 (53,959,000) 64.48 (53,085,000) 64.6 (50,805,000) 64.6 58.7 56.6 56.4
65+ 4.30 (3,781,789) 4.41 (3,732,070) 4.41 (3,688,000) 4.42 (3,628,000) 3.7 (2,944,000) 3.7 3.5 3.3 3.6

Egyptians abroad[edit]

Egyptians have a long history of mobility, primarily across the Arab world, but emigration became much more popular once it was recognised as a right in the 1971 Constitution.[12] According to the International Organization for Migration, an estimated 2.7 million Egyptians live abroad and contribute actively to the development of their country through remittances (US$7.8 billion in 2009), circulation of human and social capital, as well as investment. Approximately 70% of Egyptian migrants live in Arab countries (923,600 in Saudi Arabia, 332,600 in Libya, 226,850 in Jordan, 190,550 in Kuwait with the rest elsewhere in the region) and the remaining 30% are living mostly North America (318,000 in the United States, 110,000 in Canada) and Europe (90,000 in Italy).[13]

Urban and Rural Population[edit]

Figures from CAPMAS:[14]

Midyear

Population

Urban Population (in thousands) Urban Population (per cent) Rural Population (in thousands) Rural Population (per cent)
1990 51 911 22 519 43.4 29 392 56.6
1991 52 985 22 908 43.2 30 077 56.8
1992 54 082 23 366 43.2 30 716 56.8
1993 55 201 23 804 43.1 31 397 56.9
1994 56 344 24 276 43.1 32 068 56.9
1995 57 642 24 709 42.9 32 933 57.1
1996 58 835 25 053 42.6 33 782 57.4
1997 60 053 25 578 42.6 34 475 57.4
1998 61 296 26 104 42.6 35 192 57.4
1999 62 565 26 559 42.5 36 006 57.5
2000 63 860 27 132 42.5 36 728 57.5
2001 65 182 28 118 43.1 37 064 56.9
2002 66 628 28 554 42.9 38 074 57.1
2003 67 965 29 130 42.9 38 835 57.1
2004 69 304 29 653 42.8 39 651 57.2
2005 70 653 30 187 42.7 40 466 57.3
2006 72 009 30 585 42.5 41 424 57.5
2007 73 644 31 720 43.1 41 924 56.9
2008 75 194 32 249 42.9 42 945 57.1
2009 76 925 33 083 43.0 43 842 57.0
2010 78 685 33 804 43.0 44 881 57.0
2011 80 530 34 489 42.8 46 041 57.2
2012 82 550 35 373 42.9 47 177 57.1
2013 84 629 36 213 42.8 48 416 57.2
2014 86 814 37 095 42.7 49 719 57.3

Future Population Projections[edit]

The Central Agency for Public Mobilization and Statistics (CAPMAS) had released high/medium/low population projections for 2011–2031 based on Final Results of 2006 Population Census.[14] The 2020 high variant was 92.6 million, the medium – 91.0 million, the low – 90.0 million. The 2030 high variant is 104.4 million, the medium – 101.7 million, the low – 99.8 million. However the information could be misleading as the 2013 population figure of 84.6 million is higher than the projected high of 83 million. In fact, due to an unexpected rise in the fertility rate (from 3.0 to 3.5), the population already surpassed 91 million on 5 June 2016 while reaching 92 million on 30 November, average population age remaining stable despite a rising life expectancy.

Vital statistics[edit]

Vital statistics:[15][16][17]

Midyear population Live births Deaths Natural change Crude birth rate (per 1000) Crude death rate (per 1000) Natural change (per 1000) Total fertility rate
1934 15,449,000 651,663429,851221,812 42.227.814.4
1935 15,624,000 645,760412,197233,563 41.326.414.9
1936 15,801,000 698,186455,832242,354 44.228.815.3
1937 16,009,000 694,086434,208259,878 43.427.116.2
1938 16,300,000 704,376429,248275,128 43.226.316.9
1939 16,598,000 696,746429,033267,713 42.025.816.1
1940 16,900,000 697,700444,448253,252 41.326.315.0
1941 17,208,000 695,016440,981254,035 40.425.614.8
1942 17,522,000 658,324494,358163,966 37.628.29.4
1943 17,842,000 689,771492,644197,127 38.727.611.0
1944 18,167,000 722,166472,234249,932 39.826.013.8
1945 18,498,000 787,502512,003275,499 42.627.714.9
1946 18,835,000 776,000484,000292,000 41.225.715.5
1947 19,197,000 834,557408,577425,980 43.521.322.2
1948 19,529,000 832,728397,976434,752 42.620.422.3
1949 19,989,000 831,310410,524420,786 41.620.521.1
1950 21,514,000 904,941388,944515,997 44.219.025.2
1951 22,020,000 934,584402,158532,426 44.619.225.4
1952 22,562,000 969,443380,633588,810 45.217.827.5
1953 23,138,000 934,830429,097505,733 42.619.623.0
1954 23,747,000 957,158401,306555,852 42.617.924.7
1955 24,387,000 926,500405,663520,837 40.317.622.7
1956 25,057,000 958,880384,974573,906 40.716.424.4
1957 25,756,000 914,494429,512484,982 38.017.820.1
1958 26,480,000 1,013,743409,197604,546 41.116.624.5
1959 27,228,000 1,078,947411,188667,759 42.816.326.5
1960 27,998,000 1,113,888437,822676,066 43.016.926.1
1961 28,786,000 1,166,620420,158746,462 43.915.828.1
1962 29,591,000 1,125,798486,699639,099 41.317.923.4
1963 30,410,000 1,196,388431,673764,715 42.815.427.4
1964 31,242,000 1,205,785449,375756,410 42.115.726.4
1965 32,084,000 1,220,658411,636809,022 41.514.027.5
1966 32,937,000 1,234,976477,021757,955 41.015.825.1
1967 33,799,000 1,210,214440,161770,053 39.214.224.9
1968 34,660,000 1,206,585509,430697,155 38.116.122.0
1969 35,511,000 1,197,245468,017729,228 36.814.422.4
1970 36,342,000 1,161,539500,626660,913 34.915.019.8
1971 37,152,000 1,186,350445,192741,158 34.813.121.8
1972 37,945,000 1,187,286499,628687,658 34.114.319.7
1973 38,734,000 1,259,004459,816799,188 35.312.922.4
1974 39,534,000 1,287,614457,620829,994 35.412.622.8
1975 40,359,000 1,331,799456,041875,758 36.012.323.7
1976 41,213,000 1,378,917444,228934,689 36.411.724.7
1977 42,094,000 1,447,402457,558989,844 37.311.825.5
1978 43,006,000 1,479,698415,6051,064,093 37.210.526.8
1979 43,951,000 1,633,674444,7531,188,921 40.010.929.1
1980 44,932,000 1,569,247421,2271,148,020 37.310.027.35.3
1981 45,946,000 1,593,698432,2641,161,434 36.810.026.8
1982 46,991,000 1,601,265441,6211,159,644 34.19.424.7
1983 48,072,000 1,666,915412,7001,254,215 34.78.626.1
1984 49,190,000 1,797,206400,6001,396,606 36.58.128.44.9
1985 50,347,000 1,903,022442,2581,460,764 37.88.829.0
1986 51,545,000 1,907,975455,8881,452,087 37.08.828.2
1987 52,777,000 1,902,604466,1611,436,443 36.08.827.2
1988 54,011,000 1,912,765427,0181,485,747 35.47.927.54.4
1989 55,207,000 1,722,934414,2141,308,720 31.27.523.7
1990 51,911,000 1,687,000393,2501,293,750 32.57.624.9
1991 52,985,000 1,636,551391,5881,244,963 30.97.423.54.1
1992 54,082,000 1,496,866382,4651,114,401 27.77.120.6
1993 55,201,000 1,600,549380,0001,220,549 29.06.922.1
1994 56,344,000 1,610,652385,2961,225,356 28.66.821.7
1995 57,642,000 1,604,835384,5481,220,287 27.86.721.23.6
1996 58,835,000 1,662,065379,9831,282,082 28.26.521.8
1997 60,053,000 1,654,695389,3011,265,394 27.66.521.13.3
1998 61,296,000 1,687,252399,7721,287,480 27.56.521.03.4
1999 62,565,000 1,693,025401,4331,291,592 27.16.420.6
2000 63,860,000 1,751,854404,6991,347,155 27.46.321.13.5
2001 65,182,000 1,741,308404,5311,336,777 26.76.220.5
2002 66,628,000 1,766,589424,0341,342,555 26.56.420.2
2003 67,965,000 1,777,418440,1491,337,269 26.26.519.73.2
2004 69,304,000 1,779,500440,7901,338,710 25.76.419.3
2005 70,653,000 1,800,972450,6461,350,326 25.56.419.13.1
2006 72,009,000 1,853,746451,8631,401,883 25.76.319.5
2007 74,828,000 1,949,569450,5961,498,973 26.56.120.4
2008 76,651,000 2,050,704461,9341,588,770 27.45.921.53.0
2009 78,522,000 2,217,409476,5921,740,817 28.86.222.6
2010 80,443,000 2,261,409483,3851,778,024 28.76.122.6
2011 82,410,000 2,442,094493,0861,949,008 30.36.124.2
2012 84,418,000 2,629,769529,2472,100,522 31.96.425.5
2013 86,460,000 2,621,902511,0002,110,719 31.06.025.0
2014 88,530,000 2,720,495531,8642,188,631 31.36.125.23.5
2015 90,624,000 2,685,276573,1292,123,102 30.26.523.7
2016 92,737,000 2,600,173556,1482,044,025 28.66.122.5
2017 95,203,000 2,557,400547,2001,971,115 26.85.620.13.1
2018 97,147,000 2,382,362560,3081,822,054 24.55.818.72.9 (E)
2019 98,902,000 2,311,753570,2601,741,493 23.25.717.52.77 (E)
2020 100,604,000 2,271,802663,6701,608,132 22.66.616.0

Current vital statistics[edit]

[18]

Period Live births Deaths Natural increase
March-April 2020347,700 90,500 +257,200
March-April 2021322,900 129,700 +193,200
DifferenceDecrease -24,800 (-7.13%) Negative increase +39,200 (+43.31%) Decrease -64,000

Fertility Rate (The Demographic Health Survey)[edit]

Fertility Rate (TFR) (Wanted Fertility Rate) and CBR (Crude Birth Rate):[19]

Year CBR (Total) TFR (Total) CBR (Urban) TFR (Urban) CBR (Rural) TFR (Rural)
1992 29,7 3,93 (2,7) 23,3 2,92 (2,0) 35,0 4,91 (3,4)
1995 28,0 3,63 (2,6) 23,9 3,01 (2,2) 31,4 4,19 (2,9)
1997 3,3 2,7 3,7
1998 27 3,4 23 2,8 31 3,9
2000 27,8 3,53 (2,9) 24,8 3,09 (2,6) 30,1 3,88 (3,1)
2003 26,3 3,2 (2,5) 21,7 2,6 (2,1) 29,8 3,6 (2,9)
2005 27,1 3,1 (2,3) 23,6 2,7 (2,1) 29,6 3,4 (2,5)
2008 26,6 3,0 (2,4) 23,3 2,7 (2,2) 29,1 3,2 (2,5)
2014 29,1 3,5 (2,8) 23,3 2,9 (2,4) 32,7 3,8 (3,0)

Life expectancy at birth[edit]

Average Life expectancy at age 0 of the total population.[20]

Period Life expectancy in
Years
Period Life expectancy in
Years
1950–1955 41.1 1985–1990 63.5
1955–1960 46.4 1990–1995 65.4
1960–1965 49.3 1995–2000 68.0
1965–1970 51.6 2000–2005 69.0
1970–1975 53.0 2005–2010 69.9
1975–1980 56.8 2010–2015 70.8
1980–1985 59.9

Demographics by Governorate[edit]

Main article: Governorates of Egypt

Urban and Rural Population of Governorates[edit]

Data taken from CAPMAS:[21]

Governorate % Urban Population (2017) Rural Urban
Alexandria98.75,163,75068,2935,095,457
Aswan41.11,473,975868,820605,155
Asyut25.94,383,2893,248,2251,135,064
Beheira18.26,171,6135,050,6301,120,983
Beni Suef20.13,154,1002,438,134715,966
Cairo100.09,539,67309,539,673
Dakahlia28.36,492,3814,656,5921,835,789
Damietta39.41,496,765907,542589,223
Faiyum23.03,596,9542,768,329828,625
Gharbia28.14,999,6333,594,3361,405,297
Giza61.18,632,0213,365,8185,266,203
Ismailia44.51,303,993724,046579,947
Kafr el-Sheikh23.93,362,1852,557,058805,127
Luxor40.41,250,209744,669505,540
Matruh62.7425,624158,546267,078
Minya18.05,497,0954,507,931989,164
Monufia20.74,301,6013,410,855890,746
New Valley46.0241,247130,253110,994
North Sinai62.9450,328167,217283,111
Port Said100.0749,3710749,371
Qalyubia42.75,627,4203,224,9292,402,491
Qena18.83,164,2812,569,795594,486
Red Sea96.5359,88812,516347,372
Sharqia24.97,163,8245,422,6981,741,126
Sohag21.24,967,4093,913,1091,054,300
South Sinai53.5102,01848,07953,939
Suez100.0728,1800728,180
Total 42.2 94,798,827 54,558,420 40,240,407

Population Density by Governorate[edit]

Egyptian Population Density in pre-2013 administrative divisions[needs update]

Data taken from CAPMAS:[21] Information for population is in thousands, pop density – persons/km2 and area is in km2.

Governorate Population in thousands (2014-07-01) Pop. Density (Inhabited Area) Pop. Density (Total Area) % Inhabited to Total Inhabited Area Total Area
Alexandria4,7612,841.52,070.072.81,675.502,300.00
Aswan1,41213,477.122.50.2104.7762,726.00
Asyut4,1812,656.3161.36.11,574.0025,926.00
Beheira5,720806.3582.172.27,093.849,826.00
Beni Suef2,8122,053.4256.712.51,369.4110,954.00
Cairo9,18448,235.32,976.86.2190.403,085.12
Dakahlia5,8811,662.11,662.1100.03,538.233,538.23
Damietta1,3161,968.71,445.773.4668.47910.26
Faiyum3,1181,680.0513.830.61,856.006,068.00
Gharbia4,6982,418.72,418.7100.01,942.341,942.34
Giza7,4876,286.3567.99.01,191.0013,184.00
Ismailia1,162229.3229.3100.05,066.975,066.97
Kafr el-Sheikh3,132903.5903.5100.03,466.693,466.69
Luxor1,1324,992.7469.89.4226.732,409.68
Matruh437111.42.62.43,921.40166,563.00
Minya5,0762,104.8157.37.52,411.6532,279.00
Monufia3,8901,596.91,556.697.52,435.932,499.00
New Valley222205.10.50.21,082.24440,098.00
North Sinai428203.714.87.22,100.8428,992.00
Port Said660499.7490.798.21,320.681,344.96
Qalyubia5,0444,702.14,486.495.41,072.721,124.28
Qena3,0011,724.1277.916.11,740.6310,798.00
Red Sea3414,794.02.90.171.13119,099.13
Sharqia6,4021,343.71,303.697.04,764.284,911.00
Sohag4,5362,845.8411.514.51,593.9211,022.00
South Sinai1669.95.353.716,791.0031,272.00
Suez61568.368.3100.09,002.219,002.21
Total 86,814 1109.1 85.9 7.8 78272.98 1010407.87

Ethnic groups[edit]

Ethnic groups of Egypt (2006)[22]
Ethnic groupspercent
Egyptians

99.7%
Other

0.3%

The CIA World Factbook lists Egyptians as 99.7%, and "other" as 0.3% (2006 census).[23] "Other" refers to people who are not citizens of Egypt, who come to Egypt to work for international companies, diplomats, etc.

The vast majority of the population of Egypt consists of Egyptians including Copts, Egyptians make up 95% of the population.[24] The vast majority of Egyptians are native speakers of Egyptian Arabic.

Minorities in Egypt include the Copts who represent around 10% of the entire population[a] and live all over the country, the Berber-speaking community of the Siwa Oasis (Siwis) and the Nubian people clustered along the Nile in the southernmost part of Egypt. There are also sizable minorities of Beja and Dom. There are also refugees mainly composed of Sudanese, and the over all refugees are estimated to be around 3–5 million,[30] those from war-zone areas like Iraq, Ethiopia, Somalia, South Sudan, and Eritrea.[30]

The country was also host to many different communities during the colonial period, including Greeks, Italians, and also from war-torn areas; the Lebanese, Syro-Lebanese, and other minority groups like Jews, Armenians, Turks and Albanians, though most either left or were compelled to leave after political developments in the 1950s. The country still hosts some 90,000 refugees and asylum seekers, mostly Palestinians and Sudanese.

Other sources[citation needed] give more detailed statistics, including the Beja[31](ca. 1 million), the Nubians (ca. 300,000 in 1996), Dom (ca. 230,000 in 1996), Berbers (Siwis) (ca. 5,000).

Languages[edit]

Main article: Languages of Egypt

Arabic is the official language of Egypt, with the vast majority of Egyptians speaking Egyptian Arabic. In The Upper Nile valley, Sa'idi Arabic is prevalent. The Coptic language is used in the Coptic church for the majority of prayers, hymns, masses, and meditations. English is widely understood. Siwa language used in ethnic Berber tribal areas in the western desert (Siwa), and Nubian language is widely used among the ethnic Nubians in the southern areas.

Religions[edit]

Main articles: Religion in Egypt, Islam in Egypt, and Christianity in Egypt

According to the CIA World Factbook, approximately 90% of the population is Muslim and 10% is Christian (9% Coptic Orthodox Church, 1% other Christian).[a]

[33][34][35]

Education[edit]

Main article: Education in Egypt

The literacy rate in modern Egyptian society is highly debated. Education is free through university and compulsory from ages six through 15, though enforcement may be lax. Rates for primary and secondary education have strengthened in recent years. The vast majority of children enter primary school though a significant number drop out. There are approx. 200,000 primary and secondary schools with some 10 million students, 13 major universities with more than 500,000 students, and 67 teacher colleges. Major universities include Cairo University (100,000 students), Ain Shams University, Alexandria University, the 1,000-year-old Al-Azhar University, one of the world's major centers of Islamic learning and the AUC (American University in Cairo), . The former first lady has created many project towards the advancement of Egyptian education and the efforts to force education to the remaining 7–9% of students who drop out illegally. Child labor is a contributing factor to these dropouts but it is considered a serious crime to work children under the legal age and charges are taken very seriously at this time.

CIA World Factbook demographic statistics[edit]

Population pyramid in 2016. Many of those 30 and younger are educated citizens who are experiencing difficulty finding work.

The following demographic statistics are from the CIA World Factbook, unless otherwise indicated.

Infant mortality rate[edit]

22.41 deaths/1,000 live births (2014 est.)

Life expectancy at birth[edit]

total population: 72.7 years
male: 71.4 years
female: 74.2 years (2016 est.)

Nationality[edit]

noun: Egyptian(s)
adjective: Egyptian

Literacy[edit]

definition: age 15 and over can read and write
total population: 73.85%
male: 82.1% (2015 est.)[36]
female: 65.6% (2015 est.)[37]

Genetics[edit]

Further information: DNA history of Egypt

Y-Chromosome[edit]

Listed here are the human Y-chromosome DNA haplogroups in Egypt.[38]

HaplogroupnABE1aE1b1aE1b1b1E1b1b1aE1b1b1a1E1b1b1a1bE1b1b1a2E1b1b1a3E1b1b1a4E1b1b1bE1b1b1cFGIJ1J2KLOP,RQR1aR1b1aR1b1bR2T
MarkerM33M2M35M78V12V32V13V22V65M81M34M89M201V88M269M70
Egypt3701.35-0.542.433.240.817.031.620.819.192.4311.896.761.085.680.5420.816.750.270.810.270.540.272.162.972.970.546.22

See also[edit]

Notes[edit]

  1. ^ abcIn 2017, the Wall Street Journal reported that "the vast majority of Egypt's estimated 9.5 million Christians, approximately 10% of the country's population, are Orthodox Copts."[25] In 2019, the Associated Press cited an estimate of 10 million Copts in Egypt.[26] In 2015, the Wall Street Journal reported: "The Egyptian government estimates about 5 million Copts, but the Coptic Orthodox Church says 15-18 million. Reliable numbers are hard to find but estimates suggest they make up somewhere between 6% and 18% of the population."[27] In 2004, BBC News reported that Copts were 5–10% of the Egyptian population.[28] The CIA World Factbook reported a 2015 estimate that 10% of the Egyptian population is Christian (including both Copts and non-Copts).[29]

References[edit]

  1. ^"الجهاز المركزي للتعبئة العامة والإحصاء". www.capmas.gov.eg. Archived from the original on 11 May 2011. Retrieved 19 April 2015.
  2. ^"Egypt Facts". National Geographic.
  3. ^"population clock". Egypt Central Agency for Public Mobilization And Statistics.
  4. ^Korotayev A., Zinkina J. Egyptian Revolution: A Demographic Structural Analysis. Entelequia. Revista Interdisciplinar 13 (2011): 139–169.
  5. ^"The long-term economic challenges Egypt must overcome". Marketplace. 1 February 2011. Archived from the original on 4 February 2011. Retrieved 1 February 2011.
  6. ^"Egypt's Population Increases 1 Million in Six Months to Reach 92 Million".
  7. ^"Official Population Clock". Retrieved 20 May 2015.
  8. ^CO2 Emissions from Fuel Combustion Population 1971–2008 (pdfArchived 6 January 2012 at the Wayback Machine pages 83–85) IEA (OECD/ World Bank) original population ref e.g. in IEA Key World Energy Statistics 2010 p. 57)
  9. ^"Archived copy". Archived from the original on 25 May 2013. Retrieved 26 January 2014.CS1 maint: archived copy as title (link)
  10. ^"Demographic and Health Survey 2014"(PDF). DHS. Retrieved 1 August 2015.
  11. ^"Population in Censuses by Sex & Sex Ratio (1882–2006)"(PDF). Egypt State Information Service.
  12. ^Tsourapas, Gerasimos (2019). The Politics of Migration in Modern Egypt: Strategies for Regime Survival in Autocracies. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press. ISBN . OCLC 1080638597.
  13. ^"IOM Migration and Development in Egypt Facts and Figures"(PDF). Archived from the original(PDF) on 5 February 2011. Retrieved 21 July 2010.
  14. ^ ab"Statistical Yearbook – Population". 20 May 2015.
  15. ^"Demographic Yearbook 2019". United Nations.
  16. ^"Central Agency for Public Mobilization and Statistics".
  17. ^"Unknown". Archived from the original on 21 December 2018. Retrieved 26 April 2015.
  18. ^"Informatics bulletin".
  19. ^[1]
  20. ^"World Population Prospects – Population Division – United Nations". esa.un.org. Archived from the original on 19 September 2016. Retrieved 26 August 2018.
  21. ^ ab"Egypt in Figures 2017". CAPMAS. Retrieved 1 March 2020.
  22. ^"Africa :: EGYPT". CIA The World Factbook.
  23. ^"CIA World Factbook – Egypt".
  24. ^ abThe World Factbook
  25. ^Francis X. Rocca & Dahlia Kholaif, Pope Francis Calls on Egypt’s Catholics to Embrace Forgiveness, Wall Street Journal (April 29, 2017).
  26. ^Noha Elhennawy, Egyptian woman fights unequal Islamic inheritance laws, Associated Press (November 15, 2019).
  27. ^"Five Things to Know About Egypt's Coptic Christians". Wall Street Journal. 16 February 2015.
  28. ^"Egyptian Coptic protesters freed". BBC News. 22 December 2004.
  29. ^"Egypt". The World Factbook. Central Intelligence Agency.
  30. ^ ab"Who are the 5 million refugees and immigrants in Egypt?". brookings.edu. 4 October 2016.
  31. ^"2.2 million and extend into Egypt, Sudan and Eritrea", refworld.com
  32. ^International Religious Freedom Report for 2014 US Department of State
  33. ^International Religious Freedom Report 2006 – Egypt
  34. ^ abInternational Religious Freedom Report 2007 – Egypt
  35. ^CIA World Factbook – Egypt
  36. ^[2][permanent dead link]
  37. ^[3][permanent dead link]
  38. ^Bekada A, Fregel R, Cabrera VM, Larruga JM, Pestano J, et al. (2013) Introducing the Algerian Mitochondrial DNA and Y-Chromosome Profiles into the North African Landscape. PLoS ONE 8(2): e56775. doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0056775

External links[edit]

Sours: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Demographics_of_Egypt

Similar news:

Egypt Population 2021 (Live)

Egypt, known officially as the Arab Republic of Egypt, is a transcontinental country which spans the southwest corner of Asia and the northeast corner of Africa. This is made possible through a land bridge formed by the Sinai Peninsula. Most of Egypt is located in North Africa. It is bordered by both land and sea: the Mediterranean is to its North, Israel and the Gaza Strip to the Northeast, the Gulf of Aqaba to its East, the Red Sea to the East and South, Libya to the West and Sudan to the South.

Egypt Demographics

Ethnic Egyptians account for 91% of the total population. The largest ethnic minorities include the Turks, Greeks, Abazas, and Bedouin Arab tribes in the Sinai Peninsula and the deserts to the east, as well as the Siwis in the Siwa Oasis and the Nubian people along the Nile.

The official language is Arabic, while other widely understood and spoken languages by the upper classes include English and French.

Approximately 2.7 million Egyptians are found living abroad, as estimated by the International Organization for Migration. These include the Arab countries, like Saudi Arabia, Libya, Jordan and Kuwait, where 70% of the Egyptian immigrants reside. The rest of the 30% inhabit Europe and North America (90,000 in Italy, 110,000 in Canada and 318,000 in the United States). Constituting 91%, Ethnic Egyptians are the leading group of Egypt’s population.

Egypt Religion, Economy and Politics

Life expectancy at birth in Egypt in 2012 was estimated at 72.93 years for the total population, with 70.33 years for the male population, and 75.66 years for the female population. The birth rate was of 24.22 births for 1000 people, and the death rate of 4.8 deaths for 1000 people.

In 2018, the median age of the population reached 23.9 years, with a total life expectancy of 73 years, according to the World Factbook. We can see a slow, but seemingly consistent improvement in this area as time passes.

According to estimates made in 2012, middle-aged people of 25 to 54 years dominate the age structure at 38.1%, with the least being from 65 years and above at 4.7%. Sex ratio in 2011 was calculated as: at birth (1.05 males/females), under 15 years (1.05 males/females), from 15 to 64 years (1.03 males/females) and 65 years and above (0.82 males/females).

As of 2017 estimates, this population age structure is now at 37.6% 25-54 years of age, 4.22% for 65 plus years of age, and a staggering 52.23 % of the population is under the age of 25. That's a slight increase in the working age population and a slight decrease in the elderly population.

Total education expenditures in 2008 constituted 3.8% of GDP, while health expenditures made in 2009 amounted 6.4% of GDP). In 2012, net migration was -0.2 migrants for 1000 people. The literacy rate calculated in 2010 gave a figure of 72% of the total population; 63.5% females and 80.3% males.

In 2010, Egypt’s urban population constituted 43.4% of its urban population. Currently, the rate of urbanization is 2.1% at an annual rate of change. 99.6% of the total population’s ethnicity was Egyptian, while others amounted to 0.4% in the 2006 census. The dominating religion in the country is that of Islam at 90% (mostly Sunnis); Christianity is at 10% while Judaism is practiced by fewer than 200 people. The Bahai community of fewer than 2000 individuals is not even recognized by the government.

Egypt Population History

From 1970 to 2010, there was a population boom due to advancements in agricultural productivity and medical fields, which were made possible due to [the Green Revolution](https://www.jpost.com/Jerusalem-Report/The-Region/Egypts-other-green-revolution). When Napoleon Bonaparte invaded Egypt in 1798, the country’s population amounted to only 3 million. Over the years, the population has increased and decreased, due to erratic fluctuation patterns.

The population growth rate during every five years is given as: 1980 to 1985 was estimated at 2.39%, 1985 to 1990 at 2.30%, 1990 to 1995 at 1.76%, 1995 to 2000 at 1.72%, 2000 to 2005 at 1.85% and during 2005 to 2010 at 1.78%. Life expectancy at birth rose by 14.7 years from the period 1980 to 1985, to the period 2005 to 2010, increasing from 57.6 years to 72.3 years. The infant mortality rate was estimated at 101.1 infant deaths per 1000 live births; however this number has been decreasing as the years have progressed. In 2018, the infant mortality rate is at 19 deaths per 1000 live births.

Sours: https://worldpopulationreview.com/countries/egypt-population


1726 1727 1728 1729 1730