Mile high comics

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Welcome to Mile High Comics!

Mile High Comics is America's Largest Comics Dealer, with over 10 million comics and over 300,000 Comics Trade Paperbacks and Hardbacks in stock! If you are looking for any new or back issue comic book or comics magazine, Mile High Comics will either have it available for you right now at bargain prices, or let you sign up for a free e-mail notification when we do get it in stock via our wonderful Want List program. Browse through our incredible website for quick and easy one-stop shopping for all comics, comic books, and comics trade paperbacks ever published!

To find any title in our huge database of 500,000+ different issues, just type in any keyword or combination of keywords (such as Batman, Star Trek, or Amazing Spider-Man) and our blazingly fast search engine will then provide you with an array of possible options, ranked by popularity. You can also engage our Advanced Search which will allow you to search by individual publisher, genre, and/or by alphabetic listing.

You can also sign up here to receive our weekly e-mail Newsletter filled with comics news, special discount codes, and free items offers. Sign up for our a OneID (it only takes a few seconds to create your personal password...) to use our free Want List feature. We purchase approximately 100,000 comics each month at conventions and via our Online Buying Program, so our inventory changes every single day. Mile High Comics became America's Largest Comics Dealer by providing great service to over one million satisfied comics buyers since 1969. We make shopping for comics quick, fun, and easy for everyone!

Our Most Popular Titles

SPIDER-MAN (1963) - X-MEN (1963) - BATMAN (1940) - FANTASTIC FOUR (1961) - AVENGERS (1963) - HULK (1962) - AMAZING SPIDER-MAN (1999) - X-MEN (1991) - DAREDEVIL (1964) - ULTIMATE SPIDER-MAN (2000) - ACTION COMICS (1938) - DETECTIVE COMICS (1937) - IRON MAN (1968) - WOLVERINE (1988) - THOR (1962) - CAPTAIN AMERICA (1968) - SUPERMAN (1986) - ULTIMATE X-MEN (2000) - SUPERMAN (1939) - SPAWN - JUSTICE LEAGUE OF AMERICA (1960) - DAREDEVIL (1998) - HULK (1999) - SPIDER-MAN (1990) - CONAN (1970) - AVENGERS (1997) - FANTASTIC FOUR (1997) - GI JOE - FLASH (1987) - ADVENTURES OF SUPERMAN (1987) - NEW AVENGERS (2004) - WONDER WOMAN (1987) - GREEN LANTERN (1960) - X-FACTOR (1986) - WOLVERINE (2003) - GREEN LANTERN (1990) - SUPERMAN/BATMAN (2003) - PETER PARKER (1976) - JLA (1996) - ASTONISHING X-MEN (2004) - WEB OF SPIDER-MAN (1985) - MARVEL TEAM-UP (1972) - TEEN TITANS (1980) - NEW MUTANTS - CAPTAIN AMERICA (2004) - DEFENDERS (1972) - GHOST RIDER (1973) - FLASH (1959) - THOR (1998) - TEEN TITANS (2003)

Sours: https://www.milehighcomics.com/

Mile High Comics

American online comics retailer

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This article needs to be updated. Please help update this article to reflect recent events or newly available information.(August 2015)

Mile High Comics is an online retailer and a chain of three Coloradocomic book stores founded by Chuck Rozanski in 1969 from his parents' basement in Colorado Springs, Colorado.

History[edit]

In 1969, when Chuck Rozanski was 13, he began working out of his parents' Colorado basement, selling back issues of comic books by running mail order ads in the magazine Rocket's Blast Comicollector. The following year, he began promoting comics as the youngest seller ever to exhibit at the Colorado Springs Antiques Market. In 1971, he co-founded the Colorado Springs Comics Club. The following year, he attended his first national comics convention, Multicon in Oklahoma City, where he sold US$1,800 in comics in three days. It was this point that he realized comics retailing could be a career.

Rozanski opened his first store in Boulder, Colorado in 1974 with $800 in cash and 10,000 comics. By 1977, he had expanded to four stores in the greater Denver area. In December of that year, he purchased the Edgar Church Collection, the largest and highest-quality Golden Age comics collection ever discovered.[1] The cache had been preserved due to the unvarying 60-degree temperature and minimal humidity, and consisted of 16,000 comic books dating from 1937 to 1955, including the first Superman comic and the first Marvel Comic. The purchase of the Church Collection helped Mile High Comics expand its influence nationally, and helped bring a geometric rise to the price of rare comic books, which became a legitimate investment. Rozanski once sold a batch of comics from the Church Collection and used the profits to put a down payment on a 22,000 square-foot warehouse.[2][3]

In 1977, Mile High Comics consisted of three locations.[3]

In 1979 Rozanski purchased Richard Alf Comics' mail order division, with which he gained systems and methods for greatly expanding his mail order sales.

In 1980, Rozanski purchased a double-page ad in mainstream Marvel comics, listing prices for back issues he had for sale. This ad, which was the first of its kind, was a departure from the general practice of the time because of its inclusion of prices, which Rozanski explains was a way to educate non-collectors as to the value of their collections. The ad affirmed that back issues were a valid commodity for the collector's market, and led not only to a boom for Mile High Comics, but to the entire back-issue market.[citation needed] Mile High Comics frequently placed ads in Marvel comics in the 1980s listing back issues of comic books that could be purchased through the mail. By 1987 the company was generating $3.5 million a year in sales.[3]

In 1993 Rozanski opened the first comics mega-store in Denver, which measured 11,000 square feet.[4] The company eventually expanded to eight stores, and grew to become one of the most successful comics specialty shops in the United States.[2] One of Mile High's employees, David Vinson, was hired by DC Comics in 1994 as a manager of distributor relations.[5]

In July 2014 Rozanski announced Mile High Comics would likely end its four-decade long history of appearances at the San Diego Comic-Con, due to the proliferation of convention-exclusive variants offered by publishers and toy manufacturers to convention attendees,[6] many of whom Rozanski criticized for attending the convention solely to acquire those exclusives in order to resell them at a higher prices on eBay.[7] Rozanski further criticized publishers for denying these exclusives to retailers, which Rozanksi estimates cost Mile High Comics $10,000 of losses at the convention. Rozanski said that Mile High would continue its presence at other conventions such as Denver Comic Con, where Mile High's hourly sales were double those at San Diego, despite the fact that the Denver convention yielded half the attendance of San Diego.[6] In 2017 Mile High comics announced their end of appearing at San Diego Comic-Con due to constant increase of costs and awful management of the comic con.

As of 2019, with the closing of its Lakewood store, Mile High Comics has one remaining physical location, the Jason Street Mega Store in Denver.[8]

References[edit]

  1. ^Kochanek, Pat. "The Ultimate Pedigree", in Comic Book Marketplace #2 (Apr./May 1991), #3 (June/July 1991), #4 (Aug. 1991), and #5 (Sept. 1991).
  2. ^ abDuncan, Randy; Smith, Matthew J. The Power of Comics: History, Form and Culture. 2009. Continuum. pp. 102–103; archived at Google Books.
  3. ^ abcHayner, Don (July 26, 1987). "Big bucks in rare comics—Classic find in '77 began a new era"Archived 2018-11-17 at the Wayback Machine. Chicago Sun-Times via HighBeam Research. Retrieved November 10, 2012.
  4. ^"Newswatch: Mile High Mega-Store Opens", The Comics Journal #158 (Apr. 1993), pp. 26–27.
  5. ^"Newswatch: Hirings and Firings: DC Hires New Manager-Distributor Relations", The Comics Journal #167 (Apr. 1994), p. 32.
  6. ^ abMelrose, Kevin (July 28, 2014). "Mile High Comics may pull out of SDCC over exclusive variants"Archived 2016-04-01 at the Wayback Machine. Comic Book Resources.
  7. ^Rozanski, Chuck (July 25, 2014). "San Diego Comic Con Report #2"Archived 2018-02-23 at the Wayback Machine. Mile High Comics.
  8. ^"Mile High Comics Stores".

External links[edit]

Sours: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mile_High_Comics
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Chuck Rozanski

Charles Rozanski (born March 11, 1955) is a German-American retailer and columnist, known as the President and CEO of the Denver, Colorado-based Mile High Comics Inc., and a columnist for the Comics Buyer's Guide.

Early life[edit]

Rozanski was born March 11, 1955 in Goldbach, Bavaria, Germany,[1][2] and later moved to the United States with his mother and stepfather, an American Army officer.[1]

Career[edit]

Mile High Comics[edit]

In 1969, when Rozanski was 13, he began working out of his parents' Colorado basement, selling back issues of comic books by running mail order ads in the magazine Rocket's Blast Comicollector. The following year, he began promoting comics as the youngest seller ever to exhibit at the Colorado Springs Antiques Market. In 1971, he founded the Colorado Springs Comics Club. The following year, he attended his first national comics convention, Multicon in Oklahoma City, where he sold $1,800 USD in comics in three days. It was this point that he realized comics retailing could be a career. He opened his first store in Boulder, Colorado in 1974 with $800 in cash and 10,000 comics. By 1977, he had expanded to four stores in the greater Denver area. In December of that year, he purchased the Edgar Church Collection, the largest and highest-quality Golden Age comics collection ever discovered. The cache had been preserved due to the unvarying 60 degree temperature and minimal humidity, and consisted of 16,000 comic books dating from 1937 to 1955, including the first Superman comic and the first Marvel Comic. The purchase of the Church Collection helped Mile High Comics expand its influence nationally, and helped bring a geometric rise to the price of rare comic books, which became a legitimate investment. Rozanski once sold a batch of comics from the Church Collection and used the profits to put a down payment on a 22,000 square-foot warehouse.[2][3]

In 1979 Rozanski purchased Richard Alf Comics' mail order division, with which he gained systems and methods for greatly expanding his mail order sales. To that end, he created Alternate Realities Distributing, Inc., a wholesale distributor run by Rozanski's wife Nanette.[4] The Rozanskis eventually sold Alternate Realities to Bud Plant in 1987.[4]

In 1980, Rozanski purchased a double-page ad in mainstream Marvel comics, listing prices for back issues he had for sale. This ad, which was the first of its kind, was a departure from the general practice of the time for its inclusion of prices, which Rozanski explains was a way to educate non-collectors as to the value of their collections. The ad affirmed that back issues were a valid commodity for the collector's market, and led not only to a boom to Mile High Comics, but to the entire back issue market.

In 1991 Rozanski and Mile High Comics opened the first comics mega-store in Denver, which measured 11,000 square feet. The company eventually expanded to eight stores, and has grown to become one of the most successful comics specialty shops in the United States.[2]

Writing[edit]

In 2002 Rozanski began writing the column "Tales from the Database" for the Comics Buyer's Guide.[2]

Appearances[edit]

Rozanski drives all over the U.S. to local comics shops in order to stock Mile High's back issue inventory. He is also a frequent attendee at comic book conventions across the country.[2]

Rozanski was one of five people whose journey to and experiences at the San Diego Comic Con were depicted in the 2011 Morgan Spurlock documentary Comic-Con Episode IV: A Fan's Hope. In the film, Rozanski seeks to sell a copy of Red Raven #1 for $500,000 in order to pay off his debts. Although he does not sell the comic book, his booth at the convention generates more profit than the previous year's, allowing Mile High Comics to move into a new 65,000 square foot warehouse.[5]

Awards and recognition[edit]

Rozanski is widely recognized as an industry leader, and in 2003 he was awarded the Defender of Liberty Award by the Comic Book Legal Defense Fund for his long-standing dedication to the protection of free speech.[6]

Personal life[edit]

Rozanski and his wife, Nanette,[1][5] live in Boulder, Colorado with their four daughters, Rowan, Aleta, Tanith, and Elsbeth.[1]

References[edit]

  1. ^ abcd"Chuck Rozanksi"Archived 2013-04-06 at the Wayback Machine. Wizard World. Retrieved November 10, 2012.
  2. ^ abcdeDuncan, Randy; Smith, Matthew J. The Power of Comics: History, Form and Culture. 2009. Continuum. pp. 102-103; Archived at Google Books.
  3. ^Hayner, Don. (July 26, 1987) "Big bucks in rare comics — Classic find in '77 began a new era". Chicago Sun-Times. Archived at HighBeam Research. Retrieved November 10, 2012.
  4. ^ abRozanski, Chuck. "Returning to the Topic of My 1979 Visit to the Marvel Offices," Tales From the Database, MileHighComics.com (March 2004).
  5. ^ abComic-Con Episode IV: A Fan's Hope. 2011. Warrior Poets. Director: Morgan Spurlock.
  6. ^Weiland, Jonah (July 3, 2003). "CBLDF News: Jim Lee benefit update, Mile High's Rozanski named Defender of Liberty". Comic Book Resources.

External links[edit]

Sours: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Chuck_Rozanski

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