Swarm commander ingredients

Swarm commander ingredients DEFAULT

5 Tips To Capture a Swarm

Posted on April 15, by primebees

Leave a Comment

It&#;s spring! It&#;s raining! It&#;s SWARM SEASON!

If you don&#;t want to be a beekeeper &#; call a professional immediately  or these bees may find a permanent home in a very inconvenient place. (If you&#;d like, you can Contact Us) Bees love home siding, soffits, small cavities in brick walls, trees, sheds, or pretty much anywhere you can fit 40, or more bees and some honey! If you would like to be a beekeeper &#; keep reading for some tips on capturing swarms.

Capturing a swarm can be a great way to start off your apiary if you&#;re interested in starting off in the beekeeping hobby. I would suggest watching some swarm removal videos to get an idea of techniques that may work for your situation. You may also consider bringing an experienced beekeeper, bee removal professional, or mentor with you to help!

There are a few things you may want to keep in mind before you seek out these &#;free-bees&#;. Check out these tips and best of luck!

  1. Go quickly! True swarms are very temporary. A swarm is the reproduction of a bee colony, meaning the bees were doing well and wanted to keep their blood line going by leaving behind some bees and a new queen in their old home. They are looking for a new and permanent home and will be sending out &#;scout bees&#; to look for suitable locations. Once they find one, they&#;ll let the rest of the colony know and they&#;ll head to their new home. (Google &#;waggle dance&#; &#; it&#;s pretty awesome and represents how bees &#;vote for their new home&#; as well as communicate good food sources)
  2.  Bee prepared. Yes, I used the word &#;bee&#; incorrectly, but we&#;re beekeepers &#; we&#;re allowed to do that. What you&#;ll need:
    1. Have a box ready &#; you can use just about anything that seals up and is breathable. This includes cardboard boxes, buckets, plastic bags (for very quick transport purposes only), nuc boxes, hive boxes. What you use may depend on the size and location of the bees. Use something lighter if you have to truck it up a ladder.
    2. A Queen Clip is always a good thing to have with you &#; if you happen to see the queen you&#;re going through it&#;s nice to be prepared.
    3. Although you may not need a smoker at all, having one handy to gently herd straggler bees into the hive is a helpful way to speed up the process.
    4. A bee brush, spatula, or even just gloved hands can be a good way to transport bees from their cluster and into the box.
    5. Lures and deterrents. Swarm commander and Bee Be Gone are two products that we&#;ve used regularly. The main ingredients of Swarm Commander mimic the queen&#;s pheromones and attract the bees into your box. The Bee Be Gone can be used to keep the bees from returning to their original cluster.
    6. Take a ladder if needed.
    7. Have a permanent home ready for your bees.
  3. Getting the bees into the box. 
    1. Shake &#; this requires a very quick action and requires some planning. You want to make sure you get the bulk of the bees into the container in your first motion. Shaking the bees loose and into their new box will result in bees falling into the box and some flying away. You&#;ll want to give the stragglers time to find their way in. A queen excluder can be used while you wait for the bees to find their new home.
    2. Scoop &#; This can be done gently with a queen clip, bee brush or spatula. This should be done slowly so that the bees will stay clumped rather than taking to the air.
    3. Clip them off their roost and set them into the hive box. This works well for swarms balled on a small tree limb or even wire fencing (with permission of course).
    4. Lure them in with the queen. This takes longer but is effective once you&#;ve got the queen into the box. 
  4. Be Patient. The bees appreciate a calm and slow approach to capturing a swarm. There are certain parts of this process that go very quickly, but overall &#; be patient and gentle with the bees.
  5. Keeping the Swarm &#; bees in swarm state are pretty testy so you want to leave them alone for days before you disturb them again. I highly recommend putting a queen excluder on the bottom of your hive box or positioned on the entrance of your new hive &#; this will keep the queen in the box and prevent them from absconding to find a new, new home.

Happy beekeeping!

Like this:

LikeLoading

Category: Bee RemovalsTags: bcstx honey bee, brazos county bee removal, bryan tx bee removal, burleson county bee removal, college station bee removal, cstx bee removal, honeybee removal, swarm capture bryan tx, swarm capture college station, swarm collection college station, texas bee removal

Sours: https://primebees.com//04/15/tips-to-capture-a-swarm/

Best Swarm Lures &#; Reviews and Top Picks ()

Thanks for visiting our website. For us to continue writing great content, we rely on our display ads. Please consider disabling your ad-blocker or whitelisting our website before proceeding.

If you purchase an independently reviewed item through our site, we earn an affiliate commission. Read our affiliate disclosure.

Swarming is a natural phenomenon for bees. It is not uncommon to see a mass group of bees on a tree or crevice within your neighborhood. It is this swarm of bees that is captured by humans and used for building a colony. As a beekeeper, you may decide to buy a bee colony that has already been established and ready to make honey. Alternatively, you can capture a swarm of bees then use it to build a new colony. An understanding of bee swarming can make it easier for the beekeeper to know how to capture and use bee swarms. The bait or an empty hive is used for capturing bee swarms. You may also have to use a swarm lure in order to increase your chances of success.

Bees are particularly very selective when considering a new home. Some of the areas that seem to allure bees include: a place where bees have lived before, dry areas, a spacious area for storing enough food, a strategic location for defense, a sheltered area, and close proximity to water and flowers. Bees also tend to be attracted by locations that are inconvenient for beekeepers and homeowners. They are naturally drawn to locations that are out of reach for humans.

What are Swarm Lures

A swarm lure refers to what is used to attract a bee swarm into a hive or trap. The trap is different from what takes place when trying to attract a bee colony out of their dwelling. The swarm is usually a natural split for a bigger colony. They usually move with the queen and send out spies or scout bees to look for a good place to live in. In that way, bee swarming is a natural occurrence that helps bee colonies multiply. It is a natural way of building the future generation. The scout bees are usually attracted to a trap because of its scent. Once an ideal home is found, the scouts head back to the swarm and lead them to the new box.

Bee swarms usually occur in May to June and you can catch one successfully if it has occurred in close proximity to your location. The scout bees should also be undertaking their surveillance within your area and should sense the scent of your lure.

The alternative to trapping a bee swarm is simply getting a package. This is a popular choice among beekeepers since it is so much easier. The bee package is usually shaken from various hives and placed into a package or cage that has specific weight. Once this is achieved, the queen bee is pulled out of a small cage then added to the package. This is then sealed and shipped to the beekeeper. This means that different bees are brought together which may be a disadvantage to some extent.

The bee swarm is usually composed of a mother queen who has left with the first swarm. The swarm’s worker bees in this case belong to the same mother and may have different fathers. They are therefore related from start which is a huge advantage. The swarm also consumes plenty of honey before moving out of an existing colony. Therefore, they will immediately begin to draw wax when placed on foundation comb. This can explain why a swarm that just moved in begins to make combs on the branch or stone crevice within a few hours. Bees that have gorged on honey begin making wax from their bodies immediately which is a good thing for the beekeeper that just started out with foundation combs.

To the uninitiated, a swarm of bees seems to be a frightening sight to behold, but any beekeeper will tell you that it is exciting. A swarm means a new hive to the professional beekeeper as it is time to bring in a new cluster of bees. The swarms do not move around with babies and this is a huge advantage since they are docile and have no one to protect. However, you should avoid meddling with them since they can attack when provoked. It is also important to note that bee swarms never last for long and therefore should be trapped as soon as possible. You should also contact a local beekeeper’s association or professional beekeeper if you are not trained on how to catch a swarm of bees. It is better to be safe than sorry and remember not to experiment with bees.

With that said, let&#;s check out the best swarm lures that you can make use of to attract bees into your traps.

Best Swarm Lures

Rut Grenade Old Doc’s Swarm Bait Hive with Lure Scents

Best Swarm Lures - Rut Grenade Old Doc’s Honeybee Swarm Bait Hive with Lure Scents

This is another great swarm lure that has been tested and found to attract bees. This is ideally a swarm bait hive combined with organic compounds that attract bee swarms. The handmade bait hive contains traces of elements that usually appeal to scout bees when seeking a new home for a swarm. The scent system utilized is particularly one of the most successful in attracting bees.

This trap lure combo for bee swarms comes with two scent attractants, one a anchor scent that has 32 trace elements with natural bees wax included. Second is a Nasanov pheromone which highly appeals to scout bees. The hive is re-usable and this is a huge advantage to any beekeeper.

Pros

  • It has been used for over 50 years to catch bees.
  • Contains trace elements that attract scout bees.
  • The swarm lure contains 2 scents irresistible to bees: anchor scent and Nasanov pheromone. These are natural elements that mimic bee pheromones.
  • It can be recycled after offloading the swarm into your hive.
  • Easy to use and set up.
  • Instructions provided.

Cons

  • A bit more expensive if you&#;re just looking to buy a swarm lure and not a trap.
  • No closure at the entrance of the swarm bait. This makes transportation of a trapped swarm a challenge.
Check Price

 

9. Blythewood Bee Company Wood Pulp Honeybee Swarm Trap

Best Swarm Lures - Blythewood Bee Company Wood Pulp Honeybee Swarm Trap

This is a great option for those who would like to get a trap that is easy to handle and set. Bees are particularly allured by wood pulp due to the natural smell of wood. This lure for honeybees is made of molded fiber that is water-resistant. The design of the lure is conical shape and has dimensions of 16 x 16 x 16 inches. The unit also weighs only 5 pounds which is easy to carry and place on top of a tree. It mainly targets the queen bee. Once the queen is captured it becomes easy to get the army of soldiers that follow her.

Pros

  • It is easy to carry and set up.
  • Lightweight.
  • Easily captures the queen bee.
  • Made of natural wood.
  • Alluring to bees.
  • Spacious to capture a swarm of bees.

Cons

  • You may have to apply some bee pheromone to the lure.
Check Price

 

8. Rut Grenade Honey Bee Swarm Lure Nasanov Pheromone

Best Swarm Lures - Rut Grenade Honey Bee Swarm Lure Nasanov Pheromone

This is another great choice for large scale beekeepers, hobbyists, and mobile pollinators. It is a great formulation for those who would like to attract swarm bees to a trap or bait hive. It can also be used for orientating bees to a new home. This lure is made up of industrial grade Nasanov pheromone that has been tested and proven to be effective in attracting bees. All you need to do is apply one or two drops of the substance at the entrance of your bait or hive. It is an eco-friendly choice and therefore an investment in this means you are part of a good course.

Pros

  • Contains pheromones that bees love.
  • Easy to apply.
  • A few drops of the formulation deliver good results.
  • Eco-friendly choice.
  • Economical.
  • Professional grade pheromone.
  • Bees respond to the lure.

Cons

  • No negative feature noted.
Check Price

 

 

7. Mann Lake HD Swarm Lure

Best Swarm Lures - Mann Lake HD Swarm Lure

The Mann Lake HD swarm lure is one of those products that have been formulated with the right blend of pheromones and natural ingredients that bees can never resist. It is a natural bee swarm attractant that is formulated for all beekeepers irrespective of skill level. The ounce lure with its dimensions of x 25 x inches will last one swarm season. Those lures that are not used should be safely stored in a fridge or freezer. The rich pheromones released by the lure entice scout bees that eventually bring in the awaiting swarm of bees.

Pros

  • Powerful pheromones attract scout bees.
  • Long lasting.
  • Economical
  • Works as advertised.
  • Affordable
  • Reputed manufacturer.

Cons

  • May not work for everyone.
Check Price

 

6. Bountiful Bee Long Lasting Swarm Lure

Best Swarm Lures - Bountiful Bee Long Lasting Swarm Lure

A first glance on the ounce bottle containing the swarm lure could be misleading. One would be led into believing that this small bottle won’t last for long. Surprisingly, this pheromone rich substance has been tested and proven to work. The 1 x 1 x 3 inches bottle hides a all natural bee bait that is rich in Nasonov pheromone that attract scout bees that normally seek a new home for a swarm, of bees. The synthetic Nasonov pheromone is blended with additional ingredients that are naturally acquired. All these mimic the attractive scents that attract and keep bees within a colony.

Pros

  • Increases chances of attracting bees.
  • A small drop works for a full season.
  • The product can last for up to 1 year when unused.
  • Works as advertised.
  • Superior quality product.
  • Affordable.
  • Increases chances of bees sticking around once attracted.

Cons

  • Chances of success may vary.
Check Price

 

5. Blythewood Bee Company Swarm Commander Swarm Lure

Best Swarm Lures - Blythewood Bee Company Swarm Commander Swarm Lure

Wild bees that are swarming are usually desperate to get a new place, but it is challenging for them bees to trace their way to an empty hive. This is precisely due to the fact that bees are more sensitive to certain pheromones. The discovery of the swarm lure therefore has made things so much easier for both the bees and the beekeeper. The pheromones contained swarm lures are easily detected by scout bees which then head to the spot to survey the area. This increases the likelihood that the swarm of bees will move in to the empty hive or bait hive. The Swarm Commander Swarm Lure follows the same concept. It is a formulation that contains powerful pheromones for attracting wild bees. This will help direct swarm bees to your trap. The substance is held in a x 2x inch bottle that weighs ounces.

Pros

  • It works.
  • Affordable.
  • Longer lasting scent.
  • Does not degrade with time.
  • Easy to detect.
  • Easy to use.

Cons

Check Price

 

4. Farmstand Supply Swarm Lures for Beekeepers

Best Swarm Lures - Farmstand Supply Swarm Lures for Beekeepers

The Farmstand Supply swarm lures are an excellent product for attracting wild bees. If you have been trying to trap a swarm of bees for a while but with no success, then you should try this product. The 2 inch bottle carries one of the most powerful pheromone-rich product that has been tried and proven to deliver good results. However small the bottle may look, it can last for many years. A single application will attract a swarm of bees for up to 3 months. The bottle has dimensions of 9 x 7 x inches and weighs ounces.

Pros

  • Single application works for up to 3 months.
  • Highly effective.
  • Affordable.
  • Easy to detect.
  • Greater chances for success guaranteed.
  • Easy to use.
  • Instructions provided.

Cons

  • Results may not be guaranteed.
Check Price

 

3. Bountiful Bees Bee Bait Swarm Lure

Best Swarm Lures - Bountiful Bees Bee Bait Swarm Lure

To start off our list of the best swarm lures is this product from Bountiful Bees. It is one of the most powerful pheromone-rich bee attractants that has been proven to last for up to 3 weeks in the hive depending on your location. A single bottle of the substance can service up to hives, thus making it economical to use. This pheromone will increase your chance of catching the swarm up to 75%. According to the manufacturer, the product is made up with a natural ingredient that mimics the natural scent of a beehive. This is irresistible to bees.

The highly potent Bee Bait Swarm Lures comes in a 1 ounce bottle that has a stopper for regulating the amount of the fluid applied. You can use this for up to 2 years.

Pros

  • Long lasting.
  • Economical.
  • Made up of natural ingredients that attract bees.
  • Affordable.

Cons

  • No instructions provided on how to use.
Check Price

 

2. Honey Bee Swarm Attractant Lures

Best Swarm Lures - Honey Bee Swarm Attractant Lures

Available in 2ml and 10ml bottles is a yellow substance that does an excellent job in attracting swarm of bees. It is formulated for the beekeeper who wants to trap his new colony of bees without buying a package of bees from bee suppliers. The substance is made of bee queen pheromone and other natural components such as oils that allure to bee and keep the colony together. The manufacturer has put much effort into research geared towards adding Geraniol based compounds to the lure. This is one of the chemicals found in queen bee pheromones. This is included in all bottles so as to improve the efficacy of the lure.

This swarm lure is one of the most effective.

Pros

  • Highly effective in attracting bees.
  • Made up of oils and other natural bee attractants.
  • Easy to use.
  • Longer lasting. You have two choices; 2ml and 10 ml bottles.
  • Affordable.
  • Improved quality.
  • Popular brand.

Cons

Check Price

 

1. Janolia Honey Bee Swarm Attractant Lures

Best Swarm Lures - Janolia Honey Bee Swarm Attractant Lures

This honeybee lure is made of oils and various natural components. It is a highly potent formulation that has been perfected over the years through trial and error. The current product is ideally more advanced and is composed of a substance referred to as Geraniol. This substance is usually found in the queen bee pheromone. The product is packaged in 2ml and 10ml bottles, both of which come at an affordable price.

Pros

  • Chances of success greatly enhanced.
  • Affordable.
  • Works as advertised.
  • Easy to apply.
  • Two options available; 2ml and 10ml bottles.

Cons

  • Its efficacy might vary with trap position.
Check Price

 

A Final Word

If you have been thinking of trapping a bee swarm then, it is time to delve into this exciting activity. If you are a newbie, then do not undertake your first attempt on your own. Seek some assistance from a professional then join him or her from time to time when collecting a swarm of bees. This will give you confidence and help you learn how it is done. The above mentioned best swarm lures are the ultimate choices in the market right now and will make it easy for you to trap the swarm of bees. You can pick any one or two that appeal to you.

Do you own any of the swarm lures on this list? Which lure(s) do you think should be added to this list? Leave a comment below and let us know.

Sours: https://beekeepclub.com/best-swarm-lures/
  1. Michigan wheel props
  2. Jewish black magic
  3. Alaska wildlife jobs

I begin every bee season with a list of try-its. A try-it is something that seems like a good idea, but it’s something I haven’t actually done. It’s a term I picked up from a long-ago skating coach who used try-its on me when he couldn’t get the results he wanted with standard teaching methods.

Writing about techniques without having tried them is a bad thing, I think. So in order to have lots to write about, I need lots of experiments. This post is a summary of the season so far. I plan to expand on some of these in future posts as the experiments wrap up for the year.

Swarm catching

This year I changed from using prepackaged swarm lures (the kind that come in little plastic vials) to Swarm Commander, a product that comes in a two-ounce spray bottle. For me, Swarm Commander was an overwhelming success, and I won’t go back to the other product. Each bait hive I sprayed quickly filled with a swarm. If I had more bee equipment, I’m sure I could have gotten more swarms, but I was totally out of space by the end of May.

Straw bale gardens

Honey-bees-in-phacelia
My plan here was to make pollinator gardens from straw bales because the bales are said to have many advantages. They are touted as being weed free, slug free, and water retentive, among other things. I realize I should have conditioned them longer than three weeks; still, my bales turned instantly into hairy green bricks (they are made of wheat straw, after all), I couldn’t give them enough water (for about two months all the plants—except the wheat—wilted every afternoon). Worse, the slugs seemed to love to get their bellies tickled as they slimed up between all the mushrooms that popped out of the straw.

Once they established though, the pollinator plants thrived in them and they are a nice height for taking bee portraits. Then too, I often found mason bees sunning themselves on the sides of the bales.

For now, I remain equivocal about straw bales but I plan to try again next year. Next time, I will buy them in the fall and let them condition over winter.

Bee plants

Male-leafcutting-bee
This year, I tried many of the pollinator plants that beekeepers recommended last fall. True to form, some worked in my local climate and some did not. Most disappointing so far has been the sea holly (Eryngium), which didn’t attract anything. Agastache, which in the past was inundated with honey bees, didn’t attract a thing either.

The sunflowers did well but I was disappointed that they only attracted bumble bees—black bumble bees on a dark brown center are hard to photograph, especially when they are all substantially overhead. I do like the way the flowers look, though, and will probably plant them again. I intend to branch out and try to find those varieties with lighter-colored centers.

Also, every source I’ve read says wool carder bees love to gather wool from lamb’s ear (Stachys). I have a wealth of both wool carders and lamb’s ear, but I can’t get the two to connect. I even placed a female on a leaf, and she just flew away in a huff. How can I get a photo of a wool carder carding wool, if she won’t cooperate? Is there something else she might like?

Those plants that brought in the most bees were the California lilac, catmint, oregano, lemon balm, cosmos, and phacelia.

Cardboard mulch

I planted two different pollinator seed mixes, not in straw bales but in raised planter boxes. I always have an insurmountable weed problem, so this year I tried lining the bottom of the planters with flattened cardboard boxes. This is a technique I read about on Pinterest and the reasoning seemed sound: the cardboard suppresses weeds long enough to get your plants started, at which point the ground is shaded enough to discourage the weeds and the cardboard disintegrates.

The cardboard mulch exceeded all my expectations, and I’ve hardly pulled a weed all summer from those boxes. Suddenly I see large swaths of cardboard not as a disposal problem but as a resource.

Pollinator seed mixes

Of the two seed mixes I planted, one was free from the state of Washington called Bee-U-Tify and the second one, called Encap Honey Bee Pollinator Mix Seed Packet, was one I purchased. I have to say, I was impressed with both. The Washington mix contained 18 species and the Encap mix had Only four species were found in both. I got many, many flowers from each set and they are, indeed, attractive to bees.Mexican-hat

I’ve tried pollinator mixes before with little success. But in the book A Sting in the Tale by Dave Goulson, I read that soil that has been fertilized for crops or lawns is not wildflower friendly because the grasses use the residual fertilizer and can easily out-compete the wildflowers. The wildflowers can out-complete the grasses if fertility is low, but it can take years to deplete the added amendments. By suppressing the grasses with the cardboard mulch, I had much better results with the pollinator mixes.

Pollinator housing

Before bee season I purchased multiple packages of paper drinking straws of various diameters to line mason bees tubes. By using straws inside of straws I was able to vary the dimensions of the holes and still have liners. This is an experiment that won’t be proven until next spring, but the bees certainly liked them. They filled about three times as many tubes as they have in the past. I realize there may be multiple reasons for the increase, but it’s clear the bees had no objections to the multicolor paper straws.

I’ve transferred the full spring straws to the coolest part of my garden shed where they will overwinter out of the rain. Some of the straws are still being filled, primarily by summer leafcutting bees.

Honey supers

I tried three new comb honey supers this year. Two of these were supers I planned for last year but I didn’t get a chance to use them due to a pesticide kill that weakened many of my colonies. But this year, I stacked them up with various degrees of success.

Last year Nick Nickelson of Kent, Washington designed a comb honey super for me. I wanted to make square combs using a standard honey super rather than odd-sized equipment. Nick, an exacting woodworker, went to great effort to make a prototype design and gave me three supers to test. I will detail the design in a future post, but of the three new comb honey supers, this worked the best. It produced nice squares of honeycomb, four squares to a standard shallow frame, and ten frames to a box. Very cool.
Eco-bee-box
I also tried a frame cedar comb super from Eco Bee Box of Utah. In two weeks, this shallow box filled with more comb honey than I have ever seen in one place. In fact, I needed help to move it since I couldn’t begin to lift it. The design of this box is awesome to see with the frames set at right angles to the brood frames beneath. The problem was that the whole thing was cemented together with burr comb. All 26 frames and the space between were connected into one large jigsaw puzzle of honeycomb and every last cell was filled honey. It’s safe to say the bees love this design, but what a mess. It was a delicious mess, but this super needs some serious tinkering. More later.

The third try-it was the glass jar honey super I built last year. As it turns out, the bees built comb in the jars. Yay! But they didn’t fill the cells. Also, the jars developed a film on the inside—probably a combination of dirty feet, wax, and propolis that isn’t all that attractive. I think the super may have been too hot, among other things, and I don’t see how to ventilate the jars since they are . . . well . . . jars. I may or may not try this one again.

Honey bee waterer

The marble-filled flower pot saucer was a success and was visited by bees all summer. It was also popular with wasps, dragonflies, flies, and things I don’t have names for. I don’t actually need a waterer here, but it was fun to watch. The down side was that it needed to be filled all the time, partly due to the super-dry and hot summer we had.

Yellowjacket traps

In the past, I’ve always used yellowjacket pheromone lures by Rescue, but everyone keeps telling me it’s better (i.e. cheaper) to make my own. So this year I tried recipe after recipe containing secret ingredients such as smoked turkey, fresh chicken, tuna fish, vinegar, cat food, root beer, and bananas. I tried traps in the trees, hanging from vines, sitting on the ground. I tried traps made out of jars and bottles and boxes. For all my effort, I caught not one of the rapacious little bee-eaters. Meanwhile, my Rescue traps are full. No, please do not send me your secret recipe—I’m done collecting rotting meat from the shrubbery.

Feeders

I was given the opportunity to test some new feeders from Bee Smart Designs. The feeders come in two types, a in-hive feeder and an external hive-top model that is used with a special hive cover that supports the feeder. I&#;ve never used an external hive-top feeder and I was convinced I wouldn&#;t like it . . . but I love it. The cover itself is white and so light that I ended up using them all summer, even after I was done with the feeders. The feeders are easy to attach, secured tightly, easy to fill, and easy to change. I will say more about these feeders in a future post.

Raising bees in a swarm trap

Bees-in-a-swarm-trap
This was not a planned experiment, but as soon as I discovered an established colony in one of my flower-pot shaped swarm traps last summer, everyone everywhere warned me to cut it out immediately. Well, that did it. I decided to leave it in place to see what happened. Never in my life have I seen a colony overwinter so easily, and they were raring to go come spring. There&#;s more to the story, but that is for another day.

Rusty
HoneyBeeSuite

Note: This post contains affiliate links.

Related

Sours: https://www.honeybeesuite.com/try-its-what-worked-and-what-didnt/

Swarm Trapping: Swarm Trap Design and Trap Placement

Capturing swarms provides more than just &#;free bees&#;. This can also be a way to add good genetics to your beekeeping. In this lesson EAS Master Beekeeper John Benham explain and demonstrate the process of trapping bees. In this lesson you will learn: What makes a good bait hive, how to configure a bait hive, how to make and apply a swarm lure, and how and where to place your bait hive for your best chances of capturing a swarm. 

ARVE Error: Mode: lazyload not available (ARVE Pro not active?), switching to normal mode

Make your own Swarm Lure:

Neroli Oil

One of the swarm lure ingredients is Neroli Oil which in a pure form is very, very expensive. As a result it is typically sold in a blend such as this one by NOW oils that contains % Neroli Oil and the remainder Jojoba oil. This is ok as the Neroli oil is detected by bees in even very small concentrations. Find It Here: Neroli Oil

Citral Oil

Many turn to Lemon Grass oil for attracting swarms and this is a good option. It is actually the Citral in the Lemon Grass oil that is attractive to the honey bee swarm. So, if you are looking for a higher concentration of Citral you can actually buy Citral Essential Oil. This is not as readily available as Lemon Grass oil. Find It Here: Citral Oil

Lemon Grass Oil

(Alternative to Citral)

An alternative to Citral which is easily available on Amazon and elsewhere is Lemon Grass Oil. As mentioned before Citral is a bit harder to find while Lemon Grass oil is easily found at pharmacies, grocery stores or online: Find It Here:Lemon Grass Oil

Buy Swarm Lure:

  If you would like to buy a swarm lure that is already made, tested and proven to be effective, check out Swarm Commander.

While it is a bit pricey, think of the value that you get when you trap a swarm (or more than one swarm) of bees.

Find It Here: Swarm Commander

 

Learn More About Swam Behavior:

Honey Bee Democracy

This book is the ultimate guide in how honey bee swarms choose their hone site, written by researcher DR. Tom Seeley. If you love the science behind why our bees behave the way they do this is a must read. If you are short on time and want to cheat a bit, you can find a lecture Tom Seeley did on his research here: Honey Bee Democracy Video

Find It Here: Honey Bee Democracy

The Lives of Bees

Tom Seeley is the pioneer behind our knowledge of honey bee behavior in the wild and his years of research are described in his newest book, The Lives of Bees. This is heavy on the science and not for the faint of heart, but if you are interested in learning how bees behave in the wild and how this knowledge can change your beekeeping, this is a must read.

Find It Here: The Lives of Bees

 

Sign up to learn more about honey bees and beekeeping:

 

Are You a &#;WannaBee&#; Beekeeper? 

If you are not a beekeeper yet and you are interested in learning how to become a beekeeper, please check out our Introduction to Beekeeping Course. This course is for those looking to learn the foundations to successful beekeeping, from bee basics, hive and bee purchasing, to honey extracting and everything in between. Our 10 step guide will provide you with the knowledge, guidance, and confidence you need to over com your fears and hesitations and start your first hive and keep happy, healthy, honey making bees!

Click Here to Find Out More

 

The items include Amazon products. These are Amazon affiliate links, so if you buy an item through this site you are both fueling your beekeeping addiction and you are helping contribute a small percentage of the sale to continuing my beekeeping addiction&#;Thank you!

 

For the LOVE of bees, share!

Sours: https://www.newbeeuniversity.com/swarm-trapping-swarm-trap-design-and-trap-placement/

Ingredients swarm commander

I begin every bee season with a list of try-its. A try-it is something that seems like a good idea, but it’s something I haven’t actually done. It’s a term I picked up from a long-ago skating coach who used try-its on me when he couldn’t get the results he wanted with standard teaching methods.

Writing about techniques without having tried them is a bad thing, I think. So in order to have lots to write about, I need lots of experiments. This post is a summary of the season so far. I plan to expand on some of these in future posts as the experiments wrap up for the year.

Swarm catching

This year I changed from using prepackaged swarm lures (the kind that come in little plastic vials) to Swarm Commander, a product that comes in a two-ounce spray bottle. For me, Swarm Commander was an overwhelming success, and I won’t go back to the other product. Each bait hive I sprayed quickly filled with a swarm. If I had more bee equipment, I’m sure I could have gotten more swarms, but I was totally out of space by the end of May.

Straw bale gardens

Honey-bees-in-phacelia
My plan here was to make pollinator gardens from straw bales because the bales are said to have many advantages. They are touted as being weed free, slug free, and water retentive, among other things. I realize I should have conditioned them longer than three weeks; still, my bales turned instantly into hairy green bricks (they are made of wheat straw, after all), I couldn’t give them enough water (for about two months all the plants—except the wheat—wilted every afternoon). Worse, the slugs seemed to love to get their bellies tickled as they slimed up between all the mushrooms that popped out of the straw.

Once they established though, the pollinator plants thrived in them and they are a nice height for taking bee portraits. Then too, I often found mason bees sunning themselves on the sides of the bales.

For now, I remain equivocal about straw bales but I plan to try again next year. Next time, I will buy them in the fall and let them condition over winter.

Bee plants

Male-leafcutting-bee
This year, I tried many of the pollinator plants that beekeepers recommended last fall. True to form, some worked in my local climate and some did not. Most disappointing so far has been the sea holly (Eryngium), which didn’t attract anything. Agastache, which in the past was inundated with honey bees, didn’t attract a thing either.

The sunflowers did well but I was disappointed that they only attracted bumble bees—black bumble bees on a dark brown center are hard to photograph, especially when they are all substantially overhead. I do like the way the flowers look, though, and will probably plant them again. I intend to branch out and try to find those varieties with lighter-colored centers.

Also, every source I’ve read says wool carder bees love to gather wool from lamb’s ear (Stachys). I have a wealth of both wool carders and lamb’s ear, but I can’t get the two to connect. I even placed a female on a leaf, and she just flew away in a huff. How can I get a photo of a wool carder carding wool, if she won’t cooperate? Is there something else she might like?

Those plants that brought in the most bees were the California lilac, catmint, oregano, lemon balm, cosmos, and phacelia.

Cardboard mulch

I planted two different pollinator seed mixes, not in straw bales but in raised planter boxes. I always have an insurmountable weed problem, so this year I tried lining the bottom of the planters with flattened cardboard boxes. This is a technique I read about on Pinterest and the reasoning seemed sound: the cardboard suppresses weeds long enough to get your plants started, at which point the ground is shaded enough to discourage the weeds and the cardboard disintegrates.

The cardboard mulch exceeded all my expectations, and I’ve hardly pulled a weed all summer from those boxes. Suddenly I see large swaths of cardboard not as a disposal problem but as a resource.

Pollinator seed mixes

Of the two seed mixes I planted, one was free from the state of Washington called Bee-U-Tify and the second one, called Encap Honey Bee Pollinator Mix Seed Packet, was one I purchased. I have to say, I was impressed with both. The Washington mix contained 18 species and the Encap mix had 13. Only four species were found in both. I got many, many flowers from each set and they are, indeed, attractive to bees.Mexican-hat

I’ve tried pollinator mixes before with little success. But in the book A Sting in the Tale by Dave Goulson, I read that soil that has been fertilized for crops or lawns is not wildflower friendly because the grasses use the residual fertilizer and can easily out-compete the wildflowers. The wildflowers can out-complete the grasses if fertility is low, but it can take years to deplete the added amendments. By suppressing the grasses with the cardboard mulch, I had much better results with the pollinator mixes.

Pollinator housing

Before bee season I purchased multiple packages of paper drinking straws of various diameters to line mason bees tubes. By using straws inside of straws I was able to vary the dimensions of the holes and still have liners. This is an experiment that won’t be proven until next spring, but the bees certainly liked them. They filled about three times as many tubes as they have in the past. I realize there may be multiple reasons for the increase, but it’s clear the bees had no objections to the multicolor paper straws.

I’ve transferred the full spring straws to the coolest part of my garden shed where they will overwinter out of the rain. Some of the straws are still being filled, primarily by summer leafcutting bees.

Honey supers

I tried three new comb honey supers this year. Two of these were supers I planned for last year but I didn’t get a chance to use them due to a pesticide kill that weakened many of my colonies. But this year, I stacked them up with various degrees of success.

Last year Nick Nickelson of Kent, Washington designed a comb honey super for me. I wanted to make square combs using a standard honey super rather than odd-sized equipment. Nick, an exacting woodworker, went to great effort to make a prototype design and gave me three supers to test. I will detail the design in a future post, but of the three new comb honey supers, this worked the best. It produced nice squares of honeycomb, four squares to a standard shallow frame, and ten frames to a box. Very cool.
Eco-bee-box
I also tried a 26-frame cedar comb super from Eco Bee Box of Utah. In two weeks, this shallow box filled with more comb honey than I have ever seen in one place. In fact, I needed help to move it since I couldn’t begin to lift it. The design of this box is awesome to see with the frames set at right angles to the brood frames beneath. The problem was that the whole thing was cemented together with burr comb. All 26 frames and the space between were connected into one large jigsaw puzzle of honeycomb and every last cell was filled honey. It’s safe to say the bees love this design, but what a mess. It was a delicious mess, but this super needs some serious tinkering. More later.

The third try-it was the glass jar honey super I built last year. As it turns out, the bees built comb in the jars. Yay! But they didn’t fill the cells. Also, the jars developed a film on the inside—probably a combination of dirty feet, wax, and propolis that isn’t all that attractive. I think the super may have been too hot, among other things, and I don’t see how to ventilate the jars since they are . . . well . . . jars. I may or may not try this one again.

Honey bee waterer

The marble-filled flower pot saucer was a success and was visited by bees all summer. It was also popular with wasps, dragonflies, flies, and things I don’t have names for. I don’t actually need a waterer here, but it was fun to watch. The down side was that it needed to be filled all the time, partly due to the super-dry and hot summer we had.

Yellowjacket traps

In the past, I’ve always used yellowjacket pheromone lures by Rescue, but everyone keeps telling me it’s better (i.e. cheaper) to make my own. So this year I tried recipe after recipe containing secret ingredients such as smoked turkey, fresh chicken, tuna fish, vinegar, cat food, root beer, and bananas. I tried traps in the trees, hanging from vines, sitting on the ground. I tried traps made out of jars and bottles and boxes. For all my effort, I caught not one of the rapacious little bee-eaters. Meanwhile, my Rescue traps are full. No, please do not send me your secret recipe—I’m done collecting rotting meat from the shrubbery.

Feeders

I was given the opportunity to test some new feeders from Bee Smart Designs. The feeders come in two types, a in-hive feeder and an external hive-top model that is used with a special hive cover that supports the feeder. I’ve never used an external hive-top feeder and I was convinced I wouldn’t like it . . . but I love it. The cover itself is white and so light that I ended up using them all summer, even after I was done with the feeders. The feeders are easy to attach, secured tightly, easy to fill, and easy to change. I will say more about these feeders in a future post.

Raising bees in a swarm trap

Bees-in-a-swarm-trap
This was not a planned experiment, but as soon as I discovered an established colony in one of my flower-pot shaped swarm traps last summer, everyone everywhere warned me to cut it out immediately. Well, that did it. I decided to leave it in place to see what happened. Never in my life have I seen a colony overwinter so easily, and they were raring to go come spring. There’s more to the story, but that is for another day.

Rusty
HoneyBeeSuite

Note: This post contains affiliate links.

Related

Sours: https://www.honeybeesuite.com/try-its-what-worked-and-what-didnt/
How To Use Swarm Commander Premium Swarm Lure

What is swarm commander made of?

The Swarm Commander Super Lure is the first of it's kind flexible honey bee swarm lure. It is made from a patented product that is infused with Swarm Commander Premium Swarm Lure and will last for a minimum of 90 days.

Click to see full answer.


Just so, what is swarm commander?

Swarm Commander is a proprietary blend of oils that mimics the natural pheromone “Nasonov” and is the newest and most unique swarm lure on the market today. We developed Swarm Commander to assist hobby beekeepers in the capture of feral honey bees.

what is the best honey bee swarm lure? Best Swarm Lures

  • Farmstand Supply Swarm Lures for Beekeepers.
  • Blythewood Bee Company Swarm Commander Swarm Lure.
  • Bountiful Bee Long Lasting Swarm Lure.
  • Mann Lake HD Swarm Lure.
  • Rut Grenade Honey Bee Swarm Lure Nasanov Pheromone.
  • Blythewood Bee Company Wood Pulp Honeybee Swarm Trap.
  • Rut Grenade Old Doc's Swarm Bait Hive with Lure Scents.

Secondly, how do you use swarm commander gel?

Just spray two sprays on your inner cover and one spray on at the entrance and you are baited for at least a week. The Swarm Commander Premium Swarm Lure 2oz. bottle is an effective lure that can help you attract the passing feral swarms and capture feral honeybee colonies.

Do swarm lures work?

Putting up the swarm box, with or without a lure, is like setting a fish loose in a pond and baiting a hook hoping you can catch it. Yeah, they work, sometimes, but they are no guarantee. My advice is to split the hive now if those queen cells have larvae.

Sours: https://askinglot.com/what-is-swarm-commander-made-of

Now discussing:

What is swarm commander made of?

The Swarm Commander Super Lure is the first of it's kind flexible honey bee swarm lure. It is made from a patented product that is infused with Swarm Commander Premium Swarm Lure and will last for a minimum of 90 days.

Click to see full answer.


Thereof, what is swarm commander?

Swarm Commander is a proprietary blend of oils that mimics the natural pheromone “Nasonov” and is the newest and most unique swarm lure on the market today. We developed Swarm Commander to assist hobby beekeepers in the capture of feral honey bees.

Also, what is the best honey bee swarm lure? Best Swarm Lures

  • Farmstand Supply Swarm Lures for Beekeepers.
  • Blythewood Bee Company Swarm Commander Swarm Lure.
  • Bountiful Bee Long Lasting Swarm Lure.
  • Mann Lake HD376 Swarm Lure.
  • Rut Grenade Honey Bee Swarm Lure Nasanov Pheromone.
  • Blythewood Bee Company Wood Pulp Honeybee Swarm Trap.
  • Rut Grenade Old Doc's Swarm Bait Hive with Lure Scents.

Just so, how do you use swarm commander gel?

Just spray two sprays on your inner cover and one spray on at the entrance and you are baited for at least a week. The Swarm Commander Premium Swarm Lure 2oz. bottle is an effective lure that can help you attract the passing feral swarms and capture feral honeybee colonies.

Do swarm lures work?

Putting up the swarm box, with or without a lure, is like setting a fish loose in a pond and baiting a hook hoping you can catch it. Yeah, they work, sometimes, but they are no guarantee. My advice is to split the hive now if those queen cells have larvae.

Sours: https://askinglot.com/what-is-swarm-commander-made-of


1364 1365 1366 1367 1368